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SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

Copyright 2009 by National Institute of Steel Detailing and Steel Erectors Association of America All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. Published by the National Institute of Steel Detailing 7700 Edgewater Drive, Suite 670 Oakland CA 94621-3022 and Steel Erectors Association of America 2216 W. Meadowview Rd, Suite 115 Greensboro NC 27407

www.nisd.org

www.seaa.net

02/09________________________________________________________________

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

Disclaimer
While much effort has been expended by many persons to assure the accuracy of the information contained herein, neither the National Institute of Steel Detailing nor the Steel Erectors Association of America or no one involved, in the preparation or presentation of this publication can assume any responsibility for errors resulting from the use of the contents of this manual. The accuracy, adequacy and the applicability of all data should be verified by the user's competent person, engineering staff or consultant.

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

TABLE of CONTENTS
-TABLE OF CONTENTS

-PREAMBLE -THE TEAM -PRE-DRAFTING -CHECKLIST

I II III IV V (29CFR Subpart R 1926.750 thru 761) M1 M2 M3 M4a M4b M5 M6a M6b M6c M7a M7b M7c M8a M8b M8c M8d M8e M8f M8g M8h M8i M8j M9 M10 M11 M12

OSHA MANDATORY SKETCHES

(mandatory 7/18/2001)

-Critical lifts 1926.751 -Tripping hazards 1926.754(c)(1)(i) -Framed deck openings 1926.754(e)(2)(i)(ii) 1926.754(c)(1)(i) -4-Bolts column anchorage 1926.755(a)(1)(2) (OSHA Mandate) -4-Bolts column anchorage 1926.755(a)(1)(2) (OSHA Mandate) -Minimum 2 bolts connection 1926.756(a)(1)(2) -Perimeter protection 1926.756(e)(1)(2) (Safety lines) -Safety cable connection details 1926.756 (Optional alternative) -Typical safety cable connection details (Optional alternative) -Welded column splice 1926.756(d) (Suggested detail to meet) -Welded column splice 1926.756(d) (Suggested detail to meet) 1926.756(d) (Suggested detail to meet) -Heavy column field splice -Column web safety connection (OSHA Mandate) (Alternate) -Column web safety connection (OSHA Mandate) (Alternate) -Double angle column connections 1926.756(c)(1)(2) (OSHA Mandate) -Beam to column web connection -Column web safety connection (OSHA Mandate) (Alternate) -Typical beam connections (OSHA Mandate) (Alternates) -Typical beam connections (OSHA Mandate) (Alternates) -Beam over column (OSHA Mandate) (Alternates) -Double connection with staggered bolts (OSHA Mandate) (Alternate) -Double connection with end plates (OSHA Mandate) (Alternates) -Bracing minimum connection 1926.756(2)(b) -OSHA.../Joist Girder at column 1926.757 -OSHA.../Steel joists girders 1926.757 -Safety cable connection detail... 1926.760

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

GOOD PRACTICES SKETCHES -The Erector friendly column -Column/Beam to column checklist -Typical column lift details -Bolt access problems at small columns -Bolting access problems -Beam to column web moment connection -Access problem/Hand trap -Puncture/Snagging hazards -Puncture/Snagging hazards -Self support connections -Self support connections -Roll-over protection -Deck supports -Decking supports near cutouts (beam to beam) - Decking supports near cutouts (beam to column) -Out of position bolting/welding -Double angle beam to beam connection -Tube bracing to beam erection detail -Welded bracing erection detail -Solid bar type bracing erection detail -Spandrel detail -Wind-column & lateral stability of spandrel framing -Joist at wind column -Seated connections at column web -Erection problems with HSS braces -Tube bracing to gusset plate erection detail -Joist slip at hip & valley -Deck issues -HSS lintel beam w/shop-attached angle -Seismic load resisting systems -Seismic load resisting systems -Seismic load resisting systems (access holes requirements) -Seismic load resisting systems (weld requirements) -Seismic load resisting systems (welded flange plate)(WFP)

S1a S1b S1c S2a S2b S2c S3 S4a S4b S5a S5b S6 S7a S7b S7c S8 S9 S10a S10b S10c S11 S12a S12b S13 S14a S14b S15 S16 S17 S18a S18b S18c S18d S18e

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

APPENDIXES

-The tools of the trade -Suggested notes -Direction north/safety connection/beam marking -Typical safety line holes on beam/column -Swinging beams to beams horizontally -Swinging beams & girders to webs of columns-vertically -Table giving increase I in inches -Swinging beams & girders to plate girder-horizontally -Table of increase I of max. length M over clear dist. S

A1 A2 A3a A3b A4 A5a A5b A6a A6b VI VII VIII IX

-REFERENCES -CONCLUSIONS -ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -SKETCHES on CD

(Inside of front cover)

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

PREAMBLE
The growing trends towards Design-Build and Fast-Track methods of construction have made it more important than ever that the cooperation between members of the steel industry become even more concentrated. The ever-increasing demands from insurance and bonding interests as well as codifying bodies and government regulators only serve to emphasize the need for unification. To that end the NISD and SEAA have partnered in the production of this manual. The intent is to permit detailers and erectors together to better provide structures that are safer, timely, and more erectable, and to promote the use of structural steel as the material of choice. At the same time the impact of those demands on all of us associated in the steel community must be minimized if we are to be successful in reaching our goals. By working together we can satisfy our purpose of achieving successful project completion that provides a quality product that is accident free, efficient, productive and profitable for all involved. Following are a number of suggested concepts, hints and illustrations for erection procedures, which have been based on the OSHA 2001(29 CFR 1926.750 thru 761) new steel erection standard and the combined experience of SEAA and NISD members. None of the information presented in this guide is meant to supersede project-specific contracts, codes, specifications, or government regulations. Readers are encouraged to refer to the AISC Code of Standard Practice, the AISC Erector Certification Program, the NISD Industry Standard publication and the AISC New OSHA Rules Advisory for additional resources. Also, the NISD Guidelines For The Successful Presentation of Steel Design Documents and the AISC publication Working With Structural Steel In Schedule Driven Projects will provide valuable insight. In all cases the role and responsibility of the design engineer of record is paramount to the proper utilization and approval of the actual use of any information contained herein. The information presented in this publication has been prepared for general information only. While it is believed to be accurate, this information should not be used or relied upon for any specific application without competent professional examination and verification of its accuracy, suitability and applicability by a licensed professional engineer, designer, or architect. The publication material contained herein, is not intended as a representation or warranty on the part of the National Institute of Steel Detailing Inc. or the Steel Erectors Association of America Inc. or of any other person named herein, that this information is suitable for any general or particular use or of freedom from infringement of any patent or patents. Anyone making use of this information assumes all liability arising from such use. 02/09 II

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

Serving Detailers since 1969

THE TEAM
Successful steel project completion depends on the cooperative activities of many players. The owner, the architect, the engineer, the controlling contractor, the fabricator, the detailer, the independent suppliers, and the erector all play significant roles. This guideline will focus mainly on the contributions of the detailer and the erector; often two of the last participants to be brought onboard, yet two of the key players in the success of the project. The detailer is often described as an interpreter. He is the lead off man on many projects and is often the first to interface with the architect/engineer drawings. His responsibility is to correctly interpret the design information and to relay that data, in the form of shop and field drawings, to the approving agent, the fabricator, and the erector. The exacting nature of the detailers work, which requires zero-defect production, must account for every piece of steel on the job. He must utilize the design information to produce mill orders and to produce error-free shop drawings. The detailer must provide the erector with not only member placement drawings but also with the assurance that every piece of steel has been detailed, in proper sequence, and that the steel is safely erectable with connections that match, clearances considered, bolt placement possible and all special requirements recognized. If the detailer is one of the first to begin the arduous task of providing successful steel projects, the erector is the last. It is the erector who must make it all come together in the field and the one who is the recipient of any errors or omissions which any of the preceding players may have made. His job, no matter the weather or how challenging the conditions; is to not only bring all the pieces of steel together but to do so with all due consideration to the education and safety of the workers on the job. To permit these players to better accomplish their tasks, communication becomes of utmost importance. Not only must the erector and detailer communicate with each other but the other players must also be involved. Owners should bring all of the players on board as soon as possible and encourage kick-off meetings to permit the players to begin to form a team so that communication flows freely and all hands are working towards the common goal. Concepts, methods, and plans must be agreed on; not to mention scheduling. With all players contributing to the best of their ability, from original contract documents to final bolt placement, our project can be brought to the successful completion we all desire.

02/09

III

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

Serving Detailers since 1969

PRE DRAFTING
Prior to the start of the detailing process, we suggest that (at a kick-off meeting, if possible) the following checklist items be considered: 1) Sequence & schedule of erection: Grid lines, floors, derricking, size, tonnage. 2) Shipping requirements: Site layout, access and lay-down area, splice requirements, and shipping methods. 3) Crane capacity weight and reach constraints and hazards. 4a) Types of Connection: (e.g. seated, shear-tab, moment, girts hung or seated, etc.) 4b) Bolting requirements: (e.g. types, installation snug-tight, slip critical, Direct Tension Indicators (DTI), etc., clearance for torque guns or tools. 5) Safety requirements: prevailing codes, OSHAs requirements, fall protection, perimeter protection, safety aids, egress requirements, etc, etc. 5a) Joist Connections 5b) Fall Protection 5c) Column Splicing 5d) Beam to Column Connections 5e) Bracing 6) Field welding requirements: procedures preferences, joint preparation, and access. 7) Communication channels: between erector, fabricator, detailer, professionals, and inspector. 8) Pre-bid value engineering: best connections, shop assemblies, mechanical penetrations reinforcing, tie joists. 9) Responsibilities; contractual, design, connection design, approvals, revisions, payments. 10) Joist/ Deck/ Floor & Roof openings 11) Erectability: bolt access, shop assemblies, clearances for torque guns, hands and tools, leveling devices.

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IV

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

CHECKLIST
1) Sequence: Erector/Contractor must establish, prior to commencement of work, the sequencing so that material may be ordered and members detailed in proper order. Detailer must indicate on mill lists, shop drawings, and member placement drawings (plans and elevations) the required sequence. Revisions to the chain of sequence are expensive in terms of time and money. 2) Shipping: The erector may visit the site prior to bidding to establish what, if any, special conditions exist which are not indicated on the contract documents, however it is the controlling contractors responsibility to provide site access or advise if it is not available. In the event conditions warrant special considerations such as splicing, shipping methods, etc., the erector must advise the detailer and fabricator in a timely manner. Suggested resolution, design and/or approval of the special situation must be reviewed by the appropriate parties. 3) Cranes: The erector must notify the detailer and others if there are any special requirements due to crane reach, availability, or capacity that will affect someone elses particular operation. Critical lifts of large members, or irregular shapes, lifting lugs, and/or lifting locations should be defined and the detailer advised so that this information may be given on the drawings if necessary. Provided the erector's directives are received in a timely fashion, the detailer and fabricator should consult with the erector and define a plan of how best to proceed. If the center of gravity must be defined the design engineer should provide this information. The erector may request that the detailer show lifting weights or crane locations on the member placement drawings. 4) Types of Connections: If and when connection types are not dictated on the design documents the fabricator, detailer, and erector must consult as to what type of connection(s) will be utilized and whose responsibility is the adequacy of the connection; are moment connections field bolted or welded? Are beam to column webs seated and how much tolerance should be allowed to prohibit column leaning in multiple bays: Will girt connections at columns be seated or hung? How are spandrels and kickers treated?

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY


5) Bolting: The required type and number of bolts is the responsibility of the design engineer. However, the detailer must insure that these bolts can not only be entered, but that they can also be tightened. Care must be taken to avoid bolt to bolt interference. Latest bolt specifications must be incorporated. The erector must be made aware of the type of bolt being furnished, the number of washers required and the method of tightening. The introduction of Tension Control Bolts (TCB) and Load Indicator Washers (LIW) has helped the erector to know he has achieved specification requirements. Bolting instructions and requirements must be noted. Bolt placement lists must be accurate and precise. A minimum of 2 bolts is required at each end of a main member, and recommended at secondary members, for erection. Utilize permanent bolts at beam webs for moment connections whenever possible. When connections to shear tabs require that the bolt hole is located inside the flange, bolt entry and driving clearance become a factor. Try to place bolt holes in a shear tab on the outside of flanges whenever possible (engineer approval may be required if a lever arm is created). If web stiffeners or seats become necessary the ability to erect beams above or below may become a problem. 6) Safety requirements: The OSHA 2001 update requires the engineering community to give certain information to the construction team and identify what creates the lateral stability of a structure when complete; e.g. deck diaphragm shear, concrete cores, masonry shear walls or steel bracing. The detailer and erector should communicate to best solve the issues of temporary bracing and aids. The goal obviously is to stabilize the structure during and after erection. As temporary framing is often not within the detailers or fabricators scope of work, the erector is responsible for temporary erection bracing, only during the erection process, unless specified otherwise in the contract documents. 6a) Joist OSHA mandates that when columns are not framed in at least two (2) directions with solid members (beams or joist girders) a vertical stabilizer plate shall be provided on each column for an OSHA required bolted steel joist. This plate must be a minimum of 6 inches by 6 inches and located 3 inches below the bottom of the joist with one 13/16 inch diameter hole for guying or plumbing cables.

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY


6b) Fall Protection: The most common, if not most important, issue is that of fall protection. Multistory structures require guardrail cable at the floor perimeter and at large interior floor and roof openings. While the erector has been providing these devices for years it is required by OSHA 2001 that this be incorporated into the shop details. The method to accomplish this protection should be agreed upon prior to commencement of detailing. The erector may desire that shear studs or other items be shop attached rather than field applied. In these cases adequate fall protection must be provided and detailer/fabricator notified prior to detailing. 6c) Column Splices: The column length should be designed on the contract documents. In cases where they are not, for structures of one or two stories (with or without a basement), a column length in excess of 40 feet is quite long. While the erector might prefer long columns, and would find a way stabilize them with bracing or framing, it may be necessary for safety or shipping purposes to splice the columns. The detailer should consult with the erector to determine if, and where, a splice may be required. The designer and fabricator should also be contacted to give approval and design of the requested splice. When splicing columns on multistory projects, OSHA has mandated that columns be spliced 4 feet above the finished floor elevation. This permits the required perimeter cable to be installed at the necessary heights. Bolted splices are preferred, but when welded splices are used the 4 feet allows the erector/welder to work in a safe, comfortable position. When welded splices are utilized always prepare the upper column for welding. Tiered columns should always have a lifting device or a hole at the top of the shaft for attaching the hoisting mechanism or cable. 6d) Column Bases: OSHA 2001 requires that all columns now have a minimum of 4 anchor bolts. The detailer should reference to the contract documents to determine how much, if any, over-sizing of anchor rod holes should be provided. The use of leveling devices and what type should also be discussed with the erector. 6e) Beam to Column Connections: per OSHA 2001 directives, all double connections at column webs or beam webs over columns must have staggered clip angles or a beam seat or a top flange clip angle. Where not possible to provide these safety connections, the detailer is required by OSHA to add a note of

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY


warning to the erector on the member placement drawings. Deck supports may be required at deck cutouts near beam to beam or beam to column connections. Consult with the erector, fabricator, detailer, and clients to preferred method. 6f) Bracing: A minimum of one bolt at each end of a solid web bracing member shall be used, as directed by OSHA 2001. Holes for erection bolts are required at welded tube bracing. Provide a 1/8 inch oversized slot for erection clearance over gusset and resize the welds accordingly. Check for bolt insertion clearance at gusset plates, end plates, etc. Keep gusset plates to a minimum size by utilizing the uniform force method unless otherwise directed by the contract documents. 7) Field Welding: The erector must advise the detailer prior to shop drawing preparation what type of field welds are desired so that end preparations, root openings etc. may be properly detailed. It is the responsibility of the contract documents, not the erector, to advise the detailer of what and where any NDT is required so that the detailer can identify those areas on the member placement diagrams if requested. Special requirements for seismic considerations should be reviewed. 8) Communication: Contacts and communication are paramount to a successful project. It is only through the spirit of cooperative communication that success can be achieved and we encourage all parties to appoint a liaison with decision making authority to maintain contact with the other members of the construction/owner team. It should also be remembered by detailer and erector alike that their client should always be contacted whenever work is requested that may affect their clients scope. 9) Value Engineering: Erectors, detailers, fabricators and others may desire certain changes be made to the contract documents in order to expedite their portion of the work or to make the design more suitable to their particular operation. There may also be instances where an experienced firm may discover certain changes where, if incorporated, can be beneficial to the firm, the projects owner, or both. Certain changes may also make the bids more competitive or improve the safety conditions for a supplier. In any event, these changes should naturally be requested as early as possible, prior to bid time if permitted.

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY


Requests for certain type splices, connections, shop assemblies, erection procedures, etc., which were not considered in the contract documents should be presented prior to bid time if possible. Concerns about the availability of information to permit detailing-fabrication-erection to proceed in a timely manner should be communicated at this time; in particular concerns about mechanical openings, spandrels, field measurements, drainage, pour stop attachment, brick relief systems or other supplier required data should be addressed promptly. 10) Responsibility: To ensure that all members of the team are treated fairly it must be remembered that any required or requested changes which differ from information given in the design documents may have an impact financially on other members of the team. It should also be remembered that these changes may result in additional engineering calculations or approvals and possible schedule adjustments. We highly recommend that the proponent of the change communicate with the other players to insure that no one is unfairly jeopardized. 11) Erectability: Last, but not least on our checklist of items to be considered, is the erectability of the member. Can the bolts be entered and driven? Should certain pieces be shop assembled? Can the member be swung into place or do stiffeners, cap plates, connection angles, doubler plates or other items interfere? Are special notes required? Will the mechanical openings be available prior to installation of deck and siding? The ever growing use by the detailer of reproductions of the design documents as member placement plans require certain cautions by the detailer: is the required erection information fully shown? Is the drawing legible in the field or is it cluttered with superfluous information? (shop information, concrete data, sections and views taken without cross reference to where/from each section or view is cut, or references to drawings not included in the member placement drawing being used by the erector).

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

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Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

REFERENCES
This document takes references to the following steel industry documents:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STEEL DETAILING www.nisd.org

Industry Standard Guideline For the Successful Presentation of Steel Design Documents
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION www.aisc.org

Detailing For Steel Construction Code of Standard Practice Erector Certification Program Working with Structural Steel in Schedule Driven Projects Steel Design Guide Series: Column Base Plates Steel Design Guide Series: Facade Attachments to Steel Frame Buildings Seismic Design Manual Steel Construction Manual
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH ADMINISTRATION www.osha.gov

New Steel Erection Standard - Subpart R-Steel Erection 1926.750 thru 1926.761 with appendixes A thru H
DEPARTMENT of LABOR FEDERAL REGISTER PART VI 29CFR PART 1926 SAFETY STANDARDS FOR STEEL ERECTION FINAL RULE 01/18/2001 STEEL ERECTORS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA www.seaa.net DETAILING FOR VALUE AND SAFETY

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY FEMA 350-353 RECOMMENDED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR NEW STEEL MOMENT-FRAME BUILDINGS AMERICAN WELDING SOCIETY AWS CODE D1.5 & D1.8

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VI

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

CONCLUSIONS
e hope that this document has furnished a greater understanding of those items which erectors and detailers find necessary for the safe and efficient completion of steel projects. We sincerely hope as well, that you also have gained a greater understanding of the positive contribution that the NISD and the SEAA wish to make by more clearly defining information needed to complete our part of such project. To that end, we believe that we have provided a road map leading to the safe and successful completion of a structural steel frame. The Editors

02/09

VII

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This document would have not been possible without the dedicated work of

those who devoted countless unpaid hours of research, meetings, sketching, arguing over, polishing and finally editing for the benefit of the end usersyou. 1. The editors wish to thank the members of the National Institute of Steel Detailing and the Steel Erectors Association of America for their contribution and support throughout this project. special recognition is given to Robert Beauchamp(NISD), John Metcalfe(NISD), Michel Cloutier(Datadraft), Jim Larson(SEAA) Eddie Williams(SEAA), Duff Zimmerman (SEAA) and Richard Tucker(SEAA) for their efforts. The Editors

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VIII

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

02/09

VIII

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

SKETCHES PRINTED or on CD
In an effort to disseminate information contained in this guide and to lead towards a standardization of practices in the industry, we have provided you, the end user, with a CD-ROM containing AutoCAD .dwg format files of the sketches shown within this document . You are authorized to copy this CD or printed sketches (with acknowledgements) and use to suit specific contracts, fit them into erection or shop fabrication standards or certification program requirements.

making steel the material of choice for structures.


CD is enclosed in your Guide. Thanks for your support The Editors

The more you use them, the better the industry will perform and benefit by

_______________________________________________________________________ 02/09 IX

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

_______________________________________________________________________ 02/09 IX

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

COMMENTS & / or SUGGESTIONS


Comments or suggestions worthy of interest for improvement of this document are welcomed, please e-mail or fax to: The National Institute of Steel Detailing The Steel Erectors Association of America
executivedirector@seaa.net 413-208-6936 nisd@sbcglobal.net 510-568-3781

Your Comments:

02/09

SEAA

Serving Erectors Since 1972

Serving Detailers since 1969

DETAILING FOR ERECTOR'S SAFETY and EFFICIENCY

NOTES

02/09

steel erectors association of america


SEAA

2216 West Meadowview Road Suite 115 Greensboro, NC 27407 336.294.8880 phone 413.208.6936 fax executivedirector@seaa.net www.seaa.net

BECOME Athe Steel Erectors MEMBER of


Association of America
The Steel Erectors Association of America is dedicated to advancing the common interest and needs of all engaged in building with steel. Established in 1972, the non-profit association works to promote safety, education and training through comprehensive programs developed by "erectors for erectors".

SEAA

SEAA MEMBER BENEFITS

The Steel Erectors Association of America (SEAA) is an active participant in the development and promotion of the industry Safety Standards that impact the commercial construction industry. SEAA has developed partnerships and alliances with OSHA and other Standard Committees across the USA. The members of SEAA are affiliated steel erectors, fabricators, architects, engineers, detailers, code officials, suppliers, manufacturers and service companies.

industry representation
Firm Name Your Name Title

Working together SEAA members meet with numerous government agencies and standards committees including:

application for membership

Please check all categories that apply.

erectors (see scale)

www.ABC.org
City State Phone
www.ASA/STAC.com

www.NCCCO.org
Zip

www.OSHA.gov

www.tca.org www.NISD.org

Physical Address

Structural steel, steel joists Prefabricated building and/or siding Reinforcing steel and/or post tensioning Miscellaneous metals, stairs, ornamental iron Precast concrete - structural Precast concrete - architectural Metal deck

fabricators ($750)

www.AISC.org

www.NCCER.org

www.SJI.org

www.SDI.org
Fax Contact name Contact Title Contact Email

employee safety|steel erection training programs

Does the firm perform the erection of steel Yes No and/or allied material exclusively? Geographic area covered by your firm: How did you hear about SEAA? Annual Membership Dues: January-December Erectors based on annual revenue volume: 0-3 million $450 5-10 million $1000 Fabricators: $750 General Contractors $750 Supp. & Manufacturers $750 Specialty Services $750 Services $750 Checks should be made payable to SEAA. CC # Signature Exp. 3-5 million $750 10-up million $1250

Structural steel Steel joists - supplier and/or sales Metal deck - manufacturer Metal deck- supplier and/or sales Reinforcing steel/wire mesh Prefabricating buildings and/or siding Precast concrete - structural Precast concrete - architectural Miscellaneous metals, stairs, ornamental iron

The SEAA has developed safety training products to assist organizations with OSHA Compliance, workplace safety and professional/craft-worker development. Programs are available in English and Spanish languages which are designed to assist contractors, engineers, steel detailers, architects, and other safety personnel in understanding and complying with the new Subpart R- Steel Erection Standard and its training requirements.

general contractors ($750) suppliers and manufacturers ($750)


Crane sales Wire rope, slings, accessories Equipment and/or tools Safety equipment Fasteners

seaa e|news & safety alerts

Periodic publications to keep members informed on emerging regulatory requirements, new technologies, safety alerts and News - that necessitate contractors stay current.

specialty services ($750)

Crane and equipment rentals Certified welding Millwrights, industrial machinery installation Heavy equipment moving and rigging Shear stud installation

seaa annual convention & trade show

The SEAA Connector was exclusively developed for its members and potential members. It includes national editorials, board of director profiles, Member Directory and columns from well-known industry specialist. Reaching all segments of the steel erector community, SEAA Connector magazine is a great way to connect your business to an $8 Billion Industry.

services ($750)

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National Institute of Steel Detailing


The annual membership cycle runs from June 1st through May 31st

Membership Application

Regular Membership is open to any company that conducts its office in the Americas for, and is regularly engaged in,
the business of steel detailing. Such office shall have been conducted for a minimum period of one year. A member in this category may be chapter affiliated or a member-at-large, and has all privileges and benefits of membership including voting and holding office. Fee Schedule: $290 for companies with a gross annual income of less than $250,000 [June-September] Prorated dues when joining October-January $200 February-May $100 $450 for companies with a gross annual income greater than $250,000 [June-September] Prorated dues when joining October-January $305 February-May $155

Associate Membership is open to any company, national or regional trade or professional association interested in enhancing the
detailing profession or the activities of the NISD, whose primary business is not in structural steel detailing. This category includes all privileges and benefits of membership except those of voting and holding office. Fee Schedule: Annual membership fee is $360 [June-September] February-May $125

Prorated dues when joining October-January $245

Individual Associate Membership is open to a steel detailer who does not own a company. This category also includes other
persons interested in the future of the steel detailing industry who do not fall in the category of Regular or Associate membership. This category has limited privileges and benefits of membership, which precludes them from voting and holding office. Fee Schedule: Annual membership fee is $65 Annual dues of $65 are renewable on June 1st

Overseas Membership is open to any company that conducts a regular office for, and is regularly engaged in, the business
of steel detailing outside the Americas. Such office shall have been conducted for a minimum period of one year. Members in this category may vote (no proxy votes), but they may not hold national office. Fee Schedule: Annual membership fee is $360 [June-September] February-May $125

Prorated dues when joining October-January $245

Member Emeritus Membership is open to any individual who was a former regular member of the NISD and has retired from the
competitive field, but wishes to remain active in the NISD. Members in this category may not hold office. Fee Schedule: Annual membership fee is $100 Annual dues of $100 are renewable on June 1st

The undersigned hereby applies for membership in the National Institute of Steel Detailing, Inc.

Name Address

___________________________________________________Title _________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________

Company Name__________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________ State/Province ______________________Zip/Postal Code____________ Country _______________________________________ Telephone _______________________________________ Fax ___________________________________________ E-mail ________________________________________ Web site _______________________________________

Payment in US Dollars
Membership Fee: Postage/handling, add: $24 for Canada $38 for International TOTAL ENCLOSED US$__________ $__________ $__________ US$__________

Method of Payment
Check, payable to: NISD, Inc. 7700 Edgewater Dr., Suite 670 Oakland, CA 94621-3022 Visa

MasterCard

Number:_______________________________ Expiration Date:________ Signature:___________________________________________________


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