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Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook : PeopleSoft Application Designer June 2006

Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook : PeopleSoft Application Designer

June 2006

Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook : PeopleSoft Application Designer June 2006

Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook: PeopleSoft Application Designer SKU PT848APD-B 0606 Copyright © 1988-2006, Oracle. All rights reserved.

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Contents

General Preface About This PeopleBook

xxv

PeopleSoft Enterprise Application Prerequisites

xxv

Application Fundamentals

xxv

Documentation Updates and Printed Documentation

xxvi

Obtaining Documentation Updates

xxvi

Downloading and Ordering Printed Documentation

xxvi

Additional Resources

xxvii

Typographical Conventions and Visual Cues

xxviii

Typographical Conventions

xxviii

Visual Cues

xxix

Country, Region, and Industry Identifiers

xxix

Currency Codes

xxx

Comments and Suggestions

xxx

Common Elements Used in PeopleBooks

xxx

Preface PeopleSoft Application Designer Preface

.xxxiii

PeopleSoft Application Designer

xxxiii

Part 1 Getti ng Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 1 Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application D esigner

3

PeopleSoft Application Designer Overview

3

Peop leSoft Application Designer Implementation

3

Installation-Level Steps

3

Main Application Development Steps

4

Other Sources of Information

5

Contents

Part 2 Developing and Customizing PeopleSoft Applications

Chapter 2 Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

9

Understandin g PeopleSoft Application Designer

9

Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

9

Understanding the Eight Steps of Application Development

9

Starting Peo pleSoft Application Designer

11

Using the PeopleSoft Application Designer Window Components

13

Setting PeopleTools Options

20

Working wit h PeopleCode

21

Using the Development Editors

22

Working with Definitions

24

Understan ding Definitions

24

Opening Definitions

26

Viewing Definitions

27

Viewing and Editing Definition Properties

27

Creating Definitions

28

Saving Definitions

29

Closing Definitions

29

Renaming Definitions

29

Deleting Definitions

31

Findin g Definitions

32

Using the Multiple Document Interface

34

Using Drag-and-Drop

34

Using D ynamic Toolbars and Menus

35

Using Pop-up Menus

35

Configuring the Environment

36

Worki ng with Generated Files

38

Using

Miscellaneous

38

Using Spell Check

40

Unde rstanding Spell Check

40

Enabling Spell Check

43

Configuring Browser Options

44

Bui lding and Maintaining Data

45

Data Building and Maintenance

45

Creating SQL Tables

45

Contents

Chapter 3 Working With Projects

47

Understandin g Projects

47

Viewing Projects

48

Accessing Definitions for a Project

48

Using the Upg rade View

49

Creating and Saving Projects

49

Creating a New Project

50

Saving a Pro ject

50

Setting Project Properties

50

Inserting Definitions Into a Project

51

Removing Definitions From a Project

53

Merging Projects

53

Using Change Projects

54

Setting Project Options

55

Validating Projects

56

Setting System IDs

57

Chapter 4 Creatin g Field Definitions

59

Understanding Field Definitions

59

Creating New Field Definitions

59

Creati ng a New Field Definition

60

Specifying Attributes for a New Field Definition

61

Specifying Character Field Attributes

62

Speci fying Long Character Field Attributes

64

Specifying Number Field Attributes

64

Specifying Date Field Attributes

66

Speci fying Time Field Attributes

66

Specifying DateTime Field Attributes

66

Specifying Image Field Attributes

67

Spec ifying ImageReference Field Attributes

67

Working With Additional Oracle Data Type Mappings

67

Working With Additional Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Data Type Mappings

68

Usi ng Multiple Labels

69

Understanding Multiple Labels

69

Adding a New Label

69

Del eting a Label

70

Selecting Record Field Labels

70

Contents

Opening an Existing Field Definition

71

Viewing Field Properties

71

Changing Fiel d Definitions

72

Understanding the Effects of Changing Field

72

Changing Field Types

72

Renaming Fie ld Definitions

73

Deleting Field Definitions

74

Printing Field Definitions

74

Setting Custom Field Formats

75

Understanding Custom Field Formats

75

Understanding Format Notation

75

Changing F ormat Families

79

Editing Formats

80

Using Family Options

82

Testing F ormats

83

Using the Translate Table

84

Understanding the Translate Table

84

Adding Va lues to the Translate Table

87

Changing Translate Values

88

Deleting Translate Values

88

Saving t he Translate Table

88

Chapte r 5 Planning Records, Control Tables, and TableSets

91

Understanding the Planning Process

91

Table -Based Systems

91

Normalized Relational Databases

92

Record Definition Planning

94

Effec tive Dates

94

Control Tables

96

TableSets

97

Shar ing Tables

99

Understanding Table Sharing

100

Adding the SetID Field to Record Definitions

102

Def ining Set Control Fields

102

Modifying the Set Control Field

103

Creating SetIDs

103

Def ining Record Groups

104

Defining TableSet Controls

104

Contents

Sharing Trees

105

Chapter 6 Creating Record Definitions

107

Viewing Reco rd Definitions

107

Common Elements Used in This Section

107

Viewing Basic Field Definitions

108

Viewing Key- Related Characteristics and Default Values

108

Viewing Editing Options

108

Viewing PeopleCode Program Types

109

Reordering Fields

110

Sizing and Sorting Columns

110

Saving Record Definitions

110

Naming Rec ord Definitions

111

Creating a New Record

112

Opening an Existing Record

113

Manipula ting Fields in Record Definitions

113

Understanding Fields in Record Definitions

113

Inserting Fields Into Records

114

Inserting Subrecords Into Records

114

Setting Record Properties

115

Setting General Properties

115

Settin g Use Properties

115

Creating User-Defined Audit Record Definitions

117

Setting Record Field Properties

118

Under standing Record Field Properties

119

Understanding Record Key Considerations

119

Setting Record Field Use Properties

121

Addin g From and Through Logic to the Search Page

125

Setting Record Field Edit Properties

127

Moving Fields in the Same Record

128

Movi ng Fields to Another Record Definition

129

Deleting a Field From a Record Definition

129

Renaming Record Definitions

130

Del eting Record Definitions

130

Printing Record Definitions

131

Creating SQL View and Dynamic View Select Statements

133

Contents

Chapter 7 Administering Data

137

Understandin g Data Administration and the Build Process

137

Running the Build Process

138

Understanding the Build Menu

138

Selecting th e Build Scope

141

Selecting Build Options and Running the Build Process

141

Using Command Line Syntax to Build a Project

142

Creating Ta bles

144

Understanding the Create Table Process

145

Creating a Table

146

Specifyin g Create Options

147

Specifying Logging Options

148

Specifying Script Options

152

Confirmi ng a Table Build

156

Creating Indexes

156

Understanding Indexes

157

Configur ing Indexes

158

Adding a Custom Index

160

Editing the DDL

161

Alterin g Tables

161

Understanding the Alter

161

Determining Tables to be Altered After a Field Change

167

Altering a Table

168

Specifying Alter Options

168

Confirming Your Table Alter

171

Creat ing Triggers

172

Creating Views

172

Understanding Views

172

Crea ting Views

173

Using Joins in Views

173

Using Cross-Platform Meta-SQL for Dynamic Views

173

Administering DDL

174

Using the Record DDL

174

Setting the Tablespace

175

Usi ng Physical Data Storage

176

Cha pter 8 Designing Pages for Optimal Performance and Accessibility

179

Contents

Improving Online Performance

179

Understanding Processing Modes

179

Refreshing a P age

180

Triggering Server Processing

180

Using PeopleCode in Deferred Mode

181

Using Page Co ntrols in Deferred Mode

182

Using Error and Warning Messages

184

Designing Accessible Pages

184

Understand ing Accessibility Issues

185

Using Labels

185

Using Color to Convey Meaning

187

Verifying Titles for Grids and Scroll Areas

187

Adding Unique Labels for Push Buttons and Links

188

Deactivating Adornment Images

188

Maintain ing Logical Tab Order

188

Using Deferred Processing

188

Using Foreground and Background Colors

188

Using Ins tructional Text

188

Chapter 9 Using Page Controls

193

Understanding Page Controls

193

Aesthe tic Controls

194

Data Entry Controls

195

Function and Data Processing Controls

196

Using Charts

197

Using Frames

198

Using Group Boxes

198

Inser ting and Moving a Group Box

198

Setting Group Box Properties

199

Using Horizontal Rules

200

Draw ing a Horizontal Rule

201

Setting Horizontal Rule Properties

201

Using Images

201

Und erstanding Static Images

202

Adjusting Static Image Size and Shape

202

Setting Static Image Properties

202

Set ting Image Properties

203

Using Static Text

204

Contents

Using Check Boxes

204

Setting Check Box

204

Using Drop-Do wn List Boxes

205

Setting Drop-Down List Box Record Properties

205

Setting Drop-Down List Box Label and Use Properties

205

Using Edit Bo xes and Long Edit Boxes

206

Using Radio Buttons

206

Understanding Radio Buttons

207

Setting Rad io Button Record Properties

207

Setting Radio Button Label Properties

207

Setting Radio Button Use Properties

207

Using Subp ages

208

Understanding Subpages

208

Defining a Subpage

208

Insertin g a Subpage Into a Page

209

Specifying Informational Subpage Labels

209

Using Grids

210

Understa nding Grid Control Scope

210

Understanding Grid Properties

211

Understanding Grid Customization

211

Inserti ng and Resizing Grid Controls

213

Inserting and Manipulating Grid Columns

213

Setting Column Properties

214

Creati ng a Tabbed Grid

215

Freezing Grid Columns

216

Using Multiple Grids on a Page

216

Enabl ing Grid Personalization

217

Setting Grid General Properties

218

Setting Grid Label Properties

218

Sett ing Grid Use Properties

224

Using HTML Areas

228

Understanding HTML Area Controls

228

Inse rting an HTML Area

229

Populating an HTML Area

229

Changing an HTML Area Label

231

Using Push Buttons and Links

231

Understanding Push Buttons and Links

231

Inserting a Push Button or Link

231

Sp ecifying Destination Types

23

2

Specifying a Label for the Push Button or Link

237

Contents

Using Scroll Areas and Scroll Bars

239

Understanding Scroll Areas and Scroll Bars

239

Setting Scroll Area General Attributes

240

Setting Scroll Area Label Properties

242

Setting Scroll Area Use Properties

243

Setting Scro ll Bar Label Properties

243

Setting Scroll Bar Use Properties

243

Controlling Scrollable Data

245

Converting Scroll Bars to Grids

246

Using Secondary Pages

246

Understanding Secondary Pages

246

Defining S econdary Pages

248

Inserting a Secondary Page Control

249

Chapter 10 Creating Page Definitions

251

Understa nding Page Design

251

Level-Based Controls

252

Keys for Accessing

255

Multipl e Occurrences of Data

256

Prompt Fields

257

Derived and Work Fields

259

Sensitive Data

259

Hidden Pages

259

Upgrade Considerations

259

End Us er Page Customization

259

Using Page Development Tools

260

Using Page Definition

260

Using Toolbars

261

Using the Page Layout Grid

263

Creating New Page Definitions

264

Clon ing Page Definitions

264

Creating a Blank Page

265

Adding Page Controls

265

Dra gging Field Definitions From a Record Onto a Page

265

Dragging Record Fields From the Project Workspace Onto a Page

265

Dragging Record Definitions Onto a Page

266

Usi ng the Page Control Toolbar

266

Using the Insert Menu

267

Contents

Manipulating Page Controls

267

Selecting Controls

267

Resizing Cont rols

268

Using the Page Control Inspector

268

Deleting Controls

269

Moving Controls on the Same Page

269

Copying and Moving Controls to Another Page

270

Moving Labels

270

Setting Page Field Properties for Controls

270

Setting Record Properties

270

Setting Label Properties

275

Setting Us e Properties

278

Setting General Properties

283

Creating Display Control and Related Fields

285

Using Dis play Control and Related Fields

285

Creating Related Edit Fields

286

Creating Invisible Control Fields

287

Ordering and Spacing Page Controls

287

Understanding Page Control Order and

287

Ordering Controls Visually

288

Orderin g Controls Logically

288

Testing Page Control Order

289

Applying Control Order Rules

289

Changi ng Control Order Using the Order List

290

Finding a Field on a Page Definition

291

Using Default Order

291

Spacing Controls on Pages

291

Designing Inquiry Pages

291

Aligning Page Controls

292

Maxi mizing Performance

292

Accessing PeopleCode in Page Definitions

293

Viewing Pages in the Browser

294

Working With the View in Browser Feature

295

Changing the Default Browser

296

Generating HTML

297

Vie wing the HTML for a Page

297

Identifying Page Definitions Online

298

Producing

299

Un derstanding Page

29

9

Changing General Page Information

299

Contents

Changing Page Use Information

300

Saving Pages

303

Renaming and D eleting Pages

303

Printing Page Definitions

303

Altering Page Setup

304

Reading Your Page Definition Report

304

Working with Pages in Foreign

306

Understanding Working with Pages in a Foreign Language

306

Performing a Save As with Foreign Language

306

Deleting Foreign Language Pages

307

Chapter 11 Creating Component Definitions

309

Understan ding Component Definitions

309

What Component Definitions Manage

309

Component Buffer

310

Defining Components

311

Understanding the Component Definition Window

311

Creating a New Component Definition

312

Opening an Existing Component Definition

313

Adding Pages to Components

313

Reordering Pages in a Component

314

Copyin g or Moving Pages to Another Component

314

Setting Page Attributes

315

Validating Components

316

Specifying Market-Specific Components

317

Determining Where a Component Is Used

317

Setting Component

317

Openi ng the Component Properties Dialog Box

318

Setting General Properties

318

Setting Use Properties

318

Sett ing Internet Properties

321

Overriding the Search Record

325

Understanding Search Records

325

Ove rriding the Search Record

325

Accessing the Message Catalog

326

Enabling the Expert Entry Feature

326

Und erstanding Expert Entry

326

Enabling Expert Entry Through Security

327

Contents

Chapter 12 Creating Menu Definitions

329

Understandin g Menus

329

Defining Custom Component Menus

329

Creating Custom Component Menus

329

Setting Menu Item

330

Setting General Properties

331

Setting Use Properties

332

Working With Existing Menu Definitions

332

Adding Components to a Menu

332

Renaming Menu Definitions

332

Copying a M enu Definition

333

Deleting Menu Items

333

Printing Menu Definitions

333

Setting Up Menu Security

334

Importing Custom Menu Groups Into Portals

334

Defining Pop-up Menus

334

Understa nding Pop-up Menus

334

Creating Pop-up Menus

335

Defining Transfer Menu Items

336

Chapter 13 Using the Registration Wi zard

339

Understanding the Registration Wizard

339

Common Elements Used in This Chapter

339

Worki ng With the Registration Wizard

339

Registering a Component or iScript

340

Registering a Component in Multiple Portals

344

Registering a Mobile Page

344

Chap ter 14 Creating Style Sheet Definitions

347

Understanding Style Sheets and Classes

347

Types of Classes

347

PSSTYLEDEF

349

Creating Style Sheets

350

Cre ating a New Style Sheet

350

Inserting a Sub Style Sheet

350

Contents

Adding a New Class

350

Setting Class Attributes

351

Understandin g Class Attributes

351

Understanding Generic and Installed Fonts

352

Accessing Class Attributes

352

Specifying F onts

352

Setting Font Attributes for a Specific Language

354

Specifying Spacing and Alignment

354

Specifying Background Attributes

356

Referencing a Background Image URL

359

Specifying Border Attributes

359

Specifyin g Margins

361

Specifying Miscellaneous Attributes

362

Changing the Default Style Sheets for an Application

364

Specifyi ng a Style Sheet for a Page

364

Changing Colors on Tabs

364

Understanding Tab Definitions

365

Creating Tab Images

368

Chapter 15 Creating Image Definitions

371

Understanding Images

371

Creati ng New Image Definitions

372

Understanding Image Definitions

372

Creating an Image Definition

372

Setti ng Image Properties

373

Importing and Creating Alternate Image Types

374

Opening an Image Definition

374

Updat ing an Image Definition

374

Updating an Image Definition

375

Changing the Image Display Size

375

Spec ifying the Image Storage Format

375

Converting Images

376

Consolidating Images

376

Usi ng the Catalog of Image Definitions

378

Cha pter 16 Creating HTML Definitions

383

Contents

Understanding HTML Definitions

383

Creating an HTML Definition

383

Opening an HTM L Definition

384

Referencing HTML Definitions Dynamically

384

Part 3 Maintaining Data

Chapter 17 Constructing File Layouts and Performing Data Interchanges

387

Understanding File Layouts

387

Understanding File Layouts

387

Field Formats in a Flat File

388

FIXED Format Files

389

CSV Format Files

390

XML Format Files

391

Constructing File Layouts

392

Creating a New File Layout Definition

393

Adding File Records and File Fields

393

Reordering File Layout Nodes

395

Naming File Layouts, Records, and Fields

395

Applying Field Formats

396

Specifying File Layout, Record, and Field Properties

396

Specifying File Layout Properties

397

Specifying File Record Properties

400

Specifying File Layout Field Properties

401

Performing Data Interchanges

403

Understanding the Import Process

403

Previewing Input Data

404

Generating and Running the Import

407

Exporting Data

407

Producing a Sample File Layout

407

Creating the File Layout Definition

407

Adjusting File Layout Properties

409

Inserting a Segment and a Field

410

Contents

Chapter 18 Using Command Line Parame ters

413

Understandin g PeopleSoft Application Designer Command Line Parameters

413

Starting PeopleSoft Application Designer Command Line Interface

414

Building Projects

415

Copying Definitions

417

Comparing Definitions for Upgrade Using the Command Line

424

Chapter 19 Using Change Control

431

Understanding Change Control Features

431

Change Control Locking

431

Change Control History

433

Change Con trol Stamping

434

Understanding Implementation Considerations

434

Setting Up Change Control

435

Understa nding Change Control Security

435

Appointing a Change Control Administrator

436

Enabling or Disabling Change Control

436

Using Pr ojects

437

Understanding Projects

437

Using Multiple Databases for Development

437

Using D istributed Development Environments

438

Using Change Control

438

Locking and Unlocking Definitions

438

Viewi ng Locked Definitions

440

Inserting Comments

440

Viewing Change Control History

441

Repor ting Change Control Information

442

Part 4 Performing Updates and Upgrades with PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 20 Upgrading with PeopleSoft Application Designer

451

Understanding a PeopleSoft Upgrade

451

Contents

PeopleSoft Application Designer Upgrade Features

451

Definition Types That You Can Upgrade

452

Using the Upgrade Workspace

457

Switching to the Upgrade View

457

Viewing Upgrade Attributes by Definition Type

458

Working with Upgrade Definition Columns

458

Using Upgrade Menu Actions

459

Setting Upgrade Options

460

Preparing P rojects for an Upgrade

468

Understanding Upgrade

468

Populating Projects

468

Searching for Definitions

469

Printing All Definitions in a Project

469

Obtaining Access for Upgrading

469

Viewing U pgrade

469

Understanding Upgrade Messages

469

Determining Whether Errors Were Encountered

470

Viewing Messages

470

Printing Upgrade Messages

470

Clearing Messages

470

Chapter 21 Compar ing Source and Target Definitions

471

Understanding the Compare Process

471

Comparing All Definitions by Type

472

Compa ring Definitions by Project

472

Synchronizing Databases When Comparing Record Definitions

472

Working With Compare Reports

474

Runni ng a Compare Report

474

Working with the Compare and Report Dialog Box

475

Working With Workspace Reports

477

Acce ssing Reports

477

Searching for Definitions in Reports

477

Printing the Report

477

Sav ing Reports as Text Files

479

Working with Browser Reports

479

Understanding Browser Reports

479

Accessing and Sharing Browser Reports

479

Selecting a Project

481

Contents

Searching for Definitions

481

Viewing Report Details

481

Viewing Statu s Summary

481

Viewing Compare Results by Definition Type

482

Working with Composite Reports

483

Understanding Composite Reports

483

Generating Composite Reports

484

Working With Composite Report Output

485

Example: Cr eating a Composite Report

485

Working with Definition Status

487

Determining Definition Status

487

Comparing Source Status to Target Status

488

Comparing and Merging Page Definitions

490

Comparing and Merging Page Definitions

490

Working with the Page Compare Results

491

Comparing Definitions for Upgrade Using the Command Line

494

Chapter 22 Working with Text Definitions and Text Files During U pgrades

501

Underst anding Comparing Text Definitions and Text Files

501

Comparing and Merging Text Definitions and Files

502

Running the Merge Process for Text Definitions

502

Runnin g the Merge Process for External Text Files

502

Using the Merge Interface

503

Working with Merge Properties

505

Accessing the Merge Properties Dialog Box

506

Viewing and Setting Merge Properties

506

Running a Project PeopleCode Diff/Merge

508

Under standing the Project PeopleCode Diff/Merge

508

Running a Project PeopleCode

508

Using the Project PeopleCode Diff/Merge

508

Filt ering the Project PeopleCode Diff List

509

Chap ter 23 Copying Projects and Definitions

511

Reviewing Upgrade Settings

511

Sel ecting View Options

511

Selecting Custom View Settings

512

Contents

Overriding Upgrade Defaults

512

Recording Upgrade Settings

514

Copying Proje cts

514

Understanding Project Copy Options

515

Copying Projects to a Target Database

515

Copying a Pro ject to Multiple Databases

516

Copying a Project to a File

516

Copying a Project From a File

517

Copying Def initions for Upgrade Using the Command Line

519

Stamping the Target Database

526

Reusing Projects

527

Appendix A Understan ding Functional

Indexes

529

Functional Indexes for Microsoft SQL Server 2000

529

DB2/UDB for Linux, UNIX, and Windows

530

Function al Indexes for Informix

531

Appendi x B Referencing Selections for Command Line Parameters

535

Database Type Selections

535

Definit ion Type Selections

535

Language Selections

540

Available Release Numbers

541

Appendix C Using Default Style Classes

543

Default Style Classes

543

Appendix D Performing Bulk Operations

557

Unde rstanding Bulk Operations

557

Performing Bulk Insertions

557

Common Elements Used in This Section

558

Inse rting Fields into Records

558

Inserting Record Fields onto Pages

558

Contents

Inserting Fields into Both Records and onto

559

Performing Bulk Modifications

559

Modifying Record Fields

559

Modifying Page Fields

559

Reordering or Resizing Grid Fields

560

Changing Pag e Field Attributes

560

Performing Bulk Deletions

560

Appendix E Running PeopleTools Cross-Reference Rep orts

563

Understanding Cross-Reference Reports

563

Running a Crystal Report

565

Appendix F Working With Records Used in the Mobile Synchronization Framework

567

Understa nding Mobile Synchronization Framework Records

567

Configuring Records for the Mobile Synchronization Framework

567

Setting Record

568

Working with Required Fields and Default

568

Example: Building Records for the Mobile Synchronization Framework

569

Glossary of PeopleSoft Enterprise Terms

571

Index

593

Contents

About This Peo pleBook

PeopleSoft Enterprise PeopleBooks provide you with the information that you need to implement and use PeopleSoft Enterprise a pplications from Oracle.

This preface discusses:

• PeopleSoft Enterprise application prerequisites.

• Application fundamentals.

• Documentation updates and printed documentation.

• Additional resources.

• Typographical conventions and visual cues.

• Comments and suggestions.

• Common elements in PeopleBooks.

Note. PeopleBooks document only elements, such as fields an d check boxes, that require additional explanation. If an element is not documented with the process or task in which it is used, then either it requires no additional explanation or it is documented with common elements for the section, chapter, PeopleBook, or product line. Elements that are common to all PeopleSoft Enterprise applications are defined in this preface.

PeopleSoft Enterprise Application Prerequisites

To benefit fu lly from the information that is covered in these books, you should have a basic understanding of how to use P eopleSoft Enterprise applications.

You might also want to complete at least one in troductory training course, if applicable.

You should be familiar with navigating the system and adding, updating, and deleting information by using PeopleSoft Enterprise menus, pages, or windows. You should also be comfortable using the World Wide Web and the Microsoft Windows or Windows NT graphical user interface.

These books d o not review navigation and other basics. They present the information that you need to use the system and im plement your PeopleSoft Enterprise applications most effectively.

Application Fundamentals

Each applic ation PeopleBook provides implementation and processing information for your PeopleSoft Enterprise applications.

For some applications, additional, essential information describing the setup and design of your system appears in a companion volume of documentation called the application fundamentals PeopleBook. Most product lines have a version of the application fundamentals PeopleBook. The preface of each PeopleBook identifies the application fundamentals PeopleBooks that are associated with that PeopleBook.

General Preface

The application fundamentals PeopleBook consists of important topics that apply to many or all PeopleSoft Enterprise applications. Whether yo u are implementing a single application, some combination of applications within the product line, or the entire product line, you should be familiar with the contents of the appropriate application fundamentals PeopleBooks. They provide the starting points for fundamental implementation tasks.

Documentation Updates and Printed Documentation

This section discusses how to:

• Obtain documentation updates.

• Download and order printed documentation.

Obtaining Documentation Updates

You can find u pdates and additional documentation for this rele ase, as well as previous releases, on Oracle’s PeopleSoft C ustomer Connection website. Through the Documentation section of Oracle’s PeopleSoft Customer Con nection, you can download files to add to your PeopleBooks Library. You’ll find a variety of useful and timely materials, including updates to the full line o f PeopleSoft Enterprise documentation that is delivered on your PeopleBooks CD-ROM.

Important! Before you upgrade, you must check Oracle’s Peo pleSoft Customer Connection for updates to the upgrade instructions. Oracle continually posts updates as the upgrade process is refined.

See Also

Oracle’s PeopleSoft Customer Connection, http://www.oracle.com/support/support_peoplesoft.html

Downloading and Ordering Printed Documentation

In addition to the complete line of documentation that is delivered on your PeopleBook CD-ROM, Oracle makes PeopleSoft Enterprise documentation a vailable to you via Oracle’s website. You can:

• Download PDF files.

• Order printed, bound volumes.

Downloading PDF Files

You can download PDF versions of PeopleSoft Enterpr ise documentation online via the Oracle Technology Network. Oracle makes these PDF files available online for each major release shortly after the software is shipped.

See Oracle Technology Network, http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/psftent.html.

Ordering Printed, Bound Volumes

You can order printed, bound volumes of selected documentation via the Oracle Store.

See O racle Store, http://oraclestore.oracle.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpSctDspRte.jsp?section=14021

General Preface

Additional Resources

The following resources are located on Oracle ’s PeopleSoft Customer Connection website:

Resource

Navigation

Application mainten ance information

Updates + Fixes

Business process diagrams

Support, Documentation, Business Process Maps

Interactive Services Repository

Support, Documentation, Interactive Services Repository

Hardware and software requirements

Implement, Optimize + Upgrade; Implementation Guide; Implementation Documentation and Software; Hardware and Software Requirements

Installation guides

Implement, Optimize + Upgrade; Implementation Guide; Implementation Documentation and Software; Installation Guides and Notes

Integration information

Implement, Optimize + Upgrade; Implementation Guide; Implementation Documentation and Software; Pre-Built Integrations for PeopleSoft Enterprise and JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Applications

Minimum technical requirements (MTRs)

Implement, Optimize + Upgrade; Implementation Guide; Supported Platforms

Documentation updates

Support, Documentation, Documentation Updates

PeopleBooks support policy

Support, Support Policy

Prerelease notes

Support, Documentation, Documentation Updates, Category, Release Notes

Product release roadmap

Support, Roadmaps + Schedules

Release notes

Support, Documentation, Documentation Updates, Category, Release Notes

Release value proposition

Support, Documentation, Documentation Updates, Category, Release Value Proposition

Statement of direction

Support, Documentation, Documentation Updates, Category, Statement of Direction

Troubleshooting information

Support, Troubleshooting

Upgrade documentation

Support, Documentation, Upgrade Documentation and Scripts

General Preface

Typographical Conventions and Visual Cues

This section discusses:

• Typographical conventions.

• Visual cues.

• Country, regio n, and industry identifiers.

• Currency codes .

Typographical Conventions

This table contains the typographical conventions that are used in PeopleBooks:

 

Typographical Convention or Visual Cue

Description

 

Bold

Indicates PeopleCode function names, business function names, event names, system function names, method names, language constructs, and PeopleCode reserved words that must be included literally in the function call.

 

Italics

Indicates field values, emphasis, and PeopleSoft Enterprise or other book-length publication titles. In PeopleCode syntax, italic ite ms are placeholders for arguments that your program must supply.

 

We also use italics when we refer to words as words or letters as letters, as in the following: Enter the letter O.

K

EY +K EY

Indicates a key combination action. For example, a plus sign (+) between keys means that you must hold down the first key while you press the second key. For A LT +W, hold down the A LT key while you press the W key.

Monospace font

Indicates a PeopleCode program or other code example.

“ ” (quotation marks)

Indicate chapter titles in cross-references and words that are used differently from their intended meanings.

 

(ellipses)

Indicate that the preceding item or series can be repeated any number of times in PeopleCode syntax.

{ } (curly braces)

Indicate a choice between two options in PeopleCode syntax. Options are separated by a pipe ( | ).

General Preface

Typographical Convention or Visual Cue

Description

[ ] (square brackets)

Indicate optional items in PeopleCode syntax.

& (ampersand)

When placed before a parameter in PeopleCode syntax, an ampersand indicates that the parameter is an already instantiated object.

Ampersands also precede all PeopleCode variables.

Visual Cues

PeopleBooks contain the following visual cues.

Notes

Notes indicate information that you should pay particular attention to as you work with the PeopleSoft Enterprise system.

Note. Example of a note.

If t he note is preceded by Important!, the note is crucial and includes information that concerns what you must do f or the system to function properly.

Important! Example of an important note.

Warnings

Warnings indicate crucial configuration considerations. Pay close attention to warning messages.

Warning! Example of a warning.

Cross-References

Peop leBooks provide cross-references either under the heading “See Also” or on a separate line preceded by the w ord See. Cross-references lead to othe r documentation that is pertinent to the immediately preceding doc umentation.

Country, Region, and Industry Identifiers

Inf ormation that applies only to a specific country, region , or industry is preceded by a standard identifier in par entheses. This identifier typically appears at the beginning of a section heading, but it may also appear at t he beginning of a note or other text.

Example of a country-specific heading: “(FRA) Hiring an Employee”

Example of a region-specific heading: “(Latin America) Setting Up Depreciation”

Cou ntry Identifiers

Countries are identified with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) country code.

General Preface

Region Identifiers

Regions are ide ntified by the region name. The following region identifiers may appear in PeopleBooks:

• Asia Pacific

• Europe

• Latin America

• North America

Industry Identifiers

Industries are identified by the industry name or by an abbreviation for that industry. The following industry identifiers may appear in PeopleBooks:

• USF (U.S. Federal)

• E&G (Education and Government)

Currency Code s

Monetary amounts are identified by the ISO currency code.

Comments and S uggestions

Your comments are important to us. We encourage you to tell us what you like, or what you would like to see changed about PeopleBooks and other Oracle reference and training materials. Please send your suggestions to your product line documentation manager at Oracle Corporation, . Or email us at appsdoc@us.oracle.com.

While we cannot guarantee to answer every email messag e, we will pay careful attention to your comments and suggestions.

Common Elements Used in PeopleBooks

As of Date

The last date for which a report or process includes data.

Business Unit

An ID that represents a high-level organization of business information. You can use a bu siness unit to define regional or departmental units within a larger organization.

Description

Enter up to 30 characters of text.

Effective Date

The date on which a table row becomes effective; the date that an action begins. For example, to close out a ledger on June 30, the effective date for the ledger closing would be July 1. This date also determines when you can view and change the information. Pages or panels and batch processes that use the information use the current row.

Once, Always, and Don’t Run

Select Once to run the request the next time the batch process runs. After the batch process runs, the process frequency is automatically set to Don’t Run.

General Preface

Select Always to run the request every time the batch process runs.

Select Don’t Run to ignore the request when the batch process runs.

Process Monit or

Click to access the Process List page, where you can view the status of submitted process requests.

Report Manager

Click to access the Report List page, where you can view report content, check the status of a report, and see content detail messages (which show you a description of the report and the distribution list).

Request ID

An ID that represents a set of selection criteria for a report or process.

Run

Click to access the Process Scheduler request page, where you can specify the location where a process or job runs and the process output format.

SetID

An ID that represents a set of control table information, or TableSets. TableSets enable you to share control table information and processing options among business units. The goal is to m inimize redundant data and system maintenance tasks. When you assign a setID to a record group in a business unit, you indicate that all of the tables in the record group are shared between that business unit and any other business unit that also assigns that setID to that record group. For example, you can define a group of common job codes that are shared between several business units. Each business unit that shares the job codes is assigned the same setID for that record group.

Short Description

Enter up to 15 characters of text.

User ID

An ID that represents the person who generates a transaction.

General Preface

PeopleSoft Application Designer Preface

This preface provides an overview of the contents in PeopleSoft Application Designer.

PeopleSoft Application Designer

This PeopleBook provides an overview of PeopleSoft Application Designer and discusses how to:

• Develop and customize PeopleSoft Applications for the PeopleSoft Pure Internet Architecture.

• Maintain data using PeopleSoft Application Designer.

• Perform updates and upgrades using PeopleSoft Application Designer.

For information that is specific to your application, please refer to the application PeopleBook for your specific PeopleSoft product.

Note. As a licensee of PeopleTools, you are licensed to u se the base portal technology, which is limited to navigation to licensed PeopleSoft applications. If you want to register additional non-PeopleSoft content, customize your homepage, or create any pagelets, you must license PeopleSoft Enterprise Portal.

Preface

P ART 1

Getting Started with PeopleSoft Applicatio n Designer

Chapter 1 Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

C HAPTER 1

Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

This chapter provides an overview of the PeopleSoft Application Designer produ ct and discusses the implementation tasks necessary to work with this tool.

PeopleSoft Application Designer Overview

PeopleSoft Application Designer is the core development tool used to build and modify PeopleSoft applications. PeopleSoft Application Designer enables you to build a v ariety of definitions, including:

• Fields.

• Records (Tables).

• Pages.

• Components.

• Menus.

• PeopleCode.

• SQL.

PeopleSoft Application Designer Implementation

This section discusses:

• Installation-level steps.

• Main application development steps.

Installation-Level Steps

Before you can begin using PeopleSoft Application Designer, the following items must be in place.

Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 1

Step

Reference

Set up security.

 

For developing and customizing PeopleSoft applications you will need access to the de finitions in volved, such as fields, records, pages, and so on. Your administrator can provide access by adjustin g your definition security settings. There are also gener al PeopleTools permissions for maintaining and upgrading data that your administrator may need to provide access to as well. These include Build and Data Administration, Change Control, and Upgrade.

See Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook: Security Administration , “Implementing Definition Security”.

See Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook: Security Administration , “Setting Up Permission Lists,” Setting PeopleTools Permissions.

Set up workstations.

See Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook: System and Server Administration , “Using PeopleSoft Configuration Manager,” Configuring Developer Workstations.

PeopleSoft Application Designer is a windows-based program. To run PeopleSoft Application Designer, you need to have a supported version of Windows with ample CPU and memory resources, and you need to have the workstation configured using PeopleSoft Configuration Manager so that there is connectivity to the appropriate database and all required environment variables are set.

Main Application Development Steps

This table presents the main steps for creating a PeopleSoft application.

Step

 

Reference

Design application.

Review your in-house development cycle and documentation.

Create fields.

See C h a p t e r 4 , “ C r e a t i n g F i e l d D e f i n i t i o n s ,” p a g e 5 9 .

Create record definitions.

See C h a p t e r 5 , “ P l a n n i n g R e c o r d s, C o n t r o l Ta b l e s , a n d Ta b l e S e t s ,” p a g e 9 1 .

See C h a p t e r 6 , “ C r e a t i n g R e c o r d D e f i n i t i o n s , ” p a g e 1 0 7 .

Build SQL tables.

See C h a p t e r 7 , “ A d m i n i st e r i n g D a t a , ” p a g e 1 3 7 .

Create pages.

See C h a p t e r 8 , “ D e si g n i n g P a g e s f o r O p t i m a l P e r f o r m a n c e a n d A c c e s s i b i l i t y , ” p a g e 1 7 9 .

See C h a p t e r 9 , “ U si n g P a g e C o n t r o l s , ” p a g e 1 9 3 .

See C h a p t e r 1 0 , “ C r e a t i n g P a g e D e f i n i t i o n s , ” p a g e 2 5 1 .

Create components.

See C h a p t e r 11 , “ C r e a t i n g C o m p o n e n t D e f i n i t i o n s , ” p a g e

3

0 9 .

Register components.

See C h a p t e r 1 3 , “ U s i n g t h e R e g i s t r a t i o n Wi z a r d , ” p a g e

3

3 9 .

Test the application.

Review your in-house testing procedures and documentation.

Chapter 1

Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

Other Sources of Information

This section p rovides information to consider before you begin to use PeopleSoft Application Designer. In addition to implementation considerations presented in this section, take advantage of all PeopleSoft sources of information, including the installation guides, release notes, PeopleBooks, and training courses.

See Also

Enterprise PeopleTools 8.48 PeopleBook: Getting Started with PeopleTools , “Getting Started with Enterprise PeopleTools Preface”

Getting Started with PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 1

P ART 2

Developing and Customizing PeopleSoft Applicatio ns

Chapter 2 Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 3 Working With Projects

Chapter 4 Creating Field Definitions

Chapter 5 Planning Records, Control Tables, and TableSets

Chapter 6 Creatin g Record Definitions

Chapter 7 Administering Data

Chapter 8 Designing Pages for Optimal Performance and Accessibility

Chapter 9 Using P age Controls

Chapter 10 Creating Pag e Definitions

Chapter 11 Creating Component Definitions

Chapter 12 Creating Menu Definitions

Chapter 13 Using the Re gistration Wizard

Chapter 14 Creating Style Sheet Definitions

Chapter 15 Creating Image Definitions

Chapter 16 Creating HTML Definitions

C HAPTER 2

Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

This chapter provides an overview of PeopleSoft Application Designer and discusses how to:

• Use PeopleSoft Application Designer.

• View PeopleCode.

• Work with definitions.

• Use miscellaneous definitions.

• Use spell check.

• Build and maintain data.

Understanding PeopleSoft Application Designer

Every PeopleSoft Pure Internet Architecture applicatio n contains a collection of related definitions that work together for a specific purpose. Developing and adaptin g PeopleSoft applications is a step-by-step process in which you define and build the definitions, establish relationships among definitions, implement security, run your PeopleSoft application in an internet browser, and test every aspect thoroughly. You use one interactive tool, PeopleSoft Application Designer, for the majority of these activities. PeopleSoft Application Designer is an integrated development environment that enables you to work with the numerous definitions of a business application in a single work area.

Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

This section provides an overview of the eight steps of application development and describes how to:

• Start PeopleSoft Application Designer.

• Use the Application Designer window components.

• Set PeopleTools Options

Understanding the Eight Steps of Application Development

Application development is a systematic process. Betw een the design and implementation of the application, you define and build application definitions, establish relationships, implement security, and test every aspect thoroughly. When developing in the PeopleSoft environment, it is helpful to look at the development phase as an eight step process:

1. Design the application.

Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

Chapter 2

2. Create field definitions.

3. Create record definitions.

4. Build the application data tables.

5. Create page definitions.

6. Define components.

7. Register the components.

8. Test the application.

Step One — Desig ning the Application

Create a development plan. The first phase of development in any environment is always planning. It is not uncommon that 80% of the effort is spent on designing a solid plan before taking the first step. In PeopleSoft, you will need to fully understand the other seven step s of development to do a good job of planning. When you are finished planning, you should have a business requirements document of the tables required and the relationships between them, a list of definitions required (fields, records, and so on) complete with detailed specifications and naming conventions, mock-ups of the page layouts, and the navigational hierarchy to give users access to the pages you create.

Step Two — Creating Field Definitions

Field definitions in PeopleSoft are slightly different from other environments. Fields are defined apart from any tables they may belong to and can be re-used in any number of separate database tables. The field definition is the basis for all the steps that follow.

Step Three — Creating Record Definitions

PeopleTools-based applications are table-based systems . When creating a record definition, you are actually defining two layers of information: the record level and the field level. At the record level you determine the structure of the database table and the ultimate purpose of the record definition as well as how it will be used in the system. At the field level, you determine the characteristics of the fields and any online processing that you want to occur behind the scenes when a user enters data.

Step Four — B uilding the Tables

Once you define the record definition you must create or build the underlying SQL tables that house the application data that your users will enter online in the production environment. This Build process is the centerpiece of the data administration features in PeopleSoft Application Designer. The build process takes all of the properties of a record definitio n and creates a database table from it. Unless this step is taken, there is no table in the database to accept application data.

Step Five — Creating Page Definitions

Pages are t he user interface for the application where you pr esent the data to the users and enable them to enter data into the application data table created in the previous step. In this step you add page controls to a page and that you associate with record fields and configure the display of the page. The page is presented to the user i n a browser window as HTML.

Step Six — Creating Component Definitions

Component definitions represent complete business transactions in PeopleSoft applications and are central to navigation and security access. A component holds one o r more pages that the user navigates between using tabs or links. Here you define the search record and search attributes, processing mode, and toolbar buttons that display at the bottom of each page in the component.

Chapter 2

Using PeopleSoft Application Designer

Step Seven — Registering the Component

The Registration Wizard makes registering a component easy. In this step you accomplish several things:

attach the com ponent to a menu, assign security access for user s, and place navigational links in the registry. Once you register a component, the user interface is complete and you can view the application in the browser.

Step Eight — Testing the Application

The final step of application development is to thoroughly test the application before delivering the finished product to users. It is important to test all aspects of