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VOL 71. NO. 1

Housin g

MERCYHURST COLLEGE,

Shortag e

ERIE, PA. 16546

Upset s

September 12^1996

Student s

By John Murphy and Chris Wloch Merciad Editors

At the end of last year, the housing capacity was estimated to be 1,192 beds. The week be- fore school started there was a need dor 1,242 beds, leaving a shortage ofroughly 50 beds; The current situa tion ha s causedha rd -H ship for many students a nd Resi- dent Assistants alike. This over- crowding has also resulted in many complaints against the bousing office. "This school is attempting to project an Ivy League image, the only thing I vy League about this school i& the ivy growing on the walls," said I Senior Baldwin R.A. Tiffany Reid. The surplus of students requir- ing housing stems largely from the fact that the 1996-97 aca- demic year boasts the largest Freshmen class ever in addition to the highest percentage of re- turning upperclassmen that the college has bad in years. One of the most significant results of this housing shortage on campus is that many of the R.A.S in the three Freshmen dor-j mitories have been temporarily placed with roommates at the beginning of the school year.

AllfiveR.A.s in McAuley Hall,

thre e o f t he

Hal l hav e roommate s and

fou r R , A. s

i n B a I d wi n neithe r

of the two in Ega n have room-

ma tes.

had a roommate who was moved out just this past weekend.

One ofthe Baldwin R.A.s

u Mercy hurst feels it can make decisions that affect its students with little regard for their con-' cents. Having a roommate was not part of my contract. I can deal with it, but it was unexpected, and that's wha t bothers me," Reid said. Former Director of Housing, Dr. Gary Brown stated that he was not sure whether a single roo m was par t o f the contrac t fo r

R.A. s i n th e dorms , and tha t the y had ver y likel y assume d tha t the y wouldn't have a roommate based on the practice of previous years.

However, the

Manual for 1996-97 states under section 8.0 that the compensation for RA.s in the Baldwin, Egan, and McAuley Residence Halls ind udes a single room. Th e R.A. s i n th e dorm s who

had

Residence Life Sta (T

been expectinga single room were informed in August that they would most likely have a room- mate at the beginning ofthis year. Some of Ihem, 1 ike Tiffany Reid,

did not receive the letter of notifi-

cation until a couple of

days

before returning toe campus for R.A. training during the third wee k o f Augus t The disgruntle d R. A.s were not offered a ny com- pensation for these developments. One major difficulty of the over- crowding is the effect it has on allowing the dormitory R.A.s to carryout theirjobsproperly. "Last night a student needed some coun- selling . I coul d no t use m y roo m to talk to the guy because my roommat e was sleeping . I ende d up-having;to go to the laundry room," said Mike Morgan. Brown responded by pointing out that the shortage is only tem- porary and that these R.A.s will

time

have their own rooms by the

they go home for Thanksgiving. Based on the statisticsfrompre- vious years, roughly 50 students leave the college for various sons between the fall and winter terms. According to Brown, Freshmen over 21 are allowed to move off- campus, but those under 21 are

required by school policy to live in one of the three dorms. They cannot be moved to an apartment

eve n

whe n ther e are

openings ,

be

said ,

an d th e colleg e did

no t wan t

to deny housing to certain fresh- me n jus t s o the R.A. s coul d hav e single rooms.

See Housing, p3

Donna D'Aleo, left, and Tricia Six, in photo above, share their room

Egan

Lounge Tuesday, after the bedswere supposed to have been removed.

in Egan, while Jeremy Hartung, below, sat on a mattress in the

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Mas s Traditio n Return s

By: Bill Melville,

i

Merciad Contributing Writ

t

o

Mercyhurs t

At 11:30, on Wednesday Sept 11, ,1996 , member s o f th e Mercyhurst community HI led Christ the King chapel to'cel- ebrate the Mass of the Holy Spirit for*the first time in over three decades. Former Erie Bishop Michael Murphy, Father John Murphy and Mercyhurst's Father Steve Anderson led the Mass. The main procession contained members of various pa rts of the community who were preceded by a drummer and two flutists. After a brief invocation in the middle of the procession, the cler- gymen began. President Garvey delivered the first«reading, and a mixture of readings in different languages came together for the* second. Among the faculty wh o read were Professors Alice Edwards in Spanis h and Igo r Stalsk y i n Rus - sian. .Bishop Murphy delivered the sermon, in which he urged every- one present to devote five min- ute s a day to the presenc e o f God . "Don't be afraid of loneliness:

*

don't be afraid of silence," he offered.

a Immediately following the Mass, a picnic took place on the law n i n fron t o f Ol d Main . Man y students expressed enjoyment at the change of pace and relaxed atmosphere, although a few felt

tha t th e musi c di d not reflec t th e

spirit o f the

even t

Several professors also offered

their sentiments.

u Thi s is one

>

The Picnic in front of Old Main following the Mass of the Holy Spirit was enjoyed by students, faculty and administrators.

schoo l yea r and

inaugu -

MSG News

By: Tavis Overstreet and Chris Wloch

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Mercyhurst Student Govern- ment started off the new school year with its first meeting held in Student Government Chambers at 8:30, Monday night MSG has purchased a new elec- tronic sign board which will be placed downstairs in the union, where the old one is now. News,

II

sports, and other information of interest to students will be dis- played. The Freedom Zone received a new computer this year at a total cost of around $3,500.* MSG President Stacey Fitzpatrick disclosed that the cost of student IDs was raised from $15 to $25. SAC Chairperson Brian Marshall announced that Sept 20 is the date for the Fall Funfest

bles s the

Elections for the s be Fresher representatives will be held on* Sept 23 & 24. Three other posi-1 tions are also open: one resident and two senior representatives. Additionally, there are two stu- dent positions available for the Judiciary Board. Ron Rambally* was named as a temporary seat and a permanent replacement is currently being sought Letters of inten t are du e i n th e MS G office ! by midnight Sunday.

rate its beginning. It ended for unknown reasons at some point

in the 1960s.

- : *' !* . "

'*

According to Father Steve

Anderson, last spring, the

admin-

istration and Campus Ministry

o f th e things , along . ^.decide d to reviv e th e Mas s for th e

purpose

of

bringing

the

Mercyhurst community together

to bles s the schoo l yea r and revi - talize the rel igious energies of the community. The picnic and the Mass.weredesigned to be ofequal importance for bringing the com- munity together. ~ 3^

^Father Steve affirmed, 'The

stu-

dcills really deserve attention for attending. I was really proud. This is a sign that the spirit of God is alive and well at Mercyhurst"

with harder work ofstudents, that helps to make Mercyhurst move into the upper levels of institu- tions,"^commented History Pro- fessor, Richard Kubiak. According to Dr. Kenneth Schiff, "It was a really nice op- portunity for members ofthe com- munity to get together in an infor- mal manner." The Mass was probably first celebrated at Mercyhurst in the 1930s to ask the Holy Spirit to

Lawrence Otis Graham Starts Off 1996-97 Cultural Lecture Series

By: Chris Wloch, Merciad News Editor

This Tuesday, September 17, the 1996-97 Cultural Lecture Se- ries opens at 7:30 p.m. in the Taylor little Theater with au thor and lawyer, Lawrence Otis Gra- ham, presenting his lecture en- titled 11a rlem on my Mind." Graham graduated from Princeton and Harvard Law School and has written more than 10 books dealing with issues of

diversit y and rac e relations . In an upcoming movie for HBO, "In- visible Man: A $105,000-a-year Harvard-trained Lawyer Goes Undercover as a Busboy atGreen- wich Country Club," Oscar-win- ner Dcnzcl Washington will por- tray Graham. The lecture is free for President' s Card Holder s and th e cos t o f genera l admissio n is $4. A serie s ticke t for all si x lecture s i s available for $20.

Action from Tuesday night's volleyball tournament organized by SAC.

In action are the

'Hammerheads ' of Mik e Hamme r an d Bil l Desko , agains t Th e Spanks ' o f Mat t Orysie k

Fran Rodowicz. In this marathon struggle the

Hammerheads eventually won.

and

PAGE 3

Housing, cont'd from p. 1

However, the chronic situation has affected not only the R.A.s. Several students, particularily freshmen and transfer students,

contacted the Merciad with com-

plaints. "I was aware ofR.A. con- cerns. However, I was not aware of such complaints among other students. I have I not been ap- proached by them," Brown said. Three of die looms in Egan Hall which usually house two students now have three in them. Addi- tionally, the second floor lounge in Egan, which Brown pointed out was originally a room years

ago.

g

With regards to the lounge in Egan, Brown said that eventually it is going to,revert back*,to a lounge. It' s lousy. Most of the people in Egan don't party that much, but we need a lounge," said Freshman Jeremy Hartung "1 t's u nfa ir to students," sa id Egan R.A. Sherrie Weldon. "Girls are looking for a place to watch T.V., study et c It's frustrating and dis- appointing to them." Although Egan's third floor lounge wa s prepa red at the begin- * ning of this year as a four-person room, Brown confirmed thatas of 4 p.m. Tuesday, the 10th of Au- gust, the beds in that lounge had been removed. However, t Merciad photographer saw that the beds were still in the lounge Tuesday night

Commenting on this, Brown said, "I was in the maintenance office late on Tuesday a fternoon. Maintenance secretary Terry Frisch related that the order had been made to Bill Kerbusch for the removal of the beds." There are also four tranfer stu- dents living in the Tower. Their rooms were home to the History faculty las t year. At the sa me time,

Mercyhurst is currently renting several apartments off-campus, HighlandSquareApts., Jefferson Apts., and apartments on Lewis Avenue. Although no R.As were placed in off-campus housing, and these facilities house Freshman transit] fers over 21, Brown said that the students who were selected to live there were "hand-picked" on the basisoftheirdisciplinaryrecords. Elaborating on the overall situ- ation,Brown said that, "The hous- ing office faced a huge problem with providing for this situation. Again, we did everything pos- sible to rectify the situation. Ob- viously, it is difficult to satisfy every problem thatwill arisewith such circumstances." "Through the good efforts of the housing office we were able to create 29 beds on campus, and 29 off campus. When 1 got back from my holidays in July, I at- tempted to reach all the affected students to notify them of the changes," Brown said. Freshmen Donna D'Aleo, who shares a room with two othergirls in Egan, claimed she found out the day she arrived at Mercyhurst. "When I saw two other names on my door, I realized I had two roommates," said D'Aleo. "We get alongfine,but you never have any privacy with three people."^ /' I drove all the wayfrom the west coast and found out when I got here that I was living in the

Tower," sa id California n transfer

MattNutley.

, Freshman hockey transfer, Kelly, Kishman was not happy with the situation he found in his Jefferson Apartment "We did get fe notice in the summer about the change in - residence. Unfortu- nately, we had no electricity for the first four days on our arrival. This meant that all the food I

These

Connor

5. Their

brought from my home in Sas- katchewan, Canada, was gone off by the time thefridgeworked," said Kishman. Th e bathroom was blocked, we couldn't take a shower," he said. Th e landlord was away for the particular weekend, we had no access to where: the electricity switch was," said Brown. "I was there every day, but on the holi- day weekend (Labor Day), it was difficult to get things resolved." Commenting on why Kishman and his roommates had to pay for a phone hook-up, Brown stated that the students knew this before arriving. "Where athletes were involved, we communicated the housing situation through their coaches. They knew of the ar- rangements before they came here," he said "I went through a lot of hassle to get my room in Egan," said Mark Riley. "When I signed my contract in April, my room was for two people. I was informed in the second week of August that myroomwould have threepeople. This was not part of my contract I am very disappointed," he said. Riley calculated that with three people in his room, Mercyhurst made an extra $1,000 a month in revenue. "I feel that we should receive some sort of compensa- tion," said Riley. "We should get some compensation, especially for the first four days," said Kishman. Brown was not prepared to com- ment aboutgiving compensation. "Since I have not been approached with any complaints from stu- dents, or requests for compensa- tion, there is no point comment- ing on this. I will have to talk to the students. When yougeta room, what you are paying for is a place to stay, and a place to put your things," he said.

Student Activities Corner

1

< By Mindi McDowell Merciad Staff Writer

The members of the Student Ac- ; tivities Committee are ready for another year and want everyone to join in the fun! Here's a great way to meet people, relieve bore- dom, and get your mind off ' that f* paper that's due in a week. If you 1 haven't attended any ofthe events yet, now is your chance. Coffeehouse opens this week on Thursday night and will feature the alternative band "Seventh House"fromPittsburgh. Most of ^the songs the ba nd plays are origi- nals, but occasionally they'll add i": familiar cover songs from other bands to their set While you're |1 listening, you can enjoy any one of the coffee selections offered, includinglattes and mochas. Grab ^a couple bucks, some homework, pi and somefriendsand head to the j I Laker Inn between 8 andll p.m. 2 for some coffee, some music, and |gsome atmosphere. At 8 p.m. Friday, "Come on down! You could be the next con- testant on*the Price is Right!" Remember PIinko, the Yodler, the I* Golf Game, and the Wheel? These f. are only a few of the games that will be played in the Taylor Little Theatre at the bidding of Mercyhurst's own Bob Barker. There are $1,300 worth of prizes to be won, including a TV/VCRij combo, a stereo, a phone, CDsI and many more! Come try your J luck and see if the Tric e is Right"! The weekend events continue # in the Union on Saturday from noon until 6 p.m. with a whole new way to play a video game.

Virtual Reality allows you to put on some goggles and gloves and jump into the 3-D world of Cyberspace. Cometest yourhand- eye'coordination as you battle 'Virtual" enemies! The tournaments committee is having a soccer shootout contest Tuesdayduring Mercyhurst's soc- cer game. There is no lim it on the number of competitors, and each

person gets to take one penalty! kick. The competition will con- tinue until first and second place have been determined. The Gist place winner will receive $20 cash, and the second place winner will receive a $15 gift certificate for the bookstore. If you're inter- ested, sign up in at the Union desk by 6:30 pm Monday. Be prepared to laugh Wednes- day night because the comedy "Get Shorty," starring John Travolta, Danny DeVito, and Renee Russo, will be showing in -the Union Great Room at 9 p.m. The story centers around an ama- teur gangster who gets mixed up in the movie business. ^Bring a • blanket and pillow and get your i mind off homework for a couple

of hours.

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If you have any ideas for ac- tivities you want to see on cam- pus or just want to become in- volved, come to the SAC meeting Sunday at 7 p.m. in. the Govern- ment Chambers. Each committee is looking for eager members to help choose and organize campus events, so jump in and get in- volved!

ATTENTION!!!!!!!!

EARLY CHILDHOOD, ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY AND

%

SPECIAL

EDUCATION MAJORS

ALL MAJORS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND THE EDUCATION DIVISION MEETING

8 P.M., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,1996 D'ANGELO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER*

GUEST SPEAKER:

DR. KATHLEEN BUKOWSKI

&i*J*&

PAGE 4

We t

Growin

By Brad Rybczynski Features Editor

Mercyhurst is again expanding and improving. Over the summer construction crews were very busy on? campus. At every turn, Mercy hurst is growi ng phy sica lly. during the recess the campus Rec Center was refurbished, a foot- ball stadium was put behind the Ice Center and an addition to the Atheletic Center was erected. The inside of the Recreation Centerwas given a facelift. There is a new weight room/fitness cen- ter in the facility. Previously, stu- dents would go to the Athletic Center to pump iron or climb stairs. Now they can go to a cleaner and more spacious facility. The old green rug of the Rec

Center has been replaced by a shock-absorbant floor. The new floor will be a welcome addition to those with shin splints as well as those persons wishing for greater availability of basketball courts. Thats right, the floor is lined for basketball and volley- ball too. The Rec is equipped with two sets of basketball hoops and tw o volleybal l courts . The Rec Center has been trans- formed. What was once an almost completely wasted space has been converted to afirstclass facility for athletes and students alike. The possibilities for uses of this grand facility are nearly endless. Scott Vance, a Junior elemen- tary education major said of the new facilities, "It is nice to be able to come work out in a clean

THEMERCIAD

September 12,1996

Physical Fit|esspfe

environment"

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Those ofus who were around in previous years at the Hurst can remember either having to get in a car or braving a long walk down State to watch the Laker football Pteam play. Attendance was consistantly sparse, especially in poor weather. That will now be a thing of the past It has been a pong wait, but Mercyhurst foot- ball has finally come to campus where it belongs. The first football game ever played on Mercyhurst's campus was on Saturday, September 7. The day was rainy and dark, but that did not stop the fans from coming out to see the game and the ne w stad ium in all ofit's glory. The stands were full, and the fences lined with spectators. The attendance for the game was a

stunning1,850people.Thiswould

have been unthinkable at the down

town stadium. The grandstand i s complete with a press box and reserved section* and rehabilitation room. The addition will encompass spacious classrooms, a rehabili- tation center, a taping room and a student library. This new facility will do wonders for the Sports Medicine department

Top:Former Rec Center houses new fitness cen- ter. Middle: View of Pitch and new stand on football field. Bottom:New addition to

the

Dept

Sports-Medicine

The grounds surrounding the sta- dium have been done in true Mercyhurst fashion. Flowers and bu she s lin e the parking lo t and a re a great accent to beautify the area. Thefootballprogram is sure to benefit greatly from this new re- source. Coach Kimball said, This is a tremendous step in improving the recruiting process and the pro- gram in general." The fact that studentsno 1onger haveto trek 10 blocks down town and need only to go on their own backyard for games will provide a "great at- mosphere"for the team, Kimball added. The Sports Medicine depart- ment was also blessed with out- standing news this year. An addi- tion is being placed onto the Ath- letic Center to expand the cramped conditions of previous years. In the past, those taking classes sat on training benches during lec- tures. The one roomforthe Sports Medicine department served as a classroom, taping room

Lee Lindstrom, a sophmore SportsMedicine major, expressed the feelings of the entire depart- ment whenhe said, w everybodyis

really excited about the new addi-

tion.-

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SSSSSB

lignum

MERCIAD

1996

TSJC-O J

ONTHE DITCH

By John Murphy Editor in-chief

At this stage most people have had enough of "Hello's," "Great to see you's," "You look great's," and all sorts of insincere stuff like that I won't bother. Besides, I'm not very sociable anyway (the latter characteristic' fluctuates greatly depending on the level of alcohol in my system). Anyway, welcome to the first edition of the Merciad. I hope its adequate reading, although I have to be honest, I'm not sure if I care at this stage. I'm wrecked. I mean this is a bloody hard job. I've been running around campus for the past week trying to do a hundred different things at once, It's done, I'm

happy.

I

One of my duties us to write a column, this column. The title is related to an Irish sport called Hurling, and the title meaning 4s something like that of "Monday morning quarterbacking." Hopefully,jthe column will give this commentator's views on events that directly or indirectly affect the students of Mercy hurst. (Just to remind some of you, there is "stuff going on out there that

affects us. Shocker!)

-)_

On the subject of hurling, it's an ancient Gaelic sport, and it's the greatest

game in the world. Okay, maybe a little bias here. The day before I returned to Mercyhurst, and America for that matter, I had the privclcgc of witnessing my

home county in Ireland win the 'All-Ireland Hurling Championship .'

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Since then, I've thought about the feeling of elation this gave me. Of how I wasfilledwith such pride and emotion that I shed tears of joy, threw my arms around grown men I never knew, and even kissed them* I've thought about how I was locked in this bond with my fellow countyuien, of howythis event somehow represented all we were made of, all of what we came from, as if it were part of our souls. The event went way beyond a game and a sport It was

. And to think, such emotion was attained from watching 30 amateur sportsmen running around a field. There were no million dollar contracts here, no product endorsements, and no TV timeouts.jj These men were farmers,.shopkeepers, factory workers, ordinary people. They had nothing material to gainfromthis. Again, there was a spirit created. It was beautiful, pure, and untainted. I tried to compare the aura created by this event to sporting events that take place in this country. Sorry, no/comparison. There isnot a single major sporting event in this country that is untainted by materialism and commercialism. A greedy America has taken sports and wrenched it of all the great qualities it has *

spiritual.

the ability to promote.

can not help wondering if they look younger than I remember, when I was there. They are so carefree, so undaunted by the task of this year, so open, sure, and, well, young. I realize that I was just like that at one time, at aflashingmoment in my life that seems like yester- day. Then Sophomore year arose like a bleak winter, handing me more responsibility, and I bad to relinquish myfreshmanshadow. Naturally, Sophomore year had to drag itoutofme, while I kicked and screamed to the end. I know that I am not alone in my loss. You see, as afreshmanevery- thing is new, exciting, even dan- gerous . Awa yfromhome for per- haps the first time, without mom and dad there to guide or chide, but still with the safety net, the excuse of being a freshman. [^Sophomore year, quite bluntly, [%obs you of this. Friendships be-1§ come more complicated, family

\

By M.EJ»ike Merciad Columnist

$ As the season sheds its brilliant Summer form to turn into Au- tumn, we students discard the last vestiges of vacation and return to theihouse on the hill. "My^first year," speak some excitedly; "An- other year," grumble others; and still others quietly muse, "My last

year;"

sun. When you finally emerge be- neath that dark cloud of Sopho-

more uncertainty, you re a Junior.

And when that ends

well, I'm

still waiting. But it begins by feel- *j ing older-, a little worn, and yet as excited as any freshman. Sweet j God, one more year!

Perhaps some of you have no- ticed this, or will soon enough,

and perhaps not. It is personal. I do promise that there will be some change inside. New ideas will re- tire the old and,tbe mind will ex- plode with newly acquired knowl- edge. People .•_!#ill become differ- ent, classes*will seem morefim- portant, and homework- will be the exact same it has al- ways been. In any case, try to have fun. Enjoy it while it lasts,' the good and the bad alike. After all, we will never see this time again, this first year, tbisplast year, an- othe r year. And someday we will

take a moment from the rat race, from the exhausting, exciting, dan-

Whatever the case, it has come, like it or not Perhaps the Veteran of Mercyworld might note a few new items of interest around, for example, the football field, the tighter than lastfyear housing crowd, or the stained glass win- dow over the main entrance to the Union- a colorful reminder of the graduating class of 1996. However, the change Ithat strikes me most sharplyls^that private one within myself. A few of you might notice this as well. It seems as I embark upon my third year at the Hurst, that I am older. "Certainly not wiser," a "/friend ofmineretortswith a smile. I glance at the class of 2000 and

issues ^rear, and financial prob- lemsgrow larger than life. In short, pgerous der: When world did out I crow there, up? and won- it becomes a dull, terrible chore, but not without its moments of

v

WMCE 1996 FALL TERM SCHEDULE

Student Announcers

I Arecentexample of this is the Atlanta Games. I shouldn't be able to say this because I worked in Madrid during the Olympics. But, even though I know nada in Spanish, the negative feeling emanating from Atlanta was such that even I

conld get a sense that the games were drained of their spirit.

America was given a chance to host these ancient games, to help maintain the Values and glory traditionally associated with them. America failed. The lasting impressions perceived about Atlanta among most Europeans are thoselof meanness and a smugness on behalf of the American hosts. | The coverage and attention lavished upon the big name athletes, with the big name sponsors. The lack of attention payed to the lesser known sports, the ones

that didn t attract huge public attention, and huge revenues for advertisers. The

|

tack o f

sportsmanship displayed

? by the media

toforeignathletes who

'unbelievably' managed to

beat favored American opponents.?

By treating the Olympics as an American event,'rather than an international

event, the quality and integrity of the games were reduced in the eyes of the world. World events like the Olympics are rare, any country lucky enough to

host them usually tries to display her best values to the observing world. \ If Atlanta were the best America coulft do, then perhaps she is in trouble heading into the next century."

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MONDAYS

THURSDAYS

noon-2

2-4 *

4-6

6-8

8-10

10-12

N

Wilds

Gerrit Shuffstall

8-10

10-noon

Julian Laskos Nate Mcintosh Mike Gratzmiller Andrew Burck

Julian Laskos Nate Mcintosh Mike Gratzmiller Andrew Burck
Julian Laskos Nate Mcintosh Mike Gratzmiller Andrew Burck
Julian Laskos Nate Mcintosh Mike Gratzmiller Andrew Burck

noon-.

2-6

6-8

8-10

10-12

Lorenzana ^ ^

Luca;

Matt Mescan Paul Colontino Jamie Smith Matt Dimperio Nate Mcintosh J.D.IHaltigan

TUESDAYS

8-10

10-noon

noon-2

2-4

]

4-6

6-8^.

8-10

10-12

Sarah Lelle Matt Mescan Jamie Smith Gerrit Shuffstall Marisa Ortman Matt Dimperio Mike Gratzmiller Brian Eichstadt

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WEDNESDAYS

2-4

6-81

8-10

Matt Wilds Chris^Fultz k ft Nate Mcintosh Mike Gratzmiller

FRIDAYS

noon-2

6-8

8-10

i f

10-12

i f Matts Wilds Gerrit Shuffstall Marisa Ortman Jim Gorman Rich Costelloe

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SATURDAYS

1-4

6-10

Woodrome Anthony Woodrome Krissy Zevnik

SUNDAYS

9-12

Bob Merski

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TARHPqT STUDENT TRAVEL PLANNER on East Coast' looK-xng IOI

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PAGE 6

mt^^a^^^m^t^^m^^^m^^^^^mmmmm^^^^^^atmmm^^^mmt^^^m^m^mm^K^m^^^f^^mmm^^mm^

By Dan H ilfiker Senior Writer

Another school year is starting and students everywhere are go- ing back to the classroom in order to better their educations. For bet- ter or worse we are all here at Mercy hurst of' our own will as we have decided to go on to college as a way to get a higher education a nd possibly a better job. Unfortunately, I have recently seen a very troubling sight lam

One problem that I have with the entire Juvenile Probation sys- tem is that these kids, who have severely screwed up, do not spend their day in school, nor are they receiving any kind of private tu- toring. They spend the majority of their day sitting in a chair with a legal pad writing about what they have done wrong and how they will never do it aga in. They keep writing until that legal pad is

full.

> |

\

*

; Anothersenseless task that these

.

.

.

MERCIAD

working as an intern with the Dis- kids perform is that they work off trict Attorney's Office every day. their offense. This is theirpunish-

I work inside the confines of the ment; cleaning the courthouse

Erie County Courthouse, and

offices

totally

unsupervised

throughout the course ofthe day I throughout the course of the day.

walk past the offices of the J uve- Needless to sa y, they do not do a

nile Probation Division numer- ous times. It may not seem strange

very good job of cleaning. The worst part of this whole

to many of you, but already, after situation is that we are always

only two weeks o f school, the hallways are, filled with young children who elect not to go to school everyday, but who decide to spend their time talking to their Juvenile Probation Officer. This is a very strange thing for me to see because I have always, for the most part, enjoyed school and been fearful of the law.

hearing about how the children of this country are our future, but what type of future are we going to have ifa great numberofpeople spend their formative years not in school, orbeing privately tutored, but by writing until their arm falls off or pushing a vacuum cleaner for eight hours a day? After seeing what a lot of these

The sad thing is that most, if not kids, and many other adults a round

all, of these kids are getting ex-

the courthouse, are doing now

actly what they want by being out with their lives really makes me

of the classroom every day and being held by juvenile probation. These kids do not want to learn

feel fortunate to have grown up in the environment in which I did. Sometimes we tend to not realize

and be a part of their classmates' that there are so many out there

lives.

who are less fortunate than us.

September 12,1996

^mm^m^mt^tSm^mmim

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor

During the summer I made the decision not to return for the 96- 97 school year. After being a po- lice officer for 30 years, and 10 years as the Security Director at Mercyhurst, I felt it was time to

u go fishing." My resignation was effective September 1. 1 want to take this opportunity to say goodbye to my many friends in the student body, and particu- larly to the Class of 97 which includes many personal friends of mine. In May I will be in the audience when they graduate, to share their joy, and say goodbye, to them and their parents. To all of you, good luck in what-| ever your choose to do with your Mercyhurst experience. Please work with the new Security Di- rector, Ken Sidun, and bis staff. Carpe Diem. I will miss you and the Hurst. You all have touched my life, and I hope in some small way I have touched yours in a positive way. God bless you.

Bud Devcr Security Director

RUDEAWAKh/sllNG

B^ SHAWNTAfc HOMR D ©Wfr

**Attention Seniors*!*

ft

The class of si 997 Senior portraits will be taken for the Yearbook starting the week of Sept. 23th

I

Location:|Perfbrming Arts Center

PLEASE CALL

800-836-0558

during the week of Sept 16th to schedule your appointment,

*:«*:• *

*

PAGE 7

THE MERCIAD

September 12,1996

Political Minds SetTheirA

By Emilio Colaiacovo

and Joe

Wong

Merciad Political

Writers

As we begin a new school year,

we are going to begin a new politi- cal feature in the Merciad. Mosl previous articles in the Merciad dealing with politics expressed views on disjointed subjects and topics. With this new column, we expect to limit our weekly writ- ings to single or connected issues in contemporary politics. While we will base our writing on our individual political ideals, we do not want to concentrate on parti- sanship and answering "which

party is better."

I

At the same time, we are not labeling ourselves Democrats and Republicans or conservatives and liberals, and reserve.the right to transcend party loyalties and ide- ologies. We welcome feedback from the Mercyhurst community

on what w e write and suggestions on what we should discuss. Now to give the reader an understand-

ing of ourselves:

f

Cola iacovo; I am a junior His- tory/RIAP major and a Spanish/ Political Science minor. I was born and raised in Buffalo, New York in a traditional Italian household. My father and mother raised me in a conservative fashion but always taught me to respect the views and beliefs of others. My father immi- grated to this country at the age of 15 not knowing English; or any- one here. He dema nded no special treatment; he sought no handouts; he asked for no favors. His life was an example of what people, not government, can do to empower themselves. As I studied politics more and more, I realized the Republican party was the ideo-

logical faction that best represents my values. I believe in individual initiative and responsibility, less government intrusion, keeping more of what you earn, and fiscal responsibility. I grew up listening to the dreams

and hopes of Ronald Reagan and so if there is anyone I identify with politically, it is President Reagan. President Reagan spoke to our highest ideals and made sure through tax cuts and limiting government spending, power could be returned to the people. I tend to be quite conservative in dealing with social policy. I still believe our greatest asset in helping the downtrodden is communities, not government On economic issues, I believe in supply-side economics and fer- vently feel, through tax cuts not government regulation, our

.

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The scoreboard on the new football field with the word 'Lakers' spelt by the shrubbery beneath

VOL. 70 NOJl

ohn Murphy cott Vance hris Wloch rad Rybczynski

an Hilfiker

lamz Porzio Tavis Ovcrstreet lie Sad ley indi McDowell ara Clark ave Roth

The Merciad

.

Merciad Editors

Editor-in-Chief Sports Editor

News

Editor

Features Editor Senior Writer

James Hain Jason Giffen Michelle Mizia Aaron Connel Jerry Tramble;

Merciad Staff

Jessica Russell Stephen Nolan Emilio Colaiacovo Michelle Penrod Mary Pike

i

Michelle Fiacarella

Shawntea Howard Joe Wong Bill Melivlle Nicole Ponstingle Sue Toner

May 9, 1996

A&E Editor Advertising Copy Editor- Graphics Advisor

lie Merciad is the student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst College, Box 161,

M E. 38th St., Erie, Pa., 16546. Phone 824-2376.

j .

rhe Merciad welcomes letters to the editor withheld

amejviUbc

„U« I Kv thp Editorial Board with the Editor-in-Chief

J

The Merclad's editonal opinion . . is . determined by tne canunpi »

M

iKwcmw i »

holding final responsibility. The opinions expressed D»I™ »

r ? f

f

* ! ; TK. „«:„:«„. <>vnressed in The Merciad are not necessarily those of

/

Collegi

1 economywill produce more. Tax-

ing and spending are no longer

the answers.

i

I People crave freedom from

I government and desire the abil- ity to invest inf their families' futures, free of heavy tax bur- dens. Hopefully, our nation will move towards fulfilling those desires.

Wong: I am a senior RIAP and Political Science major, with a personal emphasis on interna-

tional affairs. I was born in Cali- fornia, but have lived in Win- chester, KY. for the past 10 years. My family has always been lower to middle-class Democratic, from my FDR grandparents to my Kennedy-inspired mother. • Living my teenage and early adult-life in semi-rural Kentucky,

I have kept my Democratic roots,

Tom Porubsky

Merciad Sports Columnist

§

Hello and welcome to 'The Sports Scoop by Poop", a weekly look at the crazy world of sports. It's football season so here is my 1996 football preview special. Nebraska starts this season trying to make it a three-peat for the national title and this might be their toughest task yet With sev- eral key losses on offense to the NFL and the fact that their new conferencewill providestiffcom- petition every week, I don't see th em being number one at the end of the year. Watch Tennessee be the na- tional champions at the end of the year. Peyton Manning isawesome and he should lead the Vols to the promised land. One thing that Tennessee has in their favor that Nebraska doesn't, is the fact that they play their toughest games at home infrontof 106,000 of the craziest fans in the world. I think that this edge will help Tennessee knock off Nebraska to be the new king of college football. Pcnn State should edge out Ohio State for the Big 10 title and go on to play a surprising Arizona State team. I think that Arizona State has a really good team and should be tough to beat especially with Jake Plummer at the quarterback spot

*

>

enda

•but modified them with southern conservatism. My primary inter-«* ests are in foreign policy and na- tional security, where I am pro- military and believe America should have influence around the world. In economics, I hold conserva- tive feelings on the budget and government spending, but real- ize Keynesian New Deal eco- nomics still holds some value today. My social-politics are clearly liberal, rangingfromsup- port for Social Security and wel- fare to education and the arts. I

am not a true classical liberal nor a modern liberal, butj feel more comfortable using those terms to describe myself than with Re- publican conservatism.

Scoop

| * The NFL should be fun to watch this year, especially with a lot of teams having explosive offenses. It is hard to pick a team out of the AFC to go to the Super Bowl, but I think that I am going to have to go with the Kansas City Chiefs. Now that they have a good kicker to go with the rest of the team, they will be better than they were last year. I don't think Pittsburgh will be

therewith all of their quarterback problems and Buffalo is too old these days so I think that Kansas City will win the AFC just be- cause no one else can. I love Green Bay in the NFC, especially with Brett Farve and the offense that they have. Robert Brooks, Edgar Bennett, Keith Jackson and the rest of that of- fense is too awesome for any de- fense to contain. Then you take a look at their defense and see the all time sack leader in Reggie White a nd a good supportingcast, they will be giving a lot of of- fenses throughout the league a lot of nightmares. They also have one of the best specia 1 tea ms units in the whole league, so this is one team to be reckoned with* When everything is sa id and done, I se e the Green Bay Packers winning their first Super Bowl since Super Bowlflll and Brett Farve being hailed as the Super Bowl MVP. Well that does it for this week a nd until next time, take it easyl

I

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••

 

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* Offer available only to new Discover Cardmembers

who call by 9/30/96 to apply. Offer good while supplies last. Must be 18 to apply. Discover Card wtl1 donate

a maximum of $25,000 to the NARAS Foundation.

TPAiST

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Use" It where you see the NOVUS* sign.

•ft

.

PAGE9

MERCIAD

Gran d

Delusion s

" Trai "spottin g

ff

by James Hain MerciadA&EEditor

60s, includes a scene in which the band plays a talent show at our fine institution. Of course, they didn't actually film it here, and the scene might not make it into

the finished film, but, hey, you cant have everything

fee l lik e a flick, chec k ou t

I f you

the new Tinseltown theater out past the mall. With 17 screens, a

pizza parlor, an arcade, and more gaudy colors than RuPaul's

closet, it's

truly a sight to behold,

the largest multinl* v in Pennsvi-

va iiia

anyone see that big movie this summer? You know, the one wher e stuf f ble w up and nothin g mad e any sens e bu t tha t wa s OK

Speaking ofmovies, did

But I have to admit that I did think Independence Day waa the best of the group, kind of like a 50s monster movie crossed with

a

70s

disaste r flick. Lot s o f fun ,

and

if you haven't seen it, don't

worry. Like most of the other big summer movies, it'll be onvideo

'before Thanksgiving

And fi-

nally, the begging starts. J Think you can turn a decent sentence? Graving the cheap thrill ofseeing your name in print?; Dying for deadlines? Obsessed with John

Murphy? Ifyou

any or all of these questions,

yesyou, maybe qualified towrite

answered yesto

you,

for us.

Th e Art s and Entertain -

ment section is especially excit-

ing, ul'm serious. It's

nage here, a thrill a minute. Call

like espio-

the

a bea d star t o n a brigh t and

Mercia d at

824-237 6 and

ge t prom -

ising future of indentured servi-

tude!

erwis e intelligen t gu y who none - theless allows his addiction to

control his life, even after he kicks the habit His ragtag pals include Spud (Ewan Bremner), a rodent-

lik e weird o who

alway s seem s t o

be 10 minutes behind everyone else , Sic k Boy (Jonn y Le e Miller ) wh o navigate s i n and ou t o f ad - diction, seemingly with ease; and Bigsbee (Robert Carlysle), who doesn't do drugs, but is psychotic enough without them. : . The drug of choice here is heroin,and there are many graphic scenes of snooting up. But Trainspotting is dearly an anti- dru g movie , and anyon e who de - nies this hasn't seen thefilm.The

ugl y live s le d b y Rento n and

hi s

cronies don't exactly scream "Emulate me!". For starters, a

By

James Hain

MerciadAScE E

In a summer full of mindless trash, it'srefreshingtohave trash that actually has something on its mind. The Scottish import

Trainspotting i s at once the most intelligent, provocative and en-

.

g movie o f the

summer,

and probably the funniest movie

about drug addiction you 're likely to see. The film was directed by Danny Boyle, who made a splash last year with the dark, dark com-

edy,

film had fun with the mechanics of murder and dismemberment,

Shallow Grave. Just as that

Welcom e back , folks . I f

you

did absolutely nothing this sum- mer, the n, well, your summer was about 50 times more exciting than mine. But it wasn't necessar- ily my fault Few of you are

a war e o f this , bu t I was actuall y a participant in our fine summer games. I was offici ally in charge o f doin g nothing . It was a bi g job, since , as you know , whe n you'r e doing nothing, it's difficult to

know when you 're finished

The

Wg Mercyhurst news this fall, of course, is that we're being fea- tured in a BIO TBdB HOLLY- WOOD MOVIE written and di-

recte d b y Mr . To m Hanks . That

Thing You

story of a (fictional) garage band

Dot, which tells the

from Eri e tha t make s it big

i n th e

|

Trainspottingriffsonsuch addic- tion-movie staples as creepy hal- lucinations, trouble with the law, and the pain of withdrawal. But

£ because the heroes knew what

p they were doing and saved the day with computer technology. Hah. Trick.question. Every- thing was like that this summer.

J baby dies from neglect, there's the aforementioned AIDS death,

and

Rento n and

hi s

pal

Spu d ge t

Trainspottingdoes something al- most unthinkable—it adds black, gallows humor to the mix. What can you say about a comedy in which one principal cha racter dies of AIDS? But the humor is deftly mixed in with the tragedy, and Boyle does an excellent job of maintaining an off-kilter tone from start to finish. Taking a cue from another underworld classic, A Clockwork Orange, Trainspotting is narra ted

its chiefprotagonist, one Mark Renton (EwanMcGregor), anoth-

by

busted by the cops. In fact, this film could be more helpful than a thousan d "Jus t Sa y No" commer -

cials in keeping kids off drugs. At

the

same time, the

film ig daring

in portraying (a nd describing) the high that causes people to be- come addicted in the first place. Trainspotting will upset a lot of people. But don't confuse the messenger with the message. Trainspotting doesn't advocate

dru g us e any

mor e tha n Leaving

Las

Veeas advocates alcohol, It presents

Return to the 50s

Out

o f all

o f th e musi c o f th e

1950s, there is one that stands out above all o f the others and sur- prisingly is the least remembered.

That

musicI is

known

as

"Rockabilly." It is more or less a

(d o no t

fusio n o f rock , blue s and

be

frightened) country, but with a

whole lot of kick to i t It is the music of rebellion. It was the choice of a generation of greas-

It is abou t bein g "cool " and

ers.

i s certainly not for

everybody.

it

As a matterof fact, it is doubt- les s tha t you hav e heard i t Eve r beard of a guy named Elvis ? Elvis was one of the early rockabilly artists, some even call him the father of rockabilly. Not every- thing Elvis did could be called

rockabilly , bu t his earl y stuf f lik e

L "Ri p i t Up,"

"Read y Teddy, "

and

" "I Got a Woman" certainly is. There are other guys like

Duane Eddy who

di d thei r shar e

of shaking up early rock music Duane Eddy could play a mighty

|. : mean guitar,

His song "Rebel

Rouser" ispractically a rockabilly

anthem. Some of the best rockabilly

The Films for Discussion Series returns next*week with Todd Solondz' Award-winning Wel- come to theDollhouse. Thestory o f a put-upo n 1 1 -year-ol d gir l and the trials of adolescence, the film won the Grand Jury Prize at Rob- ert Redford'sSundance Film Fes- tival, and will be presented Wednesday, September 18th at 7 p.m. in Zuro Recital Hall.

music wasn't made in the 1950s

though. There are bands like

The

By Nicole Ponstingle Merciad Columnist

Stray Cats who brought it into the 1980s. Their songs, like "Rock This * Town," "Rumble "in Brighton," and^Look at that Cadillac" fall within the realm o f this older genre of music. Even some oftoday's groups are trying to bringit back, bands likeSouth- ern Culture on theSkids, You can evenfind somerockabillylicksin some of Chris Isaak's tunes. Another interesting twist on rockabilly was brought to you exclusively by a band called Rocket from the Crypt, which combines punk and rockabilly, f which incidentally fit together quite well

Rockabilly is music that will go on forever. It is the music of th e "rebel. " I t has mad e a nam e for itself that even today is in demand. There is something about that rough soundthatpeople crave, not to mention that men with motorcycles and pompa-

dour s aren' t too

bad

either .

Welcome back to what prom- ises to be a fantastic year, the year that I make ajail break. Summer seemed to go too fast this year, but I hop e you enjoye d i t whil e i t lasted. I decided thatI wanted to shift my focus and work with music, so here goes nothing. People generally classify the

time that rock-n-roll

1950s as the

orn, but many think it was a legged time when a girl was

destine d t o be, well , frankly , no t to o much , and a boy was goin g t o follow in the footsteps o f daddy. The stereotypes of this time are endless. But I cannot honestly think of a time that was more alive. There was so much hap- pening in the world of music that has left its mark on our modern music. It is definitely time to stop the jokes because there was • hell ofa lot more happening in the50s than in any other decade since. Besides, it's much cooler to be

"square i than to be "groovy,*

a

fu nky n or "awesome

Short Attention! Sp ' Video Reviews

Happy Gilmore: A happy *

prise. / / Takes Two:

Two too

m

The Juror: Mistrial.

Mr.

Holland's Opus: Has

Henry Krinkle 'fiv Loner

I

Aladdin and theKing ofThieves:

Genie-al. AllDogs Go toHeaven 2\ Wanna

•!•: •

heal ft you can dance to I Mr. Wrong: And how! Mulholland Falls: Catch I

The Substitute; Absent

Things to Do in Denver When Youfe Dead: Lively. Tom and Huch Like watching

pain t dry

on

a picke t fence.

The

Truth About Cats & Dogs:

Truly hilarious.

I

Up

Close & Personal: To o clos e

for comfort WaitingtoExhale: Keepwaiting. White Squall: A wild ride, a

bet?

Barb Wire: Don't go near it Black Sheep: Shear it! "'' Broken Arrow: Buy some duct

tape.

City Halt Fight it

I

I

Diabolique: Diabolicall y bad re*f make* Executive Decision: Sound. FourRooms: Check your brain at!

the

door, f

From Dusk Till Dawn: Worth

staying up

for.

i

Crazy for YonJIke Erie Play- house opens its 80th season with this Broadway smash. Anupdate of the classic mu sica I Girl Crazy, the show la a lively Gershwin revue and stars such Playhouse veterans as Brian Altaian, Rac Jea n Urbanowic z and Joh n Bur -

ton- Runs Sept 12-15, 26-29,

Oct. 3-5,10-12, Thursda y a t 7:30,

Curtain times:

Frid ay and

Sat -

urda y at 8 and Sunda y at 2. Cal l 454-2852, cxt 41fortickets. At

the Pl»vhmis£. 13 W. 10th S t

•Keety smd Dy~The Roadhouse •Theater production of Jane SMaita'scontoversialpIay about S a woman seeking anabortion who •is kidnapped and held by a radical •rigbt-to-life group. Directed by iMercyhurst theatre instructor •Scott McClelland and starring

• Lori Allen and DorisBcckefcPlay-

I Thursday, Friday and Saw *

ing

• night s at

day

8 p.m . at

the

Road -

• house , 145 5 Sept 28.

W.

lll h S t Through

For tickets call 456-

• 5656.

I

i

i

n

u

I

I

A

PAGE 10

THE MERCIAD

September 12,1996

Garvey and Mercyhuis t Healthier Tha n

Ever

By Brad Rybczynski Features Editor

and

I bad

the

hono r o f sittin g dow n

talking with the one man that

most embodies the true Spirit of Mercyhurst, President William Garvey. There is a mystique that surround s Garvey . H e i s th e ma n

iwho has spurred the growth of

Mercyburst, he is a man with great vision. Garvey is a living example of fulfillment of our college motto, Carpe Diem, or "Seize the day." Not only has Garvey seized the day, he has seized a decade that has brought about over 60 per- cent of Mercyhurst's physical growth. During his tenure, Mercyhurst has ga ined a new stu- dent union, ice rink, performing arts center and mostrecently,a new football field.

When the

growth o f the colleg e

is mentioned to Garvey, excite- ment'fills his every word. He is quic k t o poin t out that Merc y hurs t has expanded every two years since 1987 and will build again when the library is expanded in * • Excited does not begin to de- scribe Garvey when he is asked about the students of Mercyhurst. Garvey isoverwhelmingly confi- dent when he says "the future for Mercyhurst is very bright" This

97.

i s due to th e fac t tha t Merc y hurs t students nowrepresent30 states inthe Union aswell as a great deal of foreign lands such as Ireland,

Engl a nd , Tanzania , Australi a

and

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President Garveyrelaxesin his office

Bangladesh just to name a few.^

The

geographica l diversit y i s no t

the only thing that students are now bringing to Mercyhurst, the academic caliber o f the students has also greatly increased. Garvey spoke proudly when he said "Our board scores are up 150 points" and the "the improvement of our student body has been by leaps and bounds."

The improvemen t o f al l aspect s of Mercyhurst brings about the question of whether or not Mercyhurst will get bigger. Garvey responded by saying that Mercyhurst will "better, not bigger, if Mercyhurst were to get bigger it would lose its charm." Garvey envisions a total enrollment of

\

about 3000, with 2500 on the main
\

campu s and

th e remainder at

the

Northeast campus. Garvey*s overall visionforthe future of Mercyhurst i is to be-

come part o f the top tier for na- tional liberal arts colleges. Such an accomplishment would speak volumes for the reputation o f the school. Presently Mercyhurst is

rated i n the

top tier for Northern

libera] arts colleges.

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One pressing concern about Garvey has been related to his health. In August Garvey had preventative' by -pass surgery. Garvey said, when asked about his health, "I'm in the best health I've been for years," Garvey assured me that he will fulfill his contract which runs until 1999.

A

Ple a

By Brad Rybczynsld Features Editor

The Merciad is back. This year the staff of editors and writers have changed titles or have just joined* We have lost the out* standing abilitiesofNickKrayger, but we have added new and en- thusiastic members. The infusion of new blood into the Merciad will bring change.

Chang e tha t i s hopefull y

better. I can only speak for the

Cot

th e

Feature s Sectio n and

I kno w tha t

with the staff assembled we are looking forward to a phenomenal year. The Features section this year will embody a different style and emphasis. A great many of our readers reside o n campu s and the y will be catered to.

Fro m

Weekly features of persons or events or both will be run. I am hopeful that the Features section will be where most turnto first Gnd out about exciting events on r

Mercyhurst is not a "big" school. We are a campus of approximately 2,700 students. This is not con- sidered big by most standards, but when your are trying to equally distribute attention to every de- partmen t o r du b the tas k ca n be- come a difficult one.

campus.

The features staff and,

I

cannot cover everything, we are too small. We need the help ofthe Mercyhurst community to ensure that attention is given to those that deserve it. I am asking that every department head, faculty member, administrator, club president and student be very

Th e

'Ry b

Roas t f

greedy. I want you all to hunger, to desire a spot on the Features pagei If a faculty member has done

ordinary let

something out o f the

my staff know. If you have a club event, such as a bake sale, shirt sal e or raffle , w e are offerin g fre e advertising. If a student deserves

• II *49

itionwe will give ittothem.

Without the college the Merciad

does not exist

losophy that we wish to serve the

It is in that phi-*

students of Mercyhurst. Use us, we do not mind. We are not doing you a favor byfeaturingan event or person, you are doing us the favor. The Features Section wants to

be a success. Alone we

can only

d o s o much. } Wit h you r hel p and suggestion s w e wil l improv e and

continu e to improv e by leap s and bounds. Iurge you totake advan- tag e o f us. With that said I would like to welcome all of you back to Mercyhurst. I hope that everyone | had an enjoyable and fruitful sum- merrecess.I know that I am glad to be back and hopefully all of you are as Well. To the class of 20001 am very excited to welcome you to Mercyworld. You ate the largest clas s ever admitted to the college . I am sure it is anhonor tobe a part of Mercyhurst and I urge you to become a complete part of the college. Over the summer I pondered

per, I am still not sure 1 wanted 10 welcome the class of 2000 in a grand manner and to attempt to instill in them some wisdom I have gained over the past three years.

Luckily for

everyone 1

llvi

not t o get o n my soapbox and preach. I will instead say only this : Ge t involved . Thes e fou r (o f five) years will be the most im-

portant ones of your life.

You

will find out who you are and

what you are all about

Enjoy

yourselve s and

hav e fun .

Well summer is over and soon I

will he saddened by

ing

thei r leave s and

the trees los-

by

my

losin g

till

tie ofmy hair. I plan on a g

•:•; •

endlessly on what I would write about Gis t ter m and

yea r nonetheless .

in my first column. Now that I am faced with putting words on pa-

Agai n I implor e you

to

hel p u s |

the Merciad to help

you.

A Feature's Fast Fact:

know that Dagwood

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PAGE 11

MERCIAD

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New Home Not

Sweet For Lakers

Scott Vance Merciad Sports Editor

After four wins in a row at the end of last year, a new stadium on | campus, and a overall record of 14-1 in previous home openers it was looking very bright for the Hurst ^ as they took on Robert Morris in last Saturday's home opener.

tion of Justin Everett, Brian Hamlin, and Matt Golga wasn't good enough and they were forced to call on Wicks for another punt It was at this point that Robert Morris took control of the game as Wanamaker rushed 40 yards before he was finally taken down on the Mercyhurst 16 yard line, to end the first quarter. Robert Morris started the second quarter

.However, that bright cloud S as they finished thefirstand with

i&fe&fi&tf«l

m>

turned very dark as the Lakers were defeated by a margin of 20-

0 .

• '. :

Mercy hurst started off in fine

fashion as they stopped the open- ing drive of Robert Morris, and forced a field goal which was blocked by a more than impres-

The game

just,three minutes gone they scored a three yard touch down and were successful with the ex- tra point to giv e Robert Morris a

7-0 lead.

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Lakers home opener on their new pitch last Saturday. It was first

This score seemed to trigger the Lakers offense as they drove the ball from their own 35 yard line to Robert Morris 14 yard line. Thanks to somefinerushing from Golga, Hamlin and some great catches from Tom Brediger and Joe Liotta, .Mercyhurst was on their 4th down and needed six yards when \ Robert Morris re- ceived a five yard penalty which meant that theLakers only needed one yard to continue their fine

out of danger due to some fine qua iter backing by Ja ke Newman

Wanamaker, but Robert Morris

w

I sive defensive line.

couldn't have had a better start for the Lakers as they had the ball on their own 43 yard line. How- ever, they failed to make a first down and Junior Eric Wicks was

forced to punt Robert Morris returned the punt 11 1 yards to their own 25 yard line and continued five minutes of

Rumble in the new park

actionfromthe

day blues as the Lakers lost 20-0 to Robert Morris. *

^^frthe

to

sustained

Mercyhurst

rushing

20

drive. However, it was not to be line. ^ ^ as Everett failed to get the elusive

K

Robert Morris moved the ball

alties forced the Lakers to punt. Robert Morris had the ball on the 20 yard line after Wick's punt went into the end zone for a touch- back. However, once again the Mercyhurst defense remained re- silient and forced Robert Morris fo punt, but the offense was un- able to take advantage ofthe good field position :|the defense left them in, and they turned over the ball on theirown 37 yard line with just over 7 minutes gone in the

third quarter.

chored by Jeff Swanson who had 14 tackles in the game retrieved

the ball for the /offense on their

own 46 yard line

The defense an-

The Lakers

were able to carry the ball to Rob- ert Morris's 27 yard line thanks to some fine funning by Justin *

Gibson. kThen it all went wrong as Golga fumbled the ball on the Robert

cent physically. If we play con- sistent football we can beat any team, but we didn't play consis- tent football on Saturday." There was however, some posi- tive areas on Saturday with the defense performing exceptionally well, anchored by defensive player of the*game, Frank Figliano, as well as solid games from Lou D'ambrosio and Keith Swanson. The Lakers face top opposition ["Albany State in this Saturday game. "When you 're0-l you have to focus the minute you step onto

rthe bus until the game is ended. If "We play as a unit we'll be okay. We have a tough schedule there- for e we have to come and play

each week."

t,

Both Shawn Hamlin and Mike Uler, are the only doubtful play- ers for Saturday's game due to -injuries they sustained in last Saturday's game.

92 yard touchdown. They added the extra point and took a 14-0 lead. "We had them on the ropes. It was very slick out there. The ball came out of Matt's hands which was an unfortunate situa- tion, if we had scoredfthen we could have won that game/' said

Coach Kimball. Golga's bad luck continued throughout the fourth quarter as a pass of his was intercepted a few plays later. It was a tough day for Golga who found it hard to link up with his receivers wjth any real consistency, f t> J

1 Overall head 1 coach Kimball

described the game as " a disap- pointing andfrustratinggame. It's easiertoaccept a defea t toa better team, but that wasn't the case. Wehave toget things done inside the red zone (20 yard) and we didn't get it done. However, it wasn't through lack of effort as these kids always give 110 per-

yard

Mercyhurst defense * forcedJ a ya rd needed.

fumble when on the 20 yard line.j

Once again Golga was given the opportunity to impress the 1,850

supporters who turned out on this and excellent running by Archie

wet and miserable day to watch

the Lakers. Golga rushed for three was forced to punt on their 4th

yards on the opening play, but on down at their own 37 yard line.

the second down he threw an off balance pass that was intended for one ofhis receivers which was

intercepted by the defense of Rob- ert Morris, to give them the ball on the twenty five yard line. "He Didn't have his footing on the

and be tried to force the

mud,

play as he was under pressure,"

said coach Once again Robert Morris was

unable

Mercyhurst error and two plays

to capitalize on the

later they fumbled for the second

time, and the bail was recovered

^^^ _

Jeff Andres returned the ball 35 yards to the opposition's 34 yard ''"'

This was just what the Lakers needed and they moved the ball to the Robert Morris three yardline with under a minute left in the half. The Lakers opted for a field poaL-ibut Wicks's effort, was blocked, which sent the Lakers into the locker room down seven to zero. On the opening play of the sec- ond half, Joe Liotta returned the ball 20 yards which helped the

line.

,—m,^^^—

by the Lakers. Unfortunately for Jiuist move the ball to the Robert Morris three yard line, and Rob- the Lakers, the rushing combina- Mortis 34 yard line, but two pen- ert Morris returned the ball for a

Growing Pains For New Team

By?Scott Vance Merciad Sports Editor

If

With thirteen seniors last year graduating it will be diCficult for the Lady Lakers soccer team to match the success of previous years. The team has eight new freshman. Theresa Roach is a big, strong center fielder, Maria Sunkqu istfromSweden is a full- back who is currently suffering a hip- flexorinj ury and Beth Forbus, who has already scored too great goals for the Hurst, are just a few of thefreshmannota bles. This team definitely has the ca- pability to make nationals. They have to learn to cope with the fact that sometimes things wpn't go right for them. If the keep the passion going they can be as suc- cessful as any other team. However, the Lakers didn't start out as previous Mercyhurst soc-

cer teams.

They found them-

selves two goals sown within the firstfifteenminutes of their sea- son opener against the Univer- sity of Southern Indiana. The team,- however, fought back and dominated the rest of the game, but were unable to receive any reward for the valiant effort Erin Stewart had a particularly good game and she seems to have over* come her knee injury. ' In the Lakers' second game against the team Edwardsvillc found themselves; down by three goals within the first 15 minutes, but the Hurst never let their beads drop, a nd by halftime they bad reduced the deficit to 3- 2 thanks to two fine goals from freshman Beth Forbus.* On the first goal Forbus brokefrom the midfieldjbeattwo defenders and slipped the ball past the goal keeper. Her second goal was even better as she bent a free kick with pin point accuracy into the

top corner leaving the opposi- tions goalie The Hurst started the second half as they ended thefirst,and with just one,minute gone were

awarded a penalty. Junior Nicki Esposito failed a spot kick. Itwas another freshman Theresa Roach that tied the game with a wonder- ful individual goal as she skipped by two defender and hammered the ball into the corner to leave the vgame all square at two minutes, ' left in the game. Senior Marissa Rosctti was sent off for a second

bookable offense.

This sent the

" Lakers Into overtime with just 10J players, and within thefirsteighth minutes ofovertime Edwa rdsville 5 took the lead, which proveJ to be the game winner., "I'm delighted in the way we came back, now we need to start*:

off games like that, and if we do, we're going to dofine"said bead coach Rich Hartis.

Freshmen lead the wa

By Kathy Fraley Merciad Writer

The Mercyhurst men's and women's cross country squads took thefield on Saturday (Sept 7th) for their first race of the sea* son at the Buffalo Slate Invita- tional held at Beaver Island State Park in Grand Island, N.U., The meet, featuring the top teams in the NCAA East Region, was the first taste ofcollege level compe- tition for 11 Freshmen, 7 on the woma n 's team and 4 on the men's. The women placed 7th out of 12 teams, with 260 points. The men's team placed 12th out of 13. Freshmen Andy Culler led the Laker men, finishing the 5 mile

course in 30:01 for 50th place. Other Lakerfinishers:Freshmen Steve Siemienski 58th, 30:04; FreshmanJa y Porter90th, 31:35; JuniorDavid Dausey 97th, 31:41;

Junior

Thorn a s£*Van

Fleet

118,32:50; Senior and Team Cap- tain Thomas Humphreville 135th, 34:08; Freshman Shane Lynsky 140th, 34:34. Freshman Jenny Standfcst was first in for the women, finishing in the 30th spot in 20:53 for 3.1 miles. Team captain and junior Bridget Holzheimer was next in at 21:14 for 40th overall. The La ken travel to Allegheny for the Allegheny Classsic Invita- tional this weekend.

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PAGE 12

 
 

W i -

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THE MERCIAD

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Msl«ii^WliiiiMl<il;l:

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September 12,1996

/

By Michelle Friscarella Merciad Sports Writer

This past Saturday kicked off the 1996 football season here at Mercyhursl. Even though the first game was not a victorious one, our Lakers did their best On Tuesday, Coach Joe Kimball com- mentcd that there were too many mental errors, but next week will be an improvement Pre season was a test for the Lakers. Many empty spots were left open on both offense and de-

fense.

niors had been starters for two or three years and efforts like that

Some of last year's Se-

Golf Brief

By Mike Pattison Merciad Sports Writer

The 1996 version of the Mercy hurst golf team is off to an inspiring and impressive start to this year's fall schedule. The team, under new head coach Joe Podolsky, has won its first two tournaments of the year in con- vincing fashion. The team trounced the £ opposition in the Edinboro Invitational last Wednesday at Riverside Gol Club in Cambridge Springs. Mercyhurst was led by second place finisher, Tony Greidanus, whofireda one-over par 72. Cory Decoteau, Mike Pattison, Curry Huskes and Chad Hoisek also Gred rounds of 74,75,76 , and 79 respectively to give the Hurst a remarkable 17 shot victory. The team total of 297 is the lowest team total ever posted by* a Mercyhurst golf team. Congratu- lations boys! The great scores continued last Friday as the team traveled to Elmira to try and win its second consecutive trophy. Fortunately the team didn't disappoint and came home victorious for the sec- ond time in three days. Once aga in the team was led bymcdalist Tony Greidanus whofireda 78. Tea mm a te Chad Hoisek also shot

a 78 but unfortunately succumbed

individual honors on the 3rd play- off hole. Also playing wellforthe 'Hurst was Curry Huskcs who Gred a respectable 79. Only four golfers broke 80 at the rough and three of those were Laker team members. This good start should translate into more tournament

victories for the boys of the links.

As tea m

member Tony Greidanus

said, "This is the strongest team I've seen in the four years I've been here. It's nice to go to tour-| na me n ts and have the other tea ms worried about bow well we are going to play. It is also great that the guys are bitting the ball solid right now. Chad Hoisek is play-

L a

ing really well, consistent golf and one of these times he is going to win i tournament and bring our team trophy home." The Lakers have a busy schedule next week as they play in three tournaments starting Sunday in the two-day S t Bonaventure Tournament

are hard to replace right away. According to Coach Kimball, it took the Freshmen about three or four days to come around, but now they arc doing a great job. The Seniors, the first to be re- cruited by Coach Kimball and his staff, have proved to be excellent leaders. Th e team has a positive attitude and even in demanding practices the y are respond ing well. Ifwe keep together as a team, we will do very well," stated Coach Kimball. The newest addition to Mercyhurst College has gotten everyone excited. For those who live on campus, it will mean less

travel. To the Lakers, how- ever, it means they will really play at "home." Coach Kimball and the team are grateful to everyone who has aided in this project "People have done a tremendousjob," said Coach Kimball. "The*staff has worked hard to get done and we greatly appreciate it" It is hard to predict the rest of the season. The Lakers play a very demanding schedule against tough teams. Coach Kimball feels, "The talent is here to win. If we stay.as a team we will get better each week."

"What are you guys doin' out there?" asks head coach Joe Kimball as his players put in a losing performance on Saturday.

i

Soccer Team Off To A Solid Start

By Scott Vance Merciad Sports Editor

Having finished fourth in the nation last year, the Mercyhurst men's soccer team will be hoping to improve on last year's perfor- mance and go all the way to win the national championships. They will need the talent of the new freshmen as well as the experi- ence of the upper classmen if they are to achieve this feat Some freshman noia bles are Rob yurkovfch, who is a very quick and aggressive player, Brian Sayer, who has slotted in nicely at right full back orrightmid-field, a consistent all round player, and Barry Allen, who scored a great goal in the season opener. He is a very quick playerwith greattech-

nical skill who will get better with

Allen hails from

every game. County Meath in Irela nd and is an exciting a d ition to an already ex- citing squad.

The Hurst started off the season against southern Indiana and quickly disposed of the weak op- position by a score line of 6-2 The interesting thing about this game was that there were six dif- ferent scorers, with goals com- ing from Barry Allen, Stewart Hogg (2), Rob Yurkovich, Glen Francis and Ian Dickerson. However, their second game wasn't as easy as the Lakers were defeated by a scoreline of 2-1 to Edwardsville. "After playing so well in the first game, we per 6 formed well below pa r in the sec- ond game; .We thought we won the game before we went on the field, and they let the standard, okay,the team to slip and played poorly. It was a lesson to the team that people are hoping to try to knock them off," said head coach Rich Hartis. So with an overall record of 1- 1 Mercyhurstwent intotheir game last Sunday aga inst Sagjnaw Va I-

LacrosseAt The Hurst

By Maureen McMahan Merciad SportsWriter

What has the students at Mercyhurst all in anticipation? It is the new Division I sport of men's and women's Lacrosse, head coached by Pete Ginnegar and assisted by Jeremy Murphy. A complete turn around from last season's club team, the bn 's Lacrosse team will open against Notre Dame with I that fighting Mercyhurst spirit The men's team will also compete against top ranked teams such as Michigan State and Ohio State. With a combination of talent and

their exuberant attitude, both La- crosse teams strive to be as com- petitive as possible with a "noth- ing to lose" outlook for the sea-

son*

x

came from other countries' na-

tional teams.

Two players are

from Canada, one from the En- glish National Team, as well as a player from the Iraqi National Team. If you are a die hard Lacrosse fan or somebody who wants to see the thrill of the game, come out next spring to the beautiful new sta dium a nd watch your fel- low Lakers strive for victory!

The one's to watch for on the women'steam are returning play- ers Rebecca Dubish, Kathleen 0'Hara,»Kodie Marks and Erin Traeger. All have excessive skills and hard working attitudes. With this new sport on the rise for the men's team, all 22 new players contribute to the game, and a few

ley with mixed emotions. But any doubt was soon over- shadowed, as Shawn Kroener broke the dead lock with a fine top corner strike after some fine work from Stuart Hogg. Keith Selvitelli doubled the score as he drove a half cleared bait through a cluster of players and into the back of the net Hogg added a third goal with probably the strike ofthe game, with a superbly struck left foot shot that gave the keeper absolutely no chance. The im- pressive Ian Dickerson added a fourth with a sheer class lob over the unexpecting goal keeper. Fourth goals were added from Rob Gilooly and Did ion. The team takes on East Stroudsberg this Saturday in a game the Lakers will be hoping to win in order to improve their

The Lakers are cur-

rently ranked third in their con- ference. •

rankings.

By Jessica Stout J MerciadSports Writer

Tennis is back! The Lady Lak- era have started a new season,; welcoming back five upperclass-j men, along withfivefreshmen. The new playersjoining the team are Laura Ha melly ofSharon, PA, Cara Paglia of Hermitage PA, Amy Smoulder of Warren, PA, Lindsey Waite from Liverpool, NY, and Kristina Zevnik from Euclid, OH. The players return- ingfromlast year include Lauren Diulus, Carmel Dougherty, Ma- rina George, Kim Hodgkiss-Lflly and Jessica Stout The team started off their sea- son infinestyle with a win over California University ofPennsyl- vania. The Lakers swept Califor- nia six to zero with winsfrom all three of the starting .Freshmen. The team is looking forward to GLIAC Competition, which will start on Saturdays I

Volleyball Team Improving

By Kara Clark Merciad Sports Writer

The Lakers volleyball team is looking stronger than ever with three returning seniors Heidi Bock, Heather Lemley and Natalie Pellcgrine. All of these seniors will have a big influence over the way the Lakers season will go. The Lakers have also recruited some top class Fresh- men namely Sharyl Maulman, Justyn Headley, Hollic J uslinger, Laura Sin ith, Maureen McMahon and Kara Clark all of whom will need to play their best if they are to turn around last years losing season into a whining one. The Lakers started their season at the California University of PA on August 30 and 31st and finished with two wins and two losses. The Hurst then travelled to Edinboro on September 6 and 7 for their tournament and once againfinishedwith two wins and two losses.

The Lady Lakers had their home opener against Allegheny Col- lege last Tuesday evening, but were unable to improve their record and were defeated in a close encounter.

• "The goal ofthis year's team is to finish in the top three of the GLIAC Southern Division I. I* feel that this is one of the best teams I have coached at Mercyhurst in the pastfiveyearn. Our backcourt defense is stronger jtj than ever and offensively we a re successfully running a quicker tempo offense. The biggest con- cern is the youthfulness of the team, however I do know this team will go hard against any team," said head coach Craig Davie. The ^Lakers host a tournament on September 13-14 which in-

cludes

teams .from Edinboro,

Juniata, Lock Haven, Milllersville and West Virginia, Wesleyan.

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