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The Voice of Hie Merefhurst Community

VOL. 48 NO. 3

MERCYH

SEPTEMBER 26, 1975

YEAR HIGH SCHOOL-COLLEGE PLAN DISCUSSED

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Photo by Nancy Willis William Walker, a junior law enforcement major, is the new treasurer of HUS. The other candidates were Jeffrey Best, Bradford Lauster and Joseph NeCastro.

V

Senate Elects Reps

With all the votes cast and counted, a new College Senate has been formed. The fifteen representatives have been chosen after two weeks of elections. From

the administration, the five who were selected are :

Sr. Carolyn Hermann, Jean Lavin, Miriam Mashank,

E. William Kennedy, and James Lanahan.

| p

Those selected|from the faculty are: f Edward Gallagher, Jacquelyn Howey, Sr. Mary Matthew Baltus, Marvin Camburn, and Robert Hon. The members of the student body selected from the Representative Union of Students are: | James Hallamyer, Patricia Mullaugh, Kent KochJPatrk k Weschier and Frank McMahon.

RUS Note s

The Representative Union of Students continues its current policy of meeting every week in order to deal with the larger amount of business, f-, Wpn Wednesday, September 17, the 26 present members of RUS selected the two RUS advisors:

Jeffrey Sternlieb and E. William Kennedy. Robert Dubik, one of the "walkers'' for the Council of Exceptional Children, brought to the attention of RUS tha t a $75 pledge to last ; year' s walkers had Dever been paid. It was unanimously voted that the debt be paid. RUS representatives then discussed the establish- ment of a committee to deal with all? senior class activities. The committee would be composed of seniors both inside and outside RUS. The final item of discussion was the Fall Festival which has been scheduled for October 11. The aspects of ?the discussion were: should arrangements be made for beer; should a tent be procurred; where should the festival be held. f

by Patrick Weschier

A group of educators from Mercyhurst College and Mercyhurst Prep High School began meeting oh a regular basis this week to discuss the possibility of creating some sort of continuous high school-college degree program involving the two schools. According to Sr. Maura Smith, Coordinator of the Mercyhurst Life-long Learning Continuum, the talks are a direct outgrowth of the Continuum program. Basic aims!of the Continuum program include cooperative efforts by the* various member in- stitutions to promote continuous educational ex- periences which break-through traditional boun- daries between institutions. The college^iigh school

Senator To Visit Erie

Senator Howard Baker (Republican-Tennessee), a

key figure in the Senate Watergate hearings, will be making Mercyhurst one of his stops when he comes to

Erie on Thursday, October 2.

Senator

Baker

will

J

in

participate

a/ special

Republican fund-raising function at* Rainbow Gar- dens, on behalf of Republican Congressional can-

didate Lincoln Marks.

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*

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? Prior to the fund-raising affair, Senator Baker will

in the

Richards Room at Zurn Hall. •> -U Wrnember of the United States Senate since 1966, Senator Baker gained national recognition in 1973, when he served as vice chairperson of the Senate Select Committee on Presidential ^Campaign Activities. It was this group that uncovered initial evidence in the Watergate scandal which culminated in President Nixon's resignation. I * In the course of his time in the Senate, the fifty- year old senator has also been active in drafting legislation lowering the voting age*to eighteen and expanding voter rights. His current activities include service on the Senate Select Committee investigating secret intelligence organizations such as the CIA.

be holding a 5:30 p.m. news conference

Senator Baker's appearance in Erie is under the sponsorship of thelRepublicans of Erie, Crawford, and Mercer Counties.

This Week

1

Saturday, September 27

Fields"

8:00

i

j*

Movie,

< Sunday, September 28

Movie, "Sleeper", 7 and 9 p.m. RH, I.D.'s

"W.C.

RH.I.D.'s

*

?

m

p.m.,

s

required.

'required.

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday September 29,30, October 1

Coffeehouse Circuit ^presents: "Gunhill Road" "'with their smash nit, "Back When My Hair

Was Short "

t

program presently under consideration is one example of such inter-institutional cooperation. Sr. Maura sees two positive results that would come; from the creation of a program in which

Mercyhurst Prep students could make the transition into Mercyhurst College on a gradual basis:

First, the two schools would be able to eliminate

most of the duplication that is often found ill the

I

curricula of the final two years of high school and the basic college courses taught on the same subject. Wi Second, students would nave a wider range of study available to them in a subject area, being able to move directly into college level study after achieving competency on die high school level. In addition to the planning of the academic aspects of the high school-college program, the members of the group will also be dealing with the social and psychological aspects of*a combination college-high

school program, v

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f Sr. Maura feels that provision will be made for specialized counseling of students who make the transition from the high school to the college in the course of the program. One of the most important aspects of the new program, according to Sr. Maura, will be the degree to which it will be adjustable to the individual needs of the students. "If a student wants to move through the high school-college program* in six years, the

option will* be there" says Sr. Maura. "On the other hand, some students might not want to par- ticipate in the high school-college program for the entire length of the program. Some students may

want to take college work only in their senior year.'' *

When asked to discuss

:

the theme of the new

program, Sr. Maura'responded that "the whole Keynote of the program would be the accent on what is best for the individual student, so as to enable him- her to learn the things that he-she needs to know." Sr. Maura concluded by stating the hope that the development of an allied educational program bet- ween the high school and the college would be a step in the direction of blurring the traditional dividing lines which separate learning institutions.

Coming soon - watch fortdetails "Ralph" and /'Divided We Stand"!!

! JOUR 0F> CENTRAL EUROPE

*

There

will

be

an

organizational

for

terested

meeting

in-

IN-

TOUR

all

students

in

TERSESSION

O F

EUROPE.

PLACE: 213 Main

DATE:;

C E N T R A;L

Tuesday,

I

September 30 TIME: 3:00p.m.

Hotel RestaurantI Society

The Hotel-Restaurant Society will present a wine tasting and demonstration seminar with guest lecturer Mr. Johannis Lichtenstein on Tuesday, September 30, at 8 p.m. in Room 214 Zurn. Everyone is invited.

;

' Photo by Nancy Willis

What's Jimmy Hallamyer so serious about? See page 2.

PAGE 2

MERCYHURST COLLEGE Guest Editorial

SEPTEMBER 26, 1975

/

of the baseball team allowed to drive his car across the intramural field thus creating more dangerous grooves in the field? Is it really that far to walk from the Zurn pa rking lot? | There are many more students involved in the intra-mural league than there are on the baseball team. Why do they get preference? We ar e no Notre Dame, we are Mercyhurst College and we should stop fooling ourselves and act like Mercyhurst College. The students have the RIGHT to use the safer grounds of the outfield s I am not writing this letter with the thought of going against the baseball team. On the contrary, I wish the baseball team all the luck in the world in their up- coming season. I am writing this letter to show the viewpoint of the students and the dangerous situation that exists. 1 will be very disappointed if this

situation is not remedied, % Sincerely, Jimmy Hallamyer

;

As the president of the Representative Union of Students I have been the recipient of many student gripes. I'm not complaining, in fact,: this is what I want because it is part of my job. One gripe that has seemed to stand out among others is that the students

are forced to use the so called football field next to the baseball field during the intramural football •

This field is full of rocks, glass and other dangerous

debri s whic h ca n reall y har m a student . One student . Joe Castrignano has already been put in the hospital with torn ligaments of the knee which is very serious ; and will affect him for the rest of his life. This hap-

Carol Quartuccio

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season.

pened

1

as a result of playing on the field that, among

all the another dangerous things, is on an upward slant. I want to inform the college community of this situation so something can be done before anyone else is injured. Why can't the students use the outfield of the baseball field as in past years? Why is the coach

EDUCATION

\

Walking through Mercyhurst halls can be depressing on dreary Erie days especially when | no one replies to J your friendly greetings of a simple "heHo". It happens to be ah elementary function of the oral cavity and requires fewer muscles than does neck bending, which many people render after such greetings. Faculty members are like- wise guilty of this neglectful act, which hinders the unity of our collegiate corn- munity. Because we are a relatively small intitution of higher education, we must

proceed to alleviate

DEPT. TAKES STAND

We hope you will understand.

Sincerely,

THE EDUCATION DIVISION FACULTY Sister Kathleen Cribbins, O.S.B. Mr. Edward J. Gallagher Mr. James A. Infantino Mr. Peter P. Libra Mr.BrianJ.McHugh Dr. Barbara Weigert Sister Patricia Whalen, R.S.M.

*

Dr. Marion L. Shane. President of the College Mercyhurst College *

Dear Dr. Shane:

September 17,1075

#

September 17,1975 Dear Students:

this problem. So We believe in yearbooks. We believe in you. For

this treason, we would like to share .with you the following letter which explains why we are not contributing to the Yearbook Fund.

Staff Editoria

Kinder

Grades

by Olivia Longo

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remember, "seize the opportunity" to add a bit of sunniness to someone's rainy day.

Grades have been looked down upon Jong enough. They have 'been thought of as the misguiding light of the student, as the false goal of schooling, in other words, as the source of all evil when it comes to the inverted value system of some students. It is time that something be

said in their favor.

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After all, grades are so insignificant-looking, that it is hardly fair to put all the blame on them. Still, students are accused of studying for the sak e of a grad e instead of knowledge. So, let' s get rid of the grading system and all wrongs will be *

righted/ Why should that be the cure? Are students really discouraged^ from (serious) studying because the grading system is unfair? Is it fair to blame the grading system for a screwed-up sense of values?

, It is true that all serious students are pleased with a good grade. That is a natural reaction. However, it is not always true that just because they strove for a 4.0, they couldn't care less about learning per se, grading system or no grading system. Why should a "good student'' be penalized for his-her 3.5 + quality point average and be dismissed with a "your grades don't mean anything, anyhow"?fet Of course they mean something! They cer- tainly shouldn't be looked at as the ultimate goal of education, but while a student is in school, they are the easiest, quickest, and most concrete symbol of learning. True, they don't represent a perfect picture, but is any system ever perfect? •

At the meeting of the Education Division faculty

this morning, the following recommendation was

made:

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;

The Education Division faculty unanimously agree that the administration should seek ways to finance the College yearbook outside of soliciting donations from the faculty. This practice opens the door to solicitations from all areas, such as the newspaper, theatre , and so on. Facult y do not like to refuse thei r own student s in such a situation , and feel obligate d to contribute. Since the staff has been very generous in supporting all student projects, and the Student Union Building Fund, it is unreasonable to add more *

financial requests.

appreciated.

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*;

Your assistance in this matter will be greatly

Sincerely, Barbara Weigert, Ph.D. Chairperson, Education Division.

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Let's take grades at face value. They are not learning, they merely represent learning, and as such they have their function. But it is a tem- porary function, because only knowledge will ultimately last. So let's be a bit kinder toward grades, lest; our ^ignorance be tobogganed into| nothing, as e.e. cummings wrote.

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Utter To

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The Editor

Kdltor News Kdltor Feature Editor Layout Editor Copy Kdltor > Photographer! Art Editor

Carol Quartuccio

<

4

Olivia Longo

Maryano Crowley Tonv Mancuso

' Susan Barrie

Nancy Wlllfts, Jim Varhof

Darla Malone

n and Creators :

Ftumara, Sue Klodaslcl, Esther 8chreiber

>h. ( hrt* Van Wagenen, Dave Watlln. Pa t H

ofdnaty. m

i

Faculty Consultant

Andy Roth

Dear Editor:

COME

Since the Merciad is the "voice of the Mercyhurst Community," why isn't the space allocated for the newspaper being used adequately? *

I am referring to that cartoon or whatever it is supposed to be that appeared in the last two issues of the Merciad. First of all no one can read it and secondly even if one could, it probably wouldn't make any sense. I feel I am being deprived of more Im- portant information about the school and Its activities with that ridiculous "cartoon" appearing in our newspaper.

Cartoons can be used as an effective weapon of gaining the things the students are striving for, such as a yearbook and more social functions. If these are

WORK FOR A "FIRST CLASS" PAPER

&he MERCJAD is vreaently recruiting staff members for the I 975*76 school year.

ALL positions open.

organizational meeting.

Merctad office, 4 p. m. 304 Old Main.

to be used in the future let them portray the student- CALL Carol Quartuccio at 869*1964 or attend an administration relationship we have.

Thursdays

In.the

u ?etag the editor-in-chief I feel you will correct this problem'' in our next issue.

SEPTEMBER

Coffeehouse

26, 197 5

Presents:

MERCYHURST

COLLEGE

PAGE 3

The Cpffee House Circuit is sending to Mercyhurst a three-man folk-rock group known as "Gunhill Road", Name sound familiar? It

should, mainly due to the fact that they had a Top 40 smash called "Back When My Hair Was Short" and have ap- peared on such national television shows as Midnight Special and American Band-

stand, i 'i

Gunhill Road is a band of three very talented musicians from the New York area. Glenn Leopold, born in Manhattan, is the lead singer and composer of most of the band's material. Along with Glenn, Steve Goldrick and Pdul Reisch Jr. are the other two members of Gunhill Road. Steve knew Glenn, a dynamic keyboard player in nighschooi where they per- formed together at the Bitter End (where the Coffee House originated) in New York, using Glenn's original songs. Paul, the newest member of the group and bass guitarist, connected with Glenn t and Steve through a mutual friend at the Bitter End. From there on, it's history - Gunhill Road was on its way. The group has recorded two albums and five singles and have performed with such artists as Gordon Lightfoot, the Carpenters, Carly Simon, Bette Midler, Poco, Qeorge Carlin, Robert Klein and Bill Haley and the Comets. I Gunhill Road's style of music stresses variety and emphasizes harmony and melody as well as meaningful lyrics. Leopold once said that "I guess if there is any one group that you could say we relate to it's the early Hollies". Their repetoire consists of original songs and renditions or the "golden oldies", like the Beach Boys "Barbara Ann," "Don't Walk Away, Rene" and "The Book of Love". Not only- do they have a talent for music, Glenn, Steve and Paul have a knack for creating a fantastic rapport with their audiences.

j

The Seagull

"Seagull", a different production for the Mercy- hurst Little Theatre contains no Jonathan Livingston

Seagull. On the contrary, it's written by Anton Checkov, a dramatist of the late 1800's. Surprisingly, the play is very comical arid the characters are diverse. For instance, there is Masha, a drunk snuff- sniffer portrayed at Mercy-

hurst by Maripat

Arkadina, an aging actress enacted by Mrs. Mina Eisenberg; Treplev a neurotic writer enacted by John DiGangi; Medvedenko, a boring professor ot something played by Sean Casey; Shamraev portrayed

Rafferty;

bv Glenn Hollenbach who is a court jester; Nina, a sweet budding actress performed bv Mary Ann Rozsas; Dorn, a wise manm full moustache and beard played by Mr.

Peter

Libra;

Trigorin,

a

by Nary Sue Sabol

The

generate from amazing.

enthusiasm

they

is

the stage W

Make a point to catch one (or all) of Gunhill Road's performances at the 'Hurst.

Their shows will be Saturday, September 28,29, and October 1, (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) at 9 and 10 p.m. in the Coffeehouse. Don't miss them - Gunhill Road!!

GUNHNLL

ROAD

What

SAC?

by Roanne Genovese

The Student Activities Committee, more commonly, known as SAC, is a committee of students, working in con- junction with Representative Union of Students (RUS), that helps co-ordinate the social activities on the 'Hurst campus. We need interested students .who are willing to give their time and ideas, and work with the Student Union staff, which^.includes; Frank Sirotnak,; Director, Roanne Genovese, and Bob Gaughan, Assistant! Directors and Kathy Zaffina and Terri Fiurnara, Publicity. The

purpose is for all of us to work together and plan activities in the interest of the student body. Please remember, it is your money, and if you want to see it put to good use, we need your ideas. If you are genuinely interested, please contact one of us in the Student Union Office. If we find that there is enough in-

terest generated

students, we will" hold an organizational meeting, and start} the .ball rolling. Feel free Ho come down to the Union at any time, we are open to all ideas! Thanks! IS

by

the

by Andrea Kupefz

famous writer enacted by Tom Edwards; Pauline, a bothersome wretch played by Delia Mirarchi; Sorin, a habitual hypochondriac performed by John Reed; and Yakov, a "yes man" played by Michael Phillips. So "Seagull" has interesting and unusual characters. It takes place in a utopic atmosphere on a large estate with gardens and wildlife. And for all you seagull lovers, we have one stuffed complete with a tragic theme of two young lovers. Treplev loves Nina who loves someone else. Those bird stuffers l will get you every time. And we hope

"Seagull" will get you right in your laughter and serious zone, because as Mr. Peter Libra often says: "Sailors have more fun!" And so do seagull lovers and seagull stuffers. The performance of

.fei

i *

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ICwiMi' »y

"Seagull" opens October 31 at

the witching Admission

hour

of

is

Free,

8:00.

so

ATTEND and you may even

our

fall

in

love

with * v

"Seagull."

|

Andrea Kupetz rm. 123 McAuley

The

Mercyhurst

English

Clinic is now operating in full swing under the direction of Mrs. Betty Gartner. Hours for the English Clinic has been

established as follows:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 8:30-12;00, 1:00-

4:00p.m.

|

T k^iti'J

Wednesday:

10:00-12:00,

Clinic

is

1:00-2:00 p.m.

The

|

located in Room 308, Main.

English

»

*

mbsh

Hits

Baldwin

by William "Billy" Goafz

On the evening of Thursday, September 17, at 9:00 p.m., the lights in the .front lobby of Mercyhurst's Baldwin Hall went out, the air was filled with the beams of a dozen flashlights and for a period of one hour pandemonium reigned supreme. .Despite outward ap- pearances that suggested that the front lobby might have been the scene of a student riot, this was not the case. What happened in Baldwin Hall was the first semi-public performance of Mercyhurst College's hottest new en- tertainer—Esther Marie Barbra Streisand Marilyn Monroe Schreiber. When Ms. Schrieber came on stage, she was given a rousing welcome by an estimated one hundred fans who had come from as far away as McAuley Hall. The huge crowd had begun to gather nearly half an hour before the concert,tandUhere was considerably competition for the front row seats. This writer ended up being knocked to the floor in the midst of the schuffle for the good seats, the victim of an elbow to the gut by a 92 year old lady who had gotten her guerilla warfare training from the College of Older Americans. Dressed for the occasion in

short,

turquoise

a

gown,

reminiscent of the outfits worn by the late Marilyn Monroe, Ms. Schrieber led off the concert with a smashing rendition of "Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend". ^One of| the more interesting aspects of the entire performance was* that Ms. Schrieber im-1 mediately "became" the person whose song she was* singing—whether it was^ Marilyn Monroe, Barbra Striesand, Gypsy Rose Lee, or Helen Ready. From the first song to the last, Esther had the audience in the palm of her hand.

An obvious audience favorite in the concert was Esther's powerful singing, moving experience in "Proud Mary". Near the end of the concert, the audience urged its repetition as an encore three times! Other highlights

Photo by Nancy Willis "Baldwin Bombshell" Either Marie Schrieber ol Ms. Shreiber's per- formance included a soulful rendition of "The Way We Were", and a Gypsy Rose Lee imitation that drove the audience wild. One male student, identified only by the first name Jay, collapsed and

had to be carried bodily out of the lobby after Ms. Schrieber tossed her blue "wrap", a borrowed bedsheet, to him.

It

is

obvious « from

the

audience reaction to her, that Esther Marie Schrieber is one star who is headed for bigger things. Already, she has been scheduled for her first crack at the big-time—a per- formance in the Mercyhurst Coffeehouse, Friday evening, September 26, at 10:00 p.m. I t is the writer's opinion that this is one show that you'll never forget!

Photo by Nancy Willis Barry Grossman has just

Mercyhurst Political Science prof

undertaken a new endeavor—quite apolitical, but full of spirit. It's called Kick and Barry's Bar and It's located at Pine Avenue and K.

:JHHi street.

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PAGE 4

There

If

still

are students who have not received notification from PHEAA about their third term grant.

contact

these

PHEAA at this address:

some

one of

you are

students, you must

PHEAA SectionB Box 3157.

Harrisburg, Pa. 17105

i-

I

- -

*

l/v There

two

are reasons for the delay:

i

ly PHEAA has not received

;[Basic

Educational

your

Opportunity

eligibility index.

Grant

(BEOG)

H

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

2. PHEAA is not aware that you are ineligible for a BEOG because you attended a post- secondary secondary in- stitution before April, 1973. If you are ineligible for BEOG for this reason, send to

PHEAA

the dates you

at-

tended the post-secondary institution. I 1$

The necessary information must be sent to Harrisburg before October 15, 1975 in

order; to receive the third

term grant!? *•

%*

Besides going

co-ed

this

fall, McAuley Hall has also

obtained ithe existence (of

pleasurable

Mr.

Daniel

0'Conner and his wife Lynda who both presently run the dorm. jDan feels that Mercyhurst itself is a^very friendly college with an; atmosphere that is both relaxing and

entertaining . One J of? th e biggest |differences Mr. O'Conner found ^was \ "that state colleges stick more to the laws especially when it

comes drugs and alcohol." He also feels that if residents wish, to

down to the

use of

by Chris Van Wagcncn

use drugs or even drink, it's their own business, however, when the rights of others are

abused or infringed upon that

1

the line

authority must step in. When asked about how he felt about intervisitation, O'Conner did find two bad things* about jjit. First of all he felt that society wasn't ready for an open dorm especially if they have a daughter that lives a hundred miles Ifrom home." Secondly, he felt that if the dorms were open all day long it might rub some ^roommates the wrong

to

must be drawn and

way, that is, if they had

constantly give up their room.

Photo by Nancy Willis

Dan and Lynda O'Conner

-S

Kight now the McAuley couple is still adjusting to their new way of life. For the past three years, they've been moving around quite a bit. Dan O'Conner is a 1973 graduate of Slippery Rock State College with a degree in environmental studies. In 1974 he was the assistant director of the dorm !at Edinboro whe^e he 'i also taught* at McLane High. I

Dan's

t wife

Lynda

is

presently student teaching at James S. Wilson High in Millcreek. Lynda Will be a graduate early this winter From Edinboro. *| Dan lis teaching with Sr. Maura in the Environmental Studies I Department. He is also Working on a research project wjhich he hopes to develop into an educational tool which could possibly lead to an outside Utfioratpry. 3fp*:

is

working with Mr. David Shimpeno in running the in- tramural football and softball program. i>Dan enjoys basketball immensely and hopes to someday get back into coaching. I It is hoped by both men and women at-McAuley that Dan and >Lynda enjoy their resident life in the dorm.

p* As

sports

Dan

tor.

Inquiring Reporter Asks

SEPTEMBER 26, h 975

Po YouConsider Class Participation In Grading

Si ter

Patricia'*

Whalerif*

Education—"No; it's about 10-

15 per cent of the evaluation, personal study, •which/ is reflected in tests, personal study, teaching in practicum

the

projects^hey^nmike for teaching are considered for the final evaluation."

experiences,

and

in

Mr.

Jeffery

Sternlieb

Psychology —i "No, it's a more important factor in upperclass seminars. In in- troductory courses, it's more straight forwardly based on

tests and papers."

Sr. Gabriel Koch

Mr. James Kinnane. - Law en- forcement— "I appreciate'it .very much, but I do not use it as a basis for grading.".

SWRW

Sister Mary Eymard Poydock - Biology — "Yes, since I teach research, our work is primarily class participation both orally and manually."

Resource Coordinator

In Junefof this year, the Erie Sisters of Mercy elected

Sister Gabriel Koch, R.S.M., their Resource Coordinator. In

this position

personnel within the religious order. She will be part of a three-woman management team for the order, headed by

Sister will take responsibility for finances and

?

Sr. Eustace Taylor and also* involving* Sr. Mary Charles ^

Weschler.

Prior to her election as Resource Coordinator, Sister Gabriel was serving as the director of the Mercy Center on Aging, an organization which she founded in 1974. In past years, Sister Gabriel has also served as the

treasurer of Mercyhurst College. In the 1950's, Sr. served as the faculty advisor to the Me retodin addition to her other

duties.

t

Although she left the Mercyhurst campus several years ago to start the Center on Aging, Sister still stays close to Mercyhurst College and has an active interest in the ac- tivities of the college.

Part 2

How

1

t

Improvei Your Reading Skills

CONTINUE TO BROADEN YOUR VOCABULARY

The -person with a good grasp of words is usually a good reader and a good student. Words are the basis of human communication and

enable people to convey their thoughts and emotions to each other. This is whyfTthe first

child is

word uttered by a

E roof positive that this little eing has the ability to communicate as a human.

you mature. At every grade level, and stage of life, it is necessary to increase the number and understanding of words. !Get to know their structure,; that they are composed pf roots, prefixes and suffixes, each of which has its own definition.

able to analyze its meaning. Always have a dictionary nearby whether you J; are reading for pleasure for for work. When you are reading textbooks or technical books, familiarize yourself with the glossary that is sometimes

printed in the back to define

special

whenever necessary.

words.

Use

it

what you ar e reading. Read with> a purpose, be aware of what you are' reading and why. Your speed should be adjusted to the type of material. Don't expect to whiz through a chapter of biology at the same rate as a chapter of a novel.

depth. As in most writing, each paragraph* usually has one main idea supported by details in whichjjyou may or may not be interested. Try to span as many words as possible with a continuous rhythm of eye movements of fixations. When you read a newspaper or magazine, or mon-fiction,

want" to

grasp

the

details to support the main ideas. Read each chapter for the important concepts and as many details as necessary to comprehend the material. Underline major points and make margin notes to highlight your observations. After you have finished reading, question yourself, review the summary if there is one, and then look back to see if you have understood the material. * Graphic material can help reading % comprehension, not overlook the importance of tables, maps, graphs, drawings , and photographs which are included to rein- force your understanding! of the text. * •& To be Continued next week. The Association of American Publishers will be happy to send you a com- plimentary teopy of "How to improve Your Reading

Skills" and other study skills booklets if you write to: AAP Student Service, One Park Avenue,, New - York, N.Y.

10016

[ Scanning material first can be helpful in nearly all types of reading. Get in the habit of surveying headlines, chapter, headings and subheads first.

Read

carefully the

^Maintain a list of new words you see or hear. Be on the

lookout for

ones! you don't

point of using them in writing or speaking at least twice as soon as you can. At the end of a month review your list and see if you can remember their meanings and how to use them. ADAPT YOUR SPEED SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE MATERIAL I A good reader must learn to balance speed with accuracy. Don't expect to* read everything at the same rate. Like a well-tuned car, your eyes must adapt to the terrain. Above all, you must understand and remember

you

highlights and some details. This kind of # reading is for [eneral information. It differi rom your leisure reading because the material is more serious, not as light or as easy to comprehend as fiction, for example. But it still might not be necessary to take in every

word

completely,

every 5 sentence fe

or

When reading a text first survey the entire book. Look over the table of contents, chapter headlines and subheads. Get an overview of

know. Jot them down, look

Vocabulary should grow as them "up, and then make a

Look for the main ideas. Next you will want to know the important details that sup-

port them

first and last paragraphs which should state the most important facts and con- clusions. You should read the

straight material in between at a faster rate that allows you to understand the matter

in as much depth as you want. Just remember;to keep your

eyes moving forward.^

f

joyment you can shim more easily lover the lines, paragraphs and pages. It is not important that you take in every word or sentence *in

Knowing the origin of words helps in understanding new ones. Most English words derive from Latin or Greek. This is why some knowledge of these languages is helpful. If you know the derivation of a word's parts than you will be

If you are reading for en- the author's objectives by

reading the introduction and

preface.

\

>

Studying requires close reading because you will need to remember more of the

nr :

Do

SEPTEMBER 26. 197*

MERCYHURSTsCOLLEGE

PAGE 5

a short|story by Gerard Necastro

It was not a long road, but a rough and well-traveled one. At this time though, there was

only one traveler on i t He was

w man, about

wearing denim overafis, that 1 had a purple-Stint under the § strong moonlight. Along ^with | this net wore brown heavy 1

boots > and ai checked* sTurt. f Above the shoulders, his hair I was a little yon.Hhe long side* and he wore a thick beard. 1 Generally he was a very neat f person, but this moment was £ an exception. He was rather g untidy, with the dirt from the j road turning his pants brown 9 and the wind blowing through ^ ^

the

phone call and of his wife—

together:: "What if

I told he* not to

Then

he 'thought

of

th6y

meant she

thirty-three, % . d What if she does? I told her

•:

it wouldn't be worth it

. She

couldn't, r I'm right—she

knows il'jn^right. If she did

she's gonna! be -.sorry."

mind

His

in-

the

completely

was

volvedl in his wife and

phone call, i | | l

.What he (wasn't!, thinking was that! she had a mind of her own and that she did not

|S|

always listen to him when she

|

knew she was right. ? |

«As he ran -the road got darker because : the trees lining the road got thicker, letting in less moonlight than at the beginning of the road. But it did not bother him. As a

gallop and moving as though

Farther

down' the

road,

everything became pitch

his hair ; j % ^ |But he did not care what he

looked like, as he ran down I

the road, breathi ng hard.

This road was difficult. It • matter of fact, he started to seemed so because it was not .'j run faster as he thought more

paved 5and had no lighting • about the call. He was in full

except moonlight. Even the '

moonlight! was somewhat y he was possessed.

dim, since fvaried oak and cypress trees lined the way.

To addito his difficulty, the - dark and he could not see the

night was cold and the ai r was f road at all. Although he knew thick, making each breath he ' the road, he occasionally

took a little more threatening. But he was not worried about his breath. t,^ r What was on his mind was the J phone call he had just received. ^It said something % ' about his home. It was not

the hill until he hit a cypress tree. Getting up he was struck

veered to the right until he realized he was off the road. One time , when he ran off the road he tripped over a rock and fell. He rolled down

1

by

a falling branch which left big scar on his back.

clear, but he knew he had to V get there quickly. It was short and abrupt, but most of all, it scared him. It frightened him into running straight out of the meeting without a goodbye. '•,'.;'

a

Additionally there were deep cuts in his wrists and brush- burns over his entire upper body. Blood was flowing from

his wounds, painting his body in red. Sweat coated his body and soaked This clothes, making him look almost as if he had been in water. As the sweat, poured from his wounds, it burned deeply into

them.

Nothing was to stop him; he

ran back onto the road toward his house. He maintained the same maniacal pace he had

|| B

8

|

m

u

kept previously.

1

«About two hundred yards from | his f destination, he noticed a large,|? bright, flickering:light. As he con- tinued his running, the light dominated his thought and he

was puzzled by it . Not until h e reached the*cleared field in which his house stood could he see what it was. - # When he'arrived his feet felt as though they had been pierced. His legs were tired. But they were no bother. His trouble was staring him in the

;

';. He spotted a man dressed in

a

full I circle and ? screamed.

People

looked

responded. •

p*

but

no one

1

- 1 hen two other men in black brought * someone from the house covered on a stretcher. He ran to it and looked under the blanket and cried, "Oh

Lord, forgive me."

it

L

',

Tears ran down* his cheeks as he turned toward the road.

He stared into the night, down the road, with an expression •

of disbelief. •*

He turned his face to the

thick, heavy, black, ^ rub-

bery coat, high boots, and a red helmet and ran to him. He asked him, "What happened,

what's going on?''•&£%

"Ifo'nrob^»us?

rt

^%? jWfil

*He tried to ask a few other s but got no reply. He spun in a

iE% light and stared at it for a long

while** R He darkness.

ran

again Unto * the .

'

*

**-

<•

.

j

Will Overstreet Disappearance

The Search Continues

• *

»

by William Goatz

ajfffcj

N

THIS PAGE IS DEDICATED TO THE CREATIVE SPIRIT OF THE HURST

This week marks the end of the fourth month since Merciad columnist Will Overstreet was last seen alive. In'their con- tinuing efforts to "break the case" in the Over- street disappearance, FBI

agents have asked the Merciad to cooperate by publishing this photo of Overstreet. (Overstreet is in the second row of this group photo, sixth from the left.) Because . the photo is ten years old, Overstreet has. changed

This year the Campus Ministry wants to create opportunities for faculty and students to discuss some basic questions about life. The format will be a "Hot Seat" where prominent members of the college community answer questions from the audience in Press Conference fashion. The idea for the format was inspired by j a quote from William Sloane Coffin, the chaplain at Yale University. He says: "I am tryipg very hard now to

find two or three professors at Yale who will go public with

'You know

their hurt and say,

it is really terrible that in our vocational lives we have to disown important parts of our being; that we are more deep, we are j more spiritual j and

slightly in appearance, and is today 'somewhat shorter than he was in the

photo. Incidentally, this photo is one taken by the Bay Village, Ohio Police Department, following their mass arrest of a third grade class from Saint Raphael's grade school in 1965. It seems that young Will Over- street had been the ring- leader in a student revolt among the third graders

that

sacking and burning of a

resulted

in

the

Good Humor truck which had been stationed on the St. Raphael playground. For his role in the riot, Overstreet was given a nine year sentence, served out in various institutions of "lower learning". Following parole in 1974, Overstreet came to Mercyhurst. If anyone should sight a man bearing a resem- blance to Will Overstreet, they are urged to contact the special agents at QZ 2- 3598. This could be the "break" the FBI needs!

Hot Seat

by David Blanchfield

more caring in our family and personal lives that we are in our classrooms. What are the pressures that make us do this?' "

We

are

not

political science department and Fr . Guy Patrick from the Campus Ministry office. These two colorful but respected members of the college community are both clear and articulate thinkers. Barry is especially noted for his interest in questions of law and civil rights while Fr. Guy is a frequently requested speaker at religious and civic [atherings. Both men have :een senses of humor which should add laughter to * the

evening

.

$fr;'

*

±A

-

v

:

C:i

{

two men a littl e better . I t may even give your mind a work

out.

-• »*

•::.^ ; ;^ l^y

asking our

volunteers for the hot seat to go public with their hurt. What we are asking is that they be willing to answer questions about their political view, educational philosophy, religious views, values, and other topics that. might- in- terest the listeners. The only rules are that the person on the-jhot seat may both pass over any particular question

and terminate the interview

p.m. in "the faculty lounge. at any time. ^ $k*&%i?^*j$f. Come and get to know these

The hot seat will take place Tuesday night Sept. 30 at 7

Our first two volunteers are Dr. Barry Grossman of the

*

PAGE

6 »

-.«

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

SEPTEMBER 26, 1975

Career Opportunities

!?:•••*$ - v #••

&£&$£:

->-v.---

"«p- ,

•*-

N

.

v'-.*

-

**•'-?•

>

-"

,**;*

"

~

-

.•<tt«£8&*»

v.:;?"-" •>'••:%;•

^

The booklet, (< Grants for Graduate Study Abroad" is available in the]Career Planning & f Placement

Center.

A Recruiter from Colgate University will be on campus October 15,1975 to discuss the Teaching Intern Program offered at Colgate. This discussion is open to both men and women in the fields of English, Mathematics, Science, Social

point index of 3.0 in relevant under-graduate major is required. In the selection of candidates, consideration is given itol the candidates academic background, work experience, and potential for successful completion of the degree program. The ap- plicant should have taken undergraduate courses in economics, state and local government, sociology, and statistics prior to admission for degree candidacy. J|v

Applicants not meeting thes e backgroun d requirements jmay be ac- cepted subject to satisfactory completion of prerequisites during therfirst yea#of study. Applicants must submit scores on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business or the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination administered by the Educational Testing Service. More information on

I

Studies, | French-Spanish. Adequate undergraduate preparation in liberal arts subjects relevant! to the teaching field is necessary. Previous courses £ in Education and practice teaching is not necessary, but candidates with such ex- perience will| be accepted if other qualifications are met. Good fundergraduate record and earnest desire to teach are essential. NOT OPEN TO EXPERIENCED * i TEACH- ERS. ,, M" 1 1 f Each intern receives a minimum! salary of $3,200.•% NDEA and state loans are available. | Substantial scholarship and {loan funds also are available.

This J! teaching

interna

nj&MSHn^^OT *^^m m

^

Photo by Nancy Willis

m

The staff of the Career Planning Center is always ready to help students.

v

Pave The

in

variet y

of,

a

experiences

in the

Career Planning And Placement

Helping

The Child Development Laboratory, Division ofHome Economics, offers increased

opportunities for students and faculty to observe, work with, or conduct research with preschool childrenHhis year. Under the supervision of Head Teacher, Karen Buck,

ticipat e learning

36 children aged 3 to 5^ par-

Florid a Biology. ?

Please

the

\

Graduate

Record

Way

Examinationj(GRE)r etc., is

available

Planning

Center, m'

Listed below are the dates and addresses for the P.A.C.E. Exam*. Applications may be obtained at the CPC,

in

and

the

Career

Placement

i

%

September 27 - 9:00 a.m. Federal Building, Room 4. November 18 - 1:00 Ip.m.

Edinboro fG-13

Hendricks

Hall.

January

21

9:00

a.m.

a.m.

- Mercyhurst ollege, 114 Zurn. -

February

18

9:00

Mercyhurst College, 114 Zurn. *March 2|- 1:00 p.m. Edin- boro G-13, Hendricks Hall

(tentative), f

(tentative). |

If

|

April 17 - 9:00 a.m. Gannon

j

ft

t

May 15 - 9:00 a.m. Gannon *

College (tentative)*"f ~

meeting between 1:00 ana 4:00 - fall, winter and spring terms. The,-preschoolers who participate! in the ^program are children of people at Mercyhurst and children of people from the Erie com- munity. The afternoon session includes two Vietnamese children whose parents want them to learn to speak English.

Observers are welcome to come in»the rooms with the children. For thse who do not want the children to see them, a complete closed circuit TV system lis available, with a monitor located out of the children's view. The closed circuit TV is also used to make tapes for - child development classes, for parent education sessions, and for student teacher self- evaluation. If you have a special talent or skill, *you are invited to share'-it | with the children. Art, music, dance, social work, psychology and home economics majors may be pafticulary "interestediUn carrying out course projects

special facilities located on the ground! floor of Baldwin Hall. The sessions are con-

ducted

each

Monday,

and

Tuesday,

Friday,

and

the

Thursday,

the

morning

group Held from 8:30 to 11:30,

with

afternoon! children

program provides: A

MASTER OF W ARTS! 204-Main. m. £ |

DEGREE . I CER-

TIFICATION FOR 5 HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING!; . GRADUATE LEVEL STUDY IN YOUR MAJOR FIELD

OPPORTUNITY

SCHOLARLY |

AND

REALISTIC PAID TEACHING * EXPERIENCE! IN A HIGH SCHOOL SUBSTANIAL SCHOLAR- SHIP AND LOAN FUNDS.

FOR

INTERSESSION

RESEARCH

INDEPENDEN T

Marin e

Classes will be held every Wednesdays at 1 in Zurn Room 114.

p.m. These f hours will be considered toward the 40 hours required ifor the

contact'

Eymard before nesday, October 1, are Interested.f

Interested students may

up

forJuthei Colgate

University Recruiter at the Career ^ Planning and Placement Center, 204-Main.

Washington

sign

course

Expands

George

University, Washington, D. C.

is

offering

Graduate

and

a

Program

in

Urban

Regional Planning. Urban and

Regional

planning

Program

The concept* of Placement has taken on a new image at Mercyhurst College?! When Mercyhurst College went co-

educational in!1969, the type of student and job placement went from the teaching profession into the job markets of accountants, lawyers, home economists,

en-

scientists

and

law

forcement officers.

The fact that the Placement Office helps students plan their careers in their Fresh- man year has changed! its image to Career Planning and Placement Center.

The Career Planning and Placement Center Offices are

located on the second floor of Old Main in rooms 204, 205, and 207. For those students using the Placement Center it is not an employment agency. It does not charge fees; it does I not guarantee placement. Its function is*to help students uncover op- portunities! and career

alternatives.

I

I

THE SERVICES OF THE CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT CENTER^

The services at the Career Planning and Placement Center are available free of charge, to underclassmen and seniors.?

A

major

ft

service

of

the

isp

concerned with the forces that influence , the growth and development of cities and regions, the formulation of plans and policies to meet the needs of people who comprise an urban society, and the actual achievement of the goals and objectives to which plans land policies are directed. The? number of regional land metropolitan planning agencies is in- creasing rapidly, and there is

l a great shortage of qualified ^professional planners to fill

^responsible positions at

with: self-awareness, the changing job |*market, the major-minor option which makes a student imore flexible upon graduation, necessity of lifelong learning. The Center also sends out folders of credentials^ for all candidates |who make a WRITTEN request. The credentials are useful when applying* for a job as well as graduate school. The Placement Office^tries to bring as many employers as possible to the campus to recruit graduating seniors. Seniors are advised^ to take advantage of this service. Postings of the recruiters coming to campus may be found on Placement Bulletin Boards, the Career Planning and Placement Newsletter, and the Merciad,, as well as simply checking with the Placement Office.

service

Office is career planning. The Director of Career Planning, Gary Bukowski, is available to students who - have questions relating fto their career plans and aspirations. Subjects often dealt with include: What opportunities are open to me if I major in a certain curriculum? Does the career^ I am interested in require graduate study? What are the opportunities open to me|in certain cities with my major? What han- pens in a job interview?

Providing information to the students is another part of the Career 1Planning and Placement Center. Mr. Bukowski visits with people of all professions, gathering information about ^the world of work in all facets. Any full-time jobs un- covered are listed in the Career Planning and Placement Newsletter, which is published twice-monthly. The newslette r i s maile d to al l Seniors and those alumni who request it.

The

Career

Library,

located in room 204 Old Main, is another way of gathering information. Here the students have access to various books, pamphlets, and magazines dealing with a variety of careers. •£

1

Another service provided is

^Career Planning meetings •which all students are invited to attend.^The meetings deal

in I the

Lab.

1.

Child ^Development

f

term)

t

Students in any major who wish a more in-depth study of young children should con- sider these courses: i

Childhood

Programs -theory I of

early \ childhood

f

Early

(winter

education

-methods of teaching young

children

m

I

-observation in various preschools and day care centers.

2.

Early |

Childhood

term)

Laboratory

(spring

CDL

HDFR S$ p -practicu m in th e

-curriculum > planning

teaching-recording dren's development -self-evaluation^

videotape.

|

all

levels of government and' in private consulting practice. The School of Government and Business Administration offers graduate study in urban and regional planning leading to the professsional degree of faster of Urban and Regional Planning. Urban and regional planning can be electedalso (1) as a field of study toward the degrees of Master ~; of Public Administration, Master of Arts in Government, Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Public Administration; and (2) as an area of concentration in other advancedfdegrees. Qualified student s may jpursu e a four - year program | of« study leading to degrees in both planning and law. <; i A Bachelors degree from an accredited? college» or university with a quality-

and

chil-

via

Another

is part-

time employment, ^which is

Mercyhurst

students| Part-time positions are listed on two bulletin '

the Office and |the

to

all

open

boards—one

Placement

near

other is located in the Student Union. From l there, the students should go the Career

Library^

formation.

for

more in-

Another feature of the Child Development Laboratory this year will be classes for ex- ceptional children conducted^ on Saturday morning by the Council on Exceptional Children.? g To arrange for observation

in

the

CDL, tstudents

of

faculty

should

contact* Ms.

\

Buck or Rosemary Blieszner,

Director, both at ext. 278. For more information about the CEC program , contac t &iiee n Del Sordo or Brian McHugh,

ext. 236.

"*t

fe- The members of the Career

Planning and | Placement Center are here to help you; stop by and let your em- ployment needs be known.

*•

^

SEPTEMBER 26, 1975

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

PAGE 7

Men Lunches And Dinners

\

I Friday, September 26

\

Lunch: Grilled Ham land Cheese, Tuna Noodle Casserole,^Shepherds Pie, Sandwich Bar. Dinner: RoastfTurkey with Dressing, Fried Fish, Pizza** ?

M*

Saturday, September 27

Lunch : Ho t Dog wit h Bake d Beans , Spanis h Rice, Scrambled Eggs. Dinner: Steak, Shrimp, Whoppers.

Sunday, September28 Brunch: Scrambled Eggs, Home Fries, Sandwich Bar. Dinner .v Baked Ham with French Fries,

Baked Chicken, Spanish Omlet.

|||f|| y

Monday, September29 Lunch: Sloppy Joes with French^ Fries,

Baked Noodle Casserole, Julienne

fSalad Bowl.

Dinner: Roast Beef, Pasta,

with French Fries.

|

Hamburger

|

-.

Tuesday,

September

30

Lunch*: Hot Turkey Sandwich, Beef Biscuit Roll, Fruit Salad Plate, i Dinner: Baked Meatloaf, Breaded Fish, Hoagies and Chips. Wednesday, October 1 Lunch :*. B.B.Q. Beef, Turkey Goulash,

French Toast.

Grilled

]

Dinner:

Chopped

Steak,

Polish

Sausage, Italian Meatball Sandwich.

i

Thursday,

October 2

Lunch: Spaghetti, Toasted Cheese and Tom Sandwiches, Tuna Salad Plate. Dinner: Chicken, Chop Suey, Hot Ham and

Cheese with French Fries. 3

i

INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL

Standings

Won.

.Loss., Tie

Shimpeno

Squad

Kicks Off

-

Soul On Ice Ticklers £ Relatively High Kringo's Kids Mother Truckers The Stoned Ranger s The Famil y 3 Ten Rats

by Chris Van Wagenen

Coach David Shimpeno may have a long road ahead of him with his new soccer team but if anyone could make the sport work at the 'Hurst, Shimpeno certainly has all the qualifications. On Monday, September 22nd the newly formed Mercyhurst Soccer Club bowed out to a terribly overpowering Behrend College 12-0. f One member of the team, Edlnscho, commented that

44 the team looked real well for the^first 10 minutes of play, but they got tired out after that and were not sticking to their zones." Another member, Jim Riley, felt that the team still has to condition itself for all the running they

have to do.

* Some of the standouts were

Jose Moguel, Bob Curtis and Jim Riley. All three of them handled themselves very well with some excellent foot work. Inscho hopes that the school will make it into a varsity sport. It is anticipated by ? most that if money was invested in the sport that the students involved would devote more time to the sport.

Coach Shimpeno was formerly an All-American at the University of Pittsburgh.

Righ t now ther e appear s t o b e an awful lot of interest shown by the players that are on the team. At this point of course the Mercyhurst Soccer Club is just what it says, it's a club but: in time, hopefully someday, it will ^become a

varsity sport.

?

Wanted:

Members

young children in the^Erie

£ membershi p

categories and benefits are:

publications for the year. •?

3. Student - $2.00 - NPAEYC Newsletter - participation in local activities. i ij For additional information and a membershhip form, contact Pamela Whipple, 18 Norman Way, Erie, Pa. 16508.

Students and faculty in- terested in early childhood education are encouraged to join the local affiliate of the Natibnal Association for the Education of Young Children. The Northwest Pennyslvania AEYC was|organized to help students, teachers of children in preschooll through third grade, and college faculty develo p increase d professional competence in working with children, and to help improve services for

community.

I The

1.

Regular - $13.00 - NAEYC

|

eligibility for holding

office

§|

r,

#

|

Journal. * "Young Children" NPAEYC Newsletter Professional growth

seminars-workshops;

Voting rights and

%

Women's! Varsity Tennis

2.5 Comprehensive - all of above $35.00 all new NAEYC

Ch

Headers

With? basketball season right around the corner, it's almost time to introduce the 1975-76 Laker cheerleaders. This year three juniors constitute the veterans of the squad. They are Cindy Bartolo, Debbie Duda, and Judy Mahony. They have been on the squad three years and if I their. faces aren't familar, their mouths should be. Cindy is from Greenville, Pa. and is alBusiness Major. Debbie is from Oil City, with a double major in Home Ec. and Social Work. Judy, from North East, Pa , is majoring

in Biology, i

| L

Up from the JV sguad are

Nestor

and

Cindy

Patty

Bvham. Patty is a sophomore Art major from Fairlawn N.J., I and Cindy is from Meadville, Pa. majoring in Education. A newcomer to the squad is Pam Conte from Sfonroeville, Pa, also a sophomore majoring in psychology. Their advisor this year is Mr. Edward Gallagher , who ha s prove d t o be a great help. JD

Each year it seems the squad has improved a little more. This year's squad has a

lot of potential and should be

one of th e best .

f

Financial troubles seem to be the current tune inj the

Mercyhurst Top ten. The cheerleaders! budget was eliminated for thig year, however, it has been rumored that promises have been made to try and restore it. % | The possibility of a party is "brewing" just in case the rumor proves to be untrue. So shine up your mugs andjwish them good luck. * I Practices have already started and they're raring to go. Ar^y upperclassmen and transfers, that is sophomores, juniors, and seniors, in- terested in cheering this year, come to a meeting at 4:00 Sunda y i n Webe r Hall . And fo r the rest of the campus- hope to see you at that first game, November 28 and 29, when th e Erie Classic will again be held at the Erie County Fieldhouse. Let's show some

new

season!

support for a new

Since the firsts week of

school, the Women's Varsity

Tennis

Team

has

been

in

preparation for the upcoming season. In the past the women have played a split season with matches during both fall and spring term. Alongi with the new season the girls are working with a new coach , Lynn Aldrich. Lynn Aldrich•> obtained her BA in Physical Education from Slippery e Rock, and along with coaching the women's tennis team she also teaches) Physical Education

in theEriePublic Schools. The tennis team consists of

Support your soccer team.

Soccer game at

Edinboro, 4 p.m. Monday

two girls who returned to the :eam from last year, Rose Ann Bauer - Junior and Jan e

Kerstetter - Sophomore.

$

Rose Ann and Jane ar e the 20-captains, with the remainder of "the team composed ofl Paula Pizzat, Mar y Ann King , Cind y Casali ,

Renne Fischer, Julie Collins, and Donna Walker, manager.

The

team,

along

with

Coach Aldrich and Miss Price

are looking forward

to

a

successful season. The support of the Mercyhurst community would be greatly appreciated.

Women's Varsity Tennis Fall7 5

September

20

- Saturday

23

- Tuesday

25

- Thursday

27

- Saturday

29

- Monday

October 1 - Wednesday 4 - Saturday 7-Tuesday '& 9 - Thursday

13

- Monday

14

- Tuesday

16

- Thursday

12

- Sunday

21

- Tuesday

Slippery Rock Invitational

Villa

Grove Ci ty

|

f

Clarion

Gannon

Edinboro Behrend Gannon Clarion Allegheny Behrend Edinboro Mercyhurst Invitational Tennis

Villa FM

MEET ME AT

6:80

4:00 p.m. 8:00 (4-2) 4:00p.m. 3:30 (4-3) 1:00 p.m. 12:30 (4-3) 4:00p.m. 3:30 (4-2)

4:00p.m. 3:30 (6-3) 1:00 p.m. 12:15(6-3 4:00p.m. 3:00 (6-4) 4:00 p.m. 1:15(4-3) 3:30p.m. 2:00 (3-2)

3:00 p.m. 3:00 (6-8) 4:45 p.m. 4:15 (6-3)

# 5

4:00 p.m. 3:30 (4-2)

8:30a.m. 8:30

3619 McClelland Ave and 38th St. Phone 899-0208

PAGE 8

MERCYHURST

COLLEGE

SEPTEMBER 26 , 197 5

by Chris Van Wagcncn

r'Here comes that rainy day feeling again." When the Fortunes'sang that isong a while back they must have had dreary Erie in mind. I, like anyone else, would enjoy some sunny afternoon to sit down and view one fof 'th e 'Hurst's many sporting events such as baseball. Well, as September nears its end, I

still await opening day only to find the pitter patter of a drizzling rain cloud on an empty Tullio baseball field,J did, however, between sunny skies and (tempering spirits, manage to create this ipoor excuse for a poem'for Joe Cook and his squad. | | .3

44

A drop of water so fresh and sweetf

*&

&m

• * •

Yp!

*

f

e

has stopped Cook's FleetX

They practice hard on sunny days but come game time they're washed away.

Maybe some month maybe some day '&&!('

the Laker team will hopefully play. And pla y the y will with bat and ball

I only hope

?

that rain don't fall,"

J

In other news, the Mercy- hurst soccer team managed to get bombarded by Behrend College 12-0. Part of the reason of thisfgreat humiliation is that the team lacks conditioning.

Frank Sands and Crew continue to prepare for the upcoming season that is just around the bend. Frank's problems have ranged from launches that fail to start to girls that walk a mile. All in all though, you've got to give Frank credit; he at least has patience going his way. ; ^ Women's Volleyball and the men's hockey club are about

to get underway.

both sports will shed a little •

Hopefully

sunshine. !

by Terri Fiumara

Miss%rice, director of women's athletics, reports an increase in the 1975-76 women's athletic budget. Although $3,500 has been budgeted, more money is needed to pay for the higher costs of officials, better uniforms the;girls so rightfully deserve and to make the traveling much easier and more comfortable. At this time no athletic scholar- ships are given to the women of Mercyhurst. fhis will be the next major and most'important aspect added to the women's athletic program. W J I Three new coaches have been added to the staff this

year. Of the $3,500, $1,000 is going for the salaries of these coaches. Miss Price has expressed a deep desire for the

cooperation of-'the administration! and

the students to

make the women's athletic program an important part of

the

i

MJ<- I

i

off

Wednesday $with relatively High and Soul on Ice coming away with victories.

the ad-

it

Fla g

football

kicked

Smoker

Jones

found

difficulty making

justment, after four years of

varsity

basketball,

to

flag

football. On one play, he caught a pass} from his brother Chas, found himself one?on one, dnbbledm down

the field,

and

made

a

beautiful', hook shot (Even Dick Fox would have been proud of it.) The alert referee, however, caught this and) called Smoker for ^traveling. SouH on Ice had another touchdown called back when Chas. a former lettermen in baseball, caught a touchdown pass from Smoker with his outfielders |glove. These tactics thoroughly confused The Family,^and| desbite two touchdown passes from Pat

Condrin, lost to the Icemen 25-

12.

-

%

f The' second game

of

the

afternoon had the Ten Rats going againsth Relatively High, the latter team winning the contest 13-7. Craig Sampsell, trying to disprove those rumors that he was all washed up, didn't flounder up at fall. He and Chipmunk:

Downey provided the offense, while Bruce Fenstermacher steadied the defense, they were all overshadowed by Gumsy Dillon's defensive play (or offensive, depending on how you look at it) of the game. As Jim Riley wa£

running

Gumsy

for fa

touchdown

be

but

pants

-appeared

to

his iflag,

^grabbing,* for

came up with*Jim's

f.

"instead. Riley triedlto cover

upihis personal area, and in doing so, fumbled the ball. Relatively High recovered it and stopped a potential Rat

scored

^hat wasn't the end of it After the play, a band of wild eyed vigilantes, apprehended Jim right Ion the spot, claiming they were making a citizen's arrest on the grounds that he was streaking. I'm not quite sure, but I think I heard Riley say, as they led \him away, "How many times do I have to tell you, my first name isn't Jack!" -m

by Scoff Parson

The 'Hurst on their up- coming fall trip will be two men short because of a league ruling on transfer students. The team will be without the services of All-America Martin Sturgess and Finnish Davis Cupper Reijol Fuer- mola. Thankfully these members become eligible for *

Even without the two best players, on paper the 'Hurst still looks awfully tough. What made this team number five in the nation last year was not one or two *• great players, but a teamjthat was very close in ability from the number one position all the way down to number six. No one on this team constitues an easy win for the opposition. John Voikos will definitely be leading the 'Hurst into action this year.; His im- proved physical condition and attitude will make John, who was an All-America

Spring play. %

Honorable Mention last year, an even greater threat this year. John will definitely be at the number one position. The other positions have not been determined as yet, because of. th e closeness of ability. More than likely though uppperclassmen Jack Daly, Kari Pesonon and Scott Parsons will be playing in the middle positions. Both fresh- men Alan Colbertson and Phi l Dubsky will be rounding out the fall roster #*&* f

*

v

One thing for sure is, the team is no ipushover. My personal impression is, that this' fall's squad was better than the total of last year's team. Not only in ability but attitude. The players that are

here this year want to do just that, play. If the team can do well without the two best

the

championships in Kansas City become even more tangible.

players,

\ national

The Rats, in order to spruce up their image, have hired Gail- Bechtold, Elisa Guida and Linda Pazar as cheerleaders. The salaries haven't been disclosed, but Elisa is asking for a pound'of Velveeta Cheese per game. They'll be dressed in little mousekateer outfits. Mike Diaco, spokesmen for the Rats, said they tried to get Annette Funicello to T)e captain of their cheerleading squad, but he found she has varicose h veins and falling arches. Saturday's game had the Kringo Kids derailing the Mother Truckers 34-20. Glenn

"Errol

Flynn'

Caruso \ was

t

most impressive,.leading the Kids to victory. Hearing that a scouting team would be at the game, he refused to run the ball on the left side of the field because.it didn't show

off his best profile. After the game, Glenn was courageous enough to sign autographs for his fans and teammates. The Kringo Kids did suffer from slight injuries, though these weren't caused by the TruckersJJohn Ball is their fellow/teammate and part- :ime court jester., John said

by Joe "Snides" Snyder

I

WVW

he did an experiment for his Biology class. Frank "Slim" Garwol was the lone star to shine for the Truckers scoring eight points on a pass and safety. Frank attributes his success to| |Dr. ferwin Stillman's water diet. Following tl\is diet, Frank said he lost up to 27 ounces in the past four months. Frank feels .this weight* loss has given him extra quickness and mobility. The Stoned Rangers were shut out* by the French Ticklers *38-0. The Ticklers were sparked to:victory by Charlie "Hands" Rufo and "Connie" Curtis. Charley

>-',

Photo by Nancy Willis

accredited his success to a new way of staying in shape . After each touchdown:

Charley is tackled ana molested by 22 members of the**'Hands" Rufo fan club. Charley shrugs it off and calls it part of his vigorous training procedures.: for football. The Stoned Rangers blamed their loss on the fact that their game planjwas accidentally destroyed *in a fire. The captain explained that%the game strategy was written on E-Z Widers and were unknowingly smoked before the game. To, rectify this problem, the Rangers, in the future, will use pipes only.

\

One.out of every three Marine Corps officers j is in aviation. And we're looking for more good men to joi n them. Men who wil l fly some of the world's most exciting aircraft, as f members of the world's finest air-ground team. If you're in college now, look into our PLC-Aviation program. There's no better time—and no better way—to get started J

THE MARINES ARE LOOKING I FOR A FEW GOOD MEN. i \

MERCYHURST STUDENTS: LEARN WHAT YOU CAN GET PROM THE MARINE CORPS-SEE THE MARINE CORPS REPRESENTATIVES AT THE ZURN FOYER ON 2$ & 26 SEPTEMBER 1975 FROM 9:00 A.M. TO UO0 F.M. OR CALL 2l6-5224i268 (COLLECT) FPR MORE INFO.

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