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Course Introduction P.L. Patrick Rau, Ph.D. Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics Department of Industrial
Course Introduction
P.L. Patrick Rau, Ph.D.
Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics
Department of Industrial Engineering
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China
Definition of Ergonomics Ergon: work or activity (Greek) Nomos: control, order, or law (Greek) Ergonomics

Definition of Ergonomics

Ergon: work or activity (Greek) Nomos: control, order, or law (Greek) Ergonomics (Human Factors):

The scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance Focuses on human beings and their interaction with products, facilities, procedures, environments used in work and everyday living

Domains of specialization: Physical Ergonomics Physical Ergonomics is concerned with human anatomical, anthropometric,

Domains of specialization: Physical Ergonomics

Physical Ergonomics is concerned with human anatomical, anthropometric, physiological and biomechanical characteristics as they relate to physical activity. (Relevant topics include working postures, materials handling, repetitive movements, work related musculoskeletal disorders, workplace layout, safety and health.)

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Ergonomics and Work Organization Objectives: Conduct state-of-the-art Ergonomics research in engineering, design,

Ergonomics and Work Organization

Objectives:

Conduct state-of-the-art Ergonomics research in engineering, design, information technology, and the behavioral and social sciences Apply technology and knowledge creatively to shape the future Teamwork and manage a research project

social sciences Apply technology and knowledge creatively to shape the future Teamwork and manage a research
shape the future Teamwork and manage a research project Domains of specialization: Cognitive Ergonomics
Domains of specialization: Cognitive Ergonomics Cognitive Ergonomics is concerned with mental processes, such as

Domains of specialization:

Cognitive Ergonomics

Cognitive Ergonomics is concerned with mental processes, such as perception, memory, reasoning, and motor response, as they affect interactions among humans and other elements of a system. (Relevant topics include mental workload, decision-making, skilled performance, human-computer interaction, human reliability, work stress and training as these may relate to human-system design.)

Domains of specialization: Organizational Ergonomics Organizational ergonomics is concerned with the optimization of

Domains of specialization:

Organizational Ergonomics

Organizational ergonomics is concerned with the optimization of sociotechnical systems, including their organizational structures, policies, and processes.

Early History of Ergonomics Ergonomics was first used by Wojciech Jastrzebowski in a Polish newspaper

Early History of Ergonomics

Ergonomics was first used by Wojciech Jastrzebowski in a Polish newspaper in 1857 Ramazzini (1713) published a book, The Diseases of Workers LaMettrie’s controversial book L’homme Machine was published in 1748

A period of rapid growth(1960-1980) @ (pharmaceuticals,computers,automobiles,and other consumer products) industry began

A period of rapid growth(1960-1980)

@ (pharmaceuticals,computers,automobiles,and other consumer products) industry began to recognize the importance and contribution of human factors to the design of both workplace and products manufactured there.

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Domains of specialization: Relevant topics include communication, crew resource management, work design, design of working

Domains of specialization:

Relevant topics

include communication, crew resource management, work design, design of working times, teamwork, participatory design, community ergonomics, cooperative work, new work paradigms, virtual organizations, telework, and quality management.

A history of Ergonomics (Human Factors) Early history (early 1900s----) @ motion study and shop

A history of Ergonomics (Human Factors)

Early history (early 1900s----)

@ motion study and shop management

@ Gilbreth

@ focus on fitting the person to the job by selecting and training

Birth of the profession(1945--1960)

@ the ergonomics research society was formed in Britain

@ the first book on human factors was published, entitled Applied experimental psychology: human factors in engineering design (Chapanis, Garner, and Morgan,

1949)

@ focus on fitting the equipment to the person

@ concentrated in the military-industrial complex

Computers, disasters, and litigation(1980-1990) @ new challenge:ergonomically designed computer equipment,user-friendly

Computers, disasters, and litigation(1980-1990)

@ new challenge:ergonomically designed computer equipment,user-friendly software,and human factors in the office

@ inadequate attention to human factors considerations

@ incident at Three Mile Island nuclear power

@ leak of MIC at the Union Carbide pesticide plant in India

@ explosion and fire at the Chernobyl nuclear power

@ litigations of product liability and personal injury

@ expert(15% of human factors society members) witnesses for explaining human behavior and expectations,defining issues of defective design, and assessing the effectiveness of warnings and instructions.

1990 and beyond permanent space station computers and the applications of computer technology formulate ergonomic

1990 and beyond

permanent space station

computers and the applications of computer technology

formulate ergonomic regulations for general industry

improve aviation safety

design of medical devices

design of products and facilities for the elderly judge of football games

China

introduced--1930s

engineering psychology research--1960s

establishment of standardized technology committee of Chinese

ergonomics--1980

Chinese ergonomics society--1989

Where are Human Factors Specialists? Principal area of human factors specialists working in various area

Where are Human Factors Specialists?

Principal area of human factors specialists working in various area of work

Principal area of work

Percentage of respondents

Computers

22

Aerospace

22

Industrial processes

17

Health and safety

9

Communication

8

Transportation

5

other

17

Founding Year of Some IEA Member Societies Belgian Ergonomics Society, 1989, 142 Chinese Ergonomics Society,

Founding Year of Some IEA Member Societies

Belgian Ergonomics Society, 1989, 142 Chinese Ergonomics Society, 1989, 450 Ergonomics Society, 1949, 1164 Ergonomics Society of Korea, 1982, 219 HFES, 1957, 5187 HF Association of Canada, 1968, 623 Japan Ergonomics Research Society, 1964, 2052 Russian Ergonomics Association, 1989, 625

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psychology engineering 1% 2% human factors 9% 3% 3% medicine,physiology,li fe sciences 3% education 50%
psychology
engineering
1%
2%
human factors
9%
3%
3%
medicine,physiology,li
fe sciences
3%
education
50%
8%
industrial design
21%
business
administration
Background analysis of
American human factors
society
computer science
other
Ergonomics Organizations IEA http://www.iea.cc/ HFES http://www.hfes.org/web/Default.aspx China Ergonomics Society

Ergonomics Organizations

IEA http://www.iea.cc/

HFES http://www.hfes.org/web/Default.aspx

China Ergonomics Society http://www.cesbj.org/

GESELLSCHAFT FÜR

ARBEITSWISSENSCHAFT (GFA)

www.gfa-online.de

Why Ergonomics in China? To improve quality of life for people in China by designing

Why Ergonomics in China?

To improve quality of life for people in China by designing effective, usable, and enjoyable experiences with technology We commit ourselves to the strengthening and development of Ergonomics in China

enjoyable experiences with technology We commit ourselves to the strengthening and development of Ergonomics in China
enjoyable experiences with technology We commit ourselves to the strengthening and development of Ergonomics in China
Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics Dr. Gavriel Salvendy Dr. P.L. Patrick Rau Dr. Zhizhong

Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics

Dr. Gavriel Salvendy Dr. P.L. Patrick Rau Dr. Zhizhong Li Dr. Wei Zhang Dr. Ruifeng Yu Dr. Pilsung Choe Dr. Qin Gao Dr. Liang Ma Grad students: about 15 PhD and about 40 Master’s students

Dr. Ruifeng Yu Dr. Pilsung Choe Dr. Qin Gao Dr. Liang Ma Grad students: about 15
What is HCI? HCI involves the design, implementation and evaluation of interactive system, in the
What is HCI? HCI involves the design, implementation and evaluation of interactive system, in the

What is HCI?

What is HCI? HCI involves the design, implementation and evaluation of interactive system, in the context

HCI involves the design, implementation and evaluation of interactive system, in the context of the user’s task and work User means in individual user, a group of users, or users in an organization Computer means any technology ranging from PC, large-scale system, or an embedded system Interaction means any communication between a user and computer, directly or indirectly

More about HCI Only for a little over a decade Roots in established disciplines like
More about HCI Only for a little over a decade Roots in established disciplines like

More about HCI

More about HCI Only for a little over a decade Roots in established disciplines like Ergonomics

Only for a little over a decade Roots in established disciplines like Ergonomics Used to be Man-Machine Interaction Development of information technology Concerning with user performance in the context of any system, whether computer, mechanical or manual

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FOUNDATIONS OF HCI

P.L. Patrick Rau, Ph.D. Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics Department of Industrial Engineering

Tsinghua University

Beijing, China

Models of Interaction

Tsinghua University Beijing, China Models of Interaction The interaction framework presentation O observation S
Tsinghua University Beijing, China Models of Interaction The interaction framework presentation O observation S
The interaction framework presentation O observation S U Core Task articulation performance I
The interaction framework
presentation
O
observation
S
U
Core
Task
articulation
performance
I
HCI is a new research field Design and evaluation of computing systems for human being
HCI is a new research field Design and evaluation of computing systems for human being

HCI is a new research field

HCI is a new research field Design and evaluation of computing systems for human being users

Design and evaluation of computing systems for human being users 50+ conferences; over 60,000 specialists; 100+ books; 400+ journal papers; 3000+ research results

Goals of HCI Profession

Goals of HCI Profession Influencing academic and industrial researchers Reduced anxiety and fear of computer usage
Goals of HCI Profession Influencing academic and industrial researchers Reduced anxiety and fear of computer usage

Influencing academic and industrial researchers

Reduced anxiety and fear of computer usage Graceful evolution Direct manipulation Online assistance Information exploration

Providing tools, techniques, and knowledge for systems implementers

How did everything start? Xerox PARC: Alto, 1973
How did everything start?
Xerox PARC: Alto, 1973
Graphical User Interface (GUI) Window Icon Menu Pointing device
Graphical User Interface (GUI)
Window
Icon
Menu
Pointing
device

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Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper ’ s remarks Challenges: OASIS
Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper ’ s remarks Challenges: OASIS

Outline

Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper ’ s remarks Challenges: OASIS

How did everything start? Dr. Martin Coopers remarks Challenges: OASIS

Pioneer: Xerox PARC NLS system in mid-1960s Invention of the mouse, windows, outlining, collaborative work,
Pioneer: Xerox PARC NLS system in mid-1960s Invention of the mouse, windows, outlining, collaborative work,

Pioneer: Xerox PARC

Pioneer: Xerox PARC NLS system in mid-1960s Invention of the mouse, windows, outlining, collaborative work, and

NLS system in mid-1960s Invention of the mouse, windows, outlining, collaborative work, and hypertext (Engelbart, 1988) Smalltalk in 1970s Movable, overlapping windows Xerox Star Six non-overlapping windows Multiple property sheets (Smith et al., 1982; Johnson et al., 1990)

Jeff Larkin and Bill Atkinson Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC twice in 1979 Apple’s Lisa
Jeff Larkin and Bill Atkinson Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC twice in 1979 Apple’s Lisa

Jeff Larkin and Bill Atkinson

Jeff Larkin and Bill Atkinson Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC twice in 1979 Apple’s Lisa development

Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC twice in 1979 Apple’s Lisa development team changed their direction immediately Over 15 Xerox employees joined Apple later on But Lisa was too expensive ($6,995)

Apple: Macintoch, 1984 Good artists borrow, great artists steal. - Steve Jobs

Apple: Macintoch, 1984

Good artists borrow, great artists steal.

- Steve Jobs

IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

IBM: Visi On, 1983

IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public) "Hey, Steve, just because you broke into
IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public) "Hey, Steve, just because you broke into
IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public) "Hey, Steve, just because you broke into

"Hey, Steve, just because you broke into Xerox's house before I did and took the TV doesn't mean I can't go in later and take the stereo.“

- Bill Gates, March 14,1989

in later and take the stereo.“ - Bill Gates, March 14,1989 2010/10/12 Macintosh was successful Xerox

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Macintosh was successful

Gates, March 14,1989 2010/10/12 Macintosh was successful Xerox designed computers for the future, not computers to
Gates, March 14,1989 2010/10/12 Macintosh was successful Xerox designed computers for the future, not computers to

Xerox designed computers for the future, not computers to be marketed in the future Mac commercial on 1984 Super Bowl was a big hit A huge number of media reports and reviews for one computer 500,000 sold by the end of 1985 (Jobs predicted 5 millions) Jobs quitted in 1985

of 1985 (Jobs predicted 5 millions) Jobs quitted in 1985 Here comes Windows Bill Gates was
Here comes Windows Bill Gates was aware of the importance of GUI In 1982, Jobs
Here comes Windows Bill Gates was aware of the importance of GUI In 1982, Jobs

Here comes Windows

Here comes Windows Bill Gates was aware of the importance of GUI In 1982, Jobs forced

Bill Gates was aware of the importance of GUI In 1982, Jobs forced Microsoft to develop application programs only for Apple; He didnt mention Operating System In 1985, Apple made a mistake by authorizing Microsoft to use their techniques of Mac on Windows In 1988, Apple sued Microsoft for using GUI Susan Kare left Apple and joined Microsoft to design GUI for Windows 3.0

Xerox PARC: Alto, 1973 Three Rivers Computer: Perq, 1980
Xerox PARC: Alto, 1973
Three Rivers Computer:
Perq, 1980
Xerox PARC: Star, 1981 1 0 2 4 * 7 6 8 Apple: Lisa, 1983

Xerox PARC: Star, 1981

1024*768

Xerox PARC: Star, 1981 1 0 2 4 * 7 6 8 Apple: Lisa, 1983

Apple: Lisa, 1983

Star, 1981 1 0 2 4 * 7 6 8 Apple: Lisa, 1983 2010/10/12 IBM: Visi
Star, 1981 1 0 2 4 * 7 6 8 Apple: Lisa, 1983 2010/10/12 IBM: Visi

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IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

IBM: Visi On, 1983

IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public)

IBM: Visi On, 1983 Microsoft: Windows, 1983 (Not public) Apple: Macintoch, 1984 Digital Research: GEM icon/desktop,
Apple: Macintoch, 1984 Digital Research: GEM icon/desktop, 1984

Apple: Macintoch, 1984

Apple: Macintoch, 1984 Digital Research: GEM icon/desktop, 1984

Digital Research: GEM icon/desktop, 1984

Commodore: Amiga 100, 1985 Microsoft: Windows, 1985 (First Windows product)

Commodore: Amiga 100,

1985

Commodore: Amiga 100, 1985 Microsoft: Windows, 1985 (First Windows product)

Microsoft: Windows, 1985 (First Windows product)

Microsoft: Windows 2.03, 1987 Acorn: Aurthur, 1987

Microsoft: Windows 2.03,

1987

Microsoft: Windows 2.03, 1987 Acorn: Aurthur, 1987

Acorn: Aurthur, 1987

NeXT: NeXT Computer, 1988 Commodore: Amiga Workbench 2, 1990

NeXT: NeXT Computer,

1988

NeXT: NeXT Computer, 1988 Commodore: Amiga Workbench 2, 1990

Commodore: Amiga Workbench 2, 1990

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Digital Research: GEM (modified), 1986 Apple: Macintosh II, 1987

Digital Research: GEM (modified), 1986

Digital Research: GEM (modified), 1986 Apple: Macintosh II, 1987

Apple: Macintosh II, 1987

Apple: GS/OS, 1988 IBM: OS/2 1.10, 1988

Apple: GS/OS, 1988

Apple: GS/OS, 1988 IBM: OS/2 1.10, 1988

IBM: OS/2 1.10, 1988

Microsoft: Windows 3.0, 1990 GeoWorks: PG-GEOS, 1990

Microsoft: Windows 3.0,

1990

Microsoft: Windows 3.0, 1990 GeoWorks: PG-GEOS, 1990

GeoWorks: PG-GEOS,

1990

IBM: OS/2 V2.0, 1992 Microsoft: Windows 3.1, 1992

IBM: OS/2 V2.0, 1992

IBM: OS/2 V2.0, 1992 Microsoft: Windows 3.1, 1992

Microsoft: Windows 3.1,

1992

Microsoft: Windows 95, 1995 New Deal: New Deal Office 2.5, 1996

Microsoft: Windows 95,

1995

Microsoft: Windows 95, 1995 New Deal: New Deal Office 2.5, 1996

New Deal: New Deal Office 2.5, 1996

Apple: Mac OS 8, 1997 Microsoft: Windows 98, 1998

Apple: Mac OS 8, 1997

Apple: Mac OS 8, 1997 Microsoft: Windows 98, 1998

Microsoft: Windows 98,

1998

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Commodore: Amiga Workbench 3, 1992 Microsoft: Windows NT, 1993

Commodore: Amiga Workbench 3, 1992

Commodore: Amiga Workbench 3, 1992 Microsoft: Windows NT, 1993

Microsoft: Windows NT,

1993

IBM: OS/2 Warp 4, 1996 Microsoft: Windows NT4.0, 1996

IBM: OS/2 Warp 4, 1996

IBM: OS/2 Warp 4, 1996 Microsoft: Windows NT4.0, 1996

Microsoft: Windows NT4.0,

1996

Shane Brooks: 98 Lite, 1998 Apple: Mac OS X Server, 1999

Shane Brooks: 98 Lite,

1998

Shane Brooks: 98 Lite, 1998 Apple: Mac OS X Server, 1999

Apple: Mac OS X Server,

1999

RISC OS: RISC OS 4, 1999 Apple: Aqua, 2000

RISC OS: RISC OS 4,

1999

RISC OS: RISC OS 4, 1999 Apple: Aqua, 2000

Apple: Aqua, 2000

Why Apple is so successful in what they do?

Its all about us, and how they treated us.

The other companies think they know what the customers want, but in fact, they dont.

Apple’s technology is not ahead of anyone.

However, Apple incorporates their great design with the current technology, manages every detail and give what people wanted.

Why Steve Jobs is so successful?

Why Steve Jobs is so successful?

Why Steve Jobs is so successful? Jobs is a notorious micromanager. No product escapes without meeting
Why Steve Jobs is so successful? Jobs is a notorious micromanager. No product escapes without meeting

Jobs is a notorious micromanager. No product escapes without meeting Jobs' exacting standards, which are said to cover all details as the number of screws on the bottom of a laptop and the curve of a monitor's corners. Whereas the rest of the tech industry may motivate employees with carrots, Jobs is known as an inveterate stick man. Innovation is the product of an intense, hard- fought process. Jobs inspires astounding effort and creativity from his people

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Microsoft: Windows 2000, 2000 Microsoft: Windows XP, 2001

Microsoft: Windows 2000,

2000

Microsoft: Windows 2000, 2000 Microsoft: Windows XP, 2001

Microsoft: Windows XP,

2001

IBM says so “The user experience directly affects sales, service cost, productive use, customer loyalty
IBM says so “The user experience directly affects sales, service cost, productive use, customer loyalty

IBM says so

IBM says so “The user experience directly affects sales, service cost, productive use, customer loyalty and

“The user experience directly affects sales, service cost, productive use, customer loyalty and almost every other aspect of doing business.” “User Engineering should also be treated as "value engineering" as it is all about engineering your products and services to insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.?

Learning from Apples failure

insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
insure maximum value to your users and to your business - i.e.? your stakeholders.? Learning from
Lessons learned When hardware and software makers were focused on winning business clients, price and
Lessons learned When hardware and software makers were focused on winning business clients, price and

Lessons learned

Lessons learned When hardware and software makers were focused on winning business clients, price and interoperability

When hardware and software makers were focused on winning business clients, price and interoperability were more important than the user experience. But now that consumers make up the most profitable market segment, usability and design have become priorities. Customers expect a reliable and intuitive experience — just like they do with any other consumer product.

Dr. Martin Cooper is the inventor of the first portable handset

Standing on a street near the Manhattan Hilton in 1973, he made the first phone call from his Motorola DynaTAC to Dr. Joel Engel at Bell Labs "People want to talk to other people - not a house, or an office, or a car. Given a choice, people will demand the freedom to communicate wherever they are, unfettered by the infamous copper wire. It is that freedom we sought to vividly demonstrate in 1973," said Martin Cooper.

by the infamous copper wire. It is that freedom we sought to vividly demonstrate in 1973,"
by the infamous copper wire. It is that freedom we sought to vividly demonstrate in 1973,"

Nokia did it too

“Motorola was arrogant enough to think that the digital phase would arrive more slowly than it did. They did not have all the models ready and they never really understood the user interface. “

“Only recently have the Moto phones become easy to use, like Nokia's. “

“Something similar happened to Nokia in 2004, when it lost market share, not least because of the lack of clamshell models. “

“They lost touch with the changes in the marketplace. “

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Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper’s remarks Challenges: OASIS Opportunities: new computing
Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper’s remarks Challenges: OASIS Opportunities: new computing

Outline

Outline How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper’s remarks Challenges: OASIS Opportunities: new computing

How did everything start? Dr. Martin Cooper’s remarks Challenges: OASIS Opportunities: new computing paradigms

Dr. Martin Cooper’s remarks

In 1996 Motorola introduced the StarTAC which became the world’s first ‘clamshell’ phone.

Moto achieved the number one position on the world.

“The Nokians were refracted to the marketplace and created phones that appealed to different sections of the market.”

“For instance, the shell that you can put on a phone so that you can have different colors. It sounds so trivial, but it was crucial to Nokia's success.”

put on a phone so that you can have different colors. It sounds so trivial, but
put on a phone so that you can have different colors. It sounds so trivial, but
Bob Iannucci, head of the Nokia Research Center (NRC) “First of all, Nokia is a
Bob Iannucci, head of the Nokia Research Center (NRC) “First of all, Nokia is a

Bob Iannucci, head of the Nokia Research Center (NRC)

Bob Iannucci, head of the Nokia Research Center (NRC) “First of all, Nokia is a strong

“First of all, Nokia is a strong believer in open innovation, so building the next phase of the industry is something that we expect to do together with partners, not something that I would say that we would be the only player. “ “Second thing is … the so-called innovator’s dilemma. If you’re good at one thing, it makes it very hard to transition to the next step. And there are plenty of examples of companies that tried to invent themselves out of a successful business into something new.”

Concerning users’ needs

Concerning users’ needs “I never really started to carry a cellular phone until it was small
Concerning users’ needs “I never really started to carry a cellular phone until it was small

“I never really started to carry a cellular phone until it was small enough so I could put it on my belt and not even feel it was there” -

---- Martin Cooper

belt and not even feel it was there” - ---- Martin Cooper Nokia's research areas Access
belt and not even feel it was there” - ---- Martin Cooper Nokia's research areas Access
Nokia's research areas Access and Connectivity Data and Content Technologies Device Architecture Digital
Nokia's research areas Access and Connectivity Data and Content Technologies Device Architecture Digital

Nokia's research areas

Nokia's research areas Access and Connectivity Data and Content Technologies Device Architecture Digital

Access and Connectivity Data and Content Technologies Device Architecture Digital Services Human Interaction Physical Touch Digital Match

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Nokia has a long history in designing for experiences The UX process in Nokia is
Nokia has a long history in designing for experiences The UX process in Nokia is

Nokia has a long history in designing for experiences

Nokia has a long history in designing for experiences The UX process in Nokia is seeking

The UX process in Nokia is seeking both to design for new experiences and to continuously improve existing solutions. The process consists of two principal strategies: UX target setting and UX improvement. The process starts by examining user needs and behaviors. The product development process in Nokia is a continuous cycle of field feedback and development. They use and continuously develop methods to evaluate usability and user experience in the different phases of development.

The Finnish handset giant gathers users' ideas from around the world
The Finnish handset giant gathers users'
ideas from around the world
Nokia’s one million dollar question Who else will be mobile phone users?
Nokia’s one million dollar
question
Who else will be mobile phone users?

Nokia 6108 was successful in China

Nokia 6108 was successful in China No more? Can ’ t just design for Chinese More
Nokia 6108 was successful in China No more? Can ’ t just design for Chinese More

No more? Cant just design for Chinese

in China No more? Can ’ t just design for Chinese More lessons learned Concerning users
More lessons learned Concerning users always UI design is not just pretty, but should support
More lessons learned Concerning users always UI design is not just pretty, but should support

More lessons learned

More lessons learned Concerning users always UI design is not just pretty, but should support that

Concerning users always UI design is not just pretty, but should support that tasks that people actually want to do, and forgive the careless mistakes UI design is not a one-shot affair It is impossible to design effective interactive system from one discipline in isolation Challenge: HCI in China?

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User-Centered Design in Electronic Arts (EA)

2010/10/12 User-Centered Design in Electronic Arts (EA) From the very beginning, they built Electronic Arts around
2010/10/12 User-Centered Design in Electronic Arts (EA) From the very beginning, they built Electronic Arts around
2010/10/12 User-Centered Design in Electronic Arts (EA) From the very beginning, they built Electronic Arts around

From the very beginning, they built Electronic Arts around people and with people who were just crazy about games. Kids who are not yet adolescent really want only two things in life. One is muscle, and the other is to find freedom from the control of their parents and teachers. The job of teenagers is to explore identity, so they like playing story games. Adults like to justify their leisure with self- improvement.