Sei sulla pagina 1di 26

To whom it may concern:

My name is Justin DeCotiis and I am currently seeking employment as a secondary


education biology teacher. I am a hard working professional who is dedicated to seeing his
students succeed. I have experience teaching in various contexts. I have experience working
with technology to further education and I have a love for science in general.
Spring 2007 RUTGERS COLLEGE
Major: UNSPECIFIED (MATRICULATING)
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


INTRO TO ETHICS 01 730 108 02 4 B

INTR EXPERIMENTATION 01 160 171 12 1 C+

GENERAL CHEMISTRY 01 160 162 37 4 C

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 01 830 101 03 3 C+

GENERAL BIOLOGY 01 119 102 C5 4 B

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


31.0 2.625 2.333

Fall 2007 RUTGERS COLLEGE


Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


RESRCH IN DISCIPLNS 01 355 201 J1 3 A

INTRO TO MACROECON 01 220 103 03 3 B

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 01 160 307 41 4 C+

CONTEMP PHIL OF REL 01 730 370 01 3 B

INTRO TO HUMAN ECOL 11 374 101 07 3 A

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


47.0 3.250 2.674

Spring 2008 RUTGERS COLLEGE


*** DEANS LIST ***
Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 01 160 308 11 4 B

INTRO TO MICROECONOM 01 220 102 03 3 A

CALC II FOR BIO SCI 01 640 138 07 4 R A

BIOETHICS 01 730 249 01 3 B

GENERAL PHYSICS 01 750 203 08 3 B+

GENERAL PHYSICS LAB 01 750 205 07 1 A

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


65.0 3.528 2.926

Fall 2008 RUTGERS COLLEGE


*** DEANS LIST ***
Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


CNTMP ISSUES SO AFR 01 014 330 01 3 A

GENETICS 01 447 380 03 4 B

GENERAL PHYSICS 01 750 204 03 3 A

GENERAL PHYSICS LAB 01 750 206 11 1 A

GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY 11 680 390 05 4 A

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


80.0 3.733 3.086

Spring 2009 RUTGERS COLLEGE


Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


92.0 3.086

Fall 2009 RUTGERS COLLEGE


*** DEANS LIST ***
Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


HUMAN PARASITOLOGY 01 146 328 01 3 B+

SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY 01 146 356 01 3 A

SOIL ECOLOGY 11 375 453 01 3 A

TPCS MOLECUL GENETIC 01 447 480 01 3 B+

GENETICS LABORATORY 01 447 382 02 1 A

ORGANIC CHEM LAB 01 160 311 10 2 B+

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


107.0 3.733 3.192

Spring 2010 RUTGERS COLLEGE


*** DEANS LIST ***
Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


INTRO BIOCHEM&MOLBIO 01 694 301 01 3 B+
INTRO BIOCHEM LAB 01 694 313 04 1 A

HINDU PHILOSOPHY 01 730 368 01 3 B

SPAN REVIEW & CONT 01 940 121 12 3 A

DANCE APPRECIATION 07 203 101 03 3 A

BEHAVIORAL BIOLOGY 11 704 240 01 4 A

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


124.0 3.735 3.278

Summer 2010 RUTGERS COLLEGE


Major: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Minor: PHILOSOPHY
Class: 10

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


124.0 3.278

Fall 2010 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


Program: SCIENCE EDUCATION
Degree Sought: MASTERS

Course Title School Dept Course Sect Credits Pref Grade


INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 01 940 131 04 4 E A

ED PSY/PRN CLASS LRN 05 300 306 10 3 G A

IND&CULT DIVERSITY 05 300 401 05 3 G B+

BIOLOGY & SOCIETY 11 300 450 01 3 G A

Degree Credits Term Avg Cumulative Avg


9.0 3.833 3.833
Justin J. DeCotiis
312 13th Avenue,
Belmar NJ,07719
732 677 8727
Justindecotiis@gmail.com
Certification

Education
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJ
Ed.M. Science Education (Present)
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJ
B.A. Biological Sciences Minor: Philosophy (2010)
Junior Year Abroad, Saint Louis University Madrid, Spain
Academy of Allied Health and Science Neptune, NJ
High School Diploma (2006)
Work Experience
DeCotiis Power Washing and Landscaping: (2006-Present) Operated my own power
washing/landscaping company, which worked on various projects in the Belmar/Neptune area.
Black Trumpet Restaurant: (2005-2006) Busboy
ALOHA GROVE Surf Shop: (2006) Sales Associate/Surf Instructor
Kmart: (2004) Electronics Associate
Activities/Teaching Experience
Eagle Scout: I sought out funding for 30,000 oysters which were then grown by myself and various volunteers in
Oceanport and are currently scheduled to be planted on a reef in Shark River, that has been built from clam shells
by
myself and multiple volunteers. I was responsible for training all of the volunteers in how to care for the oysters and
how to
construct the reef.
Surf Club: Activities Coordinator/Vice President: I organized various events for the surf club,
including beach cleanups, surf contests, and fundraisers. In addition I gave surf lessons to new/inexperienced
members.
Boy Scouts of America: I am currently an Assistant Troop Master for Troop 72 of Neptune
City, NJ. I currently teach young boys how to be responsible campers, wilderness survival, and camping etiquette.
Computer Teacher: I am currently volunteering at the public library in Belmar, NJ, to help senior citizens learn
how to
operate computers.
Attributes/Personal:
I enjoy surfing, fishing, hiking, snowboarding, canoing, and kayaking. I consider myself a person
of the outdoors and am an environmentalist at heart. I am proficient in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Outlook, and
Power Point. I have used logger pro, blogspot, and Excel in order to manage/teach more efficiently. I can speak
Spanish at an intermediate/advanced level, I am organized, hardworking, and dedicated to doing the best possible
job I can on everything I do. I enjoy challenges, learning from others, and being part of a team.
References: Available Upon Request
Photosynthesis Aliens
Learning Objectives
Energy
In this unit, students will learn about the energy transformation that takes place throughout
photosynthesis. Energy is a vital concept due to the fact that energy links all living being things
together. It is important that students learn that energy can take multiple changing forms.
Sunlight: Sunlight is the driving force behind photosynthesis, without it, most life on Earth
would disappear. The role of sunlight is a critical concept of photosynthesis and must be
understood by all students in order to gain a basic understanding of photosynthesis.
Requirements
Photosynthesis has very few basic requirements but these requirements are essential to the
process. Other than sunlight plants require an adequate amount of carbon dioxide and water. It
is vital that students understand the requirements needed for photosynthesis so that students can
understand how various plants are grown (on the space station, farming). Through the
understanding of the requirements students will be able to think of new creative ideas to meet the
needs of photosynthetic organisms.
Carbon dioxide: Without carbon dioxide plants could not carry out the light independent
reaction of photosynthesis (Calvin Cycle). The more carbon dioxide plants are exposed to the
easier it is for them to carry out photosynthesis (if all other requirements are sufficiently
available). Carbon dioxide provides the carbon that is fixed during the ligh tindependent
reactions which yield the greatest amount of ATP. Without this reaction plants would not be
able to flourish, there energy gathering would be significantly reduced. Students will understand
the role that carbon dioxide plays during photosynthesis.
Water: Water is needed by all organisms to survive, but its use in plants is different than in
humans. Photosynthesis’s requirement of water is a concept that must be understood by all
students. Students need to understand how vital water is to life on Earth especially to plants.
Students will gain a basic understanding of waters part in photosynthesis and that without it the
light dependent and light independent reactions could not take place.
Products
The end products of photosynthesis are one of the most important aspects of photosynthesis.
Through the production of sugar and oxygen by plants almost all other forms of life are able to
survive. Without the products of photosynthesis almost all life on Earth would perish very
quickly. Students must understand the importance that the end products of photosynthesis play
to all organisms. Students must understand that almost all of the oxygen on Earth is formed by
plants and thus without plants, we would not able to breath. Through this understanding students
will have a better understanding of the importance of one organism on another.
O2: The formation of O2 by plants through the process of photosynthesis is essential for most
species on planet Earth to survive. Plants produce almost all of the O2 present in the air and is
thus vital for our survival. The formation of O2 is one of the major reasons why plants are so
important to humans, we depend upon plants for our survival.
Sugar: The formation of sugar by plants is the final step of photosynthesis and allows plants to
harvest and store energy from the sun. Plants form glucose and sucrose from sun light, CO2 and
H2O From the sugar formed from photosynthesis plants can continue to thrive and produce
offspring.
Inquiry
Inquiry based lessons allow students to explore and discover science on their own with the
guidance of a teacher. Through inquiry, students will become like scientists building models
using their knowledge, revising their models through argumentation and empirical evidence, and
presenting their revised models to the class.
Group Work: This is a vital part of the inquiry process. Through group work students will learn
to work together as a team and as a scientific community. They will learn the meaning of relying
on a community to help with issues and be expected to help each other throughout the process.
Modeling: Students will continue to practice honing their skills at creating initial models based
on their prior knowledge. Students will work in pairs to analyze empirical evidence and revise
their models. Students will present their models to their peers and will spark discussion and
argumentation where the students will need to defend their explanation. Finally students will
revise their models based on evidence that was presented by other groups.
Argumentation: Through the use of argumentation students will improve their public speaking
abilities, confidence, and respect for one another. Argumentation is a necessary part of
modeling, in that it allows students to learn to express their ideas and challenge others ideas in a
public setting as a learning community.

Standards
Energy
NJ Content Standard: Continual input of energy from sunlight keeps matter and energy flowing
through ecosystems. CPI # 5.3.12.B.3
NSES: Matter, Energy in living systems
Photosynthesis Requirements
NJ Content Standard: Plants have the capability to take energy from light to form sugar
molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. CPI# 5.3.12.B.4
Photosynthesis Products
NJ Content Standard: In both plant and animal cells, sugar is a source of energy and can be used
to make other carbon-containing (organic) molecules. CPI#5.3.12.B.5
NJ Content Standard: As matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization
within living systems (cells, organs, organisms, communities), and between living systems and
the physical environment, chemical elements are recombined into different products.5.3.12.B.1
Inquiry and Modeling Standards
NSES: Regardless of the scientific investigation performed, students must use evidence,
apply logic, and construct an argument for their proposed explanations.
NJ Content Standard: Empirical evidence is used to construct and defend arguments. CPI:
Revise predictions and explanations using evidence, and connect explanations/arguments to
established scientific knowledge, models, and theories. CPI #5.1.12.B.3
NJ Content Standard: Refinement of understandings, explanations, and models occurs as
new evidence is incorporated. CPI: Reflect on and revise understandings as new evidence
emerges. CPI#5.1.12.C.1
NJ Content Standard: Science involves practicing productive social interactions with
peers, such as partner talk, whole-group discussions, and small-group work. CPI: Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas,
observations, and experiences. CPI#5.1.12.D.1
Broader Curriculum Context
This photosynthesis unit is an inquiry-based unit, which will not only strengthen the student’s
ability to model but will also help students formulate explanations through group work. Other
units throughout the year are also inquiry-based and thus the more experience students have
working with inquiry the better they will be at modeling and group work. This unit will take
place after plant anatomy has been discussed and will give students a view into the way in which
energy is transferred within plants. This unit will also help students have a better grasp of
ecology through the understanding of the importance of plant life to other organisms.
Project Context
The driving problem for this unit is that students will need to act as researchers, trying to
discover how a new species discovered on a new planet can survive their trip to Earth. The new
planet is much like planet Earth except for the lack of people and the extremely high levels of
O2. The indigenous population of planet Zueth are humanoids except that they seem to never
eat, have green skin, wear a strange face mask and drink exceptionally large amounts of water.
Students will be presented with the discovery of Zeuth and the Zeuthians and with the problem
facing scientists (how do Zeuthians survive). The class will be divided into groups (3 students
per group). Students will then be told that NASA tried to bring back a few Zeuthians but none of
them survived the trip. The scientists gave the Zeuthians water from Zeuth but nevertheless they
all appeared to starve to death. Students will then be asked to model how they could have
starved if they were given their nutrients and water. Through argumentation students will
discuss what the best model is and vote on the model. I expect that the model presented will be
that they get their energy from the sun. Students will then be told that scientists tried to bring
another group of Zeuthians to Earth. On this trip the Zeuthians were not given their masks and
for some reason they appeared to die of starvation yet again. Students will be told that the ship
was designed for humans and thus it was constantly filtered to remove CO2 and replace it with
O2. Students will be asked to model what additional requirements the Zeuthians need in order to
survive. The final twist of the story will be when the last group of Zeuthians starves in transport
when they are exposed to GreenLight while being given all other requirements. Students will be
told that a DNA test was run on the Zeuthians and compared to life on Earth. The results were
strange, they had more in common with plants than with animals. We are not able to access any
Zeuthian tissue but we need to design an experiment which tests the importance of each factor on
their harvesting of food. We also need to determine what it is Zeuthians are harvesting from
these variables. Teams will design experiments testing the importance of each factor and what
these factors form when together (sugar). Through the experiments, students will determine how
Zeuthians harvest their food and the safest way to transport a group of Zeuthians to Earth.

Motivation
The motivation for this unit comes from students need to know. Students will want to
learn more about this “alien” race and will find themselves wanting to discover how it is these
people could survive. In addition as NASA continues to explore our solar system more and more
scientists become more and more excited about the prospect of finding life on another planet,
which translates directly to the general public. As our world continues to become more and
more populated we would love to find another planet to either call home or discover a new form
of life.
Assessments
Variables
A. Group work: Students will be working in groups and need to share their findings. Students
should get along with each other; each student needs to be prospective and respectful of others,
and be responsible for their contribution to the group. Students need to aide their other group
members.
B. Modeling with Evidence: Students will need to justify their models with supportive evidence.
Students will need to understand evidence and interpret it correctly. Students need to create their
models based on criteria, evaluate models with other students, and revise their models after new
concepts have aroused.
C. Content: Students should understand that light energy is converted to food energy (sugar) in
plants through the process of photosynthesis. Students should be able to explain the importance
of CO2 and H2O on the process of photosynthesis.
D. Argumentation: Students need to be respectful of others views. Their views need to be based
on evidence and not just opinions. Student’s arguments need to be specific and defend a single
argument. Throughout the lesson students will need to create discussions and defend their model
in which they propose something with supporting evidence.

Estimated Length of Unit


18 Periods or about 3 and a half weeks

Lesson Sequence Time Frame (42-minute class periods)

1.1 1 Period

1.2 1 Period

2.1 1 Period

2.2 1 Period

2.3 1 Period

2.4 1 Period

2.5 1 Period

2.6 1 Period

3.1 1 Period

3.2 1 Period

3.3 1 Period

3.4 3 Periods
3.5 2 Periods

4.1 1 Period

4.2 1 Period

Materials Needed
The teacher will need to make copies of the “notices” given out by NASA explaining
what has and hasn’t work in reference to the Zeuthians. It is also advisable to have computers in
the classroom or accessible during lessons 3.3 to 3.6 so that students can research during class.
If computers are not accessible the teacher can also provide additional materials for research
during the class. Materials for all of the students labs are needed, which generally include, but
are not limited to, lamps, colored bulbs, plants, water, iodine, and basic chemistry equipment
(test tubes, beakers). Students should also have large posters to display their models, which
should be provided by the teacher these posters will change throughout the semester so there
should be at least 4 posters per group.
Expected Prior Knowledge
Students are expected to have a basic understanding of energy. Students should know
that energy has multiple forms that can be transformed and with each transformation energy is
lost as heat. Students should have basic knowledge of plant anatomy, cell theory, and cellular
energy. Students should know that organisms use sugar in order to survive. Students should
have encountered modeling and argumentation prior to the assignment and are therefore
expected to have a basic understanding of how to model and how to be part of a productive
discussion. Students should also have an understanding of the importance that plants play in the
ecosystem. Students should know that without plants most forms of life on Earth would not be
able to survive.
Expected Student Difficulties
Students may have difficulties creating an experiment from scratch, however this should not be a
problem due to the supervision by the teacher (the teacher should be there to help refine student
ideas). Students may also have difficulties understanding the concept that light energy is
converted into a product which is then used as fuel by the plant (light is turned into sugars). This
concept is not an easy concept to understand due to the fact that something intangible (light) is
turned into something tangible (sugar). Students also may have some difficulty understanding
that only specific wavelengths of light are absorbed by plants, and the color that we see is not
absorbed but is reflected back.
Backbone/ Lesson Sequence
Driving macro-structure: Students will learn about the requirements and products of
photosynthesis through an Alien problem context.
Nested Structure 1: Introduction to photosynthesis and Alien problem context. Students will
create their initial models about how Zeuthians are getting their energy.
• Lesson 1.1 - Teams of 3 to 4 students will be created, these teams will be the same
throughout the unit. Students in groups will read the handouts about the Zeuthians and Zeuth.
Students will then begin to model how they think the Zeuthians are getting their energy.
Lesson 1.2 Teams of students will finish their models and begin to present their models. The
teacher will act as the scribe for the class writing what the class thinks are good pieces of
evidence that should be carried over. Students will then vote on a new revised model as a class,
which will become the class model.
Nested Structure 2: Introduce the transportation problem of the problem context. Each piece is
to be introduced one at a time so as to keep the interest of the students throughout the unit.
Lesson 2.1: Students will model why they think the Zeuthians are not surviving even
when given the items they normally have with them.
Lesson 2.2 Through argumentation students will reach a consensus that the Zeuthians
must need sunlight in order to survive.
Lesson 2.3 The next problem will be presented (Zeuthians without their masks starved to
death). Students will add to their models from 2.2 what other requirement they think Zeuthians
need.
Lesson 2.4 Students will present their models and through argumentation will come to the
consensus that the Zeuthians need C02 in order to survive.
Lesson 2.5 Zeuthians will be exposed to green light and will starve to death while others
exposed to white light survive. Students need to model why green light was not absorbed by the
Zeuthians.
Lesson 2.6 Students will present and through argumentation will come to a consensus
that green light is not absorbed because Zeuthians are green.
Nested Structure 3: Students will learn that Zeuthians share over 90% of their DNA with plants
and thus it makes sense for us to study plants rather than Zeuthians for ethical reasons. Students
need to design experiments in order to determine why all of these things occur. Each team will
be responsible for designing their own experiment to test a piece of the model. One group will
test the necessity of CO2 another will test light absorption, another will test no nutrients
(growing a plant in only water), and another will determine what photosynthesis produces
(sugar).
Lesson 3.1 Students will be given a DNA comparison between plants and Zeuthians. For
homework teams will have to decide what aspect they wish to test and will formulate a brief
outline of how they are going conduct their research.
Lesson 3.2 Teams will discuss which aspect of the model they wish to test. Ideas will be
presented before the class to ensure that their tests are usable.
Lesson 3.3 Teams will continue to discuss and research their proposed experiments.
Lesson 3. 4 Teams will conduct their experiments as researchers.
Lesson 3.5 Teams will act as a scientific community and will share their findings with the
class
Nested Structure 4: Revision of model and conclusion
Lesson 4.1 Students will revise the class model and will discuss why all of the variables
for photosynthesis are important. students will also discuss the end products of photosynthesis.
Lesson 4.2 Students will write a letter as a class to NASA explaining the best way in
which to transport Zeuthians to Earth. They will include all the variables Zeuthians need to not
only survive but thrive during the long journey.
How Do Those Zeuthians Do it?

NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.


1. Photosynthesis Requirements
NJ Content Standard: Plants have the capability to take energy from light to form sugar
molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. CPI# 5.3.12.B.4
2. Inquiry and Modeling Standards
NSES: Regardless of the scientific investigation performed, students must use evidence,
apply logic, and construct an argument for their proposed explanations.
NJ Content Standard: Empirical evidence is used to construct and defend arguments. CPI:
Revise predictions and explanations using evidence, and connect explanations/arguments to
established scientific knowledge, models, and theories. CPI #5.1.12.B.3
NJ Content Standard: Refinement of understandings, explanations, and models occurs as
new evidence is incorporated. CPI: Reflect on and revise understandings as new evidence
emerges. CPI#5.1.12.C.1
NJ Content Standard: Science involves practicing productive social interactions with
peers, such as partner talk, whole-group discussions, and small-group work. CPI: Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas,
observations, and experiences. CPI#5.1.12.D.1

Big Ideas
1.Energy
In this unit, students will learn about the energy transformation that takes place
throughout photosynthesis. Energy is a vital concept due to the fact that energy links all
living being things together. One can see energy transfer in all walks of life whether it be
chemical energy turned into heat energy in order to provide power for houses or in living
systems (humans eating food in order to survive).
Sunlight: Sunlight is the driving force behind photosynthesis, without it, most life
on Earth would disappear. The role of sunlight is a critical concept of
photosynthesis and must be understood by all students in order to gain a basic
understanding of photosynthesis.
2. Requirements
Photosynthesis has very few basic requirements but these requirements are essential to the
process. Other than sunlight plants require an adequate amount of carbon dioxide and water. It
is vital that students understand the requirements needed for photosynthesis so that students can
understand how various plants are grown (on the space station, farming). Through the
understanding of the requirements students will be able to think of new creative ideas to meet the
needs of photosynthetic organisms.
Carbon dioxide: Without carbon dioxide plants could not carry out the light
independent reaction of photosynthesis (Calvin Cycle). The more carbon dioxide plants
are exposed to the easier it is for them to carry out photosynthesis (if all other
requirements are sufficiently available). Carbon dioxide provides the carbon that is fixed
during the light independent reactions which yield the greatest amount of ATP. Without
this reaction plants would not be able to flourish, there energy gathering would be
significantly reduced.
Water: Water is needed by all organisms to survive, but its use in plants is
different than in humans. Photosynthesis’s requirement of water is a concept that must
be understood by all students. Most people know that plants need water to survive, but
what most people don’t realize is that without water plants cannot produce energy
through photosynthesis. Through this understanding the problems of drought come to
mind and how terrible droughts can be on the food supply and ecosystem.
3. Inquiry
Inquiry based lessons allow students to explore and discover science on their own with
the guidance of a teacher. Through inquiry, students will become like scientists building
models using their knowledge, revising their models through argumentation and
empirical evidence, and presenting their revised models to the class.
Group Work: This is a vital part of the inquiry process. Through group work
students will learn to work together as a team and as a scientific community. They will
learn the meaning of relying on a community to help with issues and be expected to help
each other throughout the process.
Modeling: Students will continue to practice honing their skills at creating initial
models based on their prior knowledge. Students will work in pairs to analyze empirical
evidence and revise their models. Students will present their models to their peers and
will spark discussion and argumentation where the students will need to defend their
explanation. Finally students will revise their models based on evidence that was
presented by other groups.

1. Objectives.
a. Students should be able to identify the requirements for photosynthesis. They
should be able to explain that CO2, Water, and Light are necessary for
photosynthesis to take place.
b. Students should be able to model the requirements of photosynthesis
c. Students should be able to present their models to the class and listen to other
students present models.

1. Expected Knowledge.
a. Students should have a basic understanding of plant anatomy, energy laws
(energy can transform, energy is lost as heat). Students should be able to
cooperate in teams productively.
i. If students do not have a basic understanding of plant anatomy then they
are free to ask the teacher or other members of his/her team. In addition
students are free to use books within the classroom to look up anything
they might need to know.
ii. If students do not have a basic understanding of energy laws they are free
to ask the teacher or members of his/her team. If the majority of the class
does not know energy laws the teacher must conduct a brief review of
energy laws.

1. Expected Student Difficulties


a. Students may have a difficult time creating a proper model. Modeling is
something that is still somewhat new to students and is not expected to be
perfected until the end of the year.
b. Students may have difficulty explaining why all of these factors are required for
photosynthesis. They are not however expected to explain why they are required
until later in the unit.

1. Resources and Materials


a. Group them into teacher use and student use (where appropriate, identify texts,
equipment, media, family or community resources to be used in the lesson).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7-2PB4jj2o ET Video started at 42 seconds.

Lesson Plan.

1. Show Video
a. The video shown is a clip from ET showing ET in the bushes. The video is meant
to capture the interest of the students. From the video students will get into the
spirit of discovering aliens.
2. Give NASA notice
. The letter from NASA is attached bellow. The letter describes the planet of Zeuth and
Zeuthians. Within the letter NASA describes their failed attempts at transporting
Zeuthians to Earth. Students must first determine what the Zeuthians require, the NASA
article acts as evidence meant to guide the students into realizing that Zeuthians
(photosynthetic organisms) need light, CO2, and water.
3. Put students in Teams of 3-4 students
. Teams of students are vital for the process of modeling to take place. Each team must
work together efficiently in order to solve the problem context. Through working
together students will gain a better understanding of the requirements and products of
photosynthesis. Group work allows students to feel confident in their opinions and
provides a medium for argumentation. (Students are expected to argue their points in
order to decide on a team model).
4. Pass out poster sized paper to each team
. Posters are needed to display the team models. The posters not only let the students show
case their work during the lesson to other students, but will also be hung up, improving
the decor of the classroom. By hanging posters up students realize that their work is
important and will be proud of the activities they complete.
5. Each team models what Zeuthians are using to survive using evidence from the article to
support their ideas.
. Modeling what Zeuthians are using for food in order to survive provides students their
first look into photosynthesis. The students won’t know what the process is called but
through the information can identify the requirements of photosynthesis. Modeling of
Zeuthian food harvesting provides a chance for formative assessment. The models will
be assessed for both content and for students ability to model. Each team will have 20
minutes to model. If students are having a difficult time modeling the teacher will be
walking around the room monitoring the progress of the building of models. The teacher
can help students with their model if need be. The teacher will also continually reinforce
that students need to focus on the FACTORS and not HOW the Zeuthians are harvesting
their energy.
6. Each team presents their model to the class and hangs the model on the board
. Presenting to the class provides students with an opportunity to voice their ideas
to their peers. Through their presentations students will participate in the
scientific community within the class. In addition, presenting allows students to
the chance to practice public speaking, and boosts their confidence. Each Team
will have 5 minutes to present.
7. Teacher notes key features of models using power point or overhead projector so that
students can see main points from each team
. The teacher acting as the scribe for the class allows students to focus on listening rather
than on note taking. It also allows students to visualize all of the ideas simultaneously on
a large board (overhead or projector). This should take place as students are presenting
and will act as the rough draft of the class model.

Time Table – who is going to be doing what and when during the lesson to make sure that
students are actively engaged. Use a table for this as shown below.

Clock Activity Students Doing Teacher Doing


0-2 Video Watching Passing out NASA letter
2-5 Go into Teams Going into teams Ensuring students are going where they
need to

5-10 Reading NASA Reading the NASA notice Passing out poster paper
notice

10-30 Modelling Creating models using the Monitoring the process of model
NASA notice as evidence building
30-55 Presenting Presenting or Listening to Writing the important parts of each
Models others present teams model using the computer or
projector

55 End of Class Leaving Getting ready for the next period

Assessment.

a. The formative assessment of the lesson will take place during the presenting of the
models. The models will be assessed using the rubric below which students will have been made
aware of prior to the lesson.

b.

4 3 2 1
Evidence Model uses all of the Model has an Model lacks Model has no
Based appropriate evidence incomplete use of appropriate evidence, and/or
necessary to make evidence. Some areas evidence, and any explanations
the model clear and do not have enough explanations are included are not
concise. All evidence or not completely supported by
explanations in the unnecessary evidence supported by evidence.
model are supported is used. All given evidence.
by evidence. explanations in the
model are supported
by evidence.

Modifications. Describe the modifications you will make for different learners

a. In order to accommodate for diverse learners one could have students use multiple tools
for creating models. One team could use power point, another a poster, another could use the
chalkboard The lesson already allows for students to see the material in multiple fashions (they
have to work with the material, listen to others ideas, see others ideas, and during the next lesson
evaluate other teams ideas). The teacher could also provide students with a print out of the most
important ideas to go into the students notebook if students have a difficult time learning
information from powerpoint/projectors.
b. Describe modifications for bilingual students.
i. One could modify the lesson for bilingual students in a few ways. The
easiest way is to put all students of the same language in the same team.
This would allow students to talk through the information in their native
language. Then when the students have to present, they would have to
present in English. The second way would be to translate the NASA
article into the students primary language. Bilingual students would then
be able to read the NASA article in their own language but would still be
required to interact with other students in English.

Homework. No homework
Biology Survey
This survey will remain confidential, answer all the questions honestly, and welcome to Biology!
* Required

What is your name? *My name is Mr. DeCotiis

What would you like to be called? *If you have a nickname please write it here

What is your home phone number? *The number I can use to reach your parent/guardian

What is your home address? *

What don't you like about Biology?

What interests you about Biology?I'm fascinated by the diversity of life we can find in 1 gram of
soil

What would you like to learn this year?Be specific, and use as many examples as you can

What do you think is interesting about yourself? *I like to surf, hike, and snowboard

Submit

Powered by Google DocsReport Abuse - Terms of Service - Additional Terms


Lesson Plans
Blood Pressure Experiment
If you would like the lesson plan for the Blood Pressure Experiment please scroll down

Directions for setting up Blood Pressure Experiment


First you need to install LoggerPro, if you already have it, you can skip this step, if not
download it from here. Download the 3.8.4 version!
Next you need to hook up the blood pressure sensor. First plug in the vernier labPro
device, then plug in the blood pressure monitor into the labPro Device.

Finally plug in the labpro device into your computer (using the USB port).
Once everything is connected, then open loggerPro.

Put the cuff on the participant....

Then click RUN in the top of logger pro,


Pump the cuff up to 160, then don't touch anything, let the computer do the rest.
Inspirational Video, that I use to introduce the lesson

Lesson Plan

Blood Pressure
NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards addressed in the lesson. Do not simply list the
standard number, for example, 5.5. Instead, list the complete standard. For example, you
might list:

STANDARD 5.1.4.D.2 In order to determine which arguments and explanations are most
persuasive, communities of learners work

collaboratively to pose, refine, and evaluate questions, investigations, models, and theories
(e.g., scientific argumentation and presentation)

STANDARD 5.3.4.A.3 Describe the interactions of systems involved in carrying out


everyday life activities.

STANDARD5.3.6.A.1 Model the interdependence of the human body’s major systems in


regulating its internal environment

Identify Resources needed.

 Teacher use: Logger Pro, Computer, Power Point, Black Board. Student Use:
Vernier Blood pressure sensor
Describe what students should know before they start the lesson.
Students should know that the heart pumps blood throughout the body in order to
transport 02 and CO2. Students should also know that heart rate is directly related to
blood pressure. Students should also know that the body maintains a balance between
systems (homeostasis).

State the objectives of the lesson.

Students will be able to record blood pressure using Vernier Blood Pressure Monitor.

Students will be able to graph the rate at which blood pressure is returned to equilibrium (after
exertion)

Students will be able to explain the relationship between heart rate and blood pressure.

Identify important ideas in terms the subject area: 1. The body will maintain homeostasis when
possible.. 2. Blood Pressure will increase as heart race increase so that oxygen and CO2 are
pumped throughout the body

Describe potential difficulties students may experience with the content. Describe all
formative assessments that you plan to use and how you will provide feedback (e.g. if these
are problems - include solutions). Indicate what compensatory activities you will use for
those students who lack prerequisite knowledge.

Logger pro activity worksheet. A worksheet will be given in conjunction with the logger
pro activity which will require students to measure the blood pressure of Athletes vs Non
athletes in the class. Students will also be given a chance to discuss with other groups their
findings and give explanations as to why blood pressure increase during exercise and why
the time it takes for BP to reach resting BP is important. (this is important because the
more time it takes for blood pressure to reach normal is indicative of the bodies ability to
transport 02 and CO2 throughout the body.. The due now which will be given at the
beginning of class (while I am setting up the lesson) will be for students to read Chapter X
pgs 10-13 in their book. We will then begin the lab.

Provide a description of the lesson including an agenda for the lesson (What is going to
happen, what you will say, what questions you will ask, what students will do, all handouts
that you plan to give to the students). Choose activities that are best for the content of the
lesson. Make sure you describe how you will start the lesson and how you will end it (to
capture students’ attention and to have some sort of closure). Show how you meet the
objectives of the lesson.

I will start the lesson with a quick youtube video of an athlete running herethen students
with start with the do now

Time Table – who is going to be doing what and when during the lesson to make sure that
students are actively engaged.

Clock reading “Title of the activity” Students doing Me doing


during the lesson

0 - 6 min Do Now Writing Show a quick video Checking


up equipment for the first
activity

6-12min Getting in Lab Groups Moving to their lab Telling the class to hurry up,
tables getting ready for the lab, doing
last minute adjustments

12-35 min Doing the Lab Jumping Jacks, Helping Groups out, asking
measuring Blood groups to think about the
Pressure , Running questions on the worksheet,
Logger Pro helping students setup logger
pro

35-45 min Wrapping Up Finishing the Helping students think about


worksheet, breaking the questions, (what do you
down the think, ask your group)
computers (putting
them back if in a
mobile lab class).

45-65 min Presentations Groups will present Grading the presentations


on their findings

65-70 min Discussion Sitting in their seats Talk about what the findings
should be (blood pressure
should increase with exercise,
it should take less time for an
athlete to reach resting BP
than a non athlete).

Blood Pressure Lab

First hook up the blood pressure monitor to the computer using the USB port.

Open LoggerPro

Measure the blood pressure of two students’ blood pressures (pick an athlete and a non
athlete in your group)

This is your base blood pressure; write it down in your lab manual

Next have both individuals (one at a time) perform exercise (jumping jacks, running, get
your heart rate up!)

Measure the blood pressure of both individuals, until it returns to the base level.

Questions:

1.How long did it take for your blood pressure to return to normal?

A. Was there any difference between the two individuals?

2. Why do you think there was a difference?

Rubric For Presentations


Mastery 3 Advanced 2 Beginner 1 Not Acceptable 0

Student clearly Student worked Student showed Student did not work
demonstrates with group but minimal effort during with the group
willingness to work with had issues group work
group resolving
problems

Student clearly Student Student had minimal Student had no


demonstrated clear understood blood understanding of understanding.
understanding of blood pressure but blood pressure and
pressure and was able failed to relate failed to relate back to
to relate back to the back to the the project
project project

Student spoke clearly Student spoke Student spoke clearly Student did not speak
and with confidence clearly most of some of the time and clearly nor did he/she
the time but had no confidence have confidence
struggled with
confidence

Student analyzed Student tried to Student did not Student did not
his/her own ideas and analyze his/her analyze his/her ideas analyze his/her ideas
compared them to other ideas and tried to but tried to compare nor did he/she
groups compare to other to other groups compare his/her ideas
groups to other groups