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Eng M 530 – Engineering Project Management Laboratory Development Project Final Report Project Manager: Shannon

Eng M 530 – Engineering Project Management

Laboratory Development Project

Final Report

Project Manager:

Shannon MacDonald

Team Members:

Luke Glistak Sean Hodgson Mk Nimesh Anand Rohit

1

Comprehensive Project Plan - Summary of Subsidiary Plans

1. Detailed Scope Statement

The project scope statement details the project deliverables, objectives, boundaries, constraints, assumptions, and milestones of the laboratory development project Chrome Engineering has undertaken for Dr. Lipsett. This detailed scope statement captures in very broad terms the product for this project. It outlines what is required for approval, success and risks involved in taking this project. This scope statement establishes an agreement between our team and Dr. Lipsett establishing what fundamentally is involved in the management and delivery of this projects lab development.

2. Work Breakdown Structure

WBS is a deliverable oriented hierarchical decomposition of work to be executed, more specifically, the work to be executed by the project team. A comprehensive list of deliverables outlined in the detailed scope statement is used to prepare the WBS. WBS is a very important tool for the project and is used throughout the project planning process. All the deliverables have been carefully analyzed to develop the WBS. The project has been divided into different phases to minimize the disruptions to ongoing work, with each phase having its own key deliverables. As can be seen below, the WBS captures major deliverables of the project. The Lab migration project is divided into six major deliverables, namely lab MEC E 1-38, MEC E 2-22, infrastructure, transportation means, compliance documents and project management documents. Each deliverable is then decomposed into smaller, more manageable deliverables.

3. Detailed Statement of Work

The detailed statement of work describes deliverables which will be produced for each major component of the project. It describes in detail, the work necessary to perform and produce the project deliverables. If any scope changes occur in the project, in alignment with the project charter, detailed statement of work will be modified to reflect approved changes.

4. Work Package Dictionary

WBS dictionary documents the description of work packages within the WBS. The project WBS dictionary contains descriptions of activities to be performed in all of the work packages. The WBS dictionary contains details which include due date for the work package, resources identified, interdependencies between various project

activities, deliverable acceptance criterion and any assumptions made. If any scope changes occur in the project, in alignment with the project charter, the WBS dictionary will be modified to reflect approved changes.

5. Scope Management Plan

The scope management plan describes how the laboratory development project will be defined, managed, controlled, verified and communicated to the project team, Dr. Lipsett and the other associated stakeholders. It is established to ensure a shared understanding of how the detailed scope statement and the WBS will be created. It also establishes a formalized process for the handling of engineering change requests. The scope management plan establishes the criteria for formal verification and acceptance of scope and WBS changes.

6. Quality Management Plan

Due to the nature of the project, quality of services provided will be of paramount importance. Quality will be measured in terms of safety of personnel while performing the migration and the movement heavy machinery. The aim of the movement is to safely transfer the machinery and other small pieces equipment without disturbing the ongoing research projects & other professors, research students and University students.

7. Human Resources Plan

The human resources which have been made available to the project team include Dr. Lipsett, the project manager (Shannon MacDonald), the project team, laboratory technicians, a cleaning service, and research students under Dr. Lipsett. Each individual group of human resources has various constraints which were considered. The constraints include: minimal available time, non-project related commitments, labor agreements/regulations, and the need for advanced notifications. The risk associated with the human resources from a management perspective is small based on the nature of the project. Working conditions, risks, work durations, and breaks all conform to the rules and regulations set by Occupational Health and Safety as well as University of Alberta. To promote a sense of ownership for the project, tasks have been delegated to those individuals who volunteer for them. This allows individuals to work within their fields of interest making the work more enjoyable. Sufficient human resources are available for the project and all human requirements have been filled.

8.

Procurement Management Plan

The scope, regarding the procurement process, well defined and will require minimal resources. As the material required will be provided by University facility and needed in very small amounts. This project is a service based project. There is ample manpower and all of the equipment is readily available. Research students along with Roger Marchand and his team will be sufficient for the movement of the lab. For the movement of any heavy material, the crane and roller tables are available to Roger Marchand. The only service required through procurement is the cleaning of the lab. This will be facilitated by Bee Clean Inc and will occur before the move takes place and after the old laboratory is cleared of all the students’ possessions and equipment.

9. Risk Management Plan

The Risk Management Plan describes the methodology of the risk management process that will be implemented for the duration of the project. The risks are assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Risk Owners consist of Dr. Lipsett, Roger Marchand, AICT and the University of Alberta facilities. Dr. Lipsett and Roger Marchand are responsible for risks generated by the project, while AICT and University of Alberta Facilities are responsible for risks posed by the environment wherein the project takes place. Any risk-related documentation additions or adjustments will be made following the specified process. Any changes made to the Execution Phase of the project may impose new risks, which will require a complete iteration of the risk assessments in the specified area. Any changes to the Risk Management Plan must be approved by Dr. Lipsett directly.

10. Risk Register

All risks that have been currently identified within the project have been compiled into the Risk Register. The register specifies the types of risks, their probability of occurring and the impact that an incident would have on the project. Each risk has been assigned a Risk Owner who will be responsible for all aspects of that risk, as well as a response plan for all possible incidents. As new risks are identified during the life cycle of the project, the Risk Register is to be updated as per documentation guidelines.

11. Communication Management Plan

Communication is crucial to the success of any project. For the lab movement project we have set up the required management plan for communicating the ongoing activities and progress to all the stakeholders utilizing feedback mechanisms. We will be providing Dr. Lipsett with a detailed report to communicate

our plans with the assumptions made and execution planning for the project. Layout of the new lab as an engineering drawing in AutoCad was discussed with Dr. Lipsett for approval. Face to face meetings were preferred over other means of communication. Owing to the constraint that Research students have busy schedules, they were contacted through a questionnaire. For communication in between the team members and the project manager, Facebook & Scribd were incorporated into the communication management plan along with weekly meetings and discussions.

12. Gantt Chart

The Laboratory Development Project was initiated on January 31 st , 2011, and the initiation phase was completed on February 21 st , 2011. The Planning Phase was initiated on February 22 nd , 2011. A draft of the Project Planning Report was submitted to Dr. Lipsett for review on March 22 nd , 2011 to acquire feedback about the contents of the report, and to obtain any further recommendations that were not already stated by the project team. The Planning Phase was closed on April 11 th , 2011. The duration Execution Phase will be from May 1 st , 2011 to May 30 th , 2011. At that point, and Dr. Lipsett will assess the completion and determine if any further actions need to take place to satisfy the project requirements.

13. Cost Management Plan

Utilizing available human resources to the fullest extent is crucial to ensuring the project is completed within schedule and budgetary requirements. Many human resource assets have been provided through the University of Alberta at no cost to the project. The total budget for the project is $10 000 dollars. This sum includes contingency funds and is the absolute maximum available for this project. The cost risks associated with this project are minimal due to the project team being provided with adequate funds. The budget has been divided into two separate accounts, the primary account and the contingency account. The primary account will amount to $7500 leaving the remaining $2500 as a contingency which further mitigates the cost risk. The project team will be utilizing bottom-up estimating due to the high level of accuracy inherent to this method. Any work that has been completed which has an associated budgetary expense is to be documented on an expense sheet. The expense sheets will provide a clear picture when used to conduct an earned value analysis.

14. Estimate for Entire Project

Due to the nature of the contracts between the project team, the University of Alberta, and the client Dr. Lipsett, all labor expenses excluding the cleaning sub- contractor have been obtained at no cost to the project. The total cost for the project

has been determined to be $1,330.00. This estimate is good for 60 days after the date the report has been accepted.

15. Simple Flow Diagram

This section shows the top-level view of the entire laboratory development project in all five phases: Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. This is illustrated using a flow diagram with phase respective colors for ease of reference.

16. Project Charter Comparison

As the laboratory development project reaches completion of the planning phase this section was developed to compare the current project plan with the project charter. This comparison illustrates what project planning changes have been implemented as well as what terms were required to meet consensus and approval with Dr. Lipsett before being applied to the project scope.

Additional Plans

17. Proposed Laboratory Layout

A proposed layout of MEC E 1-38 has been created. Laboratory dimensions,

existing architecture, and electrical supplies have been included. Suggested

locations of furniture and equipment have been specified. The layout plan is subject

to change as per stakeholder requests during the Execution Phase.

18. Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned represents the internally reported body of knowledge learned over the course of a projects development. The lessons learned report is an organizational process asset and as such it typically does not enter the customer deliverables. However the lessons learned by our team over the course of this project is both informative and useful; and as such we wish to share our findings with our instructor Dr. Sami Fahmy.

19.

Slurry-Pipeline Move Qualitative Analysis

In the original project charter for the Laboratory Development Project one of the desirables was the relocation of the slurry pipeline in MEC E 2-14 to the new laboratory. We were required to qualitatively analyze this desirable to determine its feasibility. Our conclusion was that there isn’t enough space in the lab to facilitate the slurry pipeline. The full details of this analysis are disclosed in this section.

20. Stakeholder Register

The stakeholder analysis conducted was crucial to the success of the project. Missing stakeholders or neglecting to involve stakeholders in project management can delay or cancel a project all together. The stakeholder analysis which was conducted included identifying key stakeholders as well as determining what there communication needs, preferences, and limitations were. Each stakeholder or stakeholder group has had a S.W.O.T analysis was conducted to determine their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and any potential threats they may pose. The influence and expectations of the stakeholders were also assessed as well as their priorities and detailed interests. It was also important to understand the consequences of missing a stakeholder’s objectives and what impact it may have on the project. A stakeholder template was designed to standardize this analysis and to ensure all pertinent information is collected.

Contents

Comprehensive Project Plan - Summary of Subsidiary Plans

2

 

1. Detailed Scope Statement

2

2. Work Breakdown Structure

2

3. Detailed Statement of Work

2

4. Work Package Dictionary

2

5. Scope Management Plan

3

6. Quality Management Plan

3

7. Human Resources Plan

3

8. Procurement Management Plan

4

9. Risk Management Plan

4

10. Risk Register

4

11. Communication Management Plan

3

12. Gantt Chart

5

13. Cost Management Plan

5

14. Estimate for Entire Project

5

15. Simple Flow Diagram

6

16. Project Charter Comparison

6

Additional Plans

6

17. Proposed Laboratory Layout

6

18. Lessons Learned

6

19. Slurry-Pipeline Move Qualitative Analysis

7

20. Stakeholder Analysis

7

Contents

 

8

List of Drawings

13

List of Figures

13

List of Tables

13

1.

Detailed Project Scope Statement

15

1.1 General Project Information

15

1.2 Project Objectives

15

1.3 Product Scope Description

15

1.4 Project

Scope Description

15

1.5 Project Boundaries

16

1.6

Project Deliverables

16

1.7 Project Acceptance Criteria

17

1.8 Project Constraints

17

1.9 Project Assumptions

17

1.10 Initial Project Organizations

17

1.11 Initial Project Risks

17

1.12 Schedule Milestones

17

1.13 Fund Limitation

18

1.14 Cost Estimate

18

1.15 Project Configuration Management Requirements

19

1.16 Approval Requirements

19

1.17 Project Success Factors

19

2. Work Breakdown Structure

20

3. Detailed Statement of Work

21

3.2

Layout Plan

21

4. Work Package Dictionary

25

5. Scope Management Plan

52

5.1 General Project Information

52

5.2 Scope Assumptions

52

5.3 Scope Constraints

52

5.4 Scope Risks

52

5.5 Production of a Detailed Project Scope Statement

52

5.6 Creation of Work Breakdown Structure

53

5.7 Formal Verification and Acceptance

53

5.8 Scope Control and Change Management

53

5.9 Appendix: Engineering Change Request Form

55

6. Quality Management Plan

56

6.1 General Project Information

56

6.2 Quality Assumptions

56

6.3 Quality Constraints

56

6.4 Quality Risks

56

6.5 Setting Project Quality Standards

56

6.6 Quality Assurance Program

57

6.7 Quality Roles and Responsibilities

57

7.

Human Resources Management Plan

59

 

7.1 Project Information

59

7.2 Human Resources Assumptions

59

7.3 Human Resource Constraints

59

7.3.1 Project Owner (Dr. Lipsett)

60

7.3.2 Project Manager and Project Team

60

7.3.3 Laboratory Technicians

60

7.3.4 Research Students

60

7.4 Human Resources Risk Issues

61

7.5 Project Human Resources Need

61

7.5.1 Initial Laboratory Cleanout

61

7.5.2 Secondary Detailed Cleaning

61

7.5.3 Infrastructure Setup

61

7.5.4 Heavy Laboratory Equipment and Furnishing Relocation

62

7.5.5 Small Equipment, Tools, Experiments, and Furnishings

62

7.6

Time Table/Schedule

62

7.6.1 Initial Laboratory Cleanout

62

7.6.2 Secondary Detailed Cleaning

62

7.6.3 Infrastructure Setup

62

7.6.4 Heavy Laboratory Equipment and Furnishing Relocation

63

7.6.5 Small Equipment, Tools, Experiments, and Furnishings

63

7.7 Recognition and Awards

63

7.8 Compliance with Human Resources Rules

63

7.9 Team Building Effort

64

7.10 Training Needs

64

8.

Procurement Management Plan

65

8.1 General Project Information

65

8.2 Procurement Assumptions

65

8.3 Procurement Constraints

65

8.4 Market Research and Conditions

65

8.5 Procurement of Products and Services

66

8.6 Make-or-Buy Analysis

66

8.7 Contract Type, Procurement Method and Project Delivery Method

66

8.8

Procurement Justification

67

 

8.9

Roles and Responsibilities

67

9.

Risk Management Plan

68

9.1 Methodology

68

9.2 Risk Identification

69

9.2.1 Documentation Review

69

9.2.2 Tools & Techniques

70

9.2.3 Identified Risks

70

9.3

Qualitative Risk Analysis

70

9.3.1 Risk Probability & Impact Assessment

70

9.3.2 Probability & Impact Matrix

70

9.3.3 Risk Data Quality Assessment

71

9.3.4 Risk Categorization

71

9.4 Quantitative Risk Analysis

71

9.5 Risk Monitoring, Control and Response Planning

72

9.6 Roles and Responsibilities

72

9.7 Budgeting

73

9.8 Reporting Format and Content

73

9.9 Risk Ownership

73

9.10 Risk Auditing

74

9.11 Risk Management Plan Approval

74

9.12 Appendix: Laboratory Relocation Safety Checklist

75

9.13 Appendix: Probability and Impact Matrix

77

9.14 Appendix: Risk Sources and Affected Project Areas

78

9.15 Appendix: Accident / Incident Report Form

79

9.16 Appendix: Risk Management Plan Approval

81

10. Risk Register

82

11. Communication Management Plan

84

 

11.1 General Project Information

84

11.2 Objectives

84

11.3 Communication Constraints

84

11.4 Communication Assumptions

85

11.5 Communication Risks

85

11.6

Target Audiences

85

11.6.1 Stakeholder’s requiring formal Communication

85

11.6.2 Team Responsibility

86

11.7 Communication Tools and Format

86

11.8 Communication Matrix

87

11.9 Communication Guidelines

87

11.10 Special Communication Events

87

11.11 Budget

88

11.12 Evaluation

88

11.13 Appendix: Typical Project Meeting Minutes

89

12. Gantt Chart

90

13. Cost Management Plan

91

13.1 Project Information

91

13.2 Cost Assumptions

91

13.3 Cost Constraints

92

13.4 Cost

Risks

92

13.5 Budget Sources and Approvals / Cost Management Roles

92

13.6 Project Estimation Techniques

92

13.7 Changes to the Budget

93

13.8 Cost

Expenditure Tracking

93

13.9 Cost Reporting

93

13.10 Cost Closeout

94

13.11 Appendix: Expense Sheet

95

14.

Estimate for Entire Project

96

14.1 Project Cost Estimate

96

14.2 Project Cost Incurrence

97

16. Project Charter Comparison

99

17. Proposed Laboratory Layout

100

18. Lessons Learned

101

18.1 General Project Information

101

18.2 Process Methodologies

101

18.3 Project Organization

101

18.4 Risk Management

101

18.5 Scope and Time Management

101

18.6

Communication

102

19.

Slurry-Pipeline Move Qualitative Analysis

103

19.1 General Project Information

103

19.2 Problem Definition

103

19.3 Constraints

103

19.4 Spatial Requirements

103

19.5 Trade-off Analysis

104

19.6 Conclusions

104

20.

Stakeholder Analysis

103

Team #1 – Personnel Listing

117

List of Drawings

Drawing 1 – Laboratory Layout Plan

100

List of Figures

Figure 1 – Work Breakdown Structure Figure 2 – ECR Process Figure 3 – Risk Management Process Figure 4 – Cumulative Distribution Function for Move Completion Figure 5 – Probability and Impact Matrix Figure 6 – Typical Meeting Minutes Figure 7 – Earned Value, Planned Value and Actual Cost S-curve Figure 8 – Simple Flow Chart

20

54

68

72

77

89

94

98

List of Tables

Table 1 – Quality Roles and Responsibilities Table 2 – Procurement of Products and Services Table 3 – Procurement Roles and Responsibilities

57

66

67

Table 4 – Project Cost Assumptions

73

Table 5 – Risk Sources

78

Table 6 – Affected Project Areas

78

Table 7 – Risk Register

83

Table 8 – Target Audiences

85

Table 9 – Communication Matrix

87

Table 10 – Project Cost Estimate

96

Table 11 – Slurry-Pipeline Tradeoff Analysis

104

1. Detailed Project Scope Statement

1.1 General Project Information

Project Name: Laboratory Development Project Location: Mechanical Engineering Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Project Manager: Shannon MacDonald

1.2 Project Objectives

The objective of the Laboratory Development Project is to establish the plans for setting up a new laboratory in room number MEC E 1-38 in Mechanical Engineering building by migrating the equipment and infrastructure from room numbers MEC E 2-22. This involves thoroughly inspecting laboratories affected by the migration process for available furniture and equipment, and developing a laboratory layout for the new lab in MEC E 1-38. Discussion with students, researchers, faculty members and administrative staff who are going to be affected has to be undertaken and feedback should be incorporated in the project plan. Any replaced furniture or equipment must be serviceable (good working order) however quality level can include second hand purchases.

1.3 Product Scope Description

The finished product will be a research facility or laboratory used by up to a total of 12 students/researchers. This lab will include two separate lab sections: a “clean area” environment for analytical work and a “dirty area” section for hands on work.

The “clean area” environment will include space for 4 computer work stations as well as other desks, tables and chairs for paperwork and studying. The “clean area” environment will also require some shelving units.

The “dirty area” section will include the usage of heavy machinery including: a mill, a foam cutter, a refrigerator with oil sand samples, a hydraulic shaker table (already in lab), solder station as well as additional storage space for other oil sands materials.

1.4 Project Scope Description

The project management team at Chrome Engineering will provide the planning, scheduling, schedule coordination and procurement for the new MEC E 1-38

lab. We are to obtain feedback from the various stakeholders to ensure their opinions and knowledge have been utilized to benefit of the project. This will also assist in the overall coordination of the project. These stakeholders include Dr. Lipsett, the coordinator for the lab technicians Roger Marchand, as well as the researchers for the current labs. Effectively planning for the development of the lab will facilitate coordinated and optimized movement of lab resources. The entire process will be executed in a manner that minimizes the disturbance to the ongoing work/studies in the building.

1.5 Project Boundaries

The project management team at Chrome Engineering will be responsible for facilities planning, furniture procurement, and resource allocation for students and researchers at the new laboratory location. The migration of the current lab facilities and resources in the MEC E 2-22 labs will be conducted after the winter term of 2011 ends. The new lab space is expected to require 4-8 desks as well as additional chairs and tables as well as the setup of personal space for students – personal storage areas (drawers or lockers).

It is understood that not all researchers and equipment from MEC E 2-22 are being moved. Only the resources associated with the 7 researchers working for Dr. Lipsett are being relocated. We also accept that other labs will be coordinating moves at the same time. We will schedule to work with these other labs so that the usage of hallways and entrances does not clash; however we are not responsible for their moves. Our project management team is responsible for coordinating moves by producing a schedule. We are also aware that the scheduled moves do not have to happen all at once. The move should be scheduled to minimize impact on ongoing projects. As part of our procurement we must ensure proper boxes and equipment are in place to relocate everything safely. Our project management team is not responsible for construction/structural changes. Our project management team is not responsible for U of A responsible features (i.e. fire extinguishers). We must ensure that the lab in question has functional campus Wi-Fi as well as a functional phone must be setup.

1.6 Project Deliverables

Our project management team will deliver three deliverables. The first deliverable is the Phase I report outlining the project definition. The second deliverable is an intermediate report outlining the work in progress as well as delivering the currently completed work for review by Dr. Lipsett. The final deliverable is the Final Report containing our complete migration plan.

1.7

Project Acceptance Criteria

Product acceptance will be based on an assessment by the new lab users. The use of a post-move survey will provide the project team with insights as to how well the project went from the perspective of stakeholders. Project acceptance will be based on evaluation of the completed migration plan by Dr. Lipsett as well as an independent third party Dr. Sami Fahmy.

1.8 Project Constraints

The work of moving the lab will be conducted mainly with the aid of lab technicians, researchers and students. The scheduling of this project is constrained with reference to their work schedules and by the fact that we must minimize the impact / disturbance to current research work. Our project is also constrained by a budget limitation and a project completion deadline.

1.9 Project Assumptions

It is assumed that the Wi-Fi is already available at the new location provided by the Wi-Fi router in the lab. We also believe that the power supply in the new lab location is functional and that we are not required to implement any construction/structural changes.

1.10 Initial Project Organizations

The two main coordinators that have already conducted feasibility analysis on this project would include Dr. Lipsett and Roger Marchand who will coordinate the lab technicians.

1.11 Initial Project Risks

We do not currently have schedules for the other labs moving in the same time frame as these labs. This uncertainty has associated risks with the move. Other risks include any unexpected expense or schedule delay.

1.12 Schedule Milestones

Project Definition (Mar. 7)

1. Project Environment

2. Preliminary Project Scope Statement

3. Project Charter

4.

Team Charter

5. Stakeholder Register

Intermediate report outlining the work in progress (Mar. 23)

Format will be the same as the final report.

Final Report containing the migration plan. (April. 11)

Comprehensive Project Plan – Summary of Subsidiary Plan Subsidiary Plans

1. Detailed Scope Statement

2. Work Breakdown Structure

3. Detailed Statement of Work

4. Work Package Dictionary

5. Scope Management Plan

6. Quality Management Plan

7. Human Resources Plan

8. Procurement Management Plan

9. Risk Management Plan

10. Risk Register (Type I or Type II)

11. Communication Management Plan

12. Gantt Chart

13. Cost Management Plan

14. Estimate for entire Project

15. Simple Flow Diagram

16. Project Charter Comparison

17. Laboratory Layout Plan

18. Lessons Learned

1.13 Fund Limitation

This project has been assigned a budget of $10,000 and the team has been informed that this is a flexible amount. The team has been instructed to stay close to this number so we will assume it is an upper limit. The impact of this assigned budget will be the requirement to complete a cost estimate for the entire Project.

1.14 Cost Estimate

The moving of equipment and materials will be conducted by students and lab technician’s meaning additional paid movers will not be required. The cost of the move itself is anticipated to be minimal. Therefore most of the expense

expected will be in procurement and cleaning. We will be detailing a cost estimate of the move.

1.15 Project Configuration Management Requirements

The scope is well defined, and any changes in the scope are expected to be minimal. Researcher surveys may include a few new or unexpected procurement provisions; however these are not expected to be large in size or cost.

1.16 Approval Requirements

Dr. Lipsett has the final say in the approval of this project. All scope changes, cost changes, quality changes, schedule changes require his approval.

1.17 Project Success Factors

This projects success is dependent on the careful considerate and

conscientious delivery of our three project deliverables.

must be detailed, complete and functional. These deliverables will be assessed by Dr. Lipsett and the first and final deliverable will be assessed by an independent third party Dr. Sami Fahmy

These deliverables

2. Work Breakdown Structure

2. Work Breakdown Structure Figure 1 – Work Breakdown Structure 20

Figure 1 – Work Breakdown Structure

20

3. Detailed Statement of Work

3.1 Clean and Move-in Ready Lab MEC E 1-38

Lab MEC E 1-38 will be cleaned to remove any equipment, material etc which is not desired. The cleaning will be divided into two phases, namely – initial

laboratory cleanout

description of the deliverables produced:

and secondary detailed cleaning. The following is a

̵ List of items to be kept in MEC E 1-38: A list indicating all the items in MEC E 1-38 which will be left there.

̵ List of items to be disposed / relocated: A list indicating all the items in MEC E 1-38 which need to be relocated to any other location or disposed off.

̵ Lab MEC E 1-38 after initial laboratory cleanout: In the initial laboratory cleanout phase, MEC E 1-38 will be cleared of all non-essential equipments, furnishings, laboratory experiments, and infrastructure. This will require two technicians with little skill due the nature of the items being moved. The technicians will be provided by the University of Alberta.

̵ Lab MEC E 1-38 after secondary detailed cleaning: In the secondary detailed cleaning phase mopping, dusting and wiping down tables along with various other small activities will be performed. The work will require two individuals with basic cleaning skills. The work is to be subcontracted to a cleaning agency approved by the University of Alberta.

3.2 Layout Plan

A layout plan clearly showing proposed configuration of MEC E 1-38 will be prepared using appropriate software tools such as AutoCAD, SolidWorks etc. Following is a description of the deliverables produced:

̵ Layout plan: A layout plan prepared using software tools such as AutoCAD, SolidWorks etc. The plan will be drawn to scale and will take all the structural constraints into consideration.

3.3 Dirty Area

A dirty area will be created in the MEC E 1-38 for experimentation and materials storage purpose. Following is a description of the deliverables produced:

̵ Oil sands experimentation setup: Oil sand experimentation equipment will be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The commissioned experimentation setup will be

tested to ensure proper functionality. A storage area will be created to temporarily store oil sands experimentation related materials.

̵ Solder station: Solder station will be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The installed equipment must be tested to ensure proper functionality.

̵ Milling machine: Milling machine will be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The installed equipment will be tested to ensure proper functionality.

̵ XYZ Platform: XYZ platform will be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The machine has large dimensions; therefore appropriate care will be taken during its migration. The installed equipment will be tested to ensure proper functionality.

3.4 Clean Area

A clean area will be created in the MEC E 1-38 for student’s study, paperwork, communal work and instruction delivery. Following is a description of the deliverables produced:

̵ Student study area: A student study area will be created in MEC E 1-38 for

paperwork and studying of students at a location specified by the layout plan.

It will be equipped with workspace for four students with desks, chairs and network enabled computers. The workspace will also have personal storage space for students.

̵ Furniture: Required furniture will be moved to the clean area of MEC E 1-38 and placed at locations specified by the layout plan. Requirements of the furniture will be thoroughly assessed. It will also be checked that whether university can supply can any furniture. Procurement decisions will be taken after getting response from the University about furniture.

̵ White board: A whiteboard will be placed in the clean area of MEC E 1-38 at

a location specified by the layout plan. The whiteboard will be placed in a

manner which gives sufficient space to students for comfortably following instructor. It will be placed such that it does not create any obstruction in the movement of personnel in the laboratory.

̵ Communal work table: A communal work table in the clean area of MEC E 1- 38 will be placed at a location specified by the layout plan. It will be used for group based work and will be placed such that sufficient space is available to allow people stand around it and / or placement of chairs.

3.5

Infrastructure Setup

Although lab MEC E 1-38 has most of the required infrastructure put in place, a study of the infrastructure required will be made to assess shortcomings and procurement requirements. Following is a description of the deliverables produced:

̵ Electrical items: Electrical infrastructure will be setup in the lab MEC E 1-38. Necessary electrical items such as switchboards, power outlets, extension cords etc will be identified by studying layout plan and electrical requirements of equipments, computers etc. Technicians with electrical certification will complete activities in this work package.

̵ Network / Communication infrastructure: Network / Communication infrastructure will be setup in the lab MEC E 1-38. Necessary network / communication related items will be identified and procured. IT support personnel will assess the requirements and guide the procurements. They will install and configure any necessary software / hardware.

̵ Other miscellaneous infrastructure: Other necessary infrastructure required for the lab MEC E 1-38 (for example water supply, gas supply, any other equipment related special needs etc.) will be identified and procured. This infrastructure then needs to be setup in the lab MEC E 1-38. Technicians having expertise in these infrastructures will assess the requirements and guide the procurements. They will install and configure the infrastructure.

3.6 Transportation Means

Equipments, personnel and various materials will be required for completing the migration process. Following is a description of the deliverables produced:

̵ Packaging materials: Packaging materials required for covering the equipments and materials which need to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 will be procured. Different types of packaging materials will be needed for different equipments. A comprehensive list of required packaging materials will be prepared after assessing the form and structure of equipments and materials to be shifted. The required packaging materials will then be procured.

̵ Equipments for facilitating movement: Equipments and materials required for shifting the items in the lab MEC E 2-22 to MEC E 1-38 will be identified and procured. Consultation with other departments and workshops of the mechanical engineering department will be done to check which equipments can be procured internally to accomplish the migration. If any equipment is not available in the university, it will be procured from outside sources after conducting buy or rent analysis.

̵ Personnel list: Personnel needed for shifting the items in the lab MEC E 2-22 to MEC E 1-38 will be identified. Their availability and schedule will be carefully analyzed and the migration will be planned accordingly.

4. Work Package Dictionary

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1-38

1.1.1

May 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

This should be the first activity in project execution.

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Bee-clean cleaners

3 Days

Work Package Description

MEC E 1-38 should be cleaned to remove all non-essential equipment, furnishings, laboratory experiments setup, and infrastructure. The cleaning must include mopping, dusting, and wiping down tables along with various other small cleaning activities.

Work Package Deliverables

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Lab technicians and cleaners will not be absent during the activity duration.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Layout plan

1.1.2

April 1, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Chrome Engineering

7 Days

Work Package Description

A layout plan clearly showing proposed configuration of MEC E 1-38 should be prepared using appropriate software tools such as AutoCAD, SolidWorks etc. The plan must be drawn to scale and should take all the structural constraints into consideration.

Work Package Deliverables

Layout plan clearly showing configuration of MEC E 1-

38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Team has required skills to use software tools for layout design.

Team has access to the necessary software.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Oil sands

1.1.3.1.1

May 11, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians (One crane certified technician), Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

Oil sand experimentation equipment should be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The installed equipment must be tested to ensure proper functionality. Any malfunction should be immediately reported to Dr. Lipsett to take appropriate actions.

Work Package Deliverables

Commissioned oil sand experimentation machinery in the dirty area of MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Successful commissioning and operation of oil sand experimentation equipment.

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Power supply will be available uninterrupted during testing of installed equipment.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Solder station

1.1.3.1.2

May 11, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians (One crane certified technician), Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

Solder station has to be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The installed equipment must be tested to ensure proper functionality. Any malfunction should be immediately reported to Dr. Lipsett to take appropriate actions.

Work Package Deliverables

Commissioned solder station in the dirty area of MEC E

1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Successful commissioning and operation of solder station.

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Power supply will be available uninterrupted during testing of installed equipment.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Milling machine

1.1.3.1.3

May 11, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians (One crane certified technician), Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

Milling machine has to be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The installed equipment must be tested to ensure proper functionality. Any malfunction should be immediately reported to Dr. Lipsett to take appropriate actions.

Work Package Deliverables

Commissioned milling machine in the dirty area of MEC E 1-38.

Electrical conduits to facilitate operation of the mill.

Acceptance Criteria

Successful commissioning and operation of milling machine.

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Power supply will be available uninterrupted during testing of installed equipment.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

XYZ Platform

1.1.3.1.4

May 11, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians (One crane certified technician), Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

XYZ platform has to be shifted to MEC E 1-38 and commissioned in the dirty area at the location specified in the layout plan. The machine has large dimensions; therefore appropriate care must be taken during its migration. The installed equipment must be tested to ensure proper functionality. Any malfunction should be immediately reported to Dr. Lipsett to take appropriate actions.

Work Package Deliverables

Commissioned XYZ platform in the dirty area of MEC E

1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Successful commissioning and operation of XYZ platform.

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

Doors of laboratories have sufficient height so that the movement of XYZ platform is not obstructed.

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Other small equipments

1.1.3.1.5

May 13, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan, Activities in WBS

number 1.1.3.1.1 to

1.1.3.1.4.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians

1 Day

Work Package Description

Other small equipments, which are not covered by the activities in the above mentioned work packages, such as remote controlled car, ancillary materials with equipments, cables etc. has to be shifted to MEC E 1-38.

Work Package Deliverables

Other small equipments shifted to the dirty area of MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Student study area

1.1.4.1

May 20, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan, Activities in WBS

number 1.1.3.1.1 to

1.1.3.1.5.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Students, Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

A student area within the clean area of MEC E 1-38 should be created for paperwork and studying at a location specified by the layout plan. It should be equipped with workspace for four students with desks, chairs and network enabled computers. The workspace should also have personal storage space for students. Students will move their personal belongings themselves. They will coordinate the movements of their work desk etc with the laborers and lab technicians.

Work Package Deliverables

Desks and chairs for four students in the clean area of MEC E 1-38.

Fully functional computers in the clean area of MEC E

1-38.

Personal storage space for students in the clean area of MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of students.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Furniture

1.1.4.2

May 20, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan, Activities in WBS

number 1.1.3.1.1 to

1.1.3.1.5.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

Required furniture needs to be moved to the clean area of MEC E 1-38 and placed at locations specified by the layout plan.

Work Package Deliverables

Properly placed furniture in the clean area of MEC E 1-

38.

Acceptance Criteria

Functional computers.

 

Approval of students.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

White board

1.1.4.3

May 20, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan, Activities in WBS

number 1.1.3.1.1 to

1.1.3.1.5.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

A whiteboard should be placed in the clean area of MEC E 1- 38 at a location specified by the layout plan. The whiteboard should be placed in a manner which gives sufficient space to students for comfortably following instructor. It should be placed such that it does not create any obstruction in the movement of personnel in the laboratory.

Work Package Deliverables

Properly placed whiteboard in the clean area of MEC E

1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of students.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Communal work table

1.1.4.4

May 20, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Clean and move-in ready lab MEC E 1- 38, Layout plan, Activities in WBS

number 1.1.3.1.1 to

1.1.3.1.5.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Laborers

1 Day

Work Package Description

A communal work table in the clean area of MEC E 1-38 should be placed at a location specified by the layout plan. It will be used for group based work and should be placed such that sufficient space is available to allow people stand around it and / or placement of chairs.

Work Package Deliverables

Communal work table in the clean area of MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of students.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Items to be migrated to new lab

1.2.1

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which need to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 should be identified. It should be ensured that only the items that need to be migrated are chosen in this activity. Their conditions should be inspected and decision of their migration should be taken based on the found condition. The decision will be taken by lab technicians and Dr. Lipsett.

Work Package Deliverables

List of items showing items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which would be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Items to be left

1.2.2

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which need not to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 and would be kept in MEC E 2-22 should be identified. The conditions of items identified should be inspected and decision of their disposal / repair / keep as such should be taken based on the found condition. The decision will be taken by lab technicians and Dr. Lipsett.

Work Package Deliverables

List of items showing items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which would not be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38 and will be left in the MEC E 2-22.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Items to be disposed

1.2.3

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which need not to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 and are in a defunct condition should be identified. The decision of their disposal / repair should be taken based on the found condition. The decision will be taken by lab technicians and Dr. Lipsett.

Work Package Deliverables

List of items showing items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which would not be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38 and will be disposed or repaired.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Clean Lab MEC E 2-22

1.2.4

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

Activities in WBS number 1.2.1 to

1.2.3.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Laborers

2 Days

Work Package Description

Lab MEC E 2-22 should be cleaned once all the items which need to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 and disposed have been migrated and disposed.

Work Package Deliverables

Clean Lab MEC E 2-22.

 

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Electrical items

1.3.1

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Technicians from University of Alberta (With electrical certification)

2 Days

Work Package Description

Electrical infrastructure needs to be setup in the lab MEC E 1- 38. Necessary electrical items need to be identified by studying layout plan and electrical requirements of equipments, computers etc. Technicians with electrical certification will be required to complete activities in this work package.

Work Package Deliverables

List of electrical items required for the lab MEC E 1-38.

Lab MEC E 1-38 ready with necessary electrical infrastructure.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Network / Communication infrastructure

1.3.2

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering, IT support personnel

2 Days

Work Package Description

Network / Communication infrastructure needs to be setup in the lab MEC E 1-38. Necessary network / communication related items need to be identified and procured. IT support personnel will assess the requirements and guide the procurements. They will install and configure any necessary software / hardware.

Work Package Deliverables

List of network / communication related items required for the lab MEC E 1-38.

Lab MEC E 1-38 ready with necessary network / communication infrastructure.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of students.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Other miscellaneous infrastructure

1.3.3

May 6, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering, Technicians with special expertise

2 Days

Work Package Description

Other necessary infrastructure required for the lab MEC E 1- 38 (For example water supply, gas supply, any other equipment related special needs etc.) should be identified and procured. This infrastructure then needs to be setup in the lab MEC E 1-38. Technicians having expertise in these infrastructures will assess the requirements and guide the procurements. They will install and configure the infrastructure.

Work Package Deliverables

List of other miscellaneous infrastructure related items required for the lab MEC E 1-38.

Lab MEC E 1-38 ready with other miscellaneous infrastructure.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Packaging materials

1.4.1

May 10, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Packaging materials required for covering the equipments and materials which need to be migrated to MEC E 1-38 will be procured. Different types of packaging materials will be needed for different equipments.

Work Package Deliverables

List of required packaging materials for packing equipments and materials to be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38.

Packed equipments and materials to be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Equipments for facilitating movement

1.4.2

May 10, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians (One crane certified technician), Laborers, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Equipments and materials required for shifting the items in the lab MEC E 2-22 to MEC E 1-38 should be identified.

Work Package Deliverables

List of items showing items in the lab MEC E 2-22 which would be migrated to the lab MEC E 1-38.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Personnel

1.4.3

May 10, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

Activities in WBS number 1.1.3.1.1 to 1.1.3.1.5 and 1.1.4.1 to 1.1.4.4.

Activities in WBS number 1.1.2 and

1.2.1.

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

1 Day

Work Package Description

Personnel needed for shifting the items in the lab MEC E 2-22 to MEC E 1-38 should be identified. Their availability and schedule need to be carefully analyzed and the migration should be planned accordingly.

Work Package Deliverables

List of personnel necessary for migration.

Migration schedule of personnel.

 

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Lab safety manuals and first aid guides

1.5.1

April 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering, Students

Winter 2011 academic term

Work Package Description

Laboratory safety manuals and first aid guide need to be procured and appropriately placed at place where it is easily accessible. Students and lab technicians who will work in the lab should be made aware of first aid techniques and laboratory safety manuals.

Work Package Deliverables

Laboratory safety manual.

 

First aid guides.

 

Students and lab technicians trained on lab safety and first aid guidelines.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Alberta building codes documents

1.5.2

April 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

Winter 2011 academic term

Work Package Description

Alberta building codes documents need to be procured and studied to identify the parameters which need to be kept in mind during migration. Lab technicians should be made aware of the building codes.

Work Package Deliverables

Alberta building codes documents.

 

Lab technicians trained on Alberta building codes.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

University regulations documents

1.5.3

April 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Lab technicians, Chrome Engineering

Winter 2011 academic term

Work Package Description

University regulations documents need to be procured and studied to identify the parameters which need to be kept in mind during migration. Lab technicians should be made aware of the University regulations (If they are not aware already).

Work Package Deliverables

University regulations documents.

 

Lab technicians trained on University regulations (If not already trained).

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Project management courseware

1.6.1

April 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Chrome Engineering

Winter 2011 academic term

Work Package Description

Various project documents compliant with Dr. Fahmy’s instructions need to be produced. These are the documents which may not be required by client and the stakeholders but are necessary for the coursework.

Work Package Deliverables

Project deliverables compliant with Dr. Fahmy’s instructions.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Fahmy.

 

Approval of teaching assistant.

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Client / Stakeholders specific documents

1.6.2

May 30, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Chrome Engineering

5 Months

Work Package Description

Various documents for the reference of client and stakeholders need to be prepared. Feedback and opinion of the stakeholders must be well documented in these documents.

Work Package Deliverables

Client / Stakeholders specific documents which are not part of documents required for coursework.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of other stakeholders

Assumptions

None

Name of Work Package

WBS Number

Due date

Internal project planning documents

1.6.3

April 4, 2011

Responsible Organization or Individual

Interdependencies

 

Before

After

Chrome Engineering

None

None

Resources Assigned

Duration

Chrome Engineering

3 Months

Work Package Description

Various project planning documents for the reference of team members need to be prepared. These planning documents will aid the team members in preparing deliverables and client specific documents. PMI methodologies need to be studied from PMBoK and appropriately applied to the project planning.

Work Package Deliverables

Project planning documents.

 

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of Dr. Lipsett.

 

Approval of team members.

Approval of lab technicians.

Assumptions

None

5. Scope Management Plan

5.1 General Project Information

Project Name: Laboratory Development Project Location: Mechanical Engineering Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Project Manager: Shannon MacDonald

5.2 Scope Assumptions

It is assumed that all changes to the project scope will required notification to the following stakeholders: The project owner Dr. Lipsett, Shannon MacDonald Project Manager for Chrome Engineering, Researchers using the lab 1-38, Mechanical Engineering Technician responsible for commissioning the lab (via Roger Marchand).

5.3 Scope Constraints

It is assumed that creation, changes, updates to project scope will require approval of the project owner Dr. Lipsett and the Project Manager for Chrome Engineering Shannon MacDonald.

5.4 Scope Risks

We have found that some of the supporting stakeholder information such as researcher surveys from the researchers require long periods of time to respond. This may cause scope dependency risks.

5.5 Production of a Detailed Project Scope Statement

Upon receipt of client feedback and stakeholder feedback (researcher surveys) we will update any new or improved details of the project and product scope into the preliminary version. New details found from the development of the Work Breakdown Structure into the production of the detailed Project Scope Statement will also be added.

Creation of the Detailed Scope Statement Documentation and updates will be primarily handled by team member Sean Hodgson. All additions, changes, corrections, and updates are to be submitted in writing via an approved ECR (see Appendix 5.9 for ECR form). This process will be described further in section 5.8, but will require the involvement of the requesting stakeholder, the

Chrome Engineering Project Manager Shannon MacDonald, and the Project Client Dr. Lipsett.

5.6 Creation of Work Breakdown Structure

The creation of the work breakdown structure for this project followed the following steps. The project team for Chrome Engineering will evaluated the detailed project scope statement, its deliverables and overall project work and broke it down into smaller more manageable pieces. These pieces will be illustrated and further broken down using a graphical representation via a network diagram. The components of the network diagram will be further expanded upon in the creation of a WBS dictionary. Creation of the WBS documentation and updates will be primarily handled by team member Anand Rohit. All additions, changes, corrections and updates are to be submitted in writing via an approved ECR (see Appendix 5.9 for ECR form). Any team member or the client can submit a completed ECR to Anand Rohit, however it must have signed approval from both the Project Manager and the Client Dr. Lipsett.

5.7 Formal Verification and Acceptance

The final product produced for Dr. Lipsett by Chrome Engineering will be the planning documents for the Laboratory Development Project. Our completion and success in this project is dependent on the quality of these documents. The minimum required level of detail of these documents is listed in the Detailed Project Scope Statement.

Assessment from the client on the quality regarding the project deliverables will be based on the completeness of the project management and planning details in the final project deliverable. This assessment will be completed with a written review provided by an independent third party (Prof. Sami Fahmy) who will evaluate the quality of the project management documentation provided by Chrome Engineering and will assign a grade for this documentation.

5.8 Scope Control and Change Management

The Detailed Project Scope Statement will continue to develop with the progress of the project. To implement a scope change new requirements/needs to be updated and approved. All additional unexpected details must be recorded and as such the Project Scope Statement should be updated in a formal manner. It should be understood that additional requirements added on by the client can and most likely will impact the overall schedule and cost of the project which is why all changes to Project Scope require formal approval of both the project manager and the client.

Figure 2 – ECR Process Any major change to the scope of a project requires

Figure 2 – ECR Process

Any major change to the scope of a project requires the submission of an ECR by a Stakeholder. This ECR is evaluated by both the project manager and the Client Dr. Lipsett in terms of feasibility. To approve the scope change the client must come to some understanding of the impact of the scope change to both time and cost and approve these impacts. If the ECR is approved, the scope documents are updated and the Project Manager notifies the appropriate stakeholders. If the ECR is not approved the scope documents are not approved and the Project Manager notifies the appropriate stakeholders.

5.9

Appendix: Engineering Change Request Form

ECR#

 

Chrome Engineering ECR Form

Date

Page 1 of

To:

 

From:

 

Title of Change:

 

Priority: (Low, Medium, High)

 

Need Date:

 

Project:

Laboratory Development Project

Configuration Items Affected:

 

Justification for change

Justification for change
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)

Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)

Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)
Justification for change Description of Change (if necessary continue on next page)

Signature of Originator:

Signature of Project Manager:

Signature of Client:

6. Quality Management Plan

6.1 General Project Information

Project Name: Laboratory development project Location: Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Alberta Edmonton Project Manager: Shannon MacDonald

6.2 Quality Assumptions

Quality of furniture would be assessed only on their strength, not outward appearance. As per owner’s expectations, the furniture’s purpose will only be for their functionality.

Research students will comply with the safety norm and quality transportation.

6.3 Quality Constraints

Research students will not be experienced in transportation services, so it will be a constraint on both the quality and time required for the services. Materials especially electrical appliance or wiring should be certified.

6.4 Quality Risks

As most of the material will be coming from the University facility, there will be limited choice and quality of material which can be an issue. Risk of using second hand material can be a problem in future.

Services provided by research students might lack in terms of quality and punctuality.

6.5 Setting Project Quality Standards

Quality of all the material to be procured will be set by Dr. Lipsett as he will be inspecting the material and give approval for purchase.

Quality of services, movement of machines, material and cleaning will be set here. For the movement of heavy machinery, desired quality is the safety of these heavy machineries. Transporting them will require great amount of effort and control for successful transfer without any damage.

For the movement of small equipments by research students, it is desired that they should comply with the safety norms. Safety of research students and anyone passing by the corridors is the quality standard for this process.

For the cleaning services by Bee clean, cleaning the lab without disturbing the electrical systems and existing machinery will be the quality standard.

6.6 Quality Assurance Program

For assuring the quality of movement, the path for the movement of machines (path of crane) will be closed for all passerby peoples and at each entry, signboards will be displayed to inform about the movement and alternate path to pass.

Roger will personally monitor the move of heavy machinery to ensure the safety of personnel and machines.

Research students will be provided with presentation on safe methods for transferring material.

Dr. Lipsett will have a first aid kit ready in case of any minor accidents.

6.7 Quality Roles and Responsibilities

Table 1 – Quality Roles and Responsibilities

Table 1 – Quality Roles and Responsibilities

Table 1 – Quality Roles and Responsibilities

Personnel

Table 1 – Quality Roles and Responsibilities Personnel Dr. Lipsett Roger Marchand Roles Safety In charge

Dr. Lipsett

Roger

Marchand

Roles

Safety In charge

Quality in charge

Quality Officer

Safety Officer

Responsibilities

Dr. Lipsett will be responsible for providing first aid if required.

Dr. Lipsett will approve the quality standards of material and monitor the quality of movement.

Roger will approve and procure all new material for lab infrastructure required.

Roger will aid Dr. Lipsett in case of accident.

6.8

Appendix: Safe Lifting Procedures

Before lifting a load, think of other means of moving it using a device that can help you to pull, push or roll the load.

Have firm footing and make sure the standing surface that you are on is not slippery.

Determine the best way to hold the load using handles, gripping areas or special lifting tools. Get a firm grip on the load.

Keep your back straight by tucking your chin in.

Tighten your stomach muscles and lift with your legs.

Lift the load slowly.

Hold the load as close to the body as possible; be sure you position the load close to the body before lifting.

Do not twist during your lift or when moving the load. Turn with your feet rather than your back.

Set the load down gently, using your legs and keeping your back as straight as possible.

Be sure your fingers are out of the way when putting the load down and when moving the load through tight spaces.

Ask for help if you need it and use lifting tools and devices whenever they are available.

7. Human Resources Management Plan

7.1 Project Information

Project Name: Laboratory Development Plan Location: Mechanical Engineering Building at the University of Alberta Project Manager: Shannon MacDonald

7.2 Human Resources Assumptions

Assumptions made during the development of the Human Resource Plan Include:

I. The schedules of the laboratory technicians will remain available as was communicated to the project team by the technicians themselves.

II. The laboratory technician certified, experienced, and responsible for operating the crane will be available as promised.

III. The laboratory technicians who have been contacted by the project team will remain employees of the University of Alberta during the entire span of the project.

IV. The researchers involved and working under Dr. Lipsett will not take any extended leaves of absence or permanently relocate during the relocation phase of the project.

V. Researchers have accurately catalogued their needs, equipment, and availability.

7.3 Human Resource Constraints

The human resources that will be utilized during the course of the project will include Dr. Lipsett, the project manager (Shannon MacDonald), the project team, laboratory technicians, a cleaning service, and research students under Dr. Lipsett. Each individual group of human resources has various constraints which need to be considered.

7.3.1

Project Owner (Dr. Lipsett)

The project owner, Dr. Lipsett, has a flexible schedule. The constraint lies in quantity of time he is able to spend with the project team on a weekly basis which is limited to a few hours. This requires the team to be prepared with concise questions resulting in high efficiency low duration meeting.

7.3.2 Project Manager and Project Team

The project manager as well as the project team have considerable commitments to academic pursuits; work related responsibilities, as well as other personal commitments. The project manager as well as the project team will be unavailable after April 13, 2011. The project manager and the project team are limited by the amount of face to face meeting times available.

7.3.3 Laboratory Technicians

The laboratory technicians are available to the project team within regular work hours and are not permitted to work overtime at the University of Alberta. The laboratory technicians are also unavailable during weekends and on statutory holidays. Lunch breaks as well as regularly scheduled coffee breaks will also be taken at designated times for predetermined durations. These policies are set by and comply with the Canadian labour code as well as University of Alberta employee policies. Laboratory personnel handle a wide range of projects at the University of Alberta and so advanced notice of requirements is necessary. The demanding schedules of the laboratory technicians limit their work contribution. The laboratory technician’s work is primarily based on a batch work structure and so the project team will need to schedule and utilize the technicians accordingly.

7.3.4 Research Students

Research students directly affected will require advanced notice of all migration related activities. Researchers will require windows of allocated time in which they are able to relocate their materials and tools. The laboratory space allocated to a researcher is to be work ready upon that student’s relocation window. This is required to ensure minimal disruption to the researchers schedule and provides appropriate accommodations for the researcher to work.

7.4

Human Resources Risk Issues

It has been found necessary to address issues such as human resource shortages, employee transfers, and employee promotions. The project team, working with the University of Alberta, has been assured that staff will be made available regardless of the aforementioned. These reassurances have minimized the associated human resource risk. The labour intensive phase of the migration process has been scheduled to occur after the end of the semester. This is advantageous as the amount of constrains and demands on the laboratory technicians is lowered during this period time. The risk has also been minimized through the allocation of funds to a reserve dedicated for short term labour subcontracting in the event University assets are unavailable. The project team members as well as the project manager have all signed an agreement stating that the project will be completed before any member is released of his or her responsibilities.

7.5 Project Human Resources Need

The human resources required have been divided into the categories. Each category summarizes the number of individuals required, the skills of the individuals, and how to acquire the right people.

7.5.1 Initial Laboratory Cleanout

During this phase of the project the primary laboratory which the researchers are being relocated to will be cleared of all non-essential equipment, furnishings, laboratory experiments, and infrastructure. This will require two technicians with little skill due the nature of the items being moved. The technicians will be provided by the University of Alberta.

7.5.2 Secondary Detailed Cleaning

Secondary cleaning will involve mopping, dusting, and wiping down tables along with various other small activities. The work will require two individuals with basic cleaning skills. The work is to be subcontracted to a cleaning agency approved by the University of Alberta.

7.5.3 Infrastructure Setup

The laboratory has most of the required infrastructure in place. The additional infrastructure will be installed by the laboratory technicians. Electrical certification is required as well as experience with wall mounting

shelving and various other fixtures to brick. The technicians will be provided by the University of Alberta.

7.5.4 Heavy Laboratory Equipment and Furnishing Relocation

A few pieces of heavy equipment are being relocated. The heaviest piece

of equipment will require five laboratory technicians with at least one technician who is certified to operate the mechanical engineering crane. The remainder of the large equipment can be transported with pallet jacks. University of Alberta will supply the crane as well as the operator.

7.5.5 Small Equipment, Tools, Experiments, and Furnishings

The researchers themselves will be responsible for relocating small furnishings and their own experiments and possessions. This will involve all eight current researchers and will require basic skills, dolly usage, and the ability to lift 45 kilograms.

7.6 Time Table/Schedule

The activity schedule is as follows and includes the duration of the activities along with human resource release times.

7.6.1 Initial Laboratory Cleanout

Once all of the marked and or indicated items have been removed from the laboratory and relocated to their designated locations both human resources can released. The duration of the task will require 8 hours from both technicians.

7.6.2 Secondary Detailed Cleaning

The sub-contractors (Bee-Clean) will be required to supply two individuals to perform detailed cleaning amounting to 4 hours of work for each cleaner

in the new laboratory. An additional 2 hours from each cleaner will be

required in the old laboratory leaving the space move in ready. After both laboratories have been cleaned, both human resources will be released.

7.6.3 Infrastructure Setup

Infrastructure setup will require two laboratory technicians, one with electrical certification. The duration of work will require 8 hours, or a full working day to complete. The assets can then be released.

7.6.4 Heavy Laboratory Equipment and Furnishing Relocation

The large and heavy equipment relocation will require a total of five technicians and labourers. One crane certified technician to operate the crane and the rest of the individuals to support the safe relocation of equipment. The laboratory technicians will also be relocating all of the large furniture such as desks. All five assets will be required for one full working day and can be released thereafter.

7.6.5 Small Equipment, Tools, Experiments, and Furnishings

A total of eight researchers are being relocated. Each researcher will be relocating their own pieces of small equipment, tools, experiments, and furnishings. The relocation will be done in groups of two researchers. Each individual will assist the other with oversized objects. The duration of time to move both researchers’ items will consume 8 hours. After completion both researchers will be released.

7.7 Recognition and Awards

Work shall be recognized at the laboratory commissioning. The event will provide each member who voluntarily attends pizza and refreshments and will also highlight the accomplishments of those involved. Recognition will be given to work which has been completed within the allotted time and a safe manner.

7.8 Compliance with Human Resources Rules

All human resource rules have been assessed and will be adhered to. Working conditions, risks, work durations, and breaks all conform to the rules and regulations set by Occupational Health and Safety as well as University of Alberta. A detailed list of expectations will be provided to each human resource

and will be monitored throughout the project. These expectations include

prioritizing the safety of both human resources and the public. Work being completed is to be done so in a manner that satisfies the project manager and to the best ability of the human resource. Any incidents, deficiencies and other events will be promptly brought to the attention of the project manager. Unsafe work practices will not be tolerated and work that is unsafe work is not to be undertaken.

s
s

7.9

Team Building Effort

To promote a sense of ownership for the project, tasks have been delegated to those individuals who volunteer for them. This allows individuals to work within their fields of interest as much as possible making the work more enjoyable. Work has also been distributed in a manner which allows pairs of team members to work together towards common milestones. This promotes an atmosphere of teamwork and cooperation.

7.10 Training Needs

Basic lifting techniques will be briefly reviewed with the researchers to ensure all lifting in done in a safe manner. This training will not add any significant cost to the project. The remainder of the human assets have been certified and trained.

8. Procurement Management Plan

8.1 General Project Information

Project Name: Laboratory development project Location: Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Alberta Edmonton Project Manager: Shannon MacDonald Contracting Officer: Roger Marchand

8.2 Procurement Assumptions

Most of the furniture and other material required for the laboratory will be available in university facilities, other labs or store. The exact extent of availability of material is not available but there is high probability of finding the right furniture within the university campus.

All procurement if any will be done through University authorities. Our team will not directly deal with the supplier. The University will have its own supplier with earlier contracts, thus benefiting in terms of price.

The market will be stable during the procurement cycle. It is assumed that furniture market is one of the stable businesses and there should not be much fluctuation in the price of required material.

8.3 Procurement Constraints

Procurement will be done by university authorities, so there will not be much control over this activity from project manager. This lack of authority might delay the procurement process in total.

Quality of material to be purchased by university authority might also be a constraint as they can differ in quality standard expected by project team.

8.4 Market Research and Conditions

All the need for furniture demand will be met through university facilities. There is plenty of furniture available. And above all the owner require the material to be functionally superior to aesthetics, thus with enhanced options due to this fact will help in material procurement.

Requirement of furniture can be easily met from the current market conditions.

Delivery of material from university facility to our location will be fast owing to close vicinity but the paper work requirements can be an issue.

8.5

Procurement of Products and Services

Table 2 – Procurement of Products and Services

 

Product/Service

Source

Lead Time

Furniture

University facilities

1

week

Electrical utilities

University facilities

1

week

Cleaning

Bee Clean Services

1

week

Electrician Services

University facilities

1

week

Crane for transport

University facilities

3

days

Crane operator

University facilities

3

days

Transport of small equipments

Research students; University of Alberta

3

days

Safety officer/ Quality In charge

Dr. Lipsett

3

days

8.6 Make-or-Buy Analysis

As per the deliverables of the project, required material, furniture and electrical accessories will be purchased either from University facility or local market. Reason for purchase is the small requirement and manufacturing these items will be a costly affair.

Other than above mentioned deliverables, quality services are required to fulfill the expectations of stakeholders. These services will be delivered by research students with Dr. Lipsett and Roger Marchand and his team. There will be no requirement for extra manpower.

For cleaning the premises Bee clean services will be used as the only quality option available.

8.7 Contract Type, Procurement Method and Project Delivery Method

Lump sum project (fixed fee contract) will be best to meet the demand of the customer as scale of the project is small and our team will be involved in planning phase of the contract only. Rest of the project, execution, monitoring, control and completion would be done by owner. Specifically all other phases of project will be done with the movement of all machinery and equipments.

Procurement will be done by Dr. Lipsett himself and Roger through communication with University facilities. Thus procurement will be a simple process.

Dr. Lipsett and Roger will go and inspect the required material with the University facilities. The material selected would be delivered to new facility by University personnel as required.

Project delivery is completion of movement of machinery and material into new facility safely within the stipulated amount of time.

8.8 Procurement Justification

Only services from Bee Clean for cleaning up the premises before moving in would be used from resources other than University. This is a common practice so it is justified.

8.9 Roles and Responsibilities

Table 3 – Procurement Roles and Responsibilities

Personnel

Roles

Responsibility

 

Procurement

Dr. Lipsett will approve and procure all new Research equipments required.

Officer

Dr. Lipsett

Finance Officer

Dr. Lipsett will approve and finance all the payment for procurement.

Quality In charge

Dr. Lipsett will approve the quality standards of material.

Roger

Procurement

Roger will approve and procure all new material for lab infrastructure required.

Marchand

Officer

9. Risk Management Plan

9.1

Methodology

For the initial risk assessment, the project manager and the team have brainstormed and collaborated in identifying all possible risks within the current known elements of the project. These identified risks will be reviewed in the presence of Dr. Lipsett and Roger Marchand as early as their schedules allow the review.

To ensure that the risk environment is being assessed sufficiently, Dr. Lipsett will act as the risk management expert. Other risk-related inquiries will also be made to the laboratory equipment experts (Roger Marchand and his team).

The following risk management process (described in Figure 2) will be implemented throughout the duration of the project. If any changes are made to the project plan during the execution phase of the project, a risk assessment will be carried out to determine if any new risks are present.

Doing Planned Reviews Identification of Hazards Reduce the Risk Risk Assessment/ Analysis Yes Yes Can
Doing Planned
Reviews
Identification of
Hazards
Reduce the Risk
Risk Assessment/
Analysis
Yes
Yes
Can the Risk Be
Reduced?
Is the Risk
Acceptable?
No
Yes
Discontinue the
Manage the
Activity
Residual Risk

Figure 3 – Risk Management Process

Doing Planned Reviews : Risk reviews will take place during weekly meetings to discuss the current state of risks within the project.

Identification of Hazards : Throughout the project lifetime, new processes and actions may be implemented that pose new risks which had not been identified in earlier planning stages. During the planned reviews, these risks will be identified. (See Section 9.1.1 for further details)

Risk Assessment/Analysis : A risk assessment/analysis will be carried out for any new identified risks. (See Sections 9.1.2 to 9.1.4 for analyses)

Is the Risk Acceptable? : Risks are deemed acceptable only once they have been rated using a risk matrix (see Sections 9.1.2.1 and 9.1.2.2). Low level risks are “acceptable,” without any further management involvement. Medium level risks are “acceptable with certain conditions.” These risks must be closely monitored, and the project manager must be present to ensure the risk is kept under control. High level risks are “unacceptable” and any actions producing such risks will be halted immediately.

Manage the Residual Risk : Once a risk is determined to be acceptable, it must be managed in the way that is most appropriate for that risk. Methods for managing each risk will be discussed by the project manager, the team, and the Dr. Lipsett. (See Section 9.1.4 for further details)

Can the Risk be Reduced? : Further controls, management systems, protective features, etc. may be added to reduce risks to an acceptable level. (See Section 9.1.4 for further details)

Reduce the Risk : If the risk can be reduced, the necessary changes must be implemented to decrease it (see Section 9.1.4). It is important to note that if a change is made to reduce the risk present in a process or action, a full risk analysis must be redone on the newly implemented process or action. This will reveal possible new risks that may have been added to the project. (See Sections 9.1.1 to 9.1.4)

Discontinue the Activity : If a risk has been identified as unacceptable, any processes or actions that pose that risk will be stopped. This is important to protect all people involved in the project, people of the community, personal and university assets, as well as the sustainability of Chrome Engineering as an enterprise with favourable public opinion.

9.2 Risk Identification

9.2.1 Documentation Review

Risks have been identified by the project manager and the team by first reviewing the following project documentation:

1)

Activity cost estimates

2)

Activity duration estimates

3)

Scope baseline

4)

Stakeholder register

5)

Cost management plan

6)

Schedule management plan

7)

Quality management plan

8)

Project documents

9)

Enterprise environmental factors

10)

Organizational process assets

9.2.2 Tools & Techniques

Brainstorming: At weekly meetings, the team has undergone a brainstorming session to assess the possibility of risks that were overlooked earlier in the project Planning Phase. As well, origins of new risks have been considered as any changes to the project plan have been made.

Interviewing: Aside from the project team members, Dr. Lipsett has been interviewed on his perception of possible risks.

Checklist Analysis: A checklist for the duration of the Execution Process has been created to ensure essential safety and risk management processes are not overlooked. Refer to the Laboratory Relocation Safety Checklist in Appendix 9.21.

9.2.3 Identified Risks

All identified risks have been documented in the Risk Register. (See Section 10). As any further risks become apparent, a full risk analysis will be performed on each new risk, and the Risk Register will be updated accordingly.

9.3 Qualitative Risk Analysis

9.3.1 Risk Probability & Impact Assessment

Each identified risk has been assessed for the potential effects on schedule, cost, and scope by the project manager and the project team. Incident probabilities have been documented through brainstorming between the project manager and project team, as well as through interviewing Dr. Lipsett (See the Risk Register in Section 10).

9.3.2 Probability & Impact Matrix

A probability and impact matrix has been used to identify incident impacts on project objectives (time, cost, and scope). The matrix can be found in Appendix 9.22.

9.3.3 Risk Data Quality Assessment

Risk data will be reviewed on a weekly basis. The data collected from individuals interviewed for their opinions on risk probabilities have been carefully reviewed for consistency. Any variations larger than ±0.20 have been reassessed by the project manager, project team and Dr. Lipsett to attain values whose variation is equal to or less than ±0.20 for a set of ratings describing a single risk.

9.3.4 Risk Categorization

All documented risks have been categorized by the sources of risk and the area of the project affected. This methodology illustrates the areas of the project that have the greatest exposure to uncertainty. Related documentation can be found in Appendix 9.23.

9.4 Quantitative Risk Analysis

The variable X was defined as the total number of working days required by the technicians to complete the lab setup and heavy equipment move. For this estimate of 4.75 days +/- 20% it can be modeled as a normal distribution with a mean of 4.75 days and a standard deviation of 0.95 days.

The variable Y was defined as the total number of working days required by the students to move their desk possessions and personal items to the new lab. For this estimate of 5 days +/- 40% it can be modeled as a normal distribution with a mean of 5 days and a standard deviation of 2.21 days.

The total number of working days to complete the move should take (X+Y) days. This total does not include delays to start of move or any other variable occurrences.

We can model the resultant move time as follows:

Figure 4 – Cumulative Distribution Function for Move Completion Therefore there is a high degree

Figure 4 – Cumulative Distribution Function for Move Completion

Therefore there is a high degree of certainty (> 95%) that if the move is uninterrupted it will take less than 3 weeks. To allow time for any unforeseen delays it would be recommended to schedule a larger amount of time.

9.5 Risk Monitoring, Control and Response Planning

With respect to the Probability and Impact Matrix shown in Appendix 9.22, and the Risk Register in Section 10, activities posing a risk rating between 8% and 17% will be closely monitored and controlled by the risk owner during the activity to ensure safe completion. Emergency services offered by the University of Alberta will be utilized in the event of an injurious or facilities-related incident. There are no current activities with a risk rating of 18% or higher. If any risks arise with this rating, they will be avoided by changing the method of execution.

During the weekly risk assessments, any new risks that are identified will be added to the risk register.

9.6 Roles and Responsibilities

The Risk Owners consist of Dr. Lipsett, Roger Marchand, AICT and the University of Alberta facilities. Any risk-related activities or processes relevant to Dr. Lipsett or Roger Marchand will be supervised by them accordingly during the time that the risk is present. If any incidents occur, these individuals are to handle them according to the risk responses listed in the Risk Register. Any incidents relevant to AICT or the University of Alberta facilities will be documented and the corresponding departments will be contacted.

9.7 Budgeting

Project costs have been estimated with the following breakdown:

 

Table 4 – Project Cost Assumptions

 

No.

Item

Low

Most

High

Likely

1

Small Tool Box

$11.50

$25.00

$55.00

2

Coat Rack

$17.00

$20.00

$25.00

3

Shoe Rack

$15.00

$25.00

$35.00

4

Basic Shelving

$20.00

$30.00

$40.00

5

Ergonomic Chair

$100.00

$150.00

$350.00

6

Desk Lamps

$15.00

$25.00

$40.00

7

Power Bars

$6.50

$15.00

$50.00

8

Storage Bins (Under Tables)

$5.00

$12.00