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2011

ISAT
Sample Book

GRADE

8
Sample Items for Reading and Mathematics

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


Copyright © 2010 Illinois State Board of Education.

All rights reserved. This publication may be reproduced or transmitted by downloading and printing for
the purpose of practice testing and not for distribution or resale.

Portions of this work were previously published.

Stanford Achievement Test: Tenth Edition sample items used with permission of NCS Pearson, Inc.

“They Put the Flavor in What You Eat” by Seth Stern. Reproduced with permission from the July 2, 2002
issue of the Christian Science Monitor (www.csmonitor.com KidSpace at
http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0702/p18s04-hfks.html, accessed April 2, 2007). Copyright © 2002 The
Christian Science Monitor. All rights reserved. Photograph of Flavorists in laboratory courtesy of
International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. and used by permission.
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Table of Contents
Introduction ............................................................................................................................5

READING
Structure of the Grade 8 Reading ISAT ................................................................................7
Item Formats....................................................................................................................................................7
Reading Sessions............................................................................................................................................7
Shorter Passage Followed by Multiple-Choice Sample Items ............................................8
Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified ........................................................11
Longer Passage Followed by Multiple-Choice Sample Items ..........................................12
Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified ........................................................18
Extended-Response Sample Item ......................................................................................19
Extended-Response Scoring Rubric....................................................................................21
Annotated Extended-Response Student Samples ............................................................23

MATHEMATICS
Structure of the Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT ......................................................................36
Item Formats ................................................................................................................................................36
Answer Document for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT..........................................................................36
Mathematics Sessions................................................................................................................................37
Calculator Use for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT ..................................................................................37
Rulers for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT ..................................................................................................37
Scratch Paper for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT ....................................................................................37
Reference Sheet for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT ..............................................................................38
Multiple-Choice Sample Items ............................................................................................39
Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified ........................................................55
Short-Response Scoring Rubric ..........................................................................................58
Using Short-Response Samples ..........................................................................................59
Blank Short-Response Template ........................................................................................60
Short-Response Sample Items and Annotated Student Samples....................................61
Extended-Response Scoring Rubric....................................................................................69

3
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Using Extended-Response Samples ..................................................................................71


Blank Extended-Response Template ..................................................................................72
Extended-Response Sample Items and Annotated Student Samples ............................74

4
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Introduction
This sample book contains sample ISAT items classified with an assessment objective from the Illinois
Assessment Frameworks. These 2011 samples are meant to give educators and students a general sense
of how items are formatted for ISAT. All 2011 ISAT test books will be printed in color. This sample book
does not cover the entire content of what may be assessed. Please refer to the Illinois Assessment
Frameworks for complete descriptions of the content to be assessed at each grade level and subject
area. The Illinois Assessment Frameworks are available online at www.isbe.net/assessment/IAFindex.htm.
The Student Assessment website contains additional information about state testing
(www.isbe.net/assessment).

5
Illinois Standards Achievement Test
Reading Samples

6
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Structure of the Grade 8 Reading ISAT


ISAT Reading testing in spring 2011 will consist of 30 norm-referenced items, as well as criterion-
referenced items. The 30 norm-referenced items are an abbreviated form of the Stanford 10 Reading
assessment, developed by Pearson, Inc. The criterion-referenced items are all written by Illinois
educators and pilot tested with Illinois students.

Item Formats
All items are aligned to the Illinois Reading Assessment Framework, which defines the elements of the
Illinois Learning Standards that are suitable for state testing.
Multiple-choice items require students to read and reflect, and then to select the alternative that best
expresses what they believe the answer to be. A carefully constructed multiple-choice item can assess
any of the levels of complexity, from simple procedures to sophisticated concepts.
Extended-response items require students to demonstrate an understanding of a passage by explaining
key ideas using textual evidence and by using this information to draw conclusions or make
connections to other situations. The extended-response items are scored with a holistic rubric and count
as 10% of the scale score of the test.

Reading Sessions
All standard time administration test sessions are a minimum of 45 minutes in length. Any student who
is still actively engaged in testing when the 45 minutes have elapsed will be allowed up to an additional
10 minutes to complete that test session. More details about how to administer this extra time will
appear in the ISAT Test Administration Manual. This policy does not affect students who already receive
extended time as determined by their IEP.

Reading ISAT Grade 8


Session 1
45 minutes
6 shorter passages—30 multiple-choice items total

Two longer passages consisting of:


Session 2 1 expository passage with 10 multiple-choice items
45 minutes 1 literary passage with 10 multiple-choice items
1 extended-response item

Consists of 2 or 3 passages
Session 3 20 multiple-choice items
45 minutes
1 extended-response item
(Some items will be pilot items.)

7
Shorter Passage Followed by
Multiple-Choice Sample Items

8
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Reading

School Photographer
by
Kristine O’Connell George

When I am behind my camera lens


I can make people stand closer,
wrap their arms around each other,
even get them to smile.
5 When I am behind my camera lens
I see things others don’t.
I can record a single moment
That distorts or tells the truth.
When I am behind my camera lens
10 I can see everything
Except my own self, hiding
behind my camera.

GO ON
9
Reading 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

XEJ231 XEJ237
1 4
The poet most likely took the If you did not know the
idea for this poem from — meaning of distorts in stanza 2,
you should —

A a book on photography
B a volume of poetry A look for other words in the poem
C her camera’s owner’s manual that begin with “d”
≥ D her own experience B say the word over and over to
yourself
≥ C read on, looking for clues
XEJ232 D decide on the word’s part of
2 speech
Why does the speaker feel
hidden?
XEJ239
5
A No one can see her.
≥ B She is looking through the In this poem, which point of
view does the poet use?
camera.
C There is no one around.
D Other people are standing in
front of her.
≥A First person (one person who
describes her own thoughts)
B Third person (a person outside
the story who describes the
XEJ234
thoughts of one other person)
3 C Third person omniscient (a
person outside the story who
In line 6, when the speaker describes the thoughts of several
says, “I see things others don’t,” characters)
she most likely means — D Third person objective (a person
outside the story who describes

≥A people often overlook what’s events objectively)


around them
B people don’t pay attention when
their picture is taken
C cameras are the most accurate
form of record keeping
D the camera lens is like a
microscope

STOP
10
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified

Item Correct
Assessment Objective
Number Answer
2.8.04 Compare stories to personal experience, prior knowledge, or other
1 D
stories.
Shorter Passage

1.8.19 Draw inferences, conclusions, or generalizations about text and


2 B
support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge.

2.8.10 Identify literary devices: (e.g., figurative language, hyperbole,


3 A
understatement, symbols, dialogue).

1.8.03 Determine the meaning of an unknown word using word,


4 C
sentence, and cross-sentence clues.

5 A 2.8.05 Recognize points of view in narratives (e.g., first person).

To view all the reading assessment objectives, download the Illinois Reading Assessment Framework for
Grades 3–8 online at www.isbe.net/assessment/IAFindex.htm.

11
Longer Passage Followed by
Multiple-Choice Sample Items

12
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Reading

This passage is about how scientists create flavors that go in the food we eat.

They Put the Flavor in What You Eat


by Seth Stern

1 When it’s time to pick strawberries, Dennis


Kujawski goes to his laboratory instead of the
berry patch. You see, he creates the flavors in
many foods you enjoy.
2 Take strawberry yogurt, for example. It’s not
the fruit that gives most yogurt that strawberry
flavor. Read the label. Does it contain “natural
and artificial flavors”? Then Mr. Kujawski and
his fellow scientists probably cooked up those
flavors by blending natural oils and chemicals
in a New Jersey lab.
3 Kujawski’s office looks like a science
classroom. Shelves are filled with little vials.
Each vial contains a different liquid. To an
untrained nose (such as this reporter’s), each liquid smells vaguely familiar. One smells
like cut grass and another like a green apple. Others have a hint of butter or lime or
cotton candy. All these scents are important in creating a food flavoring because,
Kujawski says, 85 percent of a flavor comes from its smell.
4 Kujawski’s job is part art and part science. Picking out the right ingredients for a flavor
is like composing music or painting a picture. When he talks about adding flavors, he
asks whether it adds the right “note.”
5 He is one of many “flavorists” who work at International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF) near
Princeton, N.J. Each year, they create flavors for hundreds of foods — from candy and
cereals to soups and marinades.
6 Some flavors are based on the taste of familiar, natural products — like strawberry or
chocolate. But many flavors we recognize are completely made up: cola and fruit punch,
for instance.

How about a hamburger-flavored potato chip?


7 One snack-food company asked for a new flavor for a potato chip. They wanted it to
taste like an entire hamburger, with pickles, ketchup, and meat. IFF made the flavor, but
the chip never reached supermarkets. (Maybe the makers had second thoughts about its
potential success.)
8 IFF even creates flavors for dog food. Dogs have very sensitive noses, but it’s usually the
owner who is pickier about the smell.
9 It’s a fun job, Kujawski says, but it’s not easy. Flavorists usually study chemistry or
biology in school. They must work for years as apprentices to train their nose and tongue
to recognize thousands of ingredients.
10 Creating a flavor starts when a food company calls up with a new idea for a product.
Flavor scientists first need to know something about the idea behind the product. Will
adults or children be eating it? Is it supposed to taste natural? Extra sour? Are there other

GO ON
13
Reading 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

considerations that might affect what ingredients are used? (Non-kosher ingredients might
offend Jewish consumers, for instance. Non-vegetarian ingredients might upset Hindus.)
11 Not every food that’s supposed to taste like strawberry gets the same flavoring.
Strawberry yogurt for adult consumers tastes different from strawberry in red-licorice
candy or in ice cream. (Ice cream needs a “seedy” flavor, Kujawski says.)
12 The flavoring’s ingredients may be natural or artificial. Natural flavors may include
lemon oil, orange oil, and even rose oil. An oil’s flavor may depend on how it was
extracted. If you grind up a lime and heat it, the resulting oil is sweet-smelling. Extract
the flavor from the peel without heating, and it smells more like a fresh lime.
13 Getting oils that way is very expensive, though, so artificial flavors are often used. These
flavors can be created from ingredients that are present in natural foods but have been
manufactured in a laboratory. (Vanillin, or artificial vanilla flavor, is made from wood
pulp. But it’s chemically almost identical to “real” vanilla, made from vanilla beans.)
Some of these flavors are so strong that only a few parts per million — or parts per billion
— are needed to add a flavor. That’s like putting one drop in a swimming pool of water.
By themselves, some of the ingredients may not smell very good, such as one that adds a
“ripe” note to a flavor’s “profile.”
14 Tastes change. IFF employees do research to find what new flavors are popular —
especially among kids. Children like intense flavors. Today’s kids seem to like new
combinations of familiar and different tastes and sensations, says IFF’s Amanda Smith.
She tries to find out what kids like. (They seem to enjoy kiwi/lime fruit juices and
crackling candy in ice pops.)

Still striving for ‘the perfect strawberry’


15 Even after creating flavors for 29 years, Kujawski says it’s still a challenge coming up
with new versions of familiar flavors like chocolate and strawberry. But he’s willing to
keep trying to produce the perfect strawberry flavor. “Like an artist or photographer,” he
says, “you think, ‘Gee, I could have done that better.’”
16 Sometimes, the scientists start with a strawberry flavor they’ve already created. The labs
are full of bottles of “finished” flavors that smell like marshmallows, smoked meat, or
blueberry pie. Usually, though, they start a new flavor from scratch, drawing on the
hundreds of vials in rotating spice racks lining the walls of each lab.
17 Either way, flavorists have to work fast. Clients usually want the finished flavor in just a
few weeks.
18 Once the flavorists are satisfied with a few options, another group of scientists adds the
flavor to a sample of the new food. IFF has many kitchens where technicians can bake a
cake, make chewing gum, or put soup in cans.
19 IFF tests its flavors by asking people to try it. Sitting in small testing booths, different
versions of a product are passed to employees and even to children.
20 The taste-testers rate the flavors, writing answers on a computer screen. Is the flavor too
strong or too weak? Too sweet or too sour? There’s also a small sink so you can rinse out
your mouth between samples.
21 If the kids don’t like what they taste, scientists must go back and try again. When the
flavor is finally ready, IFF makes big batches of it to sell to the food company. The food
company adds the flavor to the product at the factory. The exact formula is always a
secret.

GO ON
14
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Reading

1 3
Which is the best summary for Which literary device is used in
paragraphs 1 and 2? the sentence below?

“Dogs have very sensitive noses,


A Berry patches serve as but it’s usually the owner who
inspiration for new flavors. is pickier about the smell.”
B Scientists create flavors by
testing foods.
A Irony
C Strawberry yogurt contains
B Simile
artificial flavors.
C Alliteration
D Flavors are often developed in
D Understatement
a laboratory.

2 4
Based on the etymology of the Which best describes what
word marinades [French apprentices are?
marinado, meaning “to cure
meat or fish in brine”], which
A Workers in a laboratory
of the following is the best
B People who study foods
meaning for the word
C Workers learning on the job
marinades ?
D People who work with chemicals

A A sauce to soak food in to enrich


its flavor
B A method for steaming produce
quickly
C Vegetables flavored with spices
D Food that is smoked on a grill

GO ON
15
Reading 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

5 7
What is the first thing scientists What happens after flavorists
do after a food company calls are satisfied with a new flavor
with a new idea for a product? for their client?

A They create flavors in a A Flavorists develop ways to


laboratory for the product. extract oils to create flavors.
B They try to find out more B Flavorists invent additional
information about the product. versions of the flavors.
C They ask people to test the C Flavorists add the flavor to a
new product. sample of the new food.
D They pick out the right mixture D Flavorists test how children
for the flavor of the product. react to the flavor.

6 8
How does the oil smell after How does the phrase, “variety is
a lime is ground up and the spice of life,” relate to
then heated? this passage?

A Ripe A Flavorists keep the exact formula


B Sour of a flavor secret.
C Fresh B Flavorists work in offices that
D Sweet look like science classrooms.
C Flavorists train their noses to
recognize the thousands
of ingredients.
D Flavorists continue to develop
new versions of old flavors to
satisfy clients.

GO ON
16
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Reading

9 10
What genre is “They Put the Which statement summarizes
Flavor In What You Eat”? the passage?

A Biography A Flavors are designed to


B Nonfiction be delicate.
C Science fiction B Familiar flavors are popular
D Autobiography with clients.
C Food flavors can be both
natural and artificial.
D Flavoring food is a
complicated process.

STOP
17
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified

Item Correct
Assessment Objective
Number Answer
1.8.16 Summarize a story or nonfiction passage, or identify the best
1 D summary.

2 A 1.8.02 Use etymologies to determine the meanings of words.


Longer Passage with Multiple-Choice Items

2.8.10 Identify literary devices: (e.g., figurative language, hyperbole,


3 A understatement, symbols, dialogue).

1.8.03 Determine the meaning of an unknown word using word,


4 C
sentence, and cross-sentence clues.
1.8.14 Determine the answer to a literal or simple inference question
5 B regarding the meaning of a passage.

1.8.14 Determine the answer to a literal or simple inference question


6 D regarding the meaning of a passage.

1.8.14 Determine the answer to a literal or simple inference question


7 C regarding the meaning of a passage.

8 D 1.8.10 Relate information in the passage to other readings.

2.8.13 Identify various subcategories of genres: poetry, drama (comedy


and tragedy), science fiction, historical fiction, myth or legend, biography/
9 B autobiography, short story, poem, fairy tale, folktale, fable, nonfiction, and
essay.

10 D 1.8.16 Summarize a story or nonfiction passage, or identify the best


summary.

To view all the reading assessment objectives, download the Illinois Reading Assessment Framework for
Grades 3–8 online at www.isbe.net/assessment/IAFindex.htm.

18
Extended-Response Sample Item

19
Reading 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Assessment Objective: 1.8.21 Explain information presented in a nonfiction passage using


evidence from the passage.

1
How do scientists combine creativity and research to develop new flavors? Use information
from the passage and your own ideas and conclusions to support your answer.

STOP
20
Extended-Response
Scoring Rubric

21
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Reading Extended-Response Scoring Rubric


Readers identify important information found explicitly and implicitly in the text. Readers use this
information to interpret the text and/or make connections to other situations or contexts through
analysis, evaluation, or comparison/contrast. A student-friendly version of this extended-response rubric
is available online at www.isbe.net/assessment/reading.htm.

Score Criteria
• Reader demonstrates an accurate understanding of important information in the text by focusing on the key ideas presented
explicitly and implicitly.
• Reader uses information from the text to interpret significant concepts or make connections to other situations or contexts logically
4 through analysis, evaluation, inference, or comparison/contrast.
• Reader uses relevant and accurate references; most are specific and fully supported.
• Reader integrates interpretation of the text with text-based support (balanced).

• Reader demonstrates an accurate understanding of information in the text by focusing on some key ideas presented explicitly and
implicitly.
• Reader uses information from the text to interpret significant concepts or make connections to other situations or contexts logically
3 (with some gaps) through analysis, evaluation, inference, or comparison/contrast.
• Reader uses relevant and accurate references; some are specific; some may be general and not fully supported.
• Reader partially integrates interpretation of the text with text-based support.

• Reader demonstrates an accurate but limited understanding of the text.


• Reader uses information from the text to make simplistic interpretations of the text without using significant concepts or by making
2 only limited connections to other situations or contexts.
• Reader uses irrelevant or limited references.
• Reader generalizes without illustrating key ideas; may have gaps.

• Reader demonstrates little or no understanding of the text; may be inaccurate.


• Reader makes little or no interpretation of the text.
1 • Reader uses no references, or the references are inaccurate.
• Reader’s response is insufficient to show that criteria are met.

• Reader’s response is absent or does not address the task.


0 • Reader’s response is insufficient to show that criteria are met.

22
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 1 Score: 2

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

* This reader demonstrates a limited understanding of the text. The response focuses on an idea
(Scientists combine creativity & research to create new flavors by mixing a lot of oils) and then
generalizes without illustrating key ideas. The reader demonstrates some understanding of the text by
summarizing, but does not use information from the text or specific references to provide interpretation.

23
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 2 Score: 2

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

24
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book
* This reader demonstrates an accurate but limited understanding of the text. The response focuses on
an idea (Scientists Combine Creativity and research to develope new flavors by adding natural flavors
and chemicals together) and then summarizes the text without providing any meaningful interpretation.
The reader understands the text well enough to summarize it accurately, but does not use the
information from the text to provide interpretation.

25
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 3 Score: 3

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

26
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book
* This reader demonstrates an accurate understanding of information in the text. The reader focuses on
a key idea from the text (they must find out what flavors adults, children, and animals like best...they
research on the idea of their flavor and who the food or snack would be for. Then they must tell flavorists
about their idea...the item is tested...if it is liked it goes to the markets...if it is not liked, scientists and
flavorists must try again) and interprets this idea (this job is very important and interesting...because it
take a lot of time and patience...workers can't just give out something that they want to give out. It has to
be approved and tested first.). Though there are some gaps in interpretation, resulting in an unbalanced
response, the reader does use accurate references to support the interpretation.

27
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 4 Score: 3

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

28
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

* This reader demonstrates an accurate understanding of information in the text by focusing on some
key ideas. The reader identifies a key idea (they mix sents togather and, they have kids test them
[research and creativity]) and provides text support (these sents are important in creating a food
flavoring because 85% of a flavor comes from it's sent...they have the kids to test the favor to see if they
like it if they dont they go back to the lab and try again). The reader goes on to interpret this idea (This
is important because it tells you they combine and makes a flavor...This is important because in order to
make there money they have to make sure they kids like it) with some gaps. There is a partial integration
of interpretation and text-based support.
29
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 5 Score: 4

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

30
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

* The reader demonstrates an understanding of important information in the text by focusing on key
ideas (...when it comes to developing new flavors, it takes a lot of effort). This idea is interpreted (It’s
hard enough to get a child to try something new, but it’s even harder to put together the ingredients for it)
and supported by a relevant text reference (“Kujawski’s job is part art and part science. Picking out the
right ingredients for a flavor is like composing music or painting a picture”). Some ideas (Creativity is
really a strong attribute for a scientist that develops new flavors) are interpreted but not supported by
text (You have to give the client something new without going overboard with the result. You have to have
the right amount of sugar, or the right amount of strawberries without overdoing the product). Overall,
the reader successfully integrates interpretation with text-based support, demonstrating balance.

31
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Grade: 8 Sample: 6 Score: 4

DIRECTIONS Make sure you


– Read the question completely before you start to write your
answer,
– Write your answer to the question in your own words,
– Write as clearly as you can so that another person can read
your answer and understand what you were thinking,
– Read over your answer to see if you need to rewrite any
part of it.

32
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

33
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book
* In this response, the reader demonstrates an understanding of important information in the text by
focusing on the key ideas. The reader identifies key ideas (They have to be creative because sometimes
they have to combine old flavors to form new ones...scientist need to do a lot of research on the type of
taste they want) and supports them with references from the text (“(children) seem to enjoy kiwi/lime
fruit juices”...“All these scents are important in creating a food flavoring because, Kujawski says, 85
percent of a flavor comes from it’s smell”). The reader interprets key ideas and significant concepts (Even
though they do a lot of hard work, it pays off when they're done) and (they need to be smart and have a
Imagination to create new flavors. Who would have ever thought you could make vanilla from wood),
with relevant supporting text references (For example...“vanillin, or artificial vanilla flavor, is made
from wood pulp. But it’s chemically almost identical to ‘real’ vanilla made from vanilla beans”). The
reader is able to integrate interpretation of the text with text-based support, creating a balance of
interpretation and text references.

34
Illinois Standards Achievement Test
Mathematics Samples

35
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Structure of the Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT


ISAT Mathematics testing in spring 2011 will consist of 30 norm-referenced items, as well as 45 criterion-
referenced items, some of which will be used for developmental purposes. The 30 norm-referenced
items are an abbreviated form of the Stanford 10 Mathematics Problem Solving assessment, developed
by Pearson, Inc. The 45 criterion-referenced items are all written by Illinois educators and pilot tested
with Illinois students.

Item Formats
All 75 items are aligned to the Illinois Mathematics Assessment Framework, which defines the elements
of the Illinois Learning Standards that are suitable for state testing.
Multiple-choice items require students to read, reflect, or compute, and then to select the alternative
that best expresses what they believe the answer to be. This format is appropriate for quickly
determining whether students have achieved certain knowledge and skills. Well-designed multiple-
choice items can measure student knowledge and understanding, as well as students’ selection and
application of problem-solving strategies. A carefully constructed multiple-choice item can assess any of
the levels of mathematical complexity from simple procedures to sophisticated concepts. They can be
designed to reach beyond the ability of students to “plug-in” alternatives or eliminate choices to
determine a correct answer. Such items are limited in the extent to which they can provide evidence of
the depth of students’ thinking.
Short-response items pose similar questions as multiple-choice items and provide a reliable and valid
basis for extrapolating about students’ approaches to problems. These items reduce the concern about
guessing that accompanies multiple-choice items. The short-response items are scored with a rubric and
count as 5% of the scale score of the test.
Extended-response items require students to consider a situation that demands more than a numerical
response. These items require students to model, as much as possible, real problem solving in a large-
scale assessment context. When an extended-response item poses a problem to solve, the student must
determine what is required to “solve” the problem, choose a plan, carry out the plan, and interpret the
solution in terms of the original situation. Students are expected to clearly communicate their decision-
making processes in the context of the task proposed by the item (e.g., through writing, pictures,
diagrams, or well-ordered steps). The extended-response items are scored with a rubric and count as
10% of the scale score of the test.
Scoring Extended- and Short-Response Items
Extended- and short-response items are evaluated according to an established scoring scale, called a
rubric, developed from a combination of expectations and a sample of actual student responses. Such
rubrics must be particularized by expected work and further developed by examples of student work in
developing a guide for scorers. Illinois educators play a substantial role in developing these guides used
for the scoring of the short- and extended-response items. Committees of mathematics educators from
throughout the state attend a validation meeting, during which they use the mathematics scoring rubrics
to establish task-specific criteria that are used to score all short- and extended-response items
consistently and systematically.

Answer Document for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT


Students in grade 8 respond to all test items in a separate answer document. Test administrators should
monitor students carefully during testing to make sure students are using the appropriate pages of the
answer document, especially for the short- and extended-response items.

36
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Sessions
All standard time administration test sessions are a minimum of 45 minutes in length. Any student who
is still actively engaged in testing when the 45 minutes have elapsed will be allowed up to an additional
10 minutes to complete that test session. More details about how to administer this extra time will
appear in the ISAT Test Administration Manual. This policy does not affect students who already receive
extended time as determined by their IEP.

Mathematics ISAT Grade 8


Session 1 40 multiple-choice items
45 minutes (30 of these are an abbreviated form of the Stanford 10.)

Session 2 30 multiple-choice items


45 minutes 3 short-response items

Session 3
45 minutes
2 extended-response items

(Some items will be pilot items.)

Calculator Use for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT


All students in grade 8 are allowed to use a calculator during all sessions of the mathematics
assessment. Students are allowed to use a calculator as long as the calculator does not have any
prohibited features as noted in the Calculator Use Policy for the ISAT Mathematics Tests
(http://www.isbe.net/assessment/pdfs/2010/calculator_ISAT.pdf ). Schools, teachers, and parents should
be advised that when students attempt to use calculators with which they are unfamiliar, their
performance may suffer. In a like manner, students who are not taught when and how to use a
calculator as part of their regular mathematics instructional program are also at risk.

Rulers for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT


All students in grade 8 will be provided with a ruler to use during all sessions of the mathematics
assessment. This ruler will allow students to measure in both inches and centimeters.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Inches
ISAT GRADES FOUR–EIGHT Centimeters
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Scratch Paper for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT


Students must be provided with blank scratch paper to use during only session 1. Only session 1
contains norm-referenced items, which were normed under such conditions. Students may not use
scratch paper during session 2 or session 3, but they may use the test booklet itself as scratch paper.
However, students must show their work, when required, for each short-response item in session 2 on
the appropriate page in the answer document. Students must show their work for each extended-
response item in session 3 on the appropriate pages in the answer document.

37
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Reference Sheet for Grade 8 Mathematics ISAT

All students in grade 8 will be provided with a reference sheet to use during all sessions of the
mathematics assessment. This reference sheet is shown below.

ISAT MATHEMATICS REFERENCE SHEET


Grades 7 and 8

or

38
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3484856
1 3
One light-year is approximately 3
Amy has of a yard of string to
5,880,000,000,000 miles. 4
make bracelets. Each bracelet
1
Which expression represents requires of a yard of string.
8
this distance in scientific
notation?
What is the greatest number of
bracelets Amy can make with
A 5.88 ⫻ 1010
this length of string?
B 5.88 ⫻ 1012
C 58.8 ⫻ 1011
D 588 ⫻ 1010 8 6 4 3
A ≥B C D

3484834 3484834_AR1
2 3356844
4
Which point on the number
line below best represents the Paula multiplied a number by
value 210? 16. Her result is a positive
number less than 16. Which of
these did Paula multiply by 16?
P Q R S

0 1 2 3 4 5 6
≥A A number between zero and
one
A Point P
B A number greater than one
B Point Q
C A number less than zero
≥ C Point R
D Zero
D Point S

3349305
5
Between which two consecutive
3
integers is 2 300?

≥A 6 and 7
B 17 and 18
C 75 and 76
D 100 and 101

GO ON
39
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3484862 3533987 3533987.AR1


6 8
Last year there were 80 students Quadrilateral KLMN is an isosceles
enrolled in the eighth-grade class. trapezoid with a perimeter of 32 cm.
This year the number of students
enrolled in the eighth-grade class L 8 cm M
increased by 10%.

K N
How many students are 14 cm
enrolled in the eighth-grade
class this year?
What is the area of quadrilateral
KLMN?
8 81 88 90
A B ≥ C D
≥A 44 cm2
B 55 cm2
C 88 cm2
3349312 3349312_AR1
7 D 112 cm2

4.5 in. 3484863


9
A company packs its coffee into
cylindrical containers. The height of
each container is 6 inches, and the
radius of the container is 3 inches.
Which is closest to the
circumference of this circle? Which is closest to the volume
(Use 3.14 for p.) of one of these cylindrical
containers? (Use 3.14 for ␲.)
A 14 inches ≥ C 28 inches
B 20 inches D 63 inches A 36 cubic inches
B 54 cubic inches
C 113 cubic inches
≥ D 170 cubic inches

GO ON
40
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3407469 3407469_AR1 3528416 3528416_AR1


10 12
What is the surface area of this Use your inch ruler to help you
rectangular prism? answer this question.

The picture shows the scale drawing


of a tree.

3 feet

3 feet
15 feet

height
A 135 square feet
B 155 square feet
C 180 square feet
≥ D 198 square feet

3349204
11 1 inch represents 5 feet.
When filled to capacity, a
container holds 4.6 liters of
Which is closest to the height
liquid. How many milliliters
in feet of the actual tree?
(mL) is this?

A 10 feet
A 0.46 mL
1
B 46 mL B 10 feet
2
C 460 mL
1
≥ D 4600 mL ≥C 12 feet
2
D 15 feet

GO ON
41
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3484864 3356856
13 15
Look at the addition patterns below. Which is equivalent to the
expression below?
1⫹3⫽4
1⫹3⫹5⫽9
x
1 ⫹ 3 ⫹ 5 ⫹ 7 ⫽ 16 ⫺1
2
1 ⫹ 3 ⫹ 5 ⫹ 7 ⫹ 9 ⫽ 25
x⫺1
A C x⫺1
2
How many consecutive odd
integers starting with 1 must
x⫺2
be added to produce 64? ≥B 2
D x⫺2

6 7 8 9
A B ≥ C D
16
Which of the following is
3400068 3400068_AR1 equivalent to the expression
14 shown?
Which expression satisfies the
pattern below?
4x ⫺ 5 ⫺ 2x ⫺ 3
A 2x ⫺ 8 C 2x ⫹ 2
n ? B 6x ⫹ 2 D 6x ⫺ 8
0 0

1 1

2 4

3 9

4 16

A 4n2 ⫺ 3 C n3
B 3n2 ≥ D n2

GO ON
42
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3400149 3400149_AR1 to AR4


17
Which represents the graph of y ⫽ 3?

y y
10 10

5 5

x x
-10 -5 5 10 -10 -5 5 10

-5 -5

-10 -10

A C

y y
10 10

5 5

x x
-10 -5 5 10 -10 -5 5 10

-5 -5

-10 -10

B ≥D

GO ON
43
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3484869 3484869_AR1
18 19
y Which of the following
equations represents the
5
relationship between x and y
4
in the table?
3

1 x y
x 0 2
–5 –4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4 5
–1
1 5
–2
2 8
–3
3 11
–4
4 14
–5

A y ⫽ 2x
B y⫽x⫹2
Which equation best represents C y ⫽ 5x
the line shown on this graph? ≥ D y ⫽ 3x ⫹ 2

A y⫽x⫹3
B y ⫽ -x ⫹ 3 3484871
C y ⫽ 3x
20
D y ⫽ - 3x The graph of a line contains the
points (5, 3) and (5, - 1).

Which of the following must


be true about the graph of
this line?

≥A The line intersects the x-axis.


B The slope of the line
is negative.
C The line intersects the y-axis.
D The slope of the line is positive.

GO ON
44
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3484873
21 22
A single round-trip plane ticket from The inequality 70° ⬍ x ⬍ 80°
Illinois to Florida costs between $200 represents the range of the ideal
and $600, depending on the time of water temperature, in degrees
year and the flight chosen. Fahrenheit, for Sammy’s fish.

Which number line best Which statement is true about


represents this cost? the situation?

A The ideal water temperature is


A 100 200 300 400 500 600 less than 70 °F.
B The ideal water temperature is
greater than 80 °F.
B 100 200 300 400 500 600 ≥C The ideal water temperature is
between 70 °F and 80 °F.
D The ideal water temperature is
less than 70 °F or greater
C 100 200 300 400 500 600 than 80 °F.

D 100 200 300 400 500 600


23
Juan had a checking account with
a balance of x dollars. After he
withdrew y dollars, he had a
balance of $100.

Which of the following shows


the correct relationship between
x, y, and $100?

A x ⫺ y ⫽ $100
B $100 ⬍ x ⫺ y
C x ⫹ y ⫽ $100
D x ⫺ y ⬎ $100

GO ON
45
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3530136 3530136_AR1-4 3484900 3484900_AR1


24 26
Which graph best represents the What is the value of x in the
solution to the inequality triangle shown?
below?

- 4x ⫹ 10 ⬍ - 6 70°

A -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5

B -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5

C -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5
56° (x – 5)°

≥D -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 24 49 54 59
A B C ≥D

25 3349352 3349352.AR1
27
1
Malia has 1 times as many
2
tennis balls as Jolie. Together

they have 20 tennis balls.


6.5 cm
How many tennis balls does

Malia have?

8 10 12 15
A B C D

What is the circumference of


this circle in terms of p?

A 65p cm ≥ C 13p cm
B 42.25p cm D 6.5p cm

GO ON
46
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

28 30
! ! ! !
Which of the following ordered The diagram shows PN and KM
pairs is located in Quadrant II? intersecting at point L.

A (- 3, - 6) C (3, 6)
B (- 3, 6) D (3, - 6) K

(3x + 5)° 2x°


3484901 3484901_AR1
29 P L N

Line l intersects parallel lines


m and n as shown.
M

4 1 8 5 What is the measure of ⬔KLN ?


l
3 2 7 6

17° 35° 70° 110°


A B C D

m n

Which list contains all the


angles that are congruent
to ∠1?

≥A ∠3, ∠5, ∠7
B ∠3, ∠6, ∠8
C ∠2, ∠3, ∠4
D ∠2, ∠7, ∠8

GO ON
47
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3349355 3349355.AR1 to .AR5


31

Which drawing represents the


top view of this solid?

≥D

GO ON
48
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3484902 3484902_AR1
32
⌬XYZ is similar to ⌬RST.

8 cm 10 cm
6 cm

Y Z S T
12 cm

What is the length of ST ?

10 cm 9 cm 8.5 cm 7.5 cm
A ≥B C D

3349325 3349325_AR1
33
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

The following pairs of numbers can be graphed on this number line.

Which numbers have the same absolute value?

≥A - 3 and 3
B 5 and 10
C 4 and - 8
D - 2 and - 4

GO ON
49
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3484896 3484896_AR1
34
The circle graph below represents a
total of 240 animals at a zoo. The
shaded sector represents the number
of monkeys at this zoo.

240 Animals at a Zoo

Monkeys
30º

How many monkeys are at


this zoo?

8 20 30 72
A ≥B C D

GO ON
50
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

3356854 3356854.AR1 to .AR4


35
Which scatter plot shows the line that best fits the data points given?

y y

x x

≥A C

y y

x x
B D

GO ON
51
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3349244
36 37
The scatter plot shows the math and Mike has only 2 red apples and
reading test scores of nine students. 3 green apples in a bowl. Without
looking he chooses an apple and
Reading and Math gives it to his sister. Then he
Test Scores chooses an apple for himself.
100
90
Math Test Score

80 What is the probability that


70 he and his sister will each get
60 a red apple?
50
40
30
10% 30% 40% 60%
20
10 ≥A B C D
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
Reading Test Score

38
Based on the line of best fit,
which is the best prediction The picture below shows both sides
for a reading test score when a of a nickel when landing heads up
student’s math test score is 90? or tails up.

85 90 95 100
A B C D
Heads Up Tails Up

If Billy tosses the nickel three


times, what is the probability of
the nickel landing tails up on all
three tosses?

1 1 1 1
8 6 4 2
A B C D

GO ON
52
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book Mathematics

39
The square letter tiles shown below are placed in an empty box. The tiles are equal in size.

N R O N R
B N R N B
If two tiles are randomly selected without replacement, what is the probability that the
first tile will be the letter R and the second tile will be the letter N?

3 2 7 7
25 15 15 10
A B C D

GO ON
53
Mathematics 2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

3530126
40
The student council is making snack
bags for a class trip. Each snack bag
will contain:

• 1 type of drink
• 1 type of cookie
• 1 type of fruit

To make each snack bag, they will


choose from 2 types of drinks,
4 types of cookies, and 2 types
of fruit.

How many combinations of


1 type of drink, 1 type of
cookie, and 1 type of fruit
are possible?

A 3
B 8
≥ C 16
D 48

STOP
54
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Answer Key with Assessment Objectives Identified


Item Correct
Assessment Objective
Number Answer
1 B 6.8.04 Use scientific notation to represent numbers and solve problems.

2 C 6.8.07 Identify and locate rational and irrational numbers (e.g., ␲, 2, 5 ) on


a number line.
6.8.09 Solve problems and number sentences involving addition, subtraction,
3 B
multiplication, and division using rational numbers, exponents, and roots.
6.8.12 Describe the effect of multiplying and dividing by numbers, including
the effect of multiplying or dividing a rational number by:
• a number less than zero;
4 A
• zero;
• a number between zero and one; and
• a number greater than one.
6.8.14 Estimate the square or cube root of a number less than 1,000 between
5 A
two whole numbers (e.g., 3 200 is between 5 and 6).

6.8.18 Solve number sentences and problems involving fractions, decimals,


6 C and percents (e.g., percent increase and decrease, interest rates, tax,
discounts, tips).

7.8.02 Solve problems involving perimeter/circumference and area of


polygons, circles, and composite figures using diagrams, models, and grids or
7 C
by measuring or using given formulas (may include sketching a figure from its
description).

7.8.02 Solve problems involving perimeter/circumference and area of


polygons, circles, and composite figures using diagrams, models, and grids or
8 A
by measuring or using given formulas (may include sketching a figure from its
description).

7.8.04 Solve problems involving the volume or surface area of a right


9 D rectangular prism, right circular cylinder, or composite shape using an
appropriate formula or strategy.

7.8.04 Solve problems involving the volume or surface area of a right


10 D rectangular prism, right circular cylinder, or composite shape using an
appropriate formula or strategy.

7.8.05 Solve problems involving unit conversions within the same


11 D measurement system for length, weight/mass, capacity, square units, and
measures expressed as rates (e.g., converting feet/second to yards/minute).

7.8.06 Solve problems involving scale drawings, maps, and indirect


measurement (e.g., determining the height of a building by comparing its
12 C
known shadow length to the known height and shadow length of another
object).

8.8.01 Analyze, extend, and create sequences or linear functions, and


13 C
determine algebraic expressions to describe the nth term of a sequence.

55
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Item Correct
Assessment Objective
Number Answer
8.8.01 Analyze, extend, and create sequences or linear functions, and
14 D
determine algebraic expressions to describe the nth term of a sequence.
15 B 8.8.04 Recognize and generate equivalent forms of algebraic expressions.
16 A 8.8.04 Recognize and generate equivalent forms of algebraic expressions.

8.8.07 Represent linear equations and quantitative relationships on a


17 D rectangular coordinate system, and interpret the meaning of a specific part of
a graph.

8.8.07 Represent linear equations and quantitative relationships on a


18 B rectangular coordinate system, and interpret the meaning of a specific part of
a graph.
8.8.08 Translate between different representations (table, written, graphical, or
19 D
pictorial) of whole number relationships and linear expressions.
20 A 8.8.09 Interpret the meaning of slope and intercepts in linear situations.
8.8.10 Identify, graph, and interpret up to two inequalities with a single
21 C variable (including the intersection or union of these inequalities) on a
number line.

22 C 8.8.11 Represent and analyze problems with linear equations and inequalities.
23 A 8.8.11 Represent and analyze problems with linear equations and inequalities.

8.8.12 Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable over the rational
24 D
numbers (e.g., 5x+7= –13, 4x–3= –7x+8, –2x+3>–5).

25 C 8.8.13 Solve word problems involving unknown quantities.

9.8.02 Solve problems that require knowledge of triangle and quadrilateral


26 D
properties (e.g., triangle inequality).

9.8.04 Identify, describe, and determine the radius, diameter, and


27 C
circumference of a circle and their relationship to each other and to pi.
9.8.05 Graph points and identify coordinates of points on the Cartesian
28 B
coordinate plane (all four quadrants).

9.8.08 Identify or analyze relationships of angles formed by intersecting lines


29 A (including parallel lines cut by a transversal) and angles formed by radii of a
circle.

9.8.09 Solve problems involving vertical, complementary, and supplementary


30 C
angles.
9.8.10 Identify front, side, and top views of a three–dimensional solid built
31 D
with cubes.

32 B 9.8.11 Solve problems involving congruent and similar figures.

56
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Item Correct
Assessment Objective
Number Answer
33 A 9.8.12 Relate absolute value to distance on the number line.

10.8.01 Read, interpret (including possible misleading characteristics), and


make predictions from data represented in a bar graph, line (dot) plot, Venn
34 B
diagram (with two or three circles), chart/table, line graph, scatter plot, circle
graph, stem–and–leaf plot, or histogram.

10.8.04 Identify or draw a reasonable approximation of the line of best fit from
35 A
a set of data or a scatter plot, and use the line to make predictions.

10.8.04 Identify or draw a reasonable approximation of the line of best fit from
36 D
a set of data or a scatter plot, and use the line to make predictions.

10.8.06 Solve problems involving the probability of an event composed of


37 A repeated trials, compound events (including independent events), or future
events with or without replacement.

10.8.06 Solve problems involving the probability of an event composed of


38 A repeated trials, compound events (including independent events), or future
events with or without replacement.
10.8.06 Solve problems involving the probability of an event composed of
39 B repeated trials, compound events (including independent events), or future
events with or without replacement.

10.8.08 Solve simple problems involving the number of ways objects can be
40 C
arranged (permutations and combinations).

To view all the mathematics assessment objectives, download the Illinois Mathematics Assessment
Framework for Grades 3–8 online at www.isbe.net/assessment/IAFindex.htm.

57
Mathematics Short-Response
Scoring Rubric
Followed by Student Samples

58
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Short-Response Scoring Rubric


The following rubric is used to score the short-response items for all grade levels.

SCORE
LEVEL DESCRIPTION

Completely correct response, including correct work shown and/or correct labels/units if called
2 for in the item

1 Partially correct response

0 No response, or the response is incorrect

Using Short-Response Samples


Beginning with the spring 2008 ISAT, the sample short-response question and answer (shown below)
that appeared in the 2006 and 2007 ISAT test directions will no longer be included in the directions
immediately prior to session 2. ISBE encourages educators to practice these types of items with students
during the course of the school year so they are familiar with them prior to ISAT testing.

SAMPLE SHORT-RESPONSE QUESTION


Sam can buy his lunch at school. Each day, he wants to buy juice that costs 50¢,
a sandwich that costs 90¢, and fruit that costs 35¢.

Exactly how much money does Sam need to buy lunch for 5 days?
Show your work and label your answer.

SAMPLE SHORT-RESPONSE ANSWER


3 2
$1.75
50¢ + 90¢ + 35¢r =each 1.75
day fo 1.75
1.75
My answer 1.75
$8.75 +_
_ 5
1.7_
$8.75 for five days
Please refer to the 2008 and 2009 ISAT sample books for additional short-response items and student
samples (online at www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/sample_books.htm).

59
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Blank Short-Response Template


Mathematics - Session 2 Question 1
Write your response to question 1 on this page. Only what you write on this page will be scored.

60
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Short-Response Sample Item 1


Below is a short-response sample item, followed by 3 samples of student responses.
This short-response sample item is classified to assessment objective 10.8.05, “Analyze and apply
measures of central tendency (mode, range, median, and mean) in problem-solving situations.”

1
List one set of 5 whole numbers for which the following is true:

• The mode is 8 and the mean is 6.

Show your work.

61
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 1A

Short-Response Student Sample 1A


Rubric Score Point = 2
Note: The student identifies a set of five whole numbers (8, 8, 7, 5, 2) with a mean of “6 ” and a single
mode of “8 ” and includes appropriate supporting work by showing that the five numbers add up to 30
(8 + 8 + 7 + 5 + 2 = 30 ).

62
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 1B

Short-Response Student Sample 1B


Rubric Score Point = 2
Note: The student identifies a set of five whole numbers with a mean of “6 ” and a single mode of “8 ”
and includes appropriate supporting work by showing that the sum of the five numbers will be 30 if the
mean is to be 6 (6 x 5 = 30…3, 4, 7, 8, 8 ).

63
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 1C

Short-Response Student Sample 1C


Rubric Score Point = 1
Note: The student identifies a set of five whole numbers with a mean of “6 ” and a mode of “8 ” and
includes appropriate supporting work by showing that the five numbers add up to 30 (8 + 8 = 16 + 0 =
16 + 7 = 23 + 7 = 30 ). The student fails to provide a single mode by including an additional mode of 7
in the set (8 8 0 7 7 ).

64
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Short-Response Sample Item 2


Below is a short-response sample item, followed by 3 samples of student responses.
This short-response sample item is classified to assessment objective 10.8.07, “Represent all
possible outcomes (sample space) for simple or compound events (e.g., tables, grids, tree diagrams).”

2
A pizza restaurant offers the following types of crusts, toppings, and cheeses.

• Crust: regular, thin


• Topping: sausage, pepperoni, bacon
• Cheese: mozzarella, cheddar

List all the possible combinations of pizzas that can be made using
1 type of crust, 1 topping, and 1 type of cheese.

65
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 2A

Short-Response Student Sample 2A


Rubric Score Point = 2
Note: The student correctly lists all twelve possible combinations of pizzas that can be made. All
combinations of pizza provided are unique.

66
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 2B

Short-Response Student Sample 2B


Rubric Score Point = 2
Note: The student uses a diagram to correctly show all twelve possible combinations of pizzas that can
be made. The strategy links each type of crust to a type of cheese and a topping to produce all twelve
unique combinations.

67
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Short-Response Student Sample 2C

Short-Response Student Sample 2C


Rubric Score Point = 1
Note: The student correctly lists the six combinations of pizza that include the regular crust, but fails to
provide any combinations using the thin crust. The student identifies that there are twelve combinations
of pizza, but does not follow through with listing the other six combinations (…I also have to do that
with the thin crust.) and simply indicates the answer is “12 ”.

68
Mathematics Extended-Response
Scoring Rubric
Followed by Student Samples

69
2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Extended-Response Scoring Rubric


The following rubric is used to score the extended-response items for all grade levels. A student-friendly
version of this extended-response scoring rubric is available online at www.isbe.net/assessment/math.htm.

SCORE MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE: STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE: EXPLANATION:


LEVEL Knowledge of mathematical principles and Identification and use of important Written explanation of the rationales and
concepts which result in a correct solution to elements of the problem that represent steps of the solution process. A justification
a problem. and integrate concepts which yield the of each step is provided. Though important,
solution (e.g., models, diagrams, symbols, the length of the response, grammar, and
algorithms). syntax are not the critical elements of this
dimension.

• shows complete understanding of the • identifies all important elements of • gives a complete written explanation of the
problem’s mathematical concepts and the problem and shows complete solution process; clearly explains what was
principles understanding of the relationships among done and why it was done
• uses appropriate mathematical terminology elements • may include a diagram with a complete
4 and notations including labeling answer if • shows complete evidence of an appropriate explanation of all its elements
appropriate strategy that would correctly solve the
• executes algorithms and computations problem
completely and correctly

• shows nearly complete understanding of • identifies most of the important elements • gives a nearly complete written explanation
the problem’s mathematical concepts and of the problem and shows a general of the solution process; clearly explains
principles understanding of the relationships among what was done and begins to address why
• uses mostly correct mathematical them it was done
3 terminology and notations • shows nearly complete evidence of an • may include a diagram with most of its
• executes algorithms completely; appropriate strategy for solving the elements explained
computations are generally correct but may problem
contain minor errors

• shows some understanding of the • identifies some important elements • gives some written explanation of the
problem’s mathematical concepts and of the problem but shows only limited solution process; either explains what was
principles understanding of the relationships among done or addresses why it was done
• uses some correct mathematical them • explanation is vague, difficult to interpret,
2 terminology and notations • shows some evidence of a strategy for or does not completely match the solution
• may contain major algorithmic or solving the problem process
computational errors • may include a diagram with some of its
elements explained
• shows limited to no understanding of the • fails to identify important elements or • gives minimal written explanation of the
problem’s mathematical concepts and places too much emphasis on unrelated solution process; may fail to explain what
principles elements was done and why it was done
• may misuse or fail to use mathematical • reflects an inappropriate strategy for • explanation does not match presented
1 terminology and notations solving the problem; strategy may be solution process
• attempts an answer difficult to identify • may include minimal discussion of the
elements in a diagram; explanation of
significant elements is unclear

• no answer attempted • no apparent strategy • no written explanation of the solution


0 process is provided

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Using Extended-Response Samples


Beginning with the spring 2008 ISAT, the sample extended-response problem and solution (shown
below) that appeared in the 2006 and 2007 ISAT test directions will no longer be included in the
directions immediately prior to session 3. ISBE encourages educators to practice these types of items
with students during the course of the school year so they are familiar with them prior to ISAT testing.

SAMPLE EXTENDED-RESPONSE PROBLEM


Mrs. Martin wants to put tiles on the floor by the front door of her house. She wants
to use 3 different colors of tiles in her design.

She also wants


1
— of the tiles to be blue,
2
1
— of the tiles to be gray, and
4
1
— of the tiles to be red.
4

Use the grid below to design a floor for Mrs. Martin. Label each tile with the first
letter of the color that should be placed there.

Show all your work. Explain in words how you found your answer. Tell why you
took the steps you did to solve the problem.

SAMPLE EXTENDED-RESPONSE SOLUTION

B B B B B B –1
2 blue
B B B B B B
G –1 gray
G G G G G 4
R R R R R R –1
4 red

First , I know that there are 4 equal rows, so 2 rows is half and
1 row is –41 . So I made 2 rows B for blue because she wants
half the tiles blue. Then I made 1 row G for gray because she
wants –41 of the tiles to be gray. Since she wants gray and red
to be the same amount of tiles, I made the last row R for red.

Please refer to the 2008 and 2009 ISAT sample books for additional extended-response items and
student samples (online at www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/sample_books.htm).

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book
Blank Extended-Response Template
Mathematics - Session 3 Problem 1

DIRECTIONS
Make sure you
– show all your work in solving the problem,
– clearly label your answer,
– write in words how you solved the problem,
– write in words why you took the steps you did to solve the problem, and
– write as clearly as you can.

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics - Session 3 Problem 1 (continued)

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Mathematics Extended-Response Sample Item 1


Below is an extended-response sample item, followed by 3 student samples.
This extended-response sample item is classified to assessment objective 8.8.13, “Solve word
problems involving unknown quantities.”

1
Mr. Mason’s yard is 10,000 square feet. One bag of grass seed covers approximately
2,400 square feet and costs $8.99 per bag before tax. The sales tax is 7.25%.
(Note: Mr. Mason must buy full bags of grass seed.)

What is the minimum cost for the grass seed Mr. Mason needs to cover his entire
yard, including sales tax?

Show all your work. Explain in words how you found your answer. Write why you
took the steps you did to solve the problem.

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1A

DIRECTIONS
Make sure you
– show all your work in solving the problem,
– clearly label your answer,
– write in words how you solved the problem,
– write in words why you took the steps you did to solve the problem, and
– write as clearly as you can.

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1A Continued

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1B

DIRECTIONS
Make sure you
– show all your work in solving the problem,
– clearly label your answer,
– write in words how you solved the problem,
– write in words why you took the steps you did to solve the problem, and
– write as clearly as you can.

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1B Continued

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1C

DIRECTIONS
Make sure you
– show all your work in solving the problem,
– clearly label your answer,
– write in words how you solved the problem,
– write in words why you took the steps you did to solve the problem, and
– write as clearly as you can.

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1C Continued

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Scoring Guide for “Mr. Mason’s Yard”


To solve this problem, students are asked to determine the minimum cost needed to cover a yard with
grass seed.

Extended-Response Student Sample 1A


MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE EXPLANATION

4 4 4
The response shows complete The response identifies all The response gives a complete
understanding of the problem’s important elements of the written explanation of the
mathematical concepts and problem, shows complete solution process. The student
principles. The student provides understanding of the relationships explains why 5 bags were needed
work to find the cost of one bag of among these elements, and uses (I came up with 4.16 and since I
seed, including tax (8.99 x .0725 = an appropriate strategy to could only buy full bags I would
.651775 + 8.99 = $9.64), the correctly solve the problem. The need 5 bags), why 8.99 was
number of bags needed (10,000 ÷ student shows work to find the multiplied by .0725 and that
2,400 = 4.16 = 5), and the final cost number of bags needed (10,000 ÷ product was added to 8.99 (to get
of multiple bags of grass seed 2,400 = 4.16 = 5), calculates the tax the cost per bag of grass seed plus
(9.64 x 5 = $48.20). (x .0725), adds tax (.651775 + 8.99 = sales tax), and why 9.64 was
$9.64), and finds the final cost of multiplied by 5 (to find the
multiple bags of seed (9.64 x 5 = minimum cost for the grass seed).
$48.20).

Extended-Response Student Sample 1B


MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE EXPLANATION

4 4 4
The response shows complete The response identifies all The response gives a complete
understanding of the problem’s important elements of the written explanation of the
mathematical concepts and problem, shows complete solution process. The student
principles. The student provides understanding of the relationships explains why 10,000 was divided
work to find the number of bags among elements, and uses an by 2400 (to find out how many
of seed needed (10,000/2400 = appropriate strategy to correctly bags of seed are needed ), why 4.16
4.16; 4.16D5), work to find the total solve the problem. The student was rounded up to 5 ( grass seed
cost of the 5 bags before tax (5 x provides evidence of finding the bags only comes in wholes), and
8.99 = $44.95), and work to find number of bags of seed needed why 5 was multiplied by 8.99 (the
the final cost of the five bags of (10,000/2400 = 4.16; 4.16D5) and cost of 5 bags).
seed, including the correct tax evidence of calculating and
(44.95 x 1.0725 = 48.2088 D48.21). adding tax to the total cost of the
bags of seed to calculate a final
cost of multiple bags of seed (5 x
8.99 = $44.95, 44.95 x 1.0725 =
48.2088 D48.21).

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2011 ISAT Grade 8 Sample Book

Extended-Response Student Sample 1C


MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE EXPLANATION

2 3 2
The response shows some The response identifies most The response gives some written
understanding of the problem’s important elements of the explanation of the solution
mathematical concepts and problem and shows a general process, explaining what was
principles. The student shows understanding of the relationships done in the solution process (got
work to find the correct number among them. The response shows my answer by dividing 2400 by
of bags of seed needed (10,000 ÷ nearly complete evidence of an 10 thousand…that rounded off to
2400 = 4.16; 4.16 = 5). The student appropriate strategy for solving 5…I added $8.99 + 7.25 x 5 and got
applies the tax incorrectly, using the problem. The student provides $45.24), but no attempt to explain
tax as dollars instead of percent. evidence of finding the correct why these steps were taken is
number of bags of seed needed provided.
(10,000 ÷ 2400 = 4.16; 4.16 = 5),
adding the tax (I added $8.99 +
$7.25 x 5 ). The final cost (45.24)
does not indicate the cost of 5
bags, but the cost of one bag, with
incorrect tax for 5 bags.

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