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BU 930.610.

S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar V


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Lindsay J Thompson 410.935.3709/lthompson@jhu.edu
Richard G Milter 410.234.9422/milter@jhu.edu
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¦e are eager to help you learn and succeed in this course. If you want direct and specific feedback from us,
please ask for it and be willing to spend time discussing your work. Please feel free to contact us to arrange
appointments (in person or by phone) at a mutually convenient time.

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The reading for this course includes a set of required readings selected from business and academic press
sources. You are also encouraged to explore as much as possible of the supplementary readings and content
resources listed in the syllabus. Most of the required reading and learning materials for this course are
available through the Johns Hopkins University library either as reserve readings or electronic journals with a
readily accessible link via Blackboard. Others are available online as open source access. You must be sure that
your electronic access to the Johns Hopkins library is activated from your computer and working effectively.
Access modes for each source are indicated on the course reading list. You are required to complete the moral
compass workbook: Thompson, Lindsay J (2008), ›   
   
    ,
Information Age Press.

You are expected to make a daily practice of reading substantive business, economic, and world news.
Suggested sources are the ¦  
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and the    , which are available through the JHU library and also offered at discounted student
rates. You are also encouraged to participate actively in at least one online business news community.

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You should participate actively in the Blackboard class discussion board and contribute to your team discussion
board. This course will incorporate materials and resources using Blackboard. Most of the course readings,
syllabus, and other learning materials will be available through Blackboard. You are advised to check in to the
Blackboard site at least twice a week to check announcements, contribute to your team͛s Group Pages, and
participate in the Class Discussion Forum. To access the course site, please log into http://bb.carey.jhu.edu. If
you need support for Blackboard, please call 1-866-669-6138.

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The Seminaris a highly interactive learning experience focusing on the ethical challenges of business in a
complex, global society, enabling you to build a framework for high-stakes decision-making in the dynamic
global context of completing value claims. Throughout the Seminar you will explore the architecture of human
values from various dimensions: personal, organizational, societal, cultural, and cross-cultural. You will examine
a variety of complex scenarios and cases you may encounter in your business career. You will also learn from
each other as you explore, discuss, and debate ideas and values. Be prepared for experiences that will stretch
your mind and challenge your worldview in unexpected ways!
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BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar 0
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Carey learning focuses on wealth and value creation for human flourishing and creates a platform of personal
responsibility for growth in a collaborative community of inquiry, innovation, and discovery. The Seminar will
help you achieve all the Carey MBA learning goals and objectives, but will focus on those highlighted below.
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£arey Learning Goals £arey Learning Objectives
Students will identify complex issues that affect organizations and create
1.1
Integrate multiple factors in appropriate strategies to address these issues.
business decisions. Students will implement and evaluate innovative strategies and tactics
1.2
designed to address a specific organizational issue.
Students will apply quantitative tools and techniques to analyze and address
Balance qualitative and 2.1
organizational issues.
quantitative inputs in business
Students will apply qualitative tools and techniques to analyze and address
analysis. 2.2
organizational issues.
Students will demonstrate an appreciation for multiple perspectives and
3.1
Embrace and function in diverse experiences through the ability to work effectively in teams.
business contexts. Students will analyze local and global market conditions and incorporate this
3.2
analysis into decisions.
4.1 Students will develop business solutions that address critical social needs.
Create business solutions that
address social problems. Students will apply ethical frameworks and codes of conduct to guide
4.2
decisions and actions.
Lead in an adaptive and 5.1 Students will demonstrate effective oral, visual, and written communication.
continuous learning culture. Students will demonstrate effective leadership through their course work,
5.2
behaviors, and dispositions/attitudes.

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£OURSE LEARNING OUT£OMES


o      

1 Values at Work Develop a framework for living your values at work


0 Moral £osmology Understand how images and stories anchor values
3 The Moral £ompass Develop a framework for managing moral complexity

4 The Leadership Labyrinth Understand values management as a leadership skill


5 The Good £ompany Evaluate the value integrity of a business

6 The Livable £ity Evaluate the livability of a city


7 A Metro Business Plan Develop a business plan for improving the livability of a city
Understand the value challenges of a cross-cultural, cross-sector business
8 Partnering for Good
partnership
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The Seminar is a highly interactive, constructive learning experience. As a graduate student, you are
responsible for your own learning and for creating knowledge with and for your peers. Attendance and
participation are required for you to succeed in this course. You are expected to participate actively, exercise
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar |
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initiative, and create a rigorously challenging environment for inquiry, innovation, and discovery. Learning
methods emphasize a full range of academic inquiry, collaborative discovery, critical thinking, and
communication skills. Course assignments include critical review of texts and media, reflective writing and
dialogue, individual and group exercises, projects, online interaction, and case studies. The learning model is
designed to create disorienting dilemmas that reflect the uncertainty, ambiguity, and competing value claims of
the contemporary global business environment. Students accustomed to lecture-based courses and
quantitative disciplines with highly structured classes and fixed, empirical outcome measures should expect to
find some aspects of the Seminar experience challenging and perhaps uncomfortable.

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The entire seminar series is designed to foster intellectual depth and flexibility, a global worldview, and skills
orienting you towards business with humanity in mind: critical thinking and collaboration; empathic
intelligence; adaptive innovation; and personal integrity. You are expected to do your best work and earn at
least a ͞B͟ in this course. A ͞B͟ grade indicates that you have successfully completed the required learning and
your performance meets the Carey School standards of excellence. A grade above or below ͞B͟ indicates that
your performance was significantly above or below the expectations for a ͞B.͟ To earn a ͞B͟ you must:
½c Be present. Class activities are a learning performance; missing classes will lower your grade.
½c Prepare thoroughly and participate actively in class and other learning activities.
½c Complete all deliverables fully, in proper format, and on time.
½c ¦ork effectively with others using intelligence, imagination, and interpersonal skills to generate
ideas, discussion, analysis, insight, and solutions.
½c Demonstrate sound reasoning and insight in evaluation, interpretation and synthesis of factual
evidence, case literature, theories, models, and concepts in identifying, framing, and analyzing
questions, problems, and issues.
½c Communicate effectively using correct English grammar, syntax, structure, and form in both
written work and oral presentations.
½c Demonstrate understanding of course content.
½c Demonstrate competency in course-related skills and dispositions.
½c Act with integrity.
½c Demonstrate professional respect, courtesy, and sensitivity in dialogue and discussion with
people of divergent standpoints and values.

Your grade for this course will be determined in a review of your class performance and learning portfolio.
  
     
     See    at the end
of the syllabus.

Portfolio
Your portfolio will include your     five  
   
 entries,
and one project deliverable selected from options that to be discussed in the first class.
50%
Important Dates
  !: Schedule a portfolio conference with your instructor during this time.
" Complete all items in your portfolio for review.

£ontribution to Learning £ommunity 


! " 
This is your class performance grade. Class participation, initiative, punctuality, attitude, 50%
interpersonal skills, and teamwork are included in this portion of your grade.
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar ë
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You are expected to make intelligent and rigorous use of academic knowledge and resources; your opinions,
facts, and reasoning expressed in class discussion, presentations, and written work should reflect breadth and
depth of engagement with relevant and recent scholarship. You must cite sources properly. Cutting and
pasting excerpts from books, articles, or internet sources is plagiarism. Your written work must be entirely your
own; if you incorporate other people͛s ideas or data into your work, you must acknowledge and cite those
sources. 2 # ›$›%$&$%2$'. For formal academic writing, please see APA Guidelines for citation format
and style guidelines.

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As the instructors, we reserve the right to alter course content or adjust the pace to accommodate class
progress and adapt to relevant but unforeseen current events. Please be alert to the possibility of changes in
the syllabus. As we build a learning community together, we may decide to make adjustments in some of the
readings, deliverables, due dates, and class activities in order to optimize the learning experience for you and
your class colleagues. It is your responsibility to participate and stay abreast of such changes. ¦e will
announce these changes on Blackboard, so be sure to check Blackboard at least every day or two during the
semester. Please pay attention to what is going on and be alert to discussions and announcements about any
changes.
Please let us know if you don͛t understand something in the syllabus, if you are unclear about an assignment,
or if you have questions about any other aspects of the course. It is your responsibility to ask for clarification ʹ
and we will be happy to help you. You are encouraged to speak up in class ʹ your questions may help clarify
learning for others. Your team members and classmates may also be able to help you sort out your questions ʹ
but do not hesitate to contact us.

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In the last week so of the course, you will receive an email requesting your response to a series of questions
about the course. Please make sure your current email address is correct in ISIS. Your participation in the
course evaluation system is very important and the results are used to make improvements to the curriculum.
If you have questions about the course evaluation process or don͛t receive a link to the course evaluation,
please let contact me.
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar ÿ
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£lass Meetings: Wednesdays, 1:30-3 PM
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£ourse Learning Goal


To understand wealth creation for human flourishing as the values context of global business

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Required:
½c Thompson, Lindsay J (2010)͟A Moral Compass for Global Business Leaders,͟  
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Springer. Read the article.
½c Millennium Development Goals: chttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3p0VLTowAA
½c The Global Compact: chttp://www.unglobalcompact.org/AboutTheG£/TheTenPrinciples/index.html
½c Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) chttp://www.unprme.org/the-6-
principles/index.php
½c Appiah, Kwame A
÷c (2010). $
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$ 
, New York: ¦¦ Norton. Read the
Preface
÷c ¦atch ͞¦hen Honor meets Morality,͟ interview with Kwame Appiah, November 29, 2010
http://english.aljazeera.net/programmes/rizkhan/2010/11/2010112993230885416.html
½c Review the syllabus, learning goals, and performance evaluation model
½c Make sure you are listed on a team and know who your team members are
½c Complete the Personal and Professional Profile
½c Explore the BlackBoard course website
½c ¦rite at least one entry in your  
   
 reflecting on these assignments
½c Post at least one comment to the BlackBoard Discussion Forum in the week prior to the first class.
½c Create and organize your Blackboard Portfolio
½c Start learning about your city and the two retail giants, Target and ¦almart.

Suggested:
½c ¦orld Economic Forum 0 " &&: http://riskreport.weforum.org/
½c Campbell, Richmond (2007). "Moral epistemology." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/moral-epistemology/
½c ·

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 '. http://caae.phil.cmu.edu/cavalier/80130/ You will use
this as a resource.
½c ¦   !. http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/ Explore the website and compare the
values of your region of the world with at least one other region.
½c Appiah, Kwame A
÷c ͞The Ethics of Identity͟ lecture at Princeton University
http://www.princeton.edu/¦ebMedia/lectures/20031210appiahVN300K.asx
÷c ͞Talk of the Nation͟ interview with Kwame Appiah, Sept 13, 2010
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129832899
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Wednesday, March 03, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To develop a framework for living your values at work
Questions: ¦  
 


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½c Bring your     workbook to class.

Complete during class:


½c Giving Voice to Values: Personal and Professional Profile; Exercises; Mini-Cases
½c Team values and rules (post on team page in Blackboard)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, March 24)

£omplete after class:


½c Live Case Summary (post your portfolio in your ¦eek 1 Portfolio folder

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Wednesday, March 30, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To understand how stories and images anchor values
Questions: ¦  
 

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£omplete before class:


½c Steven Pinker, ͞The Moral Instinct,͟    *
, January 13, 2008
½c Joseph Campbell, ͞The Message of Myth,͟ '# (DVD available for viewing in school)
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

Complete during class:


½c Individual field notes on the ¦alters Art Gallery collections
½c Team discussion to compare individual field notes
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 1)

£omplete after class:


½c Team collage (post on real or Blackboard wall by 8 AM Thursday, March 31)

Bonus Resources:
½c Sissela Bok,  
  University of Missouri Press, 2002
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar 
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Wednesday, April 6, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To develop a framework for managing moral complexity
Questions: ¦hy are people emotionally attached to their values? ¦hat is the role of emotions and
embodiment in your moral compass?

£omplete before class:


½c Thompson,     workbook, Ch 1-4 , pp 1-90.
½c Joseph Campbell, ͞The Hero͛s Adventure,͟ '# (DVD available for viewing in school)
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

Complete during class:


½c Team discussion to compare ¦isdom Traditions and personal values
½c Team Moral Compass (post on real or Blackboard wall by 8 AM Thursday, April 7)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 7)

£omplete after class:


½c Personal Moral Compass (post in portfolio by 8 AM Monday, April 25)

Bonus Resources:
½c Rushworth Kidder. $"'  %&!
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HarperCollins, 2003. http://www.globalethics.org/book-excerpts.php

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Wednesday, April 13, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To understand values management as a leadership skill
Question: How are the moral challenges of leadership different from the moral challenges of personal and
professional life? ¦hat is collaborative leadership? ¦hat is your greatest leadership challenge?

£omplete before class:


½c Ronald Heifetz and Donald Laurie, ͞The ¦ork of Leadership,͟ $ !  
 &!. Harvard
Business School ·
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4150.
½c Chrystia Freeland, ͞The Rise of the New Global Elite, '+January-February 2011.
½c 
(DVD available for viewing in school)
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

Complete during class:


½c Discussion of 

½c Case briefing of 
(post Blackboard wall by 8 AM Thursday, April 22)
½c Moral leadership analysis of 

½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 21)

Bonus Resources:
½c David Segal, ͞The Perfect Brainstorm,    *
December 19, 2010
½c Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, Annie McKee, ͞Emotionally Intelligent Leadership,͟ $ !  

&!HBR OnPoint Collection
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar 
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Wednesday, April 00, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To evaluate the value integrity of a business
Questions: ¦hat is a good company? ¦hat are the moral challenges of corporations? How do we identify and
evaluate a ͞good͟ company?

£omplete before class:


½c Thompson, The Value Integrity model
½c Michael E Porter and Mark R Kramer, ͚Strategy and Society: The Link between Competitive Advantage
and Corporate Social Responsibility,͟ $ !  
&!, December 2006.
šc Global Compact; the Sullivan Principles.;
šc Fortune Global 500 ͞Beyond the Bottom Line,͟
(http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2006/10/30/8391850/index.htm
½c General resources on corporate social performance: Calvert Group (http://www.calvertgroup.com/)
KLD Analytics (http://www.kld.com/resources/index.html), The UN Global Compact Ten Principles
(http://www.unglobalcompact.org/AboutTheGC/TheTenPrinciples/index.html)
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

£omplete during class:


½c Team project: The Target/¦almart Face-Off; The Company Report Card (post Company Report Cards on
Blackboard wall by 8 AM Friday, April 22)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 21)

Bonus Resources:
½c Marilise Smurthwaite, ͞The Purpose of the Corporation,͟ '   %&
 
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"   , Oliver ¦illiams, editor,
South Bend: University of Notre Dame Press, 2008, Chapter 1.
½c Lindsay Thompson, ͞The Future of Enterprise Regulation: Corporate Social Accountability and Human
Freedom,͟  
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University of Maryland School of Law, III, 2. May
2008.
½c James Post, Lee Preston, Sybille Sachs. &#

 
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¦ . Stanford: Stanford Business Books, 2002. Read Chapters 1, 2, and 4.
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Wednesday, April 07, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To evaluate the livability of a city

Questions: ¦hat is a livable city? ¦hat is the impact of globalization and urbanization on cities? ¦hy is the
livability of cities important?

£omplete before class:


½c Innovative Cities http://wbi.worldbank.org/wbi/news/2010/06/16/mayors-dialogue-innovative-cities-
june-22-23-2010
½c International Making Cities Livable; UN Habitat; USAID: Making Cities ¦ork; McKinsey: Cities
½c Michael Porter Initiative for Competitive Inner Cities
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

£omplete during class:


½c Team project: The City Report Card (post Blackboard wall by 8 AM Friday, April 29)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 28)

Bonus Resources:
½c Richard Dobbs and Shirish Sankhe, ͞Comparing Urbanization in China and India,͟.
/ 
July 2010.
½c Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Random House 1993.

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Wednesday, May 4, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To develop a business plan for improving the livability of a city
Questions: ¦hy are livable cities important for business? ¦hat is the role of business in the livability of cities?

£omplete before class:


½c Bruce Katz:http://www.brookings.edu/events/2010/1208_metro_summit.aspx
½c Brookings Metro Business Plan
http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/events/2010/1208_metro_summit/1208_metro_summit_bu
siness_framing_paper.pdf.
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

£omplete during class:


½c Team project: The Metro Business Plan (post Blackboard wall by 8 AM Friday, May 6)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, May 5)
Bonus Resources:
½c Emerging Markets, Globalization, and Urbanization :
http://www.brookings.edu/handlers/MultimediaDownload.ashx?ref=%7b591693EC-4908-4078-8733-
CBB481D9AFBA%7d&type=audio&flb=
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar V
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Wednesday, May 11, 0011

£lass Session Learning Goal


To understand values management challenges of cross-cultural, cross-sector partnerships
Questions: ¦hat challenges do US global companies face in expanding to international markets? How ethical is
the US corporate retail brand? ¦hat challenges to emerging economy cities face in attracting responsible and
sustainable investment? How can these competing values of multiple stakeholders be negotiated?

£omplete before class:


½c Paired Team project: Proposals for Retail Expansion/Economic Development (post Blackboard wall by 8
AM ¦ednesday, May 11)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, April 28)
½c Contribute to the weekly Blackboard discussion

£omplete during class:


½c Paired Team project: Negotiating the international public/private partnership (post summary of
negotiated partnership ʹ or rejection -- Blackboard wall by 8 AM Friday, May 6)
½c Team Learning Summary (post on team page in Blackboard by 8 AM Thursday, May 5)

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BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar VV
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ONLINE BUSINESS MEDIA, NETWORKS, AND JOURNALS

Business press and media


½c Business ¦eek: Business ¦eek B¦ Video
½c Economist: Economist
½c Fast Company: http://www.fastcompany.com/user Social Capitalism Award
½c ¦all Street Journal: ¦SJ Student Subscription ¦SJ Video

Business ethics / social responsibility networks, organizations, and resources


½c # 
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%PRME
½c   %Net Impact
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 : CSR ¦ire
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Business ethics journals available through JHU libraries


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. ISSN: 0963-9284. London: Routledge Ltd.
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.ISSN: 1085-4622. Greenwich CN: Elsevier Science.
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&!2ISSN: 0962-8770. Oxford UK: Blackwell Publishers
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/ . ISSN: 1052-150X. Bowling Green OH: The Society of Business Ethics
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2ISSN: 0277-2027. Troy NY: Human Dimensions Center,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
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&!. %  2 Oxford UK: Blackwell Synergy.
½c 


 
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&!#
 
. ISSN:
0306-8293. Bradford UK: MCB Social Economics Ltd.
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2ISSN: 0964-8410/1472-0701. Oxford UK: Blackwell
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0!2ISSN: 1067-6163. New York NY: Aspen Publishers.
½c  
#" . ISSN: 1744-9626/1744-9634. London, New York NY: Taylor Francis
Group.
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. ISSN: 1382-6891/1573-1944. Dordrecht Netherlands: Springer.
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar V0
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Pre-Work Learning
You will articulate a point of view about human values in the global
economic and business
‰   
narrative
  

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½c Values at Work c
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1 ½c To develop a framework for living c your values at work
  c
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Moral Cosmology c
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2 To understand how images and stories anchor values
c
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The Moral Compass c
3 c
To develop a framework for managing moral complexity
c c
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The Leadership Labyrinth c
4 To understand values management
c
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The Good Company c
c business
5 To evaluate the value integrity in
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The Livable City c
6 c
To evaluate the livability of a city
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The Metro Business Planc
7 To develop a business plan for improving
c the livability of a city
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Partnering for Good c
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8 To understand values management challenges of a cross-cultural,
cross-sector business partnershipc
c c
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BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar V|
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Pre-Work Learning
Articulate a point of view about s human values in the global
economic and business narrative
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For 200 years (roughly 1800-2000 CE), an assumption of ͞trickle down͟ wealth for all has been
part of the global economic narrative of dramatically increasing economic growth. Towards the
end of the 20th century, as economic inequality grew more acute both among and within
nations, the United Nations launched an initiative to champion human values and rights, raise
the visibility of poverty-induced human suffering as a global problem, and reorient business
and business schools towards creating wealth for human flourishing.

As you reflect on the UN documents ($


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of them 
 and/or 
# with your own knowledge, experience, and values?

¦hat are your thoughts about the emerging global economic narrative?

How would you apply Appiah͛s theory of moral change to the values shift in this narrative?

¦hat do you think this values shift means for business?


BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar Vë
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BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar Vÿ
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QUALITY OF THOUGHT HUMAN VALUES


£omplexity + Imagination £haracter + Leadership
A: £reates new knowledge, methods and/or A: £ollaborates with others in
models for understanding and resolving
A adapting values to build a culture of
complex problems. conscience in response to emergent
A-: Adapts knowledge, methods and models to
A- complex moral challenges and value
create innovative understanding conflicts
of/solutions to complex problems. A-: Builds a consensus of shared
B+: Adapts knowledge, methods and models to B+ values to manage moral challenges
develop problem-solving approaches and value conflicts
tailored to the unique context of problems. B+: Applies values to manage moral
B: Applies appropriate disciplinary knowledge, challenges
methods and models to organize, interpret, B: Demonstrates moral clarity in
evaluate, & analyze evidence in resolving defining, articulating, and acting on
complex problems effectively. personal values
B-: Demonstrates incomplete mastery of
B B-: Demonstrates lack of clarity about
relevant disciplinary knowledge, methods,
and models in organizing, interpreting,
evaluating, and analyzing evidence to
understand and resolve complex problems.
B-

SIGNATURE STYLE
DIS£URSIVE FORM
Originality + Authenticity
Technical mastery + Innovation
A: Unforgettable and unreplicable by
A: Sets a new exemplary standard of
others
excellence
A-: Projects a seamlessly integrated,
A-: Introduces innovations that enhance the
identifiable, refined, and compelling
effectiveness of discursive forms
personal style
B+: Introduces skillfully designed and executed
B+: Projects unique signature strengths of
innovative elements to discursive forms
character, personality, imagination,
B: Demonstrates technical mastery of design,
erudition, values, and worldview
construction, and execution appropriate to
B: Projects recognizable personal strengths
a range of conventional discursive forms
and personality
(written, interactive, quantitative, media)
B-: Demonstrates little originality or
B-: Demonstrates incomplete technical
authentic personality
mastery of conventional discursive forms
BU 930.610.S11 | Thought and Discourse II | Leadership Ethics Seminar V?
c
  

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Written Documents
½c Essay
½c Executive summary ½c Meeting agenda ½c Promotion case
½c Review ½c Meeting summary ½c Sales report
½c Brief ½c Performance review ½c Project update
½c Research report ½c Grievance filing

Media
½c ¦eb page ½c TED-style lecture ½c Slide show
½c Video clip interview ½c PowerPoint ½c Film
½c Video clip composition presentation ½c Blog
½c Mash-up ½c Multimedia collage
½c Ad campaign ½c Commercial

Oral Presentations
½c Elevator speech ½c Introductory remarks ½c Roast
½c Expository lecture ½c Keynote speech ½c Panel moderation
½c Debate ½c Persuasive speech
½c Toast ½c Product promotion

£reative Expressions
½c Poem ½c Sculpture ½c Product design
½c Collage ½c Event process design ½c Ad campaign
½c Musical composition ½c Event set design ½c Process design
½c Logo ½c Product package design ½c Contingency plan

Interactive £ommunications
½c Job interview (either ½c Group discussion ½c Discernment process
side) ½c Consensus process ½c Dialogue
½c Difficult conversations ½c Peer coaching
½c Performance review ½c Decision process

Analytical/Quantitative Documents
½c Financial statements ½c Pricing strategy ½c Cost-benefit analysis
½c Sales report ½c Budget justification ½c Decision analysis
½c Spreadsheet analysis ½c Cost overrun report ½c ¦orkflow analysis
½c Conceptual modeling ½c Revenue projections ½c Operations analysis