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www.thelighthousenews.com Vol. 11, No. 5 | Thur sday, March 10, 2011 WHAT’S INSIDE Senior Chief Builder

Vol. 11, No. 5 | Thur sday, March 10, 2011

WHAT’S INSIDE

Vol. 11, No. 5 | Thur sday, March 10, 2011 WHAT’S INSIDE Senior Chief Builder Michelle
Vol. 11, No. 5 | Thur sday, March 10, 2011 WHAT’S INSIDE Senior Chief Builder Michelle

Senior Chief Builder Michelle Bernales reads a Dr. Seuss book

at Marina West Elementary School

in Oxnard on Read Across America

Day, March 2. Page 3.

in Oxnard on Read Ac ro ss America Day, March 2. Page 3. A Naval Base
in Oxnard on Read Ac ro ss America Day, March 2. Page 3. A Naval Base

A Naval Base Ventura County police

officer keeps his weapon trained on the building where “hostages” were being held during a Solid Curtain- Citadel Shield training exercise on Feb. 23. The annual anti-terrorism and force protection exercise takes place each year. Pages 20-21.

NMCB 40 returning from Afghanistan

each year. Pages 20-21. NMCB 40 returning from Afghanistan PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y / LIGHTHOUSE

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Lexi Gerkey, a fifth-grader at Parkview Elementary School in Port Hueneme, creates a

“Welcome Home” sign for Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 40. Children from the school sent care packages and valentines to the Seabees throughout their seven- month deployment and plan to be at the Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu airfield when the main party returns home. For more on NMCB 40’s deployment, see Page 18.

home. For more on NMCB 40’s deployment , see Page 18. PHOTO BY MC C MICHAEL
home. For more on NMCB 40’s deployment , see Page 18. PHOTO BY MC C MICHAEL

PHOTO BY MCC MICHAEL B. WATKINS / NMCB 40

Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 40’s advance party depart Camp Deh Dadi Two, Afghanistan, on Feb. 28 for their journey back to homeport in Port Hueneme. Camp Deh Dadi Two started as an open valley and was built from the ground up by Seabees. NMCB 40 will turn the camp over to the Army and NATO forces, and it will be a major hub in the northern distribution network supply route.

Base honored for conserving natural resources

Once again, chief of naval operations awards Naval Base Ventura County for its efforts in environmental stewardship

For the second time in three time it carries out the base mis- 2008. The base has also won sev-

eral CNO awards for environ- mental restoration. Shide noted that NBVC — pri- marily Point Mugu and San Nicolas Island — has extensive natural resources. “We have threatened and en- dangered species,” he said. “We have marine mammals. We have

SE E AWA RD, PAGE 19

years, Naval Base Ventura Coun- ty — home to several threatened

sion,”said Dan Shide, installation environmental program manager.

and endangered species — has “It also recognizes that NBVC

won top honors from the chief of naval operations for natural resources conservation. “This award recognizes that NBVC takes a proactive and in- novative approach to environ-

leadership is actively engaged and personally committed to this is- sue.” NBVC also won the CNO En- vironmental Award in the Natu- ral Resources Conservation,

mental stewardship at the same Large Installation, category in

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The Lighthouse

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Ask the Captain

By Captain Jim McHugh

NBVC Commanding Officer

the Captain By Captain Jim McHugh NBVC Commanding Officer Q A the work space and surrounding

Q A

the work space and surrounding area.

Why are parking lots not being swept clean?

Question: Why is the outside of Building

drains and surrounding areas. Unfortunately, due to current funding levels, we are not re- sourced to sweep parking lots, which will cause

Our Environmental Division inspects the base

3008 not maintained? There are leaves and

dirt as high as the curb on the north and west

sides of the building in the parking lot. Someone occasional buildup of leaves and pine needles.

cleaned the drain cover on the north side and

the drains if the leaves and dirt start filling the

drains.

Answer: The appearance of our facilities,

with both Commander Navy Region Southwest

and Naval Base Ventura County. We encourage

all of our tenants and residents to take pride in

Our Public Works Department monitors

left the leaves on the sidewalk. This not good for storm water system annually and identifies lines

needing cleaning. Cleaning of drains and piping is prioritized by need and risk of flooding and performed according to available funding. Day-to-day maintenance will be one of the

landscape and open space is an important issue rst areas where we all see significant change as

the federal budget woes continue. I urge every- one to show patience and exibility over the next few weeks — and possibly months — until the Defense Appropriations bill stalemate is resolved.

2

the Defense Appropriations bill stalemate is re solved. 2 Please submit your questions or comments to

Please submit your questions or comments to Lighthouse Editor Andrea Howry at lighthouse@navy.mil

to Lighthouse Editor Andrea Howry at lighthouse@navy.mil NAVAL BASE VENTURA COUNTY COMMANDING OFFICER CAPT. JIM

NAVAL BASE VENTURA COUNTY COMMANDING OFFICER

CAPT. JIM McHUGH

CHIEF STAFF OFFICER

CAPT. DAVID SASEK

LIGHTHOUSE EDITOR

ANDREA HOWRY lighthouse@navy.mil

805-989-5281

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

TERI REID

MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST

MC1 AARON PETERSON

TERI REID MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST MC1 AARON PETERSON 800-221-STAR (7827) PUBLISHER GEORGE H. COGSWELL III Ve

800-221-STAR (7827)

PUBLISHER

GEORGE H. COGSWELL III Ventura County Star

NICHE PUBLICATIONS DIRECTOR

MICHAEL HOFFMAN mhoffman@vcstar.com

805-437-0206

ADVERTISING

JANE ALVAREZ jalvarez@vcstar.com

805-437-0372

ADVERTISING JANE ALVAREZ jalvarez@vcstar.com 805-437-0372 THE LIGHTHOUSE IS PUBLISHED AT NO COST TO THE GOVERN- MENT

THE LIGHTHOUSE IS PUBLISHED AT NO COST TO THE GOVERN- MENT EVERY OTHER THURSDAY BY THE STAR, OF CAMARILLO, CA. THE STAR IS A PRIVATE FIRM IN NO WAY CONNECTED WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OR THE UNITED STATES NAVY, UNDER WRITTEN CONTRACT WITH NAVAL BASE VENTURA COUNTY. THE LIGHTHOUSE IS THE ONLY AUTHORIZED CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE NEWSPAPER FOR MEMBERS OF THE U.S. NAVY, CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES, RETIREES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS IN THE VENTURA COUNTY AREA. CONTENTS OF THE PAPER ARE NOT NECESSARILY THE OFFICIAL VIEWS OF, NOR ENDORSED BY, THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, OR THE DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AND DO NOT IMPLY EN- DORSEMENT THEREOF. THE APPEARANCE OF ADVERTISING IN THIS PUBLICATION INCLUDING INSERTS AND SUPPLEMENTS, DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, THE U.S. NAVY OR THE STAR, OF THE PRODUCTS OR SERVICES ADVERTISED. EVERYTHING ADVERTISED IN THIS PUBLICATION SHALL BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE, USE OR PATRONAGE WITHOUT REGARD TO RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN, AGE, MARITAL STATUS, PHYSICAL HANDICAP, POLITICAL AFFILIATION, OR ANY OTHER NON-MERIT FACTOR OF THE PURCHASER, USE, OR PATRON. IF A VIOLATION OR REJECTION OF THIS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY BY AN AD- VERTISER IS CONFIRMED, THE PUBLISHER SHALL REFUSE TO PRINT ADVERTISING FROM THAT SOURCE UNTIL THE VIOLATION IS CORRECTED. EDITORIAL CONTENT IS EDITED, PREPARED AND PROVIDED TO THE PUBLISHER BY THE LOCAL INSTALLA- TION PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICES UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE NAVAL BASE VENTURA COUNTY PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE.

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Base celebrates Women’s History Month COMMUNITY CALENDAR

face Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Divi-

Base Ventura County in celebration of March being Women’s History Month. On Thursday, March 24, the winner of the Joyce W. Stewart Memorial Award will be announced at 10 a.m. at the Bard Man- sion. The deadline to nominate someone for

the award is close of business Monday, an at the Naval Construction Battalion W. Stewart Memorial Award are present-

award, which is named for the first wom-

Both the March 28 talk and the Joyce

Two events are taking place at Naval 2766 or Pamm Klieman at 982-4130.

The annual honor is given to an indi- sion (NSWC PHD), is hosting a presenta-

vidual or a team that works for the ac- tion by the police chiefs of Oxnard, Geri ceptance of diversity and promotes equal Williams, and Port Hueneme, Kathleen

treatment at an NBVC command or or- ganization.

Sheehan. Their talk begins at 1:30 p.m. in Building 1388, the audiovisual center at

This is the 20th anniversary of the NSWC PHD.

March 14. A sample nomination form is available by calling Federal Women’s Pro- gram Co-Chairs Lisa Zimmerman at 982-

Center to achieve the professional grade of GM-14. On Monday, March 28, the Naval Sur-

ed by the Federal Women’s Program, a committee of the Equal Employment Op- portunity Council for NBVC.

‘The more you read, the more you will know’

Volunt eers from NBVC read to local youngsters on Dr. Seuss’ birthday

By Andrea Howry

Lighthouse editor

Red and white striped top hats replaced Sailors’ caps on We dnesday, March 2, as six volunteers from Naval Base Ventura County read to youngsters from a local elementary school on Read Across Amer- ica Day, also known as Dr. Seuss’ birth- day. The next day, Capt. David Sasek, chief staff officer of NBVC, read three Seuss books to preschoolers in his son’s class at the Child Development Center, Port Hue- neme. “Reading to children opens a world to them,he said. “I came from a family of avid readers, and I’m trying to pass that on to my children.” All three of his youngsters — ages 10, 6 and 4 — love to read, he said. Senior Chief Builder Michelle Bernales, the NBVC command community services officer, organized the community relations event that had she and five others from NBVC reading “Hop on Pop,” “Green Eggs and Ham” and other Seussian titles to students at Marina We st Elementary School in Oxnard.

to students at Marina We st Elementary School in Oxnard. PHOTOS BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

PHOTOS BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Capt. David Sasek, chief staff officer of Naval Base Ventura County, gets some special help from his 4-year-old son Colin as he reads a Dr. Seuss book to his son’s preschool class at the Port Hueneme Child Development Center.

class at th e Po rt Huenem e Chil d Development Center. ET C Jim my

ETC Jimmy Croughen reads to a class at Marina West Elementary School in Oxnard.

ed. In addition, she said, “this was a great opportunity for our military members to get out in the community and have a lot of fun.”

Karen Miyamoto, a kindergarten teach- er at Marina We st, said she ap preciated the Navy’s help in “bringing these books to life” and carrying out the goal of Read Across America Day by demonstrating how important it is to read to a child. “Hopefully these children will go home and tell their parents they need to read 20 minutes every night,she said. “There’s a correlation between how much a parent reads to a child and how well that child does in school.” Jo ining Bernales at Marina We st we re Senior Chief Aviation Structural Me- chanic Homer Carrillo, Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Murray Willett, Legalman 1st Class Monica Vo ce, Chief Electronics Technician Jimmy Croughen and Air Traf-

Bernales teamed up with United Way ing aloud to youngsters is well document- fic Controller 1st Class Nathaniel Sobey.

The National Education Association established Read Across America Day on March 2, the day Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, was born in 1904.

to bring the Sailors to Marina We st. She noted that literacy among elemen- tary school students is dropping at an alarming rate and that the benefit of read-

March

PASTA FEED: Family 11 Night Spaghetti Dinner, 5 to 8 p.m., The Point, Point Mugu. Adults $5;

kids under 5 eat free; kids 5 to 10 half price. Open to all with base access.

HEALTH FAIR, ST. 17 PATRICK’S DAY 5K: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Bee-Fit Center, Port Hueneme.

Fitness assessments, TRX demonstration, exercise class demos. Run registration 11 a.m., race at 11:30. Info: 982-4726.

18 DATE NIGHT: Parents Night Out. 6 to 9:30 p.m., free child care

at both Hueneme and Mugu provided on first-come, first- serve basis for active duty only. Sign up before March 16 at CDC for children 1 to 5 years old and Youth Activity Center for those in kindergarten through 12 years old. Space is limited.

25 CAR SEAT CHECK:

10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., softball field parking

lot next to NEX, Point Mugu. Make sure your car seat is installed properly. First-come, first- serve. Info: nbvc_safety@navy.mil.

April

MILITARY BUSINESS & COMMUNITY EXPO:

8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.,

21

Ventura County Office of Education. $35 until March 25, $40 until April 15, $50 at the door. Free job fair 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sponsorships, exhibit booths and job fair tables available. Talks include opportunities with the “great green fleet” and getting a job on base. Info: 969-5244.

3

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American Red Cross means a lot to military families

In 1881 Clara Barton founded today’s American Red Cross. Since its beginning, the Red Cross rush- es to where help is needed. And people around the country rally with outpourings of volunteer assistance and donations of funds and needed supplies. But the work of the American Red Cross is not limited to disaster response. Since 1942, following the tradition of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the pres- ident declared the month of March as Red Cross Month. This focus on the Red Cross coincides with their major push for fund raising to accomplish their diverse mission throughout the year and across the coun- try. Most of us know about the Red Cross Disaster Re lief and re cove ry effo rts. We not only know about their blood drives, but many of us give blood. But the Red Cross works tirelessly 24/7. The American Red Cross provides disaster preparedness support and training, childcare (babysit- ting) certification, CPR training and cer-

tification, swimming lessons, water safety the globe briefing service members and drive, the Red Cross needs you.

Homefront in focus withBeth Wilson
Homefront
in focus
withBeth
Wilson

The Red Cross office at Naval Base Ventura County is conducting monthly CPR classes. See Page 22.

and lifeguard certification, to name just a few services.

families on support it provides. The Red Cross does more than send emergency notifications. They perform well-being checks, offer financial assis- tance, facilitate holiday mail for troops, information and referral, deployment sup- port and services for veterans. Did you know they can help you start

To learn about volunteer opportunities in your area log on to www.redcross.org/ en/where and type in your ZIP code for a list of needs in your area. As military families we need to keep the toll-free number in our smart phone and wallet to facilitate connecting with the Red Cross in the event of an emergency. The

a career in the medical field with their military assistance number is 877-272-

7337. When calling have the full name of your service member, their rank, branch of service, date of birth or Social Secu-

American Red Cross Month is an op- rity number, military address and informa-

tion on deployed unit (if currently de-

portunity to get acquainted with the ser-

nursing assistant training program? And, they can build your resume in other areas as well – by volunteering.

vices and support they provide. It is an ployed).

opportunity to review your disaster pre- paredness. It is a time to take a class. It is an opportunity to volunteer. The Red Cross depends on volunteers;

The American Red Cross – serving our communities, our nation and our family. Please consider supporting them and vol- unteering today.

— Connect with Beth at her site (www. enlistedspousecommunity.com). Enlisted Spouse Radio celebrates the Month of the Military Child throughout March. Tune in for great resources for you and your children (www.blogtalkradio.com/nht).

For military families the Red Cross is as such 96 percent of their total work force

much more. 24/7/365, the Red Cross quick- ly sends emergency communications to

is volunteers. There are many areas to volunteer where you can utilize your exist-

deployed service members on behalf of ing skills or develop new ones. From as-

their family (www.redcross.org). The Red Cross is on military installations across

sisting with disaster recovery, delivering military messages or working at a blood

Thursday, March 10, 2011
Thursday, March 10, 2011

4

across sisting with disaster recove ry, deli ve ring military messages or working at a bl

across sisting with disaster recove ry, deli ve ring military messages or working at a bl

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Family Robotics Nights bring STEM closer to home

Counting the tiles on the floor as you take a walk with your toddler, encouraging your elementary-age child to try a new educational computer software program or allowing your teenager to help with the household budget are all ways to build an appreciation of science, technology, engi- neering and math. By doing these things you may be bol- stering your children’s chances of success in their future careers. This is because en- joying math and science may determine a child’s later career success. The National Science Foundation esti- mates that 80 percent of jobs created in the next decade will require some form of math and science. For this reason, many schools and businesses are focusing more

time, energy and money on Science, Tech- in place of taking on the fields they want tura County Community Support Pro-

nology, Engineering and Mathematics — STEM.

due to poor preparedness. This preparation cannot start too

quired outside of the lecture setting — in places like laboratories. Students have chosen easier majors and courses of study

families can find ways to encourage STEM at home as well. Spending time with children piecing puzzles together, discussing how families can improve recycling efforts or experi-

School connection withMonica James
School
connection
withMonica
James

Neal Friedman of Robotics and Things will lead families in their efforts to build a family robot and how they can add to it once they take it home. They can then bring their robots to Kids’ Day on April

menting with recipes in the kitchen are 30 for a Robotics Competition. All fami-

lies will receive a certificate of participa- tion, and those who win in various catego- ries will receive priz es. However, the best prize in this competition is that families will have the opportunity to work togeth- er, have fun together and enjoy learning about many aspects of math and sci- ence. Mark your calendars for Family Robot- ics Nights: April 6 at Point Mugu, April 7 at Port Hueneme Youth Center, and April 8 at the Camarillo Youth Center. Families interested in participating can register at one of the CYP Youth Centers. Registration and participation will be lim- ited to the first 100 families to register.

grams is coordinating a Robotics Program. Families will have the opportunity to work together to build a robot. The kits, pro- vided by a sponsorship from Time Warner Cable, will be provided to 100 families during Family Robotics Nights, which will

just a few examples of how families can encourage STEM efforts at home. Additionally, keeping in contact with your child’s school to learn how they are encouraging an interest in math and sci- ence may give you even more ideas. Par- ents who have building skills or cooking skills can offer their time and expertise to support their own children, as well as many other students. In an effort to support families’ endeav- ors to encourage STEM, Naval Base Ven-

In recent years, there has been a sig- soon.

From block building as a preschooler to rebuilding an engine as a teenager, math and science can be enjoyable and educa-

to do with poor preparation for high tional. While schools are refocusing to take place at the CYP Youth Centers on

school classes and the intense work re-

include more STEM in their curriculum,

nificant decline in the number of college students choosing majors in science- or technology-related fields. Much of this has

For more information contact the NBVC school liaison officer at 989-5211 or e-mail monica.james@navy.mil.

April 6, 7, and 8.

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The Lighthouse

What in our lives will be important 100 years from now?

As a lifelong baseball fan, I was thrilled to buy for my little niece, Lauren, her first baseball glove. I am proud to say that she is a great little girl as well as being quite an athlete at age 8. Despite her size, she is absolutely fearless on the soccer field. When my brother told me that she was interested in playing T-ball, I couldn’t wait to see them during our vacation togeth- er. While I was playing catch and trying to teach her the fundamentals of baseball, a wonderful flood of memories overcame me in how my brother and I used to play the same way when we were boys. This was during the Little League phase of our athletic past. I thank God we grew up in a nice neigh- borhood where there were many kids our

age. Like many young boys, we used to at carnivals or arcade centers. Believe it life of a child.”

play pickup baseball games until late into the summer evenings. Looking back, I can now see it was certainly an idyllic and wonderful place to grow up! To this day I find it hard to explain what life used to be like to someone who is un-

der 25 years of age. It was definitely a interested in baseball? I don’t know. Wh at because you were important in a life

different era and time in America. Young-

or not, Pac-Man and Donkey Kong were

I just wanted to remind us that we

once considered the technological pin- are already important in someone’s

life. As busy as life can get sometimes,

I wonder: Many years from now, when let us not forget the ones whom God

my niece grows up and gets married and

has children of her own, will she still be how our world will be a better place

has entrusted in our lives. Who knows

play, for 25 cents at a time, were located

the only video games where you could like. But the world may be a better

place because I was important in the

sters, for example, didn’t sit in front of a computer and play games all day. In fact,

have fond memories playing catch with her Uncle Jeff in Navy base housing when she was a little girl. I want to end my article with a beautiful and well-known piece of writing. Yo u ma y have seen these fa- miliar words on a poster of a little boy staring out towards the ocean. This excerpt was from “Within My Power” by Forest Witcraft. The post- er is titled, “One Hundr ed Ye ars From Now. ” He writes: “One hundred years from now it will not matter what kind of car I drove, what kind of house I lived in, how much money was in my bank account nor what my clothes looked

Chaplain’s corner withLt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Han
Chaplain’s
corner
withLt. Cmdr.
Jeffrey Han

nacle of arcade games!

I do hope for her, however, is that she will

of a child also.

Lent and Holy Week services get under way at NBVC

11, March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8 and April 15. The Roman Catholic schedule continues with Palm Sunday services April 17 at 9 a.m. at Point Mugu and at 11:15 a.m. at Port

are taking place beginning Thursday, Hueneme; Maundy Thursday services at eme; and Easter Sunday services at 9

March 10. Each service will be followed 6:30 p.m. April 21, at Port Hueneme, fol- a.m. at Port Hueneme and 11:15 a.m. at

lowed by family sharing supper and potluck; Good Friday services April 22 at 6:30 p.m. at Port Hueneme, followed by a soup supper and potluck; and Easter Sunday Catholic

and April 14. At the Port Hueneme Seabee Mass April 24 at 9 a.m. at Point Mugu and ed at Chabad of Oxnard Jewish Cen-

Chapel, services begin at 6:30 p.m. March

by a soup supper and potluck. At the Point Mugu Chapel of Faith, these services begin at 6 p.m. March 10, March 17, March 24, March 31, April 7

Point Mugu, plus a 6:30 a.m. sunrise service in the Seabee Chapel courtyard at Port Hueneme. The Jewish holidays are being celebrat-

The Protestant worship schedule in- cludes Palm Sunday services April 17 at 9 a.m. at Port Hueneme and 11:15 a.m. at Point Mugu; Good Friday Cantata service at 5 p.m. April 22 at Port Huen-

The 2011 Lent and Holy We ek schedule kicks off this month at Naval Base Ven- tura County. For Roman Catholics, Community Sta- tions of the Cross with school children

11:15 a.m. at Port Hueneme.

ter.

6 Thursday, March 10, 2011
6
Thursday, March 10, 2011

a.m. at Port Hueneme. ter. 6 Thursday, March 10, 2011 Worship schedule Seabee Chapel Port Hueneme

a.m. at Port Hueneme. ter. 6 Thursday, March 10, 2011 Worship schedule Seabee Chapel Port Hueneme

a.m. at Port Hueneme. ter. 6 Thursday, March 10, 2011 Worship schedule Seabee Chapel Port Hueneme
a.m. at Port Hueneme. ter. 6 Thursday, March 10, 2011 Worship schedule Seabee Chapel Port Hueneme

Worship schedule

Seabee Chapel

Port Hueneme Building 1433 Phone: (805) 982-4358 Fax: (805) 982-5364

Protestant Sunday worship service: 9 a.m. Choir rehearsal: Wednesday, 6 p.m.

Catholic Mass Sunday: 11:15 a.m. Confession by prior appt.: 10:45 a.m. Wednesday: 11:30 a.m. Confession by prior appt.: 11 a.m.

Christian Bible Studies Women’s Bible Study: Tuesday, 10 a.m. All Hands Bible Study: Thursday, 11:30 a.m. Catholic Religious Education Pre-K through high school Tuesdays, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Chapel of Faith

Point Mugu Building 121 Phone: (805) 989-7967 Fax: (805) 989-7968

Protestant Sunday worship service: 11:15 a.m.

Catholic Mass Sunday: 9 a.m. Confession by prior appt.: 8:15 a.m. Thursday: 11:30 a.m. Confession by prior appt.: 11 a.m.

Chaplains serving NBVC

Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Han Command Chaplain

Lt. Deann Coleman Staff Chaplain

Father Antony Berchmanz Catholic Priest

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Seabee Ball draws 1,000

Marine Corps general is guest speaker for Seabees’ 69th birthday party at Reagan Library

By MC2 (SCW) Ace Rheaume

NMCB 5

On the evening of March 5, Seabees celebrated their 69th birthday at the Ron- ald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library in Simi Valley. More than 1,000 Seabees, family and friends from Southern California gathered around to represent pride, build camaraderie and share their unique history. “You can enjoy friendship, see veterans

unique history. “You can enjoy friendship, see veterans EO 3 Brandon Welence , a Seabee attached
unique history. “You can enjoy friendship, see veterans EO 3 Brandon Welence , a Seabee attached

EO3 Brandon Welence, a Seabee attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5, proposes to his girlfriend, Tashel, during the Seabee Ball.

proposes to his girlfriend, Tashel, during the Seabee Ball. PHOTOS BY MC 2 (SCW) ACE RHEAUME
proposes to his girlfriend, Tashel, during the Seabee Ball. PHOTOS BY MC 2 (SCW) ACE RHEAUME

PHOTOS BY MC2 (SCW) ACE RHEAUME / NMCB 5

Utilities Constructionman Master Chief Jim Lampman, left, and Construction Mechanic Constructionman Apprentice Seberiano Gutierrez, the oldest and youngest Seabees at the event, participate in the cake-cutting ceremony at the Seabee Ball.

“I like being a Seabee a lot,said Guti- errez. “I wouldn’t choose any other job.” Shortly after, Seabees welcomed their

SE E BA LL , PAGE 25

The event kicked off with a cocktail hour followed by a catered meal. As a tra- dition, a cake-cutting ceremony was held where the youngest and the oldest Seabees at the event cut the cake; this year’s Seabee Ball recognized Construction Mechanic

and talk with people you’ve served with Constructionman Apprentice Seberiano

then and now,” said Lt. Cmdr. Russell C.

Rang, the executive officer of the Civil Utilities Constructionman Master Chief surprised I was the youngest Seabee.”

Engineer Corps Officer School and mas- ter of ceremonies for the event. “It means a lot.”

Gutierrez as the youngest Seabee and ence and rank,” said Gutierrez. “I was ing forward to the challenge.

Jim Lampman as the oldest.

Gutierrez stated that he is unsure where

“It was a great honor to cut the cake he will be stationed after Construction

with the oldest Seabee with all his experi-

Mechanic “A” School, but he will be look-

his ex peri- Mechanic “A” School, but he will be look- Homes for Heroes Now in

his ex peri- Mechanic “A” School, but he will be look- Homes for Heroes Now in
his ex peri- Mechanic “A” School, but he will be look- Homes for Heroes Now in

Homes for Heroes Now in Ventura County
Homes for Heroes
Now in Ventura County

Homes For Heroes is a community-minded program whose purpose is to provide real rebates and real discounts for workforce heroes who are buying or selling a home. Work force heroes include but are not limited to: Military personnel, teachers, firefighters, peace officers and health care workers who provide extraordinary services to the public every day.

For more information contact Rob Martell @ 805-504-0224 or HomesForHeroes@Movewest.com Ventura County rep for Homes For Heroes. dre# 01157205 Movewest Realty, Inc.

2185 Ventura Blvd. • Camarillo, CA 93010 • DRE License #01458651

7

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NMCRS drive kicks off

The 2011 Active Duty Fund Drive in support of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) is currently being con- ducted until March 31. The slogan for this year’s campaign is: “It’s about more Sail- ors and Marines giving!” The NMCRS provided assistance to 921 Sailors, Marines and their families in Ven- tura County last year. More than $477,000 in interest-free loans was disbursed, as well as grants totaling $17,000. The majority of these loans and grants provided finan- cial relief during emergencies. The main goal of the NMCRS Active Duty Fund Drive is to raise awareness of the services that NMCRS offers and to give 100 percent of all Sailors and Marines

an opportunity to contribute. In 2010, cash. Service members are encouraged to “News of the Society” tab.

more than $73,000 was raised at NBVC.

Each dollar raised can be used several can be spread over a 12-month period, 982-4730 or e-mail james.w.jones5@navy.

At NBVC, contact Lt. James Jones at

payroll deductions (allotments), checks or

Donations are accepted in the form of ment video is available on line at the so-

and the chief of naval operations endorse-

education for spouses and dependent chil-

penses, medical or dental expenses, fam- ily emergencies or transportation expens- es. Call 982-4409 for eligibility requirements. • Budget counseling or spending plans.

re quirements. • Budget counseling or spending plans. • Interest-free loans for post-secondary dren. •

• Interest-free loans for post-secondary

dren.

• Complimentary layettes to new par- ents.

Visiting nurse program.

• Thrift shops.

• Identifying additional resources for clients in need.

ciety’s web site (www.nmcrs.org) under the

contribute by allotment since the donation

times when provided as an interest-free thereby minimizing the financial impact mil or call Chief Religious Program Spe-

cialist Alan Grow at 982-4358 or e-mail alan.grow@navy.mil for additional infor- mation. Command representatives may also contact Nadine Gamble, the executive director of the NBVC NMCRS at 982-

car repairs.

The 2011 contribution form, tri-fold 4409 or via e-mail at nadine.gamble@

ified needs like food, gas, rent, essential on the next Vo lunteer Orientation.

on a member’s budget. For those unable to make a monetary donation, the society would be pleased to have assistance as a volunteer. Call 982-4409 for information

loan. Services provided by NMCRS in- clude:

• Interest-free loans and grants for ver-

• Quick assist loans for basic living ex-

brochure, poster, Power Point presentation

nmcrs.org.

Schedule of events

The NMCRS Office will be closed

for a Volunteer Recognition Luncheon on March 31 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Thrift Shop: (Bldg. 829, Port Hue-

neme): Open Monday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Low-cost uniforms, civilian clothing, baby items, house-

hold items and more. Prices start at 5 cents!

Budget for Baby: Tuesday, April

12, and Tuesday, May 10, from 6 to 7 p.m. Learn how your new bundle of joy will impact your budget and how to pay for all those additional expens- es like formula, diapers, clothing and car seats. Participants will receive Baby’s First Seabag, filled with new- born items from Gerber, at least one handmade item and a new outfit for your baby. • Volunteer Orientation: Tuesday, April 5, at 1 p.m. Recruiting Office staff, Thrift Shop cashiers and Budget for Baby instructors. Reimbursement for child care and mileage. Snacks provided. Information: 982-4409.

Thursday, March 10, 2011
Thursday, March 10, 2011

8

Reimbursement fo r child care and mileage. Snacks pr ovided. Information: 982-4409. Thursday, March 10, 2011

Reimbursement fo r child care and mileage. Snacks pr ovided. Information: 982-4409. Thursday, March 10, 2011
Reimbursement fo r child care and mileage. Snacks pr ovided. Information: 982-4409. Thursday, March 10, 2011

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Buffalo’s hot at commissary

If you’ve wondered why there’s a big buffalo head hanging in the Naval Base Ventura County Port Hueneme Commis- sary, here’s why:

In the last four months, the Port Hue- neme Commissary has set the record for the most sales of bison meat out of any commissary in the United States. Store Director Billy Benner credits health-conscious California. “Bison is much leaner than beef,” he explained. “It has much less fat, so there’s a lot less shrinkage.” The commissary cooked up bison burg- ers during its recent Super Bowl Tailgate party to introduce the meat to those who had never tasted it, and they sold quick-

ly. Benner expects even stronger sales once the recipe cards arrive with bison as the main ingredient for a variety of dishes. The commissary sells bison steaks, ground patties and hot dogs. And just so no one gets buffaloed: The stuffed head in the commissary is fake.

gets buffaloed: The stuffed head in the commissary is fake. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y /
gets buffaloed: The stuffed head in the commissary is fake. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y /

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

The commissary at Naval Base Ventura County Port Hueneme is selling more bison than any other commissary in the United States. Store Director Billy Benner credits the meat’s low fat content and low cholesterol, combined with a health-conscious base, as reasons why.

Get your taxes prepared for free

The Tax Center at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, is up and running, preparing taxes for free until April 15. The Vo lunteer Income Ta x Assistance

program serves all active duty personnel Thursdays; noon to 4 p. m. We dnesdays;

from all branches, their dependents and retirees. VITA can help with the electronic filing

of federal and state tax returns, saving served basis.

most people more than $100 in prepara- tion fees.

For more infor mation, call the Naval Legal Service Office at 982-3124.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays; and 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays. Returns are done on a first-come, first-

The Tax Center is located in the Naval Construction Training Center computer lab in Building 1417. Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and

Registration open for triathlon, Mud Run

Registration is now open for the April 9 Admiral’s Cup triathlon at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu and for the May 7 Naval Construction Training Cen- ter Mud Run at NBVC Port Hueneme. The 24th annual Admiral’s Cup starts at 8 a.m. at Point Mugu Swimmer’s Beach. It consists of a 400-meter ocean swim in

water that usually ranges from 58 to 62 and $20 for civilians.

degrees, a 12-mile non-draft legal bike ride on a course that is flat and fast, and a 5k

flat-course run. Registration at www.ac- triathlon category or “Mud Run” under

the running category in the keyword

tive.com closes at 11:59 p.m. April 4. Cost

is $20 for military and $50 for civilians. area.

To access re gistrat ion forms at www. acti ve.com, type in “A dmir al” under the

Costs for relay teams are $45 for military and $60 for civilians. The Mud Run is at 12:30 p.m. at Dozer Field. It starts with a 2-mile run and fin- ishes with an obstacle course through mud. Registrants must be 16 or older. Registration at www.active.com closes at 11:59 p.m. May 2. Cost is $10 for military

mu st be 16 or older. Re gistr at ion at www.active .com closes at 11:59

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Marine Corps commandant visits Mugu on way to event

Marine Corps commandant visits Mugu on way to event PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y / LIGHTHOUSE

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Capt. Jim McHugh, commanding officer, Naval Base Ventura County, greets Gen. James Amos, commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, on the Point Mugu runway.

of th e U.S. Marine Corps, on th e Po int Mugu runway . PHOTO BY
of th e U.S. Marine Corps, on th e Po int Mugu runway . PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Maj. Warren Cook, commanding officer of Recruiting Station Los Angeles, describes to Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, the various substations represented by some of the 30 Marines who greeted him at the Point Mugu air terminal.

wh o greete d him at the Poin t Mugu air terminal. The commandant of the
wh o greete d him at the Poin t Mugu air terminal. The commandant of the

The commandant of the Ma- rine Corps, Gen. James Amos, landed at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu on Saturday, Feb. 26, and updated his South- ern California recruiters on the state of today’s military and the progress being made in Afghani- stan before heading to Simi Val- ley for an annual event to honor America’s living Congressional Medal of Honor recipients. Capt. Jim McHugh, command- ing officer, NBVC, greeted Amos on the runway as the welcoming party wa ited nearby. But gi ve n the frigid and windy weather, Amos ushered the grateful Ma- rines into the air terminal for the short welcoming ceremony and briefing. About 30 Marines from Re- cruiting Station Los Angeles,

which has 15 substations in the they’re doing, pointing out that doing very, very well,” he said. Celebration of Freedom Gala, an NBVC, also attended the event,

about 750 people to attend the Sasek, chief staff officer of

Valley. McHugh and Capt. David

tory of the Marine Corps. He also updated them on the

situation in the Middle East, vow- ing that the Marines’ victories in Iraq will be repeated in Afghani-

During the Celebration of Freedom Gala Feb. 26, McHugh, left, and Capt. David Sasek, right, chief staff officer, Naval Base Ventura County, pose with U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta, who received a Congressional Medal of Honor on Nov. 16, 2010, for “extraordinary heroism and selflessnessin Afghanistan.

PHOTO COURTESY CAPT. DAVID SASEK

general, who shook hands and stan.

chatted with each one. He praised them all on the job

“We’ve put a lot of assets into the Helmand Province and we’re

That night, Amos was one of

Southern California area, were

on hand to greet the four-star most highly qualified in the his- doing very well.”

today’s recruits are some of the

“We’ll be there awhile, but we are

annual event at the Ronald Rea- which honored more than 40

gan Presidential Library in Simi

Medal of Honor recipients.

10 Thursday, March 10, 2011
10
Thursday, March 10, 2011
40 gan Presidential Library in Simi Medal of Honor recipients. 10 Thursday, March 10, 2011

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

250 riders attend NBVC’s first Motorcycle Safety Fair

12

By Andrea Howry

Lighthouse editor

Cold temperatures and a constant driz- zle didn’t stop about 250 motorcyclists from visiting the Motorcycle Safety Fair put on Friday, Feb. 25, by the Naval Base Ventura County Safety Department. In fact, the weather ended up being ap- propriate for a safety fair, with rain-slick- ened roads and excessive speed combining to create their share of motorcycle acci- dents in Ventura County. “Speeding and lack of safety gear are probably our two main areas of concern,” said Builder 1st Class Patrick Posey of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, a riding enthusiast who helped organize the event at the Port Hueneme Parade Deck with George Egeler, the base safety manager. Egeler added another: lack of experi- ence. “They go on deployment and when they come back, they’re rusty,” he said. “There are no bikes in Iraq. They simply forget the basic skills.” The safety fair offered riders the chance

to brush up on those skills, courtesy of Oxnard Police Department, which gave HOGs, the Harley Owners Group, and mail nbvc_safety@navy.mil.

the Harley Owners Group, and mail nbvc_safety@navy.mil. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y / LIGHTHOUSE Naval Base

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Naval Base Ventura County Safety Manager George Egeler, left, and BU1 Patrick Posey of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, look over one of the motorcycles on display at the Feb. 25 Motorcycle Safety Fair at the NBVC Port Hueneme parade grounds.

Jason Pridmore and his Lancaster motor- cycle school, which offered safety tips; the

out information on the latest traffic laws; and riding groups and vendors, including

American Legion riders. Egeler said the safety fair was a first for the base, and he’s hoping to bring it back. He estimates that about 10 percent of base personnel ride motorcycles, with battal- ions having the highest percentages of riders. Excessive speed is often an issue, Posey and Egeler said: “They’re young and they want to go fast,” is how Posey put it. So is inappropriate safety gear. “They use the gear, but it’s often the wrong gear for the type of bike they’re riding,” Posey said. “They’ll ride a sport bike with a half helmet, and that doesn’t do a lot for you if you have an acci- dent.” Neither do tennis shoes as opposed to an over-ankle boot. The Motorcycle Safety Fair was a pre- lude to the Fourth Annual Ride for Safe- ty, set fo r May. Last ye ar’s Ride fo r Safe- ty brought out more than 70 riders for a daylong trip through the mountainous backroads of Ventura and Los Angeles counties. For infor mation on this year’s event, e-

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Bee Club scholarship

The Bee Club of Naval Base Ventura County is offering a “Can Do” scholar- ship that is open to any qualified student graduating from a Ventura County high school (including GED and home school graduate) who is a dependent of any military member assigned to Naval Base Ventura County. Two individual $1,000 scholarships will be awarded this year. The Bee Club is a naval officers’ spouses group whose mission is to pro- mote Seabee and Civil Engineer Corps heritage, and to provide friendship, men- torship, social activities and support amongst the spouses of military officers in the Ventura County area. Scholarship applications are available online at www.BeeClub.org and will be accepted through April 15. For more infor mation about the Bee Club and the “Can Do” scholarship re- quirements and application, visit: http:// www.BeeClub.org or call Kelsie Garin at 240-3092.

Cub Scouts recruiting

All boys in first through fifth grade are invited to join Cub Scouts Pack 3248. A sign-up and orientation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. March 25 in the NBVC Point Mugu Chapel fellowship room. The pack’s sponsor is the NBVC Point Mugu Chief Petty Officer Association. Information: 482-8938.

Lodge items for sale

The Navy Lodge has scheduled a liq- uidation sale from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 22, 23 and 24 at the Navy Lodge, Building 1172, Naval Base Ventura County Port Hue- neme. Towe ls, linens, shampoo, conditioner, bath soap and some kitchen items, in- cluding cooking utensils, are being sold. “Many of the items are either slightly damaged or no longer meet our Navy Lodge standards,” said Manager James Tiqui.

NMCB 40 ends deployment with mess hall

the season where they can rest and enjoy a meal,” said Seaman Brett Rankin, steel- worker, FOB Griffin dining facility con- struction project assistant crew leader.

Navy Seabees from Naval Mobile Con- struction Battalion 40 added the final seg-

ments to a dining facility they built on Griffin and FOB Qeysar. The $200,000 what we were able to accomplish and if

dining facility was one of many projects

Faryab province Feb. 13 prior to their re- planned and built by the Seabees to in-

deployment to the United States. The 30-Sailor detachment, which pro- vided construction, logistical and physical support to four International Security As- sistance Force bases in northwestern Af-

ghanistan, is completing a seven-month picnic benches and furniture; and other establish a place like this and are proud

Forward Operating Base Camp Griffin in

we didn’t have it, we’d make it.” There were 13 Sailors assigned to build

clude a tactical operation center for the the 30-by-90-square-foot dining facility,

which was completed one month and two

U.S. Army’s 3rd Battalion, 6th Field Artil-

The Seabees built up physical infrastruc- “This dining facility will be able to host ture and maintenance programs at FOB 125 people. We are definitely proud of

By Ensign Peter Lee

U.S. Public Affairs Detachment ISAF Regional Command North

professional. They thought and planned before beginning a project and were able

to think on the fly. It wa s a good deploy-

MAIMANAH, Afghanistan – U.S. ment.”

lery, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th weeks ahead of schedule.

Mountain Division; water wells; Morale, We lfare and Re creation bu ilding; chapel;

“It’s a quality of life issue,” added Egelston. “We were glad we were able to

to be forward operating.” The Seabees are the U.S. Navy’s combat- capable construction element with the

tents and buildings supporting U.S. Army and ISAF soldiers. “After a patrol or being outside the wire,

Egelston, detachment officer-in-charge. we wanted the Soldiers to have a place ability of operating in any environment

that would be warm or cold depending on

“A lthough junior, eve ry Sailor wa s ve ry

deployment. “We wouldn’t be here if we didn’t enjoy what we do,” said Chief Steelworker Alan

to support construction requirements.

NMCB 3 works to qualify 230 in SCW program

By MC3 (SCW) Christopher Carson

NMCB 3

CAMP LEATHERNECK, Afghanistan — Hundreds of Seabees from Naval Mo- bile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 3 have been taking extra time to focus on both deployment and getting qualified in the Seabee Combat Warfare Specialist (SCW) program. NMCB 3 has been deployed to Afghan-

istan since November and has set an ag- gressive goal to qualify 230 of its Seabees in the SCW program before the end of deployment. The SCW qualification process is dif- ferent from other platform-based warfare qualifications in that the final board re- quires a practical demonstration of in- depth knowledge of construction battalion operations. The depth and breadth of knowledge tested ratchets up or down with

respect to the pay grade of the person lum.

qualifying. For example, an E1-E3 would

have to plan and present a 14-man foot cal application and touch everything in of the junior Seabees who will take our

patrol, while a chief petty officer or ensign would have to plan a large mission of 125 Seabees, including construction projects, convoys, security and transporting of all

equipment and personnel from a home maximize unit readiness so Seabees are ified 62 members in SCW and will con-

base to a forward location in a tactical prepared when they are pushed out to tinue toward its goal of 230 members by

work at the forward operating bases dur-

environment.

chance to get hands-on experience with a lot of the training in the warfare curricu-

has been a unique but valuable situation for the SCW trainees. The deployment environment has given the Seabees a

The Seabees have been going to SCW classes five days out of the week and have also sought detailed information from bat- talion subject matter experts. “It is nice to know that, even though the program can be rough at times, we are contributing to professional development

NO BREATHING EASY

contributing to professional development NO BREATHIN G EASY PHOTO BY MC 2 (SCW ) ACE RHEAUME

PHOTO BY MC2 (SCW) ACE RHEAUME / NMCB 5

Seabees attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5 participate in a gas mask training exercise Feb. 24 at the Naval Construction Training Center’s confidence chamber at Naval Base Ventura County Port Hueneme. NMCB 5 is preparing for a battalion field training exercise in April.

Being deployed to a contingency area ing deployment.”

“The fact that you’re able to do practi-

the TOA (Table of Allowance) adds to the learning experience,” said Command Mas- ter Chief (SCW/EXW) Percy Trent. “The program overall allows the command to

places in the future,” said Construction Electrician 1st Class (SCW) Crystal Cor- ner, NMCB 3’s SCW coordinator. As of February, the battalion has qual-

the end of deployment.

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Award honors NBVC for environmental stewardship

aircraft and relocates them. “A t this time, 41 hawks have been re lo- cated, and only three have been confirmed returned to NBVC,” the award nomination states. The NRP monitors more than 100,000 adult elephant seals, California sea lions and harbor seals that breed and give birth

lands, including the largest remaining coastal salt marsh estuary in Southern California. The base must manage these resources

at the same time it employs 17,000 person- ing these species and works to protect few, if any, feral cats remain on the island. to up to 40,000 pups each year at San

nel, operates a major aviation shore com- mand and Naval Construction Force mo- bilization base, and tests combat and weapons systems. The base is home to seven species that are listed by the federal government as endangered or threatened: Salt Marsh Bird’s-Beak, a plant; We stern Snowy Plo- ver, California Least Tern, Light-Footed Clapper Rail, Least Bell’s Vireo, all birds; black abalone; and Island Night Liz- ards.

The NRP also captures falcons, hawks ored June 7, in a ceremony at the Navy

port of the mission and finding effective and creative ways to protect our natural resources,” he said. The CNO award winners will be hon-

“Some of the major achievements of of restoring native oyster populations. The the environmental staff performs in sup-

Nicolas Island. And it monitors the South- west Pond Turtle, Brandt’s Cormorant and migratory birds. Shide calledthe award an honor. “It is a recognition of the good work

migratory birds. It’s a lot to manage.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

In addition, the Belding’s Savannah Sparrow and the San Nicolas Island Fox are listed as endangered by the State of

From June of 2009 to June of 2010, 52 cats and 10 kittens were relocated to a feral cat sanctuary in Ramona, where they will live out the remainder of their lives and the kittens will be adopted. “In 2010, monitoring efforts continued via surveys and camera traps,” the award nomination states. “It is believed that very

The program is now ahead of schedule and in the monitoring phase to ensure all cats have been captured.” Starting this year, the NRP will create oyster beds at Point Mugu with the intent

work is being funded by a grant from the Nature Conservancy and will take place in partnership with Channel Island Ma-

and owls that present a strike hazard to

Point Mugu also has designated wet- California.

According to the award nomination let- ter, NBVC’s Natural Resources Program (NRP), which is part of the Environmen- tal Division, places emphasis on monitor-

them by controlling access to habitats or nesting areas for species such as the Cali- fo rnia Least Te rn, We stern Snowy Plove r and the black abalone. But there are other activities as well.

the NRP during FY09 and FY10 includ- ed the removal of feral cats on San Nico- las Island to restore seabird nesting colo-

nies and the initiation of a program to rine Research Institute.

re-establish eelgrass in Mugu Lagoon,” the award nomination states.

Memorial in Washington, D.C.

the aw ard nomination states. Memorial in Wa shington, D.C. Celebrating th e 2010 Alfred P.
the aw ard nomination states. Memorial in Wa shington, D.C. Celebrating th e 2010 Alfred P.

Celebrating the 2010 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility going to the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering are, from left, Capt. Rick Cook, commanding officer, CSFE; David Lu, executive director of CSFE; Rear Adm. (select) Michael White; Susan Lester, management analyst; and Dr. Ramon Flores, director of Knowledge Management and Information Technology. Lester and Flores jointly nominated CSFE.

n Technology. Lester an d Flore s jointly nominated CSFE. PHOTOS BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

PHOTOS BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

SWC Chris Pogue, director of the steel shop at the Naval Construction Training Center, shows Rear Adm. (select) Michael White a piece of metal used in the shop. White toured the NCTC facilities after presenting the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering with the 2010 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility.

Admiral presents CSFE with workplace flexibility award

Rear Adm. (select) Michael White vis- ited Naval Base Ventura County on Feb. 23 to present the Center for Seabees and

Facilities Engineering (CSFE) an award said.

for outstanding workplace practices. White also took the opportunity to tour the Naval Construction Training Center and chat with instructors about the school and the current crop of students. “It’s impressive what is being done with

schools all over the country,” he said. increase workplace effectiveness and en- so he could fulfill his lifetime dream of

vantage of a compressed work schedule

sites that use flexibility as a strategy to

Capt. Rick Cook, commanding officer

“We can complete our mission and still

Today’s challenging fiscal environment of CSFE, said the whole idea behind walk around with a smile on our faces,” makes that task even more difficult, he workplace flexibility is to enhance both he told White.

White said he was impressed with the

mission and do it safely. ”

careers and healthy lifestyles.

Before the tour, White presented CSFE with the 2010 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibil- ity.

“People need to be able to do other “creative policies” that resulted in both things with their lives than work,” he efficient day-to-day operations and high

workplace morale. Besides the 5-4-9 compressed work

The award goes to employers and work- one employee who was able to take ad- schedule, CSFE employees can also tele-

work and take part in health and wellness programs.

said. He was especially impressed with the

“These students learn how to execute a

hance business and employee success.

coaching his son in football.

19

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Annual anti-terrorism exercise includes hostag

February training results in gate closures, random vehicle searches, but base officials say it’s all worth the effort

Last month’s Solid-Curtain-Citadel

Shield anti-terrorism training exercise, which put Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) into its highest level of force pro- tection since 9/11, was deemed a success by base officials. “We know it was inconvenient for a lot of people, but what we accomplished and what we learned simply couldn’t have oc- curred any other way,” said Robert Huether, installation training officer. “We needed to be in fully enforced FPCON Charlie for a sustained amount of time.” FPCON Charlie, or Force Protection Condition C, was in effect for 24 hours beginning Wednesday, Feb. 23. It required several gate closures, mandatory identifi- cation checks and random vehicle search- es. The actual training exercise ran from Feb. 21 to 25 and was conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States and Guam. Several scenarios took place at NBVC during those five days:

• A hostage situation unfolded at Port

Hueneme. Base officials worked with the

Oxnard Police Hostage Negotiation Team and Special Weapons Tactics team (SWAT) to “rescue” the seven hostages and capture the gunman.

• At Point Mugu, a car bomb was dis-

covered when someone tried to ram through the Las Posas Gate. The driver was detained and Explosive Ordnance

Disposal technicians successfully defused the bomb.

• An underwater improvised explosive

device was discovered in the port and suc-

cessfully defused.

• In a surveillance exercise, someone

who was taking unauthorized photos of NBVC from outside the Port Hueneme gates was detained and questioned.

• An intrusion alarm was set off at Point

Mugu. “Interagency cooperation went very well,” Huether said of Oxnard SWAT’s involvement in the exercise. “This par-

20 ticular scenario gave everyone an oppor-

“This par- 20 ticular scenario gave everyone an oppor- A Naval Base Ventura County police officer

A Naval Base Ventura County police officer keeps his weapon trained on the building where “hostages” were being held during a Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2011 exercise.

We know it was inconvenient for a lot of people, but what we accomplished and what we learned simply couldn’t have occurred any other way.

we learned simply couldn’t have occurred any other way. — Robert Huether Installation training officer tunity

— Robert Huether Installation training officer

tunity to practice better communications in case of an emergency.” The next major exercise will take place in July when the region’s Navy installa- tions train to respond to a natural disas- ter.

installa- tions train to respond to a natural disas- ter. Members of Explosive Ordinance Disposal at

Members of Explosive Ordinance Disposal at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, deploy a drone in an at a potentially explosive device inside during a Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2011 exercise.

inside during a Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2011 exercise. Above, a member of Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD)

Above, a member of Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) prepares to remove the possible explosive device. At right, EOD takes cover behind an electrical box before attempting to remove the back passenger side window to get to the device.

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es, car bomb

www. TheLighthouseNews .com es, car bomb Photos by MC2 (sW) Karalie Moore / NbVC tempt to

Photos by MC2 (sW) Karalie Moore / NbVC

tempt to open the door of a car that ran the base gate with

tempt to open the door of a car that ran the base gate with The Lighthouse
The Lighthouse Thursday, March 10, 2011 Police officers and Oxnard SWAT team members provide cover
The Lighthouse
Thursday, March 10, 2011
Police officers and Oxnard SWAT team members provide cover as others make their approach to the building where hostages were being held.

“Hostages” rush out of the building at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, where they were being “held” during one of several training exercises that made up Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield during the last week in February.

21

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The Lighthouse

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Red Cross teaches monthly classes on first aid, CPR

22

The American Red Cross is holding monthly classes on first aid and cardio- pulmonary resuscitation at Naval Base Ventura County. Classes are being taught from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month in the Red Cross training classroom at the NBVC Fleet and Family Support Center, Port Hueneme. The eight-hour class covers first aid and CPR for adults, children and infants. Upcoming dates are April 12, May 10 and June 14. The classes are free for active-duty mil- itary personnel and their dependents, thanks to a grant from the Department of Defense to the Red Cross. Cost is $60 for everyone else, including retirees and contractors. Red Cross certification is now good for two years, not just one. That changed on Jan. 1. “It’s important to know CPR because you may find yourself in a position where

you need to use it to save someone’s life,” explained Judy Stahl, a Red Cross volun- a life, and it’s a pretty simple thing to

learn. There’s not much reason not to know it.” In the past, officially recognized CPR involved chest compressions and mouth-

Judy Stahl shows Curt Baker the proper technique for adult CPR. The two American Red Cross volunteers are coordinating monthly CPR classes at Naval Base Ventura County Port Hueneme.

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWRY / LIGHTHOUSE

Count y Po rt Hueneme. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWR Y / LIGHTHOUSE Re d Cross recently

Red Cross recently introduced “Citizen “It’s really a privilege for us to be there.

It’s a chance for us to express how much we appreciate them and all they do.” The Red Cross also shows up “basi-

“That eliminated a major reason why cally, wherever we’re asked to be,” Stahl

people wouldn’t learn CPR,” Baker said. The Red Cross will continue to offer both types of training, however, because full CPR with rescue breaths is still best in some cases, especially for children, teen-

agers, drowning victims or people who been the Service to Ar med Forces coor-

collapse due to breathing problems. The monthly classes add to an already busy Red Cross schedule at the base. Red Cross instructors teach infant CPR and first aid at the FFSC classes for new par- ents, and they frequently do CPR and first

aid classes at individual commands and ness School.

for deploying battalions. Some volunteers who are deployed even hold classes in Af- ghanistan. The Red Cross also attends all pre-de-

ployment picnics, deployments and home- emergency services and classes that are

offered at other branches — “everything from psychological first aid to babysit- ting,” Stahl said. For more infor mation on the CPR classes, call 982-3074. For infor mation on other Red Cross services, go to the Ven- tura County website at http://www.arcven-

The Red Cross office in the FFSC is staffed with volunteers from 8:30 a.m. to noon Monday through Fr iday. The office provides information on blood donations,

CPR,” with chest compressions only, and the American Heart Association is follow- ing suit.

said. “Air shows, Seabee Days, health fairs, Ride to the Flags – we go wherever we’re invited.” Stahl and Baker, who are celebrating their 20th anniversary this month, have

dinators for about two years. They grew up in the Los Angeles area, then returned three years ago after spending much of their professional lives in Boston, he as a computer consultant and she as the chief information officer for the Harvard Busi-

comings, serving snacks and warm thoughts. Being in the deployment area, where Sailors sometimes wait for hours between the family goodbyes and the actual take- off, is Stahl’s favorite. “It’s amazing how much a doughnut can

teer. She and her husband, Curt Baker, are the Service to Ar med Forces coordina- tors for the American Red Cross of Ven- tura County. “If you happen to be in the right place at the right time, you can save

Immigration outreach

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigra- tion Service will provide services on Thursday, March 24, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to all military personnel, de- pendents, retirees and Defense De- partment personnel at Building 1180, Region Legal Service Office, second floor. The outreach will directly assist with immigration and naturalization issues either beginning or already started, including fingerprinting. Bring all relevant paperwork, includ- ing copies of filed documents, No- tices of Action, Alien Registration Number or LIN/WAC numbers, cor- respondence and any other informa- tion that pertains to your inquiry. Sign-up is required. Stop by the Naval Legal Service Branch Office on the first floor of Building 1180 to complete a military inquiry sheet. For more infor mation, call the branch office at 982-3124.

to-mouth resuscitation. The American mean at 3:30 in the morning,” she said. tura.org or call 987-1514.

Team prepares USS Nitze for deployment

By Nancy Kanter

NSWC PHD Command Communications

and David Springer

NSWC PHD AEGIS In-Service Baseline Lead

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division (NSWC PHD) coor- dinated and led an assist team, along with an engineer from NSWC Dahlgren, from Feb. 6 to 11 to provide support to USS Nitze (DDG 94) in preparation for its 2011 deployment. The team visited the ship to conduct an onboard tech assist in response to a Ca- sualty Report (CASREP) reporting Com- mand and Decision (CND) faults. These faults resulted in a loss of combat system capability. The root cause was identified and corrected during the team’s first day onboard. During the remaining four days of the visit, the team continued monitoring and observing fault-free performance of CND, and they assisted ship’s force technicians in troubleshooting and correcting addi-

tional AEGIS We ap on System faults not and devotion in support of the combat

associated with the original CASREP. The team was able to respond so quick- ly to the request for assistance due to the recently implemented Baseline 7.1.2 First Responder initiative as directed by Vice

Adm. Kevin McCoy, NAVSEA com- nicians not only increased their level of

mander. “This is a perfect example of what NSWC PHD does so well — quickly re- sponding with the right people at the right

time to restore a ship to full combat ca- Ventura County. It is the Navy’s premier pability,” said David Springer, NSWC in-service engineering and logistics center

PHD AEGIS In-Service Baseline Lead.

and has been in existence for more than

The team’s efforts allowed the ship to 45 years. The command provides test and

evaluation, in-service engineering and in- tegrated logistics support for weapon and

Following the team’s departure, the combat systems installed in the United ship’s commanding officer, Cmdr. R.D. States Navy fleet, United States Coast

fully participate in pre-deployment work- up exercises.

knowledge but will ensure USS Nitze is self-sustainable. Thank you for your sup- port and for a job well done!” NSWC PHD is located at Naval Base

system significantly improved USS Nitze’s mission readiness,” said Brawley. “Your hard work to restore stability to CND will prove to be crucial to USS Nitze’s deploy- ment. The training you provided our tech-

Brawley, issued a Bravo Zulu naval mes- sage acknowledging the team’s successful efforts in restoring his combat system to full up-round status. “NSWC PHD’s exceptional dedication

Guard fleet and many foreign Navy fleets. NSWC PHD’s focus is to provide safe, ef- fective and affordable weapon systems that enable ships and Sailors to fight and win.

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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Help when you need it.

. c o m Thursday, March 10, 2011 Help when you need it. The Fleet &
. c o m Thursday, March 10, 2011 Help when you need it. The Fleet &

The Fleet & Family

Support Center

CONSEP helps junior Sailors plan for their future

with whatever decision they ultimately make. This four-day workshop provides guid-

a workshop designed for junior Sailors to ance for Sailors with less than 10 years options they may not have considered vi-

able before. The next CONSEP will be March 21-24 at the FFSC at Naval Base Ventura Coun- ty Port Hueneme. FFSC encourages any Sailor approaching EAOS to attend this class to be sure that this important career decision is an informed decision. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend. Call the

service and who are at least one year pri-

mation they need in order to make an or to Expiration of Active Obligated Ser-

receive an extraordinary amount of infor-

for, complete with resumes and interviews. The final day presents options with their current employer, the United States Navy,

The Career Options and Navy Skills Evaluation Program (CONSEP), offered by the Fleet & Family Support Center, is

informed decision about whether to pur- sue a civilian career or stay Navy. CONSEP was designed as part of the “life cycle” approach to delivering transi- tion and career change information to our service members. This program allows

vice (EAOS). The agenda covers personal planning and goal-setting in the areas of basic life skills; an entire day of financial facts, investments and goals; a career day devoted to discovering what they can do, want to do and have to do; and defining

members to prepare for successful careers what skills the private sector is looking FFSC at 982-5325 for information.

Resume Shark withMary-Jean Owens FFSC
Resume
Shark
withMary-Jean
Owens
FFSC

All classes at Port Hueneme unless oth- erwise noted. Call 982-5037 for more in- formation. Toll-free appointment scheduling ser- vice: 1-866-923-6478, call 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Confidential clinical counseling, relocation assistance, resume assistance, financial consultations and many other support services are available at your convenience at the Fleet and Fam- ily Support Center.

Life Skills Workshops

• Blended Families (4 sessions): Learn

to focus on a child’s developmental mile-

stones in the context of social, moral and cognitive development. Dispel the myths of stepparenting and transform into a new family. Thurs., March 10, 17, 24, 31; 3 to 5 p.m.

• Life Coaching & Counseling: Clarify

your goals, break them down into manage- able tasks and get weekly support to stay motivated. Call 982-5389 for individual appointment or group times!

Career Support and Retention

(Register for TAP classes with your Command Career Counselor)

• Executive Transition Assistance Pro-

gram: Monday-Thursday, April 4-7, 7:30

a.m. to 4 p.m. E-7 and above, all retirees. Civilian attire, bring medical records and DD2648 on Monday.

• Transition Assistance Program: Mon-

day–Thursday, April 11-14, 7:30 a.m. to

4 p.m. Seperatees E-6 and below: Civilian attire, bring medical record and DD2648 on Monday.

• Goal Setting: Lean how to identify,

prioritize and achieve long-, medium- and short-term goals through proper planning and organizational strat egy. We d, March 16, 10 a.m. to noon.

• CONSEP: Financial, life skills and

career management for members with less

than 10 years of service. Monday-Thurs- day, March 21-24, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

• MS Excel: We d., March 23, 8:30 to

10:30 a.m.

• VA Workshops/Briefs: Get on-the-spot

assistance in filing your VA claim! Call 982-5325 to sign up. We d., March 23, 9 a.m. to noon.

Sexual Assault Prevention Response (SAPR)

• Data Collection Coordinator Training:

Exceptional Family Member

Parents Support Network: A support

group for active and retired military fam- ilies with special needs children. Share local re sources and get support. We d., April 13, 9:30 to 11 a.m. Call 982-3159 for more information.

to schedule any of the classes.

• Command Financial Specialist Re-

fresher: Refresher class for CFSers who have been in the position for 3 years. Mon., March 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

New Parent Support

• Little Explorers for Toddlers: An in-

teractive parent-toddler playgroup for

babies 15-36 months. Thursdays, 10 to 11 a.m., except first Thursday of the month. Call 982-5037 for location.

• New Mamas: For expecting mamas

and mamas with babies 0–15 months old.

Transition, Relocation, Financial, CCC Information, education and support.

quarterly focus group meeting. Thurs., March 17, 9 to 10 a.m.

Yoga Mamas: For expecting and new

mamas. a gentle stretch. Tuesdays, 12:30

ried to the Navy? Learn about military to 1:45 p.m., Bee Fit Center.

• Deployments: Birth Bonding & Be-

and customs. We d., March 23, 3 to 5 yond: Deployments, return and reunion

p.m.

benefits, family programs, Navy jargon

Relocation

• Smooth Move: Make your PCS move

easy, simple and smooth. Know your en-

titleme nts from the ex perts. We d., March 16, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

• TRACC, PFM Meeting, CFS Forum:

• Married to the Military: Newly mar-

We dnesdays, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p. m.

with babies in the home can be challeng- ing. Get support and information. Thurs., March 31, 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Free food distribution

• March 19: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Bldg. 19,

near the Pleasant Valley Gate, Port Hue- neme. Food items vary from month to month. Requirements: Active duty E-6 and below or their spouses; bring an LES and only one issue per family. E-7 with two or more dependents may qualify. In- come guideline statement available at dis- tribution site. Custodian of a child who is a family member of Active Duty person- nel on deployment.

Training for new SAPR data collection coordinators. This is a required training for DCCs. Mon., March 28, 9 to 11 a.m.

• Financial counseling by appointment.

Are you juggling your bills? Need finan- cial advice? An FFSC financial coun-

selor is available Monday through Friday

• Ombudsman Basic Training: Required at the Hueneme or Mugu FFSC. Call

to become an ombudsman and if more 982-3640 (Port Hueneme) or 989-8844

(Point Mugu). Information available on car buying, understanding your TSP, planning for retirement, getting a 720 credit score, saving and investing, home buying and developing a spending plan. Financial classes available at your com- mand space. Call 982-3640 or 982-3102

29, 6 to 8 p.m., FFSC Port Hueneme, Bldg.

1169.

Financial Management

Ombudsman

than 3 years have elapsed since attending OBT. Monday-Wednesday, March 14-16, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., FFSC, Port Hue- neme, Bldg 1169.

• Ombudsman Meeting: Tues., March

23

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24 Thursday, March 10, 2011
24
Thursday, March 10, 2011

Ball celebrates Seabees’ 69th birthday

CONTINUED FROM 7

guest speaker onto the stage, Marine Corps Brigadier Gen. Lawrence D. Nich- olson. “A s a Marine, the first Navy personnel other than our corpsman who I’ve worked with are the Seabees,” said Nich- olson, a senior military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense and guest of honor for the Seabee Ball. “I have proudly [served and] certainly enjoyed my time serving with Seabees across 31 years.” As a token of appreciation, Nicholson was presented with a handmade cigar humidifier and was named an Honorary Seabee for his strong leadership and sup- port for the Seabees. Overall, the event was a dazzling suc- cess. “The tradition rolls on,” said Rang. “I think we get better each and every year, and the venue of the Ronald Rea- gan Library is superb.”

and the venue of the Ronald Rea- gan Library is superb.” PHOTO BY MC 2 (SCW

PHOTO BY MC2 (SCW) ACE RHEAUME / NMCB 5

Capt. John W. Korka, right, commodore of the 31st Seabee Readiness Group, and Command Master Chief Ray Dickey present Marine Corps Brigadier Gen. Lawrence D. Nicholson, the senior military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense and the evening’s guest speaker, an Honorary Seabee plaque at the Seabee Ball.

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LighthouseThe

Thursday, March 10, 2011

.com LighthouseThe Thursday, March 10, 2011 To our adver tisers: Pl ease check yo ur ad

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