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FORMATIONS AND ORDERS OF MOVEMENT

I. MOVEMENT FORMATION: FIRE TEAM WEDGE (MG Team attached)


A. Fighting formation
B. Equal distribution of M,W & E
C. Leader positions fixed/ unfixed
II. THREE MOVEMENT TECHNIQUES UTILIZED:
A. TRAVELING technique used behind FFL when contact is not likely
B. TRAVELING OVERWATCH forward of the FFL when enemy contact is possible.
C. BOUNDING OVERWATCH used forward of the FFL when enemy contact is expected.
III. DISTANCES-are based on (control) but dictated by vegetation, terrain and visibility.
IV. ACTIONS AT NIGHT-MODIFIED WEDGE
V. ACTIONS AT THE HALT-SHORT HALT & LONG HALT (GV/LV)

• FIRE TEAM WEDGE MODIFIED WEDGE

LEAD TL LEAD TL

AR R/CM R/CM
AR
GR
SL GR
MG SL
RTO RTO
AG MG
AG
TRAIL TL
R/CM R/CM
AR
GR AR
TRAIL TL
GR
FORMATIONS AND ORDERS OF MOVEMENT 25 JAN 08
I. SHORT HALT POSTURE (SHP)
II. STOP, LOOK, LISTEN AND SMELL (SLLS) 3-5 Minutes
III. PINPOINT/DECISION POINT
IV. LONG HALT POSTURE (LHP)
A. Strong Point (10, 2, 4, 8, MG)
B. Sectors of Fire
C. Location (Show on Map or give Grid)
V. MOVE OUT
FIRE TEAM WEDGE MODIFIED WEDGE
AG MG
LEAD TL AG MG R/CM
R/CM
AR LEAD TL
GR
RTO SL GR
RTO SL AR

AR AR
R/CM R/CM

TRAIL TL
TRAIL TL
GR GR
LEAD TL
LEAD TL
AR R/CM
GR R/CM
AR
SL
GR
MG RTO SL
AG RTO
MG
TRAIL TL AG
R/CM
R/CM AR AR
GR TRAIL TL
GR
FORMATIONS AND ORDER OF MOVEMENT

INTRODUCTION 11 OCT 07

Good Morning Rangers, my name is SFC/SSG ______________. I will be


the Primary Instructor for your next period of instruction which is on Formations
and Order of Movement, commonly referred to as FOOM.

ORIENT BOARD

Before we begin, let me orient you to my board. At the top of my board, I


have several administrative notes used to assist me in putting out all of the
necessary information. At the bottom left portion of my board, I have a twelve-
man Infantry squad broken down into Fire Team wedges. At the bottom right
portion of the board I have a twelve-man Infantry squad broken down into the
modified wedge. If you notice my board is color coded but not personalized,
while here at Camp Darby and throughout Ranger school all of your boards will
be color-coded and personalized. For an example of color-coding, my Lead Fire
Team is in BLUE, my Headquarters is in YELLOW, and my Trail Fire Team is in
GREEN. Personalizing your board simply means to place the Ranger’s name
next to his assigned position. Such as Ranger ________ is the lead Fire Team
Leader.

TRANSITION: FIRE TEAM WEDGE

The most commonly used movement formation in the United States Army
today is the Fire Team Wedge. The Fire Team wedge is a fighting formation that
allows you to have 360-degree security at all times, an equal distribution of
personnel and weapons, and is easy to control.

LEAD FIRE TEAM

Let me direct your attention to the Fire Team wedge. At the apex of the
formation, we have the lead Fire Team Leader. He is responsible for frontal
security, enroute route selection and land navigation. To the lead Fire Team
Leader’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10 meters is the Automatic
Rifleman.
To the lead Fire Team Leader’s right at a 45-degree angle for
approximately 10 meters is the Rifleman/Compassman. While here at Ranger
school the Ranger not carrying a key weapon system will have the additional
duty as Compassman. This is due to the fact that the lead Fire Team Leader
cannot effectively perform his three additional duties of frontal security, enroute
route selection and land navigation with his nose buried in his compass. To the
Rifleman/Compassman’s right at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10 meters
is the Grenadier.
Rangers this is the lead Fire Team.
HQ ELEMENT

Next in the order of movement is the Headquarters’ element. At the apex


of the Headquarters’ formation is the Squad Leader. He is responsible for
accountability, command and control, and whatever the squad does or fails
to do. To the Squad Leader’s right at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10
meters is the RTO.
To the Squad Leader’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10
meters is the M240B Gunner. To the M240B Gunner’s left at a 45-degree angle
for approximately 10 meters is the Assistant Gunner (AG).
Rangers this is the Headquarters’ element.

TRAIL FIRE TEAM

Last in the order of movement is the trail Fire Team. At the apex of this
formation is the Trail Fire Team Leader. He is responsible for rear security and
assisting the Squad Leader in maintaining accountability and command
and control.
To the trail Fire Team Leader’s right at a 45-degree angle for
approximately 10 meters is the Automatic Rifleman. To the trail Fire Team
Leader’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10 meters is the Rifleman.
To the Rifleman’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 10 meters is the
Grenadier.
Rangers this is the trail Fire Team.

M240B TEAM

Rangers, if you notice, I have the M240B on the left flank of the Fire Team
wedge. This is known as a heavy left formation. If the M240B were on the right
side it would be considered a heavy right.
As the Squad Leader, you will determine what side you want your M240B
Team to travel on, based off of your METT-TC analysis and the enemy’s most
probable course of action, and likely avenues of approach. When moving, should
you decide that you need to move the M240B from the left to the right flank, all
you have to do is point this out to your M240B Gunner. The M240B Gunner and
the AG can then change positions in the formation with the RTO without halting
the entire element.

LEADER POSITIONS

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Rangers, the Squad Leader and the trail Fire Team Leader’s
positions are not fixed. They can move anywhere within their element in
order to maintain control. For example, the Squad Leader can move anywhere
within the Squad in order to maintain control. The trail Fire Team Leader can
move anywhere within his team in order to maintain control.
The one exception to this is the lead Fire Team Leader; his
position is fixed within the formation. The lead Fire Team Leader is at the
apex of his formation so that he can perform his three additional duties of frontal
security, enroute route selection and land navigation. He is also at the apex of his
formation to lead by example and immediately deploy his Fire Team since they
are the team that is most likely to make contact with the enemy first.

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL AND WEAPONS

As you can see, the Fire Team wedge allows you to have an equal
distribution of personnel and weapons. This allows the Squad Leader to
engage the enemy in any direction with an Automatic Rifleman, a Rifleman and a
Grenadier with the hopes of not losing the same two types of weapon systems on
initial contact.
Notice that the Automatic Rifleman in the lead Fire Team is on the left
flank and that the Automatic Rifleman in the trial Fire Team is on the right flank.
The Rifleman and the Grenadier in the lead Fire Team are on the right flank and
the Rifleman and Grenadier in the trail Fire Team is on the left flank.
If you were to be hit from the front, right, rear or left flank, you have an
Automatic Rifleman, a Rifleman and a Grenadier to engage the enemy forces
with.
For example, if you were to be hit from the front, you have an Automatic
Rifleman, a Rifleman and a Grenadier to engage with from the lead Fire Team. If
you were hit from the right flank you have a Grenadier and Rifleman from the
lead Fire Team, and an Automatic Rifleman from the trial Fire Team to engage
the enemy with. The same is true for contact from the rear and left flank.

SECURITY

The Fire Team wedge also allows you to have 360-degree security at
all times. For example the lead Fire Team Leader is responsible for frontal
security from the 10 o’clock to the 2 o’clock.
The Rifleman in the lead Fire Team to the Automatic Rifleman in the trail
Fire Team is responsible for right flank security from the 2 o’clock to the 4
o’clock.
The Grenadier in the trial fire Team is responsible for rear security from
the 4 o’clock to the 8 o’clock.
From the Rifleman in the trail Fire Team to the Automatic Rifleman in the
lead Fire Team is responsible for left flank security from the 8 o’clock to the 10
o’clock.

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CLOSING: FIRE TEAM WEDGE

Rangers, as you can see the Fire Team wedge allows you to have an
equal distribution of personnel and weapons; 360-degree security at all times and
is easy to control.

TRANSITION: MOVEMENT TECHNIQUES

When moving in the Fire Team wedge, we utilize three movement


techniques. The three movement techniques are:
The Traveling, Traveling Overwatch, and the Bounding Overwatch
movement techniques.

TRAVELING

The Traveling movement technique is used behind Friendly Forward Lines


when contact is NOT likely. The distances between personnel will stay the same,
but the distances between elements will be approximately 20 meters. For
example, the distance between the last man in the lead Fire Team, which is the
Grenadier, to the first man in the headquarters’ element, which the Squad
Leader, will be approximately 20 meters. The distance between the last man in
the headquarters’ element, which is the AG, to the first man of the trail Fire
Team, which is the trail Fire Team leader will be approximately 20 meters.

TRAVELING OVERWATCH

The Traveling Overwatch movement technique is used forward of the


Friendly Forward Lines when contact is POSSIBLE. The only difference from the
Traveling to the Traveling Overwatch is the distance from the Lead Fire Team to
the Headquarters’ element will be increased to 50 meters. For example the
distance from the last man in the lead Fire Team, which is the Grenadier, to the
first man in Headquarters’ element, which is the Squad Leader, will be
approximately 50 meters.
The distance between the last man in the headquarters’ element, which is
the AG, to the first man of the trail Fire Team, which is the trail Fire Team leader
will stay the same, at approximately 20 meters.

BOUNDING OVERWATCH

The Bounding Overwatch movement technique is used Forward of


Friendly Forward Lines when enemy contact is EXPECTED. I will not go into
great detail on this movement technique. You will receive this in a later class on
danger areas.

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You just need to remember two things about the Bounding Overwatch
movement technique:
First the Squad Leader along with the Headquarters’ element will usually
stay with the Overwatch element and secondly the Bounding element will not
bound more than small arms range, or out of sight of the Overwatch element,
normally no more than 150 meters.

TRANSITION: DISTANCE

Rangers, so far we have discussed the distances between personnel and


Fire Teams. Keep in mind that these distances are based on control but dictated
by vegetation, terrain and visibility.

VEGETATION

You may be operating through a thickly vegetated area such as the


jungles of Panama. If you find yourself in this situation, you may have to close up
the distances between your personnel and Fire Teams in order to maintain
control of your elements.
Or you may be operating in a sparsely vegetated area such as in the
winter time here in Georgia. If you find yourself in this situation you may want to
increase the distances between your personnel and Fire Teams, as long as you
can still maintain control of your elements.

TERRAIN

You may find yourself in terrain such as the rolling hills of Georgia. Here
you may have one Fire Team in the low ground and another cresting over the top
of a hill. If this happens, you may have to close the distance between Fire Teams
in order to maintain control of your elements.
Or you may find yourself moving in a desert environment such as Iraq or
Afghanistan. In this situation you may want to increase the distances between
personnel in the Fire Teams as long as you can still maintain control of your
elements.

VISIBILITY

Rangers, there are two types of visibility: Good visibility and Limited
visibility. Good visibility will be a great asset during a patrol.
But you may find yourself in periods of Limited visibility such as rain,
snow, fog, and smoke from the battlefield, and of course, during the hours of
darkness. If you find yourself in any of these situations you may have to modify
your movement formation into the modified wedge.

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MODIFIED WEDGE

Rangers, the modified wedge is nothing more than collapsing the flanks of
the Fire Team wedge into two columns. Let me direct your attention to the
modified wedge.
At the apex of the formation is the lead Fire Team Leader. He is still
responsible for frontal security, enroute route selection and land navigation.
To the lead Fire Team Leader’s right at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5
meters is the Rifleman/Compassman. The Rifleman still performs his additional
duty of Compassman as I explained earlier. To the Rifleman/Compassman’s left
at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5 meters is the Automatic Rifleman. To
the Automatic Rifleman’s right at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5 meters
is the Grenadier. This is the lead Fire Team.
To the lead Fire Team Grenadier’s left at a 45-degree angle for 3-5 meters
is the Squad Leader. He is still responsible for accountability, command and
control and whatever the Squad does or fails to do.
To the Squad Leader’s right at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5
meters is the RTO. To the RTO’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5
meters is the M240B Gunner. To the M240B Gunner’s right at a 45-degree angle
for 3-5 meters is the Assistant Gunner (AG). This is the Headquarters’ element.
To the AG’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5 meters is the
trail Fire Team’s Rifleman. To the trail Fire Team Rifleman’s right at a 45-degree
angle for approximately 3-5 meters is the Automatic Rifleman. To the Automatic
Rifleman’s left at a 45-degree angle for approximately 3-5 meters is the trail Fire
Team Leader. The trail Fire Team Leader is still responsible for rear security
and assisting the Squad Leader in maintaining accountability and
command and control. To the trail Fire team Leader’s right at a 45-degree
angle for approximately 3-5 meters is the Grenadier. Rangers, this is the trail Fire
team.

MODIFIED WEDGE: KEY LEADER/M240B

Once again the Squad Leader and trail Fire Team Leader’s
positions are not fixed positions. They can move anywhere within their
element in order to maintain control. For example, the Squad Leader can move
anywhere within the Squad in order to maintain control. The trail Fire Team
Leader can move anywhere within his team in order to maintain control.
The one exception to this is the lead Fire Team Leader; his position is
still fixed within the formation. The lead Fire Team Leader is at the front of his
formation so that he can perform his three additional duties of frontal security,
enroute route selection and land navigation. He is also at the front of his
formation to lead by example and immediately deploy his Fire Team since they
are the team that is most likely to make contact first.
Once again the M240B Gunner is on the left flank. This however is NOT
considered a heavy left or right in the modified wedge formation. As the Squad

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Leader you will decide as to which side of the modified wedge the M240B
Gunner will travel. This is based off of the Squad Leader’s METT-TC analysis
and the enemy’s most probable course of action. Again, the Squad Leader can
shift his M240B from the left or right flank without halting the element. You as the
Squad Leader just tell the M240B Gunner to switch out with the RTO.

FIRE TEAM WEDGE: SHORT HALT/LONG HALT-GOOD


VISIBILITY

While moving it may be necessary to call a halt. For instance you may
want to conduct a map check, cross load heavy equipment or to conduct a water
break. Anyone in the patrol can call a halt, but it is normally done by the lead Fire
Team Leader or the Squad leader. The only reasons that anyone besides a
leader should call a halt is if they see the enemy or signs of the enemy, have lost
mission essential equipment, or they are injured. Rangers let me direct your
attention to the Fire Team wedge.

LEAD TL CALLS HALT-GOOD VISIBILTY

While moving during the hours of good visibility in the Fire Team wedge,
the lead Fire Team Leader may find it necessary to call a halt. If so, he will give
the hand and arm signal to halt to his Fire Team. The hand and arm signal to halt
is nothing more than using the non-firing hand with the fingers extended and
joined, palm facing forward, arm bent at a 90-degree angle, upper arm parallel to
the ground. (Demonstrate)
The lead Fire Team Leader moves to the next available position that
provides cover and concealment and assume a good short halt posture.
Rangers a good Short Halt Posture is nothing more than taking a knee
behind cover and concealment, with your rucksack on your back, your weapon at
the ready, pulling security in your assigned sector of fire.
The lead Fire Team Leader will ensure that the rest of his Fire team does
the same. When halted the lead Fire Team has security from the 9 o’clock to the
12 o’clock to the 3 o’clock position.

The Squad Leader will then continue to close the distance between the
Headquarters’ element and the lead Fire Team, to a position where the trail Fire
Team will be able to gain interlocking sectors of fire with the lead Fire Team.
Once this is done the Squad Leader will give the hand and arm signal to halt,
assume a good short halt posture and ensure that the rest of his element does
the same.
Rangers at all halts the Squad leader must decide where to emplace the
M240B Gun Team based off of his METT-TC analysis, the enemy’s most likely
avenue of approach and the enemy’s most probable course of action.

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Let’s say that since the lead Fire Team Leader called the halt, the Squad
Leader will most likely leave the M240B Gun Team at the 9 o’clock until the
Squad Leader determines why the lead Fire Team Leader has called the halt.
The trail Fire Team Leader will continue moving forward until he has
moved his Fire Team to a location where they will achieve interlocking sectors of
fire with the lead Fire Team. Once at this location the trail Fire Team Leader will
issue the hand and arm signal to halt, assume a good short halt posture and
ensure that the rest of his Fire Team does the same.
Rangers understand that you want interlocking sectors of fire
approximately 35 meters out (hand grenade range). The trail Fire Team Leader’s
team has security from the 3 o’clock to the 6 o’clock to the 9 o’clock. The trail
Fire Team leader will ensure that his Grenadier is pulling rear security from the 4
o’clock to the 8 o’clock.
Since the lead Fire Team Leader called the halt the Squad Leader will
move up to the lead Team Leader’s location to find out why he has called the
halt.
Enroute the Squad Leader will spot check the lead Fire Team to ensure
that they are in the proper short halt posture.
Simultaneously the trail Fire Team Leader will ensure that his Grenadier is
pulling rear security, and spot-check his men to ensure that they are in a good
short halt posture behind available cover and concealment. He will then move
forward to the Squad Leader’s last known location, spot-checking the
headquarters’ personnel as he moves forward, once at the Squad Leader’s last
known location he will wait for further guidance.
Once the Squad Leader has moved up to the lead Fire Team Leader’s
location he will then find out why the lead Team Leader has called the halt. For
example he has spotted a potential linear danger area, he wanted his men to
cross load equipment or conduct a water break.
If the Squad Leader wanted to go ahead and move out at this time he
would give the Team Leaders task, conditions, and standards to get their men
prepared to move, and they would then continue to move.

SL CALLS HALT-GOOD VISIBILITY


While moving in periods of good visibility if the Squad Leader wanted to
call a halt he would send the signal to halt either by hand and arm signal or by
FM to the lead Fire Team Leader. Once the lead Fire Team Leader received the
command to halt, the Squad would halt as previously described.

CONDUCT SLLS-GOOD VISIBILITY

Since this is in periods of good visibility the Squad Leader can use the
hand and arm signal to initiate SLLS. The hand and arm signal to initiate SLLS is
nothing more than taking your non-firing hand and cupping it behind the
corresponding ear. (Demonstrate)

SLLS stands for Stop, Look, Listen, and Smell.

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STOP: You will stop all movement
LOOK: You will look for signs of the enemy, things like trash, old fighting
positions, expended brass, or the enemy themselves.
LISTEN: You will listen for signs of the enemy, things like engines running,
the enemy talking, or the enemy moving.
SMELL: You will smell for signs of the enemy, things like food, smoke
from fires, or POL products (fuels).
SLLS will be conducted for 3-5 minutes or for as long as the Squad
Leader deems necessary.

When SLLS is complete, in periods of good visibility the Squad Leader


will terminate SLLS by using his non-firing hand and making a slashing motion
by his ear, by rotating his hand at the wrist. (Demonstrate)

Because the Squad Leader called the halt, the Team Leaders need to
move to his location to see why the Squad Leader has called a halt. The lead
Fire Team Leader will have the Rifleman/Compassman assume frontal security
from the 10 o’clock to 2 o’clock. He will also spot-check his Fire team to ensure
that they are in a good short halt posture as he works his way to the Squad
Leader’s location.
At the same time the trail Fire Team Leader will ensure that the last man
in his team is pulling rear security from the 4 o’clock to the 8 o’clock. He will then
spot-check his team to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture. While
enroute to the Squad Leader’s location he will also check the Headquarters’
element to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture.
Once the Team Leaders reach the Squad Leader’s location the Squad
Leader will tell them why they have halted. For example he wants to cross-load
heavy equipment, conduct a water break, or conduct a security halt for whatever
reason he deems necessary.

MAP CHECK/PINPOINT LOCATION-GOOD VISIBILITY

The Squad Leader will give task conditions and standards on how he
wants to pinpoint his location on the map. He will tell the trail Team Leader to
start at the 3 o’clock position and work his way around the perimeter in a clock
wise manner ensuring that the men are in a good short halt posture and pulling
security. At the same time the lead Team Leader and the Squad Leader will
pinpoint their current position on the map, as well as determine the distance and
direction for their next movement. Once they have done this the lead Fire Team
Leader and trail Fire Team Leader will change positions. The trail Team Leader
and Squad Leader will confirm their current position on the map, as well as
confirm the distance and direction for their next movement.
Based off the map check the Squad Leader will decide to either move out,
or place the men in the long halt posture because they will be there for an
extended period of time. For example the Squad Leader determines that this is
the security halt for the ORP (Objective Rally Point), or he wants the men to take
a break and drink water.

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LONG HALT POSTURE-GOOD VISIBILTY

The Squad Leader will then give the team Leaders Task, Conditions, and
Standards to place their personnel into a good long halt posture.
Rangers, the Long Halt Posture is nothing more than quietly rotating the
rucksack off of your back, placing it frame down on the ground, cat eyes facing
toward the center of the perimeter, getting in the prone position behind available
cover and concealment, and pulling security in your assigned sector of fire.
The Squad Leader will tell the lead Fire Team Leader to move to his
closest man at the 9 o’clock position and move in a clockwise direction through
the 12 o’clock to the 3 o’clock pulling security in the short halt posture for each
man as they get into the long halt posture. The trail Fire Team Leader will start at
his closest man at the 3 o’clock and work his way through the 6 o’clock to the 9
o’clock putting his men in the long halt posture in the same manner as previously
described for the lead Fire Team Leader.
As the Team Leaders place their men in the long halt posture they will
assign them hasty sectors of fire.
During periods of good visibility they will use easily identifiable features
such as “That tree to that rock” when assigning their men left and right limits.
The Team Leaders must ensure that their men’s sectors of fire interlock with the
men to their left and right approximately 35 meters out. As a courtesy the lead
Fire Team Leader will check with the far left man in the Trail Fire Team to ensure
he has interlocking sectors of fire out to 35 meters in the 3 o’clock position. The
Trail Fire Team Leader will do the same with the Lead Fire Team Leader’s far left
man to ensure he has good interlocking sectors of fire out to 35 meters from the
9 o’clock position.

Additionally, during periods of good visibility the Team Leaders will at


a minimum disseminate the following information to their men as they place
them in the long halt posture:

1. Why the Squad has halted


2. They will show their men the Squad’s current location on the map.
3. The distance and direction for the next movement.

For example: “We have halted because this is the security halt prior to the
ORP, this is our current location on the map (point to it on the map), and our
next movement is 300 meters on a 290-degree azimuth to the ORP”.

Rangers if you notice I have both Team Leaders working on opposite


sides of the perimeter at the same time. The reason for this is if the Squad
makes contact, the Squad Leader has a better chance of not losing both Team
Leaders at the same time on the initial contact.
Once the Team Leaders have emplaced their men in the long halt posture
they will return to the Squad Leader’s position for further guidance.

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EMPLACING M240B

While the Team Leaders are emplacing their men in the long halt posture
the Squad Leader will emplace the M240B Gun Team in position, if he has not
already done so when the Squad initially halted. Even if the M240B had already
been emplaced by the SL when the squad initially halted the SL must go and
check the gun. After the Gun Team has been emplaced, any further
dissemination of information to that Gun Team is the responsibility of the Team
Leader who’s side of the perimeter the Gun Team is emplaced on.
Additionally the M240B holds a sector of fire that is independent
(separate/alone) from the Squad’s sector of fire. When a M240B gun team is
initially emplaced it is generally given a Principle Direction of Fire (PDF). For
example, you’ve probably done this if you have ever been a leader emplacing a
gun, “orient your fires on that road intersection/ that trail”, that is an example of a
PDF. The M240B will have a Primary sector of fire and possibly a Secondary
sector of fire.
The important thing to remember is that the positions on the left and
right of the Gun Team will have interlocking sectors of fire in front of the
M240B’s position, approximately 35 meters out. This is so that if the tactical
situation changes, the Squad Leader will have the flexibility to move the
M240B from one side of the perimeter to the other, without creating a gap in his
Squad’s sector of fires.

SPOTCHECK PERIMETER

After all the men in the Squad are placed into the long halt posture, the
Team Leaders will return to the Squad Leader’s position in the center of the
perimeter. The Squad Leader will go and spot-check the perimeter to ensure that
his Task, Conditions, and Standards have been met.
Once the Squad Leader is satisfied with the perimeter he will at that time
give further guidance to his Team Leaders for conducting any priorities of work
that he deems necessary.
PREPARE TO MOVE-GOOD VISIBILTY

When the Squad leader is ready to move out he will issue Task,
Conditions and Standards to the Team Leaders in order to get their men ready to
move. The Squad Leader will tell the lead Team Leader to move to his closest
man at the 9 o’clock position and move in a clockwise manner through the 12
o’clock to the 3 o’clock pulling security in the short halt posture for each man as
they get into the short halt posture, ready to move out. Once this is done the lead
Fire Team Leader will move to the apex of his Fire Team and give the Squad
Leader a “thumbs-up” telling him that his team is prepared to move out.
The trail Fire Team Leader will start at his closest man at the 3 o’clock and
work his way through the 6 o’clock to the 9 o’clock pulling security for each man
as they get into the short halt posture in the same manner as described for the
lead Fire Team Leader. Once the trail Fire Team Leader’s team is ready to move
he will move to the apex of his team and give the Squad Leader a “thumbs-up”.

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While they are doing this the Squad Leader will get a headcount of all of
his Squad members. He will be able to do this because they are operating during
periods of good visibility and he will be able to see them.
Once the Squad Leader receives a “thumbs-up” from both team leaders,
the Squad Leader will give the hand and arm signal to move out to the lead Fire
Team Leader.
Now Rangers at this time the Squad is at a very vulnerable point, as
security tends to fall off when a Squad or element is starting to move out
because everyone’s attention is focused on the lead element. Therefore not
everyone is going to stand up and start moving out at the same time.
When the lead Team Leader receives the hand and arm signal to move
out he will relay it to his team and move out in the direction of travel. After the
lead Team Leader has moved approximately 10 meters the Automatic Rifleman
and Rifleman/Compassman from the lead team will pick up and start to move
out. After the Automatic Rifleman and Rifleman/Compassman from the lead team
have moved approximately 10 meters the Grenadier from the lead team will pick
up and begin to move.
The Squad Leader based on the movement technique being used will wait
for the last man of the lead team to go the appropriate distance before he issues
the hand and arm signal to the headquarters’ element to pick-up and begin
moving. For example if they are using the Traveling Overwatch technique the
Squad Leader will wait until there is approximately 50 meters between his
element and the lead Fire Team before he picks-up and moves out. The
remainder of the Squad members and teams will pick-up and move out in this
sequential manner.

MODIFIED WEDGE SHORT/LONG HALT-LIMITED VISIBILITY

Rangers, if and when you find yourself moving during periods of limited
visibility in the modified wedge you may have to conduct a halt. Keep in mind,
anyone in the patrol can call a halt, but it is normally done by the lead Fire Team
Leader or the Squad leader.
Again the only reasons that anyone besides a leader should call a halt is if
they see the enemy or signs of the enemy, have lost mission essential
equipment, or they are injured.

LEAD TL CALLS HALT-LIMITED VISIBILITY

While moving, if the lead Fire Team Leader deems it necessary to call a
halt he will give the command to halt. Because they are moving during periods of
limited visibility, most likely hours of darkness, he will not be able to use hand
and arm signals. Therefore once the lead Fire Team Leader has moved to an
area that is large enough to provide cover and concealment for the entire Squad,
he will turn around and issue the command to halt to the Ranger behind him. He
will do this by placing his hand in the center of that man’s chest and telling him to
“Halt”. Once he has issued the command to halt, the lead Fire Team Leader will

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assume a short halt posture. The command to halt will continue to be passed
back from man to man in the same manner.
After receiving the command to halt, those Rangers in the right column
(right flank) of the modified wedge will continue moving forward until they have
achieved interlocking sectors of fire with the men to their front and rear, then face
to the right, take two to three steps to the nearest covered and concealed
position and assume the short halt posture.
The Rangers in the left column (left flank) will do the same, with the
exception of facing to the left. This will allow a path for the leadership to move
about the squad in the center of the perimeter without tripping over everyone.
Since the lead Fire Team Leader called the halt, the Squad Leader will
move up to the lead Team Leader’s location to find out why he has called the
halt. Enroute the Squad Leader will spot check the Rangers in the lead Fire
Team to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture. Simultaneously the
trail Fire Team Leader will ensure that his Grenadier is pulling rear security, and
spot-check his men to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture behind
available cover and concealment. He will then move forward to the Squad
Leader’s last known location, spot-checking the headquarters’ personnel as he
moves forward, once at the Squad Leader’s last known location he will wait for
further guidance.
Once the Squad Leader has moved up to the lead Fire Team Leader’s
location he will then find out why the lead Fire Team Leader has called a halt. For
example he has spotted a potential linear danger area, he wants his men to
cross load equipment or conduct a water break. If the Squad Leader wanted to
go ahead and move out at this time he would give the Team Leaders task,
conditions, and standards to get their men prepared to move, and they would
then continue to move.

SL CALLS HALT-LIMITED VISIBILITY

If the Squad Leader deemed it necessary to call a halt while moving


during periods of limited visibility he can pass the command to halt forward to the
lead Fire Team Leader, physically move up to his position, or call him on FM. To
pass the command to halt forward, the Squad Leader would move up to the man
in front of him, grab him by the shoulder and whispering in his ear “Halt”, the
command to halt would be passed from man to man all the way up to the lead
Fire Team Leader in this manner. Once the lead Fire Team Leader received the
command to halt, the squad would halt in the same manner as previously
described.
Because the Squad Leader called the halt the Team Leaders need to
move to his location to see why the Squad Leader has called a halt. The lead
Fire Team Leader will have the Rifleman/Compassman assume frontal security
from the 10 o’clock to 2 o’clock. He will also spot-check his Fire Team to ensure
that they are in a good short halt posture as he works his way back to the Squad
Leader’s location.

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At the same time the trail Fire Team Leader will ensure that the last man
in his team is pulling rear security from the 4 o’clock to the 8 o’clock. He will then
spot-check his team to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture. While
enroute to the Squad Leader’s location he will also check the Headquarters’
element to ensure that they are in a good short halt posture.
Once the Team Leaders reach the Squad Leader’s location the Squad
Leader will tell them why they have halted. For example maybe the Squad
Leader wants to cross-load heavy equipment, conduct a water break, or conduct
a security halt for whatever reason he deems necessary.

SLLS LIMITED VISIBILITY

The Squad Leader will then issue Task, Conditions and Standards for
conducting SLLS. Since this is during periods of limited visibility the Squad
Leader will tell the Team Leaders to inform their men SLLS will start now and
terminate when a leader comes back to their location and tells them it is
complete.
The lead Fire Team Leader will move to his nearest man at the 9 o’clock
position and then move in a clockwise direction to the 12 o’clock position then to
the 3 o’clock briefing each man that SLLS will start now and complete once a
leader comes back and tells them that SLLS is complete. Simultaneously the trail
Fire Team Leader will start at his nearest man at the 3 o’clock position, then
moving in a clockwise direction to the 6 and then to the 9 o’clock position briefing
each man that SLLS will start now and complete when a leader comes back and
tells them that SLLS is complete. Once the Team Leaders have gone out and
briefed their men that SLLS has started, the team Leaders will return back to the
Squad Leader’s position, at that time SLLS will begin.
Again SLLS will last for 3-5 minutes or for as long as the Squad Leader
deems necessary.
MAP CHECK/PINPOINT LIMITED VISIBILITY

Once SLLS is complete the Squad Leader will give task conditions and
standards on how he wants to pinpoint his location on the map. He will tell the
trail Team Leader to start at the 3 o’clock position and move about the perimeter
in a clockwise direction informing the men that SLLS is complete, and checking
the men to ensure that they are in the short halt posture and pulling security.
At the same time the lead Team Leader and the Squad Leader will
pinpoint their current location on the map, as well as determine the distance and
direction for their next movement. As this is during periods of limited visibility they
will pinpoint their location using NVGs, or by getting under the RTO’s poncho and
poncho liner, and using a red lens flashlight. While they do this the RTO will
make sure that no red light escapes from the poncho and poncho liner to ensure
noise and light discipline is maintained.
After they have pinpointed their location the lead Fire Team Leader and
trail Fire Team Leader will change positions. The trail Team Leader and Squad
Leader will confirm their current position on the map, as well as confirm the
distance and direction for their next movement.

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Based off the map check the Squad Leader will either decide to move out,
or place the men in the long halt posture because they will be there for an
extended period of time.
For example the Squad Leader determines that this is the security halt for
the Patrol Base, or he wants the men to take a break and drink water.

LONG HALT POSTURE- LIMITED VISIBILTY

The Squad Leader will then give the team Leaders Task, Conditions, and
Standards to get their personnel into a good long halt posture.
The Squad Leader will then tell the lead Fire Team Leader to move to his
closest man at the 9 o’clock position and move in a clockwise direction through
the 12 o’clock to the 3 o’clock pulling security in the short halt posture for each
man as they get into the long halt posture. The trail Fire Team Leader will start at
his closest man at the 3 o’clock and work his way through the 6 o’clock to the 9
o’clock putting his men in the long halt posture in the same manner as previously
described for the lead Fire Team Leader.
As the Team Leaders place their men in the long halt posture they will
assign them hasty sectors of fire. During periods of limited visibility they will pull
out their compasses and give their men azimuths for their left and right limits.
The Team Leaders must ensure that their men’s sectors of fire interlock with the
men to their left and right approximately 35 meters out and between the teams.
Additionally, during periods of limited visibility the Team Leaders will at a
minimum disseminate the following information to their men:

1. Why the Squad has halted


2. The Squad’s current location on the map.
3. The distance and direction for the next movement.

During hours of darkness as the Team Leaders brief their men they must
maintain noise and light discipline, so they are not going to show their men the
Squad’s current location on the map, they will tell their men the six-digit grid for
the Squad’s current location.

For example: “We have halted because this is the security halt prior to the
patrol base, we are currently located at GA123456, and our next movement is
200 meters on a 190-degree azimuth to the patrol base”.

EMPLACING M240B

While the Team Leaders are emplacing their men in the long halt posture
the Squad Leader will emplace the M240B Gun Team in position, if he has not
already done so when the Squad initially halted. After the Gun Team is emplaced

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any further dissemination of information to that Gun Team is the responsibility of
the Team Leader who’s side of the perimeter the Gun Team is emplaced on.
After all the men in the Squad are placed in the long halt posture, and the
Team Leaders have returned to the Squad Leader’s position in the center of the
perimeter. The Squad Leader will go and spot-check the perimeter to ensure
that his Task, Conditions, and Standards have been met.

PREPARE TO MOVE/MOVE-LIMITED VISIBILTY

Once the Squad Leader determines it is time to move out he will give
Task, Conditions, and Standards to his Team Leaders to get their personnel
ready to move out. The Squad Leader will tell the lead Team Leader to move to
his closest man at the 9 o’clock position and move in a clockwise manner
through the 12 o’clock to the 3 o’clock pulling security in the short halt posture for
each man as they get into the short halt posture, ready to move out. Once this is
done the lead Fire Team Leader will move to the front of his Fire Team
The trail Fire Team Leader will start at his closest man at the 3 o’clock and
work his way through the 6 o’clock to the 9 o’clock pulling security for each man
as they get into the short halt posture in the same manner as described for the
lead Fire Team Leader.
Once the trail Fire Team Leader’s team is ready to move out he will move
to the Squad Leader’s location and tell him that his team is prepared to move.
The Squad Leader will then tell the trail Fire team Leader to move forward to the
front of the formation approximately two to three paces in front of the lead Fire
Team Leader’s position to establish a chokepoint. While at the chokepoint the
trail Team Leader will physically touch each man in the Squad as they pass his
position to count them out of the security halt.
The Squad Leader will follow the trail Fire Team leader up to the front of
the formation until he is face to face with the lead Fire Team Leader. There the
Squad Leader will verify that the Lead Fire Team Leader’s team is prepared to
move. Once the Squad Leader has verified that all elements are ready to move,
and that the chokepoint is established, he will tap the lead Fire Team Leader on
the shoulder and tell him to move out.

The lead Fire team Leader will turn to the man behind him and place his
hand on the man’s chest and tell him “we’re moving”, this will be passed back in
a zigzag fashion from man to man until it reaches the last man in the patrol. The
lead Team Leader will then get up and move in the direction of travel ensuring
that he is physically counted out by the trail Team Leader and that the man
behind him is up and moving. Each man will wait until the man in front of him has
moved approximately 3-5 meters before they get up from the short halt posture.

When the trail Team Leader has counted everyone out of the security halt
he will take up his place in the formation and ensure that the Grenadier is behind
him.

HEADCOUNT LIMITED VISIBILITY

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The trail Team Leader will then pass up the headcount. He will
do this by moving to the man traveling in front of him, grab him by the shoulder
and whisper in his ear either headcount “good”, if they have everyone, or
headcount “bad” if his count of personnel is short. The headcount will be passed
in a zigzag fashion forward from man to man until it reaches the lead Fire Team
Leader. If the headcount was “good”, then the lead Fire Team Leader will pass
back the “headcount good” back in a zigzag fashion until it reaches the trail Team
Leader, this lets the leadership know that information dissemination is occurring
and that they don’t have any breaks in contact.

If the headcount was sent up as “headcount bad”, as soon as the


Squad Leader gets this information he has two options:

The first option is to reinitiate a headcount while they continue to move.


To do this the Squad Leader will move to the man to his front, grab him by the
shoulder and whisper in his ear “initiate headcount”, this will be passed forward
to the lead Team Leader. Once the lead Team Leader gets this command he will
turn around to the man behind him and say “Headcount, I am one, pass it back”,
that man will then turn around to the man behind him and say “headcount, I am
two, pass it back” this will continue back until it reaches the trail Team Leader. If
the headcount is correct this time the squad will continue on its movement, if the
headcount is still bad, the Squad Leader must halt the patrol and conduct a
physical headcount of each man.

The second option and the one you will use here at Ranger school, is if
the initial headcount is bad, you as the Squad Leader will IMMEDIATELY halt the
patrol, and the Squad Leader and trail Team Leader will move to the front of the
formation and physically count each man. If the headcount is still bad, the Squad
Leader will give Task, Conditions and Standards to the trail Team Leader for the
Trail Team Leader and a Ranger buddy to go back to the last security halt and
police up any lost Rangers.

SUMMARY

Rangers, during this period of instruction we have covered:

1. The Fire Team Wedge


2. The Modified Wedge
3. The three movement techniques
4. The distances between Fire Teams, and personnel
5. How to conduct security halts for the periods of good and limited
visibility.

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At this time what are your questions pertaining to this period of
instruction?

If there are no questions/no more questions, take a ten minute break.

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