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I nternatio n al C o lle c tor s Library

Ga rden C it y N ew Yo rk
,
C o nt e nt s

The Frog Prince


Th Ga ll ant T il or
e a

Th Gi ant and the T ai lor


e

Th Li tt le Farmer
e

Th Go l den Key
e

Sharing Joy and Sorrow


Th N i l
e a

T m Thum b
o

T m Thumb s Travels

The Young Gi ant


Sweet Po ridger

The Elves
Fai r K t inelj e and Pif Paf Polt ie
a r - -
r

The Old Beggar Woman -

Th e Jew Among Thorns


Ki ng Th u hb d
r s e ar

Clever Gretel
Fit h s B ird

c er

Th Robber Bri degroom


e

O l d Hildeb rand
The S ingi ng Bone
M ai d M aleen
The Goose Gi l -
r

Th Ski lful Hun tsman


e

The Princess in D isguise


Cin dere ll a
S i n li M ount in
r e a

Th G l ass Coffin
e

Rapunzel
The Sleep i ng Beauty
O l d Ri nk nkra

Hanse l and Gretel


Th Straw the Coal and the Bean
e , ,

Th Deat h f the Hen


e o

Th Rabb it s Bri de

e
vi Contents
36 . The H are and the H edgehog
37 . Th D g and the S p arrow
e o

38 . Old S ultan
39 ° M Korb es
r.

40 . The Vaga b onds


41 .

42 The
. m Bre en Town Musici ans
43 The W
. onderful Musici an
44 Th.e M us o e the B ird and the Saus age
, ,

45 The rum C bs o n the Table


46 Th.e C a t and the M ous e in Partnership
47 Th e S pi der and the Flea
The Wolf and the Seven Lit tle Ki ds
The Wolf and the Fo x

The Wolf and the M an


Gos sip Wolf and th e Fo x

Lit tle Red Ridi ng Hood


How Mrs Fo M arri ed Ag ai n
. x

Th e Fo x nd the Ge ese
a

55 . The Fox and the Horse


56 . The Fo and the C at
x

57 The Sole
58 . The Willow Wren -

59 The Will ow Wren and the Bear -

The Little F olk s Presents



60 .

61 . The E lf
62 . The F o undling B ird
63 . The Water o f Li fe
64 . The Water S p i te r

65 . The Tab le the As s and th e S ti ck


, ,

66 . One Ey e Tw o E yes and Th ee E yes


-
,
-
,
r -

67 . The Knapsack the Hat and th e Horn , ,

68 . Sweeth eart R oland


The Devi l s Three Gold Hai rs

69 .

7o The Griflin
.

7 1 The . Sea Hare -

7 2 The M i
. a den Wi thout Hand s

7 3 The i P nk
74 M other H ul da
75 Th True Bri de
e

76 . Th Three Li tt l e B irds
e

77 The Th ee Snake Leaves


r -
C ontents
The Whi te Snake
The T h ee Spinners
r

Rumpelsti ltskin
Th Queen Bee
e

Th Go lden Goose
e

Th Th ree Feathers
e

Th Hut in the Forest


e

Donkey Cabbages
Snow White and Rose Red
- -

Th Poor M i ller s Boy and the Cat


Th O l d Woman in the Wood


e

Th Lambki n and the Little Fi sh


e

Th J uni per Tree


e

J ind and J o ing l


or a r e

Th Goose Girl at the We ll


e -

Th T hree Li ttle M en in the Wood


e

Th Whi te Bri de and the Black Bri de


e

Brother and S ister


Th Gold Children
e

Th Twi n Brothers
e

Ferdinand the Faithfu l and Ferdi nand U nf i thful


a

Th Three B l ack Princesses


e

Snow Whi te and the Seven Dwarfs


-

Th Shoes Th at Were Danced to Pi eces


e

Th Boots f Buffalo Leather


e o

The Si Servants
x

Si Soldi ers o f Fortune


x

The Tw o Travelers
Th Ear f Co m
e o

Th Aged M other
e

Th Hazel Branch
e

Th Old Gran dfat her s C om er



e

Th Ungrateful S o n
e

Th B ittern and the Hoopoe


e

Th Three Languages
e

Th Star M oney
e

Th Poor M n and the R ich M n


e a a

Th Stolen Penni es
e

Th Sh oud
e r

Th Wilful Chi l d
e

Th Ros e
e

Th T ai lor in Heav en
e
Content s

Pove ty and Humi li ty Lead to Heaven


r

Th Flail from Heaven


e

The M oon
The Peasant in Heaven
Eve s Va i ous Chi ld en

r r

The Po o B y in the Grave r o

O u Lady s Chi ld

r

Gambl n g Hansel i

Th O l d M n M ade Young Again


e a

Th L i s Ani mals and the Devi l s


e ou

M aster Pfriem
Th Heavenly Weddi ng
e

God s Food’

St Joseph in the Forest


.

The Th ee Green Twi gsr

Our Lady s Little Glass ’

Brother Frolick
The Bri ght S un Bri ngs It to Li ght
Th Sparrow and Hi Four Chi ldren
e s

Th Durat on of Life
e i

Th Twelve Apostles
e

Fai thful John


Th S i Swans
e x

The Se en Ravens v

The Twelve Brothers


Iron John
Th Ki n g s Son Who Feared Nothi ng

Th Drummer
e

The Tw o K ings Chi ldren


The Iron Stove


The S inging Soaring Lark ,

The N ixi e of the M ill Pond -

The R aven
Th Crysta l Ball
e

Th e Donke y
Hans the Hedgehog
Th King o f the Golden M ount i n
e a

Th Golden B ird
e

Strong H ns a

Th Blue Li ght
e

Th Fisherman and Hi Wi fe
e s

The Good B rgai n a


C o nt ent s

Prudent Han s

Hans in Luck
C l ever Else
Hans M arri ed
Th Youth Wh Cou l d N o t Shiver and Shake
e o

Fred and Kate


Wi se Folk s
Th Lazy Sp inner
e

Th Three Sluggards
e

The T we lv e Idle Servants


Lazy Har y r

Odd and Ends


s

Brides n T i al
o r

Th Spindle the Shutt l e and the Nee dl e


e , ,

Th Peasant s Wi se Daughter

Th Shepherd Bo y
e

Th M aster Thi ef
e -

Th Three Brothers
e

Th Four Skilful Brothers


e

Tales f Snakes
o

Th Turni p
e

Th Twelve Huntsmen
e

Th M ai d f Brakel
e o

Going Traveli ng
K n i t and Hi Three Sons
o s s

Th Sto y of S hl u fl n Land
e r c a ra e

Th D itm
e h T ale of W onders
ars c

Domesti c Servants
Th Rogue n d Hi M aster
e a s

Th Wise Servant
e

Th Seven Swabi ans


e

Lean Lisa
Go dfather Death
Death s M essengers

Th W onderful Glass
e

Th Old Witch
e

T h Devi l s Sooty Bro ther


Bearskin
Th Devi l and Hi Grandmother
e s

Th Grav e M ound
e

Th Peasant and the Devi l


e

Th Th ree Apprenti ces


e
C ontents
Doctor Know all
Th e Three Arm y Surgeo ns
Th e Spiri t in the Bottle
Th e Three C hildren o f Fort une
The Cunni ng Li ttle T ai lor
The R i ddl e
A Ri ddli ng Tale
Th e Beam
T h e F ro g P ri nc e

LONG A GO when wis hes often came true there li ved a King Whose
, ,

daughters were all handsome but th youngest w as b eautiful ,


e so

that the sun hi mself w ho h seen everythi ng w as b emused eve y


, as , r

time he h one over her be c use o f her b eaut y N ear the royal castle
s a .

there w a great dark wood and in the wood under n ld linden


as , a o

t ree w a well ; and when the day w hot the Ki ng s daughter


as as ,

u ed t o go forth into the woo d and it by the brink f the cool well
s s o ,

and if the time seemed long h would tak e ut a golden b all and , s e o ,

throw it up nd catch it again and this w a her favo i te p as time


a , s r .

Now it ha pp ened o ne day th at th e golden b all ins tead of falling ,

b ack into the mai den s little hand whi ch had sent it aloft d opped

, r

t o the groun d near th e edge o f th e well and rolled in The Ki ng s



.

daughter followed it wi th her eyes as it sank but the well w ,


as

dee p s o deep that the bottom could not be seen Th en h b egan t o


, . s e

weep and he wept and wep t if he could never b e comfo ted


,
s as s r .

An d in th e mi dst f her wee pi ng h heard a voi ce sayi ng t o her


o s e ,

Wh at ai ls you Ki ng daughter ? Your tears wou ld melt a heart of

, 3

stone .

An d when sh loo k ed t e where th e voi ce c ame from th ere


e o se ,

was nothin g but a frog stretching hi thi ck u gl y head out o f the s

water Oh is it you old waddler? sai d he; I wee p b e cause my


.

, ,

s

golde n ball h fallen into the well as .


Never mind d not weep ans wered the frog ; 1 can help y u;

,
o

,

o

but what will y u give me if I fetch up y our b all agai n ?


o

Whatever y u like dear frog sai d h ; ny f my clothes my



o , ,

s e

a o ,

pearls and jewels or even the golden crown that I wear


,
.

Y our clothes y our pearls and j ewels and y our golden crown are

, ,

no t f me answered the frog; but if you would love me and


or ,
” “
,

have me f y our compani on and play fellow and let me it by you


or -
,
s

at tab le and eat from y ou p late and d i nk from your cup and
,
r ,
r ,
2 G imm s Co mp le te F i y T le s r

a r a

sleep in your littl e bed—if you would promise all this then would I ,

di v e be l ow th water and fetch you yo ur golden ball agai n



e .

Oh yes she ans wered; I wi ll promise it all whatever you


,
” “
,

want ; if you will only get me my ball again But she thought to .

herself What nonsen e he talks ! as if he could do anythin g but sit


,

s

i n the water and croak wit h the other frogs o could poss ibly b e any ,
r

one s compani on

.

But th frog soon he he rd her promi se drew hi head


e ,
as as a ,
s

un der the water and sank down o ut of s i ght but after a whi le he ,

came to the s urface again wi th the ball in hi mouth nd he threw s ,


a

it on the grass .

Th King s daughter w as overjoyed to see her pre t ty play thi ng


again and she caught it up n d ran o ff wit h it


,
a .


Stop stop ! cri ed the frog; take me up t o ; I cannot run fast
,
” “
o as

as y u ! o

But it w of no u fo croak croak after her as he mi ght she


as s e, r , ,

wou l d not listen to him but made haste home and very soon forgot , ,

a l l about the poor frog who had to betake hi mself t o hi well again , s .

Th next day when the Ki ng s daughter was s it ti ng at table wi th


e ,

the King and all the co urt and eating from her golden plate there , ,

c m e something p itter patter up the marble stai s and then th ere


a -
r ,

came a knocking at the door and a voi ce cryin g Youngest King s , ,


“ ’

daughter let me in ! ,

And she got up and ran to see who it could be but when he ,
s

Opened th door there was the frog sit ti ng outs ide Then h shut
e , . s e

the door has ti ly and went back to her seat feeling very uneasy ,
.

Th e Ki ng noti ced how quickly her heart was beat in g and sai d , ,

M y child what are you afrai d f? Is there a gi ant stan di ng at the


, o

door ready to carry you away ? Oh no an wered she ; no gi ant ” “ ”


, s

,

but a horri d frog And what does the frog want ? a ked the Ki ng
.
” “ ”
s .


0 dear father answered s h when I was sit ti ng b y the well
,
e,

yesterday and playi ng wi th my golden ball it fell into the water


, , ,

and whi le I w as crying for the loss f it the frog came and g t it o ,
o

agai n for me o n condition I would let him b e my compani on but I ,

never thought that he could leave the water and come after me ; but
now there he i outside the door and he wants to come in to me
s ,
.

And then they all heard him k nocking the second t ime and
crying ,

Y oung e t King s d ug ht e “
s

a r,

O p en t o me!
B y t he w ell w a t er
Wha t p ro mis ed you me ?
The F og P inc e
r r 3

Yo ung estKing s da ughter



Now o p en t o me !

Th at whi ch thou hast promi sed must thou p erform sai d the ”
,

King; o go now and let him in



s .

S o h went and opened the door and the frog hop ped in fo l
s e , ,

lowi ng t her heels ti ll he reached her chair Then he stopp ed and


a , s .

cri ed Lift me up to sit b y yo u


,

.

But she delayed doing o unti l the King ordered her When once s .

the frog was o n the chai r he wanted t o get o n the tab le and there , ,

he sat and sai d N w pus h y our golden p late a li ttle nearer so that
,

o ,

we may eat together .


And o she di d b ut everyb ody mi ght se how unwi lli ng she w as


s , e ,

and the frog feasted hearti ly but every morsel seemed to s tick in ,

her throat .


I have had enough now sai d the frog at las t and as I am ,

,

ti ed you must carry me to your room and make ready your silken
r , ,

b ed and we will lie down and go to sleep


, .

Then the Ki ng s daughter began t o weep and w as afrai d o f the


cold frog that nothi ng would satisfy hi m but he must sleep in her
,

prett y clean bed No w the King grew angry wi th her sayi ng That
.
, ,

whi ch thou h ast promised in thy time o f necessity must th ou now ,

p erform .

So she p icked up the frog with her finger and th umb carried him ,

upstairs and put hi m in a co rner and when she had lain down to ,

sleep he came creeping up saying I am tired and want sleep


, , ,

as

much as y ou ; ta ke me up o I wi ll tell y our father ,


r .

Then he felt b es i de herself wi th rage and pi cking him u p she


s , ,

t hrew hi m wi th all her stren g th agai nst the wall crying No w wil l

, ,

yo u be q ui et yo u ho rri d frog !

,

But as he fell he ceased t o be a frog an d b ecame all at once a


, ,

Prince with b eautiful kind e yes An d it came to pass th at wi th her .


,

father s cons ent they became b ri de and bri degroom And he told

, .

her how a wi cked wi tch had b ound hi m by her spell and how no s,

on ebut she alone could have released hi m an d that t hey t wo ,

would go togeth er t o hi s father s ki ngdom An d there came t o the ’


.

door a car i age drawn by eight white horses wi th whi te plum es o n


r ,

their heads and wi th golden harness and b ehi nd the carri age was
, ,

stan di ng faithf ul Henry the servant o f the y oun g P i nce ,


r .

No w faithful He nry had suffered such ca e and pain when his


,
r

master w as t urned into a frog that he had been obli ged to wear ,

three iron b an ds over his hea t t o k eep it from brea king wi th trou r ,
4 G i mm C o mp le t e F i y T le r

s a r a s

ble and anxi ety When the carriage started to take the Prince to hi
. s

kingdom and fai thful Henry had helped them both in he got up
, ,

behi nd and w full o f joy at hi master s deli verance And when


,
as s

they had gone a part f the way the Prince heard a sound at the o ,

b ack of th ca ri age as if somethi ng had broken and he turned


e r , ,

roun d and c i ed H enry th wheel must be breaking ! but Henry


r ,

,
e

ans were d ,


The w heel does n o t brea k,
Tis t he b a nd rou nd my hea rt

Tha t t o les s en it s a che,


,

When I g riev ed for yo ur s a ke,


I b ou nd rou nd my hea rt .

Again and yet once again there was the same sound and the
, ,

Prince thought it mus t be the wheel breaking But it was the break .

ing f the other ban d from fa t hful Hen y s heart because he was

o s i r ,

s o reli eved and happy .

T h e G a ll a n t T a i l o r

O NE SUM MER a li ttle tailor was sitting n hi board near


M OR N I N G o s

the wi ndow and worki ng cheerfully wi th a l l hi m i ght when an


,
s ,

o l d woman cam e down the street cr yi ng Good je lly to se ll ! Good ,

jelly to sell ! ”

Th e cr
y sounded pleasant i n the li t tle ta i l or s ears so he put hi

,
s

head o ut of the window and called u t Here my good woman ,


o ,

,

come here if you want a customer


, .

So the poor woman cli mbed the steps wi th her heavy basket and ,

was obli ged to unpack and display all her pots to the tailor He .

looked at ev ery o n f them and lift ing all the li ds appli ed hi e o , ,


s

nose to each and sai d at last Th jelly seems pretty good ; y u


, ,

e o

may weigh me out four half oun ces o I don t mi nd havi ng a quar , r

ter of a pound

Th woman who had expected to fi n d a good customer gav e


e , ,

him what he asked for but went ff angry and g umb li ng ,


o r .

T hi s je ll y i the v e y thi ng f me c i ed the li tt l e tai l or; t wi ll


“ ”
s r or , r r

give me strength and cunni ng ; and he took down the bread from ”

th cupboard cut a whole round f the lo f and spread t h jelly n


e ,
o a ,
e o
The G a lla nt Ta i lo r 5
i t, lai d it near hi m and went o n sti tchi ng more gall antly than ever
, .

All the whi le the scent o f the sweet jelly was sprea din g throughout
the room where there were quanti ti es o f flies who were at tracted
, ,

by it and flew to partake .

Now then w ho asked you t come ? said the tai lor and drove

, o

,

the unbidden guests away But the fli es not understandi ng hi lan .


, s

guage were no t to be g t id o f like that and returned in larger


, o r ,

numbe s than before Then the t i lor not bein g ab le to stand it any
r . a ,

longer took f om hi chimney com er a ragged cloth and sayi ng


,
r s -
, ,

No w I ll let yo u have i t ! beat it among them un n ci full y When


“ ’ ”
, r er .

he ceased and counted the slain he found seven lying dead before
, ,

hi m This i indeed somewhat he sai d wondering at hi o w n gal


“ ”
. s , ,
s

lantry ; the whole town shall kn ow thi s



.

So he hastened t o ut o ut a belt and he s ti tched it and put o n it


c , ,

in large cap itals Seven at o ne blow ! ,


—The town di d I y! sai d
“ ”
sa

the little tailor; the whole world shall know it ! And hi heart

s

quivered with jo y like a lamb s tai l ,


The tai lor fastened the belt roun d hi m and began to think o f ,

going out into the world fo hi workshop seemed t o o small fo hi ,


r s r s

worship So he looked about in all the hou e for something that


. s

would be useful t o take with hi m b ut he found nothi ng but an o ld ,

cheese whi ch he put in his pocket Outside the door he noti ced
, .

that a bird had got caught in the bushes o he took that and put it , s

in hi pocket with the cheese Then he set out gallantly on hi wa y


s . s ,

and as he was li ght and active he fe lt no fatigue .

Th way led over a mountain and when h


e eached the topmost e r

peak he saw a terrib le giant sitti ng there and looki ng about him at
hi ease The tailor went bravely up to hi m called o ut t o hi m and
s .
, ,

s ai d Comrade good day ! There you sit looki ng over the wi de


,

,

world ! I am n the way thi ther to seek my fortune ; have y ou a


o

fancy t go wi th me ? o

The gi ant looked at the tai lor contemp t uously and sai d Y u lit

, ,
o

tle ras cal ! Yo u miserable fellow ! ”

That may be ! answered the li ttle ta ilor and undoing hi coat


“ ”
, s

he showed the gi ant hi belt; you can read there whether I am a s


man n t ! or o

Th gi ant read
e Seven at o n blow ! and thi nking it meant men
: e

that the tail or had killed felt at once more respect for the littl e ,

fe ll ow But as he wanted to prove hi m he took up a stone and


. ,

squeezed it so hard that water came out f it Now y u can do o .



o

that said the gi ant— that i if you have the strength for it

,

s, .

That s not much sai d the litt l e tai lor I call that play and he
“ ’ ” “ ”
, , ,
6 G imm C o mp l te F iry T l s r

s e a a e

put hi hand in hi pocket and took ut the cheese and squeezed it


s s o ,

so that the whey ran out of it We ll sai d b what do you think .



,

e,

f that ?

o

Th gi ant di d not know what to say t o it for he could not hav e


e ,

believed it f the little man Then the gi ant took up a stone and
o .

th ew it so high that it was nearly ut f s ight Now li tt le fellow


r o o .

, ,

suppose you do that ! ”

Well th ow n s i d th t ilor ; but the stone fe ll back to eart h



r ,

a e a

again—I wi ll throw y u ne that wi ll never come back So he felt o o .


in hi pocket took u t the bird and threw i t into the ir A n d the


s ,
o , a .

bird when it found itself at liberty took wing flew ff and


, , , o ,
re

tu ned no more What do you thi nk f that comrade ? asked the


r .

o ,

tail or .

There i no doubt that yo u can th ow sai d the gi ant ; but we


“ ” “
s r ,

wi ll see if y u can car y o r .

He l ed the li t tle tailor to a mi ghty k tree whi ch had been oa

felled and w lyi ng on the ground and said Now if you are
,
as , ,

,

strong enough he lp me to carry thi s tree ut o f the wood


,
o .

Wi l ling l y answered the li ttle man ; you take the trunk n



,
” “
o

your shoulders I wi ll take the branches wi th all their foli age that is
, ,

much the most di fli ul t c .


So the gi ant took the t unk n hi shoulders and the t ilor seated r o s , a

hi mself o n a branch and the gi ant who could not see what he was
, ,

doing had the who le tree to carry and the little man on it well
, ,
as .

And the little man w very cheerful and merry and whi stled the as ,

tune Th e we e t h e t ilo iding by as if carryi ng the tree


:

er r r e a rs r

,

w asmere child s play Th gi ant when he had struggled n under


. e ,
o

hi heavy load a part f the way w as ti red ut and cri ed Look



s o , o , ,

here I must let go the tree !


,

Th tai lor jumped o ff qui ckly and taking ho l d of th tree wi th


e ,
e

both arm s as if he were carrying it said to the gi ant You see y u


, , ,

o

can t carry the tree though you are such a big fe ll ow !


They went on together a li t tle farther and present ly they came to ,

a cherry tree and the gi ant took hold o f the topmost branches
, ,

where the ripest f uit hung and pulling them downwards gave r , ,

them to the tailor to ho l d b iddin g hi m eat But the li ttle tai l or was ,
.

much too weak to ho l d the tree and as the gi ant let go the tree , ,

sprang back nd the tailor was caught up into the i And when
, a a r .

he d opped down again wi thout any damage the gi ant sai d t hi m


r ,
o ,

How i this ? Hav en t you strength enough to ho l d such a weak
s

spri g as that? ”

It i not strength that i lacking answered the little tailor;



s s ,
8 G imm Co mp lete F i y T les r

s a r a

So he w received into it very honorably and a sep arate dwell


as ,

in g t apart for him


se .

But the rest o f the soldi ers were very much t against the lit tle se

tai lor and they wished him a thousand miles away What shall be
,
.

done about it ? they said among themselves ; if we pick a quarrel


” “

and fi ght wi th hi m then seven of us will fall at each b l ow That wi ll .

b e f no good to u
o s .

So they came t o a e lunon and went all together t o the Ki ng r so


'

to k for their dis charge W never intended sai d they to serve


as .

e ,

,

wi th a man who ki lls seven at a b low .


Th King felt so ry t o lose ll hi fait hful servants becau e o f o ne


e r a s s

man and he wi shed that he had never seen him and would will
, ,

i ngly get i d o f him if he mi ght But he di d not d re to di smiss the


r . a

li t tle tailor f fear he should kill ll the Ki ng s people and place


or a

hi mself upon the throne He thought a long whi le about i t and at .


,

last made up hi s mi nd what to do He sent for the li ttle tail or and .


,

told him that as he w as so great a warri or he had a proposal t o


make to hi m He told him that in a wood in hi domini ons dwelt two
. s

gi ants who di d great damage b y robbery mu der and fi and


, ,
r ,
r e,

that no man durst go near them for fear o f hi life But that if the s .

tai lor should over ome and slay both th ese giants the King woul d
c

gi ve hi m hi only daughter in marri age and half hi ki ngdom


s ,
s as

dowry and that a hundred horsemen should go with him to give


,

him ass istance .

Th at woul d be somethi ng for a man li ke me ! thought the li ttle


“ ”

tailor a beautiful Princess and half a ki ngdom are not to be had


,

eve y day and he s ai d to the Ki ng Oh yes I c n soon overcome


r ,

,

,
a

the gi ants and yet have no need of the hundred horsemen ; he w ho


,

can kill seven at o ne b low h no need to be afrai d f t wo as o .


So the li ttle tailor t out and the hundred horsemen followed se ,

hi m When he came to the border o f the wood he sai d to hi escort


. s ,

Stay here whi le I go to attack the gi ants .

Then he sprang into the wood n d looked about hi m ri ght and ,


a

left After a while he caught sight o f the t w o gi ants ; they were


.

lyi ng down un der a tree asleep and snoring that all the b ranches ,
so

shook Th li ttle tai lor ll ali ve filled both hi pockets with stones
. e , a ,
s

and climbed up into the tree and made hi way to an overhanging , s

bough that he could seat hi mself just above the sleepers ; nd


,
so a

from there he let n stone after another fa ll on the chest f n f


o e o o e o

the gi ants Fo a long time the gi nt was quite unaware f thi s but
. r a o ,

at l ast he waked up and pu hed hi s comrade and s id What are s ,


a ,

you hit ting me for? ”


G lla nt Tailo 9 The a r


Y u are dreami ng
o said the o ther I am no t touching y u ”
, ,

o .

And they composed themselves again t o sleep and the tai lor let fall ,

a stone n the other giant


o .


What can that he? cried he what are yo u casting at me ? I ”
,
“ “

am casti ng no thi n g a t yo u answered the first grumbling ”


.
, ,

The y di sputed ab out it for a whi le but as the y were ti ed they , r ,

gave it up at las t and their eyes closed once more Then the li tt le
, .

tai lor began hi s game anew picked o ut a heavier stone and threw it ,

down wi th force upon the first gi ant s chest ’

Thi s is t o much ! cri ed he and sprang up like a ma dm an and


“ ”
o ,

struck his co mpanion such a b low that the tree shook above them .

The other p ai d hi m b ack wi th ready coin and th ey fought wi th ,

such fury that they tore up trees b y their roots t o use for weapons
against each other o that at last the y b oth o f them lay dead upon
,
s

the ground And no w the lit tle tailor go t dow n


. .


Another piece of luck ! said he that the tree I was sitti ng in ”
,

di d no t get torn up t o o o else I shoul d have had t o jump li ke a ,


r

squi rel from o ne tree t o another


r .

Then he drew hi sword and gave each o f the gi ants a few hacks
s

in the b reast and went back t o the horsemen and sai d Th e deed

, ,

i done I have made an end o f b o th o f them but it went hard wi th


s , ,

me ; in the struggle they rooted up trees to defend thems elves but ,

it was o f no u e they had t o do wi th a man w ho can ki ll seven at


s ,

one blow

.

Then are y ou no t wounded ? asked the horsemen Nothing o f


“ ” “
.

the so t! ans wered the tailor I have n t turned a h ir


r

,

o a .

The horsemen sti ll woul d not beli eve it and rode i nto the wood ,

t o see and th ere they found the giants wallowing in the ir blood
, ,

and all about them lying the uprooted trees .

Th e li ttle tai lor then claimed the promised b oon but the Kin g ,

repented him o f his offer and he sought again how t o rid himself of ,

the hero Before yo u can possess my daughter and the half o f m y


.

kingdom sai d he t o the tail or you must perform another heroic


,

,

act In the wood lives a uni corn who does great damage ; you mu t
. s

secure him .


A uni corn does not st i ke more terror into me than two gi nts r a .

Seven at ne b low ! —that i my way was the tail or s an swer


o s ,
” ’
.

So taking a rope and an axe wi th hi m he went o ut into the


, ,

wood and told those who were ordered to attend him to wait ut
,
o

s id He had not far t o s eek the uni corn soon came o ut and sprang
e .
,

at him as if he woul d make an end of him without de l ay Soft ly .



,

softly sai d he most haste worst speed and remai ned stan di ng
,

,

,
ro G imm s Co mp lete F i y T le
r

a r a s

until the animal c me qui te near then he s lipped quietly behi nd a


a ,

t ree Th uni corn ran wi th all hi mi ght agai nst the t ree and stuck
. e s

hi horn so deep into the t unk that he could not get it o ut ag in


s r a ,

and so was taken .

N w I hav e you sai d the tai lor comi ng o ut from behi nd the
“ ”
o , ,

tree and p utfi ng the rope round the uni m neck he took the
, , co

s ,

axe set free the horn and when all hi party were assembled he led
, , s

forth the animal and brought it to the King .

Th Ki ng did not yet wi sh to give hi m the prom ised reward and


e ,

s t him a thi rd task to do Before the weddi ng co ul d take place the


e .

tai l or was to secure a wi ld boar whi ch had done a great deal f o

damage in the wood Th huntsmen were t accompany him . e o .

All ri ght sai d the tail or thi s i chi ld s play


“ ”
, ,

s

.

But he di d not take the huntsmen into the wood and they were ,

a ll the b e t ter p leased fo the wi ld boar had many a ti me before


,
r re

i d them in such a way that they had no fancy to di stu b hi m


ce v e r .

Wh en the boar caught s ight o f the tailor he n at hi m wi th foam ra

in g mouth and gleami ng tusks to he hi m to the ground b ut the ar ,

ni mble hero rushed into a chapel whi ch chanced to be ne r and a ,

jumped quickly out of a window o n the other s ide The boar ran .

after him and when he got insi de the do r shut after him and
,
o ,

there he was impri soned fo the creature was too big and un ,
r

wieldy to jump o ut of the w indow too Then the little tailor c lled . a

the huntsmen that they might the prisoner with their o wn eyes ; s ee

and then he betook him elf t o the King who now whether he li ked s , ,

it or n t w obli ged to fulfil hi promi se and give him hi d ugh


o ,
as s ,
s a

ter and the half of hi kingdom But if he had k nown that the great
s .

warrior was onl y a li ttle tailor he would have taken it s t ill more to
heart So the weddi ng w celebrated wi th great sp l endor and li t tl
. as e

joy and the tailor w as made into a King


,
.

One night the young Queen heard her hu band talk i ng in hi s s

sleep and sayi ng Now b y make me that waistcoat and patch me


,

o ,

those breeches or I wi ll lay m y yard measure about your shoul


,

ders ! ”

And o as she perceived of what low birth her husband w she


s ,
as ,

went to her father the next morning and tol d hi m a ll and begg ed ,

him to set her free from a man who was nothing better than a t i a

l or Th Ki ng bade her h comforted sayi ng Toni ght leave your


. e e , ,

bedroom door open my gu ard shall stand outside and when he i


, ,
s

asleep they shall come in and bind hi m and carry him ff to a ship o ,

and he shall be sent to the other side f the world o .


So the wife fe lt con ole d but th Kin g s water bearer who had
s , e

-
,
Gi nt nd t he T ilo The a a a r 11

been listening al l the whi le went to the li ttle tai lor and di sclosed to ,

him t h who l e p lan


e .

I sha ll pu t a t op to ll this sai d b



s a ,
e .

At ni ght he lay down as usual in bed and when hi wife thought , s

that he w asleep she g t up opened the door and lay down


as , o ,

again Th li t l t ailor who only made belie ve he w s leep b g an


. e t e , as a , e

to murmur plainly N w b y m ke me that wai stcoat and patch ,



o ,
o , a

me those breeches I wi ll l ay my yard me sur about your shou l


,
or a e

ders ! I ha e s lain seven at n b l ow ki lled tw o gi ants caught


v o e , ,

corn and taken a wild boar and shall I be afrai d f those who are
, , o

standing out ide my room door? s


And when they heard the tailor y thi s a great fear seized them sa ,

they fled away if they had been wild hares and none f them
as , o

wou l d venture to attack him .

And so the little tai lor remained a Ki ng all hi s lifeti me .

T h e Gi a n t an d t he T a i l o r

A CERTAI N TAI L OR who was great at boasting but poor at doing took ,

it into hi head to go abroad for a whil e and look about the worl d
s ,
.

A s soon as he could mana g i t he left hi workshop n d wand red e ,


s ,
a e

o n hi way o ver hi ll and dale sometimes hi ther someti mes thi t her
s , , , ,

but e ver n and o n Once when he was ut he perce ived in th blue


o . o e

distance a steep hill and behi nd it a tower reaching to the cloud,


s,

which rose up ut o f a wild dark forest Thunder and li ght ni ng


o .
“ ”
,

cried the tail or what i that? and a he was strong ly goaded by


,
s

s

curios ity he went bo l dl y towards it But what made the tai lor Open
,
.

hi eyes and mouth when he came near it w


s to se that the tower ,
as e

had legs and leapt in o n bound ov er the steep hi ll and was n w


,
e ,
o

standing as an all powerful gi ant before hi m -


.

What do y u want here u li ttle fly s l eg ? cri ed the gi ant


“ ’ ”
o , yo ,

with a v oice as if it were thundering n eve y si de Th t il or o r . e a

whimpered I want just t look about nd see if I can earn a bit Of


, o a

bread for myse lf in this forest If that i what y u are after said .
” “
s o ,

the gia nt you may have a p l ace with me If it must be why


,
.
” “

not ? What wages shall I receive ? Y shall hear what wages y u ” “


ou o

shall have E v ery year three hundred and s i ty fi days and when
. x -
ve ,

it i leap year one more i nto the bargain Does that sui t you ? All ” “
-
s ,
.
12 G imm Co mp let e F i y T les r

s a r a

right repli ed the tailor an d thought in hi o w n min d a man



, , ,
s ,

mu t cut his coat according to hi cloth ; I will try to get away as


s s

fast as I can .

On this the gi ant s ai d to him GO little g muflin and fetch me ,



, ra a ,

a jug of water Had I no t better bring the well itself at once and
.
” “
,

the sprin g t o o ? asked the b oaster and went wi th th pitcher to th



, e e

water What ! the well n d th spring t o growled the giant in hi


.

a e o,

s

heard fo he was rather clowni sh and s t up i d and beg n to be


, r , a

afrai d That knave i n t a fool he has a wi zard in hi body Be on


.

s o ,
s .

your g uard ld Hans thi s is no servi ng man for y u


, o ,
-
o .

When the tailor had brought the water the gi ant bade hi m go ,

into the forest and cut a couple o f b locks of wood and b ri ng them
,

back Why not the whole forest at Once with o ne s troke The
.

,
.

who le forest young and Old with all that is t here both rough and
, , ,

smooth? asked the li ttle tailor and went to cut the wood What !

, .

the whole forest young and old with all that is there both rough
, , ,

and smooth and the well and its sp i ng too growled the credulous
,
r

,

gi ant in hi s beard and w as s till more terrified Th e lmav e can do



.
,

much more than b ak e apples and h s a w izard in hi b ody Be on ,


a s .

y our g uard old Hans thi s is no serving man for you !


, ,
-

When the tai lor had brought the wo od the giant commanded ,

him to shoot t wo o thr ee wild boars for supper Why no t rather a



r .

t housand at o n shot and b i n g them all here ? inquired the o ten



e ,
r s

t t io us tailor
a Wh at ! cri ed the timi d gi ant in great terror Let
.
“ ”
.

well alone toni ght and lie down to rest ,


.

The gi ant w as o terrib ly alarmed that he co ul d not close an eye


s

all ni ght long for thi nkin g what would b e the best way to get rid o f

thi s accursed sorcerer of a servant Time b in gs counsel Next . r .

morni ng the g ant and the tailor went to a marsh roun d whi ch ,

stood a number of willow t rees Then said the giant H ark you .
,

,

tailor seat yourself on on of the willow branches I long f all


, e -
, o

thi ngs to see if you are big enough to bend it down All at once the .

tai lor w as sitti ng on it holding hi breath and maki ng himself so , s ,

heavy that the bough b ent down When however he w as com .


, ,

p ll ed to draw breath it hurried him ! f unfortunately he had no t


e ,
or

put hi goose in hi pocket ! hi gh into the air that he never w


s s so as

s een agai n and thi to the great deli ght f the gi ant If th tailor
,
s o . e

has not fa llen down agai n he mu t still b e hovering about in the ,


s
T h e L i tt l e F a rme r

THER E w as a cert i n vill age where li ved many rich farmers and
a

only one poo r o ne whom they called the Little Farmer He had not
,
.

even a cow and sti ll less had b e money to b uy o ne; and he and hi
, s

wife greatly Wis hed for such a thing One day he sai d to her Li .
,

s

ten I have a good idea ; it is that your godfather the joiner shall
,

make us a calf of wood and paint it brown s as to look j u t li ke ,


o s

any other; and then in time perhaps it will grow big and b ecome a
cow .

Thi s noti on pleased the wife and godfather j oiner s t t o work to ,


e

saw and plane and soon turned out a calf complete wi th it head
, ,
s

down and neck s t retched out as if it were grazing .

Th e next mornin g as the cows were d i ven to pasture the Li ttle


, r ,

F armer call ed out to the d over Lo ok here I have got a li ttle calf r ,

,

to go but it i sti ll y oung and must be car i ed


, s r .

All i ght ! sai d the drover and tucked it under hi s arm ca i ed


“ ”
r , ,
rr

it into the meadows and stood it in the grass So the calf stayed
,
.

where it w put and seemed to be eating all the ti me and the


as , ,

d over thought to himself I t wi ll soon b e able t o run alone if it



r , ,

grazes at that rate ! ”

In the eveni ng when the herds had to b e d i ven home he sai d to


,
r ,

the calf I f you can stand there eatin g lik e that you can j ust walk
,

,

off o n your o w n four legs ; I am not going to lug yo u under my arm


again ! ”

B ut the Little Farmer w as stan di ng by hi s house door an d wai t -


,

in g for hi calf; and when he saw the co w herd coming through the
s -

vil lage without it he asked what it meant The co w herd answered


, .
-
,

I t i s t ill o ut th ere eat ing away and never attended to the cal l

s , ,

and woul d not come with the rest .


Then the Li ttle Fa mer sai d I wi ll tell y ou what I must have



r , ,

my beast brought home .


And they went together through th fie l ds in quest f it but e o ,

some one had stolen it and it w as gone A nd the drover sai d ,


.
,

M ostly likely it has un awa y


“ ”
r .

But the Little Farmer s i d Not it ! n d brought the cow herd a ,


“ ”
a -

before the b ailiff who ordered him f hi careles sness to give the
,
or s

Li ttl e Fa mer a co w for the mi ssing calf


r .
14 G imm C o mp lete F i y Ta les r

s a r

S o no w the Li ttle Farmer and hi wife possessed their long s

wished for o w ; they rejoiced wi th all their hearts but unf tu


-
c , or

n at ly the y had no fodder fo it and could gi ve it nothin g t o eat


e o r , ,
s

that before long they had t o kill it It flesh they salted down and . s ,

the Little Farmer went to the town to sell the ski n and bu y a new
ca lf with what he got fo it On the way he came to a mill where a r .
,

raven w sitti ng wi th broken wings and he took it up o ut f pity


as ,
o

and wrapped it in the skin The weather w as very stormy and it .


,

b lew and rained o he t urned into the mi ll and asked for shelter
,
s .

The m ill er s wife w alone in the house and she said t o the Lit

as ,

tle Farmer We ll co me in and li down in the s traw and he


,

,
e ,

s

gave hi m a piece f bread and cheese So the Little Farmer ate and
o .
,

then lay down with his skin near him and the mi ller s wife thought ,

he was sleeping wi th fati gue After a whi le in came another man .


,

and the mi ller s wife received hi m very well saying M y husb and

, ,

i out ; we wi ll make good cheer


s .

The Little Farmer li stened to what they sai d and when he heard ,

good cheer spoken o f he grew angry to thi nk he had b een p ut ff, o

with bread and cheese Fo the mi ller s wife presently brought out . r

roast meat salad cakes and wi ne


, , , .

Now as the pair were sitting down t o their feast there came a ,

knock at the door Oh dear cri ed the woman it i m y hu b ndl


.
, ,

s s a

In a twinkli ng she popped the roast meat into th oven the wi ne e ,

under the pillow the salad in the bed the cakes under the b ed and
, , ,

the man in the linen closet Then he Opened the door t o her hu -
. s s

b and sayi ng Th ank goodness y u e here ! What weather it i


, ,

,
o ar s,

as if the world were coming to an endl ”

When the mi ller saw the Little F armer lyi ng in the straw he ,

s i d What fellow have you got there ? Ohl sai d the wife the
a ,
“ ” “ ”
,

poor chap came in the midst o f the wind and rain and asked f or

shelter and I gave him some bread and cheese and spread some
,

straw for him .


The husband answered Oh well I have no ob j ecti on only get , , ,

me somethi ng t eat at once But the wife said There i nothing


o .

,

s

but bread and cheese .


Anythi ng wi ll do for me answered the miller b read and



,

,

cheese for ever ! and catchi ng s ight f the Littl e Fa mer he cri ed

o r , ,

Come along and keep me company! Th Little Farmer did no t
,

e

w it to be asked twi ce but sat down and ate


a ,
.

After a whi le the miller noti ced the skin lyi ng o n the ground with
the raven wrapped up in it and he sai d What ha ve yo u go t , ,

there ? Th Li ttle Farmer answered A fo tune teller And the



e ,

r -
.

16 G imm s Co mp le te Fairy Ta les
r

and bui lt himself a good house and the other farmers sai d S urely , ,

th e Lit tle Farmer has b een where it rai ns gold pieces and has ,

brought home money by the bushel .


An d he w as s ummoned b efore the b ailiff t o ay whence hi ri ches s s

came And all he sai d w as I sold m y calf s s ki n for three hundred


.
,
“ ’

dollars .

When the other fa rmers heard thi s the y wished t o share such
good luck and ran home k il led all their cows skinned them in
, , ,

order t o sell them al o for the same hi gh pri ce as the Li ttle Farmer
s .

And the bailiff sai d I must b e b eforehand with them So he sent


,

.

hi s servant into the town t o the ski n b uyer and he onl y gave her -
,

three doll ars for the s kin and that w as faring bett er than th e ,

othe s for when the y came they did not get as much as that for
r , , ,

the skin buyer said What am I t o do w ith all these ski ns ?


-
,
“ ”

No w the other farmers were very ang y wi th the Li ttle F armer r

for misleadi ng them and they vowed vengeance agai nst him and
, ,

went t o complain of hi de ceit t o the bailiff The poor Lit tle Fa mer
s . r

was wi th o ne voice sentenced to death and to be put into a cas k ,

wi th holes in it and rolled into the water So he was led to


,
cu . ex e

tion and a p i est was fetched t o s y a mass fo hi m and the rest o f


,
r a r ,

the people had t o stand at a distance As soon the Little Farmer . as

caught sight of the priest he knew him fo the man w ho w hi d in r as

the li nen closet at the mi ller s And he sai d t o hi m As I let you o ut


-

.
,

o f the cu p b oard y u mus t let me o ut o f the cas k



, o .

At that moment a shepherd passed wi th a flock o f shee p and ,

the Little Farmer knowing him to have a great wi sh to b ecome


bailiff hims elf call ed o ut with all his mi ght No I wi ll no t and if
, ,

, ,

all th world asked me I would not !


e ,

The shepherd hearing him came up and asked what it w as he


, ,

would not do The Li ttle Farmer answered They wan t t o make


.
,

me bai liff if I sit in thi s cas k but I wi ll not do it !


, ,

Th she pherd sai d I f that i s all there i to do in order to b e



e ,
s

come b ailiff I will sit in the cask and welcome A nd the Little .

Farmer an were d Yes that is all just y u get into the cask and y u
s ,

, , o ,
o

wil l become b aili ff So the shepherd ag eed and got in and the
.

r , ,

Li ttle Farmer fastened o n the top ; then he collected the herd of


sheep and drove them away .

Th p i est went b ack t o the pari sh assembly and to l d them the


e r -
,

mass had been said Then they came and began t o roll the cask into
.

th e water and as it went the shepherd ins ide call ed o u t I consent


, ,

t o be b ai liff!

The y th ought that it w as th e Little Farmer w ho spo k e and the y ,


Go lden Key 7 The

answered All right; but first you must go down be l ow and look
,

about yo u a little and they roll ed the cask into the water

, .

Upon that the farmers went home and when they reached the ,

vi llage there they met the Little Farmer d iving a flock of sheep
,
r ,

and l ooking qui te calm and contented Th farmers were astoni shed . e

and cri ed Little Farmer whence come you? How did you get out
, ,

of the water? ”

Oh easily answered he I sank and sank un t il I came to the



,

, ,

bottom ; then I broke through t h cask and came o ut of it and there e ,

were b eautiful meadows and p lenty f sheep feedi ng so I brought o ,

away thi s flock wi th me .


Then s i d the farmers Are there any left ? Oh yes answered “ ” “ ”


a , ,

the Li ttle Farmer more than you can possibly need


,

.

Then the farmers agreed that they woul d go and fetch some
sheep also each man a flock for himse lf ; and the baili ff sai d M
, ,

e

first And they all went together n d in the b lue k y there were li t

.
, a s

tl e fleecy cl ouds li ke lambkin s and they were reflected in the ,

water; and the farmers cried out There are the sheep down there ,

at the bottom .

When the bailiff heard that he pressed forward and sai d I will

,

go first and look about me and if thi ngs look well I wi ll call to , ,

you An d he j umped plum p into th e water and they ll thought



.
, a

that the noise he made meant C ome the whole compan y “ ”


,
so

jumped in n after the other o e .

So perished all the proprietors o f the vi llage and the Little ,

Fa mer as sole hei became a ri ch man


r ,
r, .

T h e G o l de n K e y

IN wi nter time when deep snow lay n the ground a poor b y


THE ,
o ,
o

was forced to go ut n a sledge to fetch wood When he had


o o .

gathered it together and packed it he wi shed as he was so frozen


, , ,

with co l d not to go home at once but to light a fi and warm him


, ,
re

self li tt l e So he scraped away the snow and as he was thus clear


a .
,

ing the groun d he found a ti ny go l d key Hereupon he thought


, ,
.

that where the key was th l ock must be also and dug in the ,
e ,

ground and found an iron chest If the key does but fi t it ! thought .
“ ”

he ; no doubt there are preci ou things in that li t tle b



He s ox .

18 Grimm s Co mp le te Fai y Ta les ’
r

searched but no keyhole w as there At last he di scovered o ne but


,
.
,

so small that it w as hardly vis ible He t ied it and the key fitted it . r ,

exactly Then he turned it once round and now we must wai t until
.
,

he h qui te unl ocked it and op ened the lid and then we shal l
as ,

learn what wonde ful thi ngs were lying in that box r .

Sh a ri ng Joy an d S o rro w

THER E WAS once a tailor who w as a quarrelsome fellow and his , ,

wife w ho w a good industrious and pi ous never co uld please him


,
s , , , .

Whatever he di d he was not sati sfied but grumb led and scolded
s , , ,

and k nocked her about and b eat her A s the authori ties at last .

heard o f it they had him summoned and put in pri son in order to
,

make him better He w as ke pt fo a whil e o n bread and water and


. r ,

then et free again He w as forced however to promise no t to b eat


s .
, ,

hi wife any more b ut t o live wi th her in p eace and share j oy and


s , ,

sorrow wi th her as married people ought t o do


, .

All went on well fo a t ime but then he fell in to hi s old ways r , ,

and w s urly and quarrelsome An d becaus e he dared no t beat her


as .
,

he woul d sei e her by the hair and tear it o ut The wom an esca ped
z .

from hi m and sp rang out into the y ard b ut he ran after her wi th
, ,

hi yard meas ure and s ci ssors and chas ed h er a b out and threw the
s -
, ,

yard meas u e and scis sors at her and whatever else came in his
-
r ,

way When he hit h er he laughed and when he mi ssed her he


.
, ,

stormed and swore Thi s went on s o long that the nei ghbors cam e
.

t o th e wi fe s ass i stance

The tai lor w as agai n s ummoned b efore the magis trates and e ,
r

mi nded o f hi s p romi se Dear gent lemen s ai d he I have kept m y


“ ” “
.
, ,

word ; I have no t b eaten her but have shared joy and sorrow wi th ,

her How c an that b e sai d the judge when sh continually


.
” “
,

,

e

brings such heavy complaints again t you ? I have not beaten her s
” “
,

but just because he looked so strange I wanted to co mb her hair


s

wi th my hand ; h however go t away from me and left me quite


s e, , ,

spitefull y Then I hurried after her and in order t o b ring her back
.
,

to her dut y I threw at her as a well meant admoni ti on whatever


,
-

came readil y t o hand I have shared j y and sorrow wi th her al so


. o ,

for whenever I hi t her I w as fu ll o f j o y and she o f sorrow; and ,


Tom Thumb 19

ifI missed her then h w as joyful and I so ry Th judges were


,
s e ,
r .

e

not satisfied wi th thi s answer b ut gave him th reward he deserved ,


e .

T h e N ai l

A MER CHANT had done goo d bus iness at the fair; he had sold hi s
w res and li ned hi money bags wi th gold and s ilver Then he
a ,
s -
.

wanted t o tr avel homewards and b e in hi own house b efore ni ght , s

fall So he packed hi s t unk wi th the mone y on his horse and rode


. r ,

awa y .

At noon he rested in a town and when he wanted to go farther ,

the stab le b oy b rought out his horse and said A nai l is wanting
-
,

,

si
r, in the shoe o f it left hind foot Let it b e wanting ans wered
s .
” “ ”
,

the merchant; th e shoe wi ll certain ly stay o n for i mi les I have



s x

s till to go I am in a hu ry . r .

In the afternoon when he once more ali ghted and had hi horse
,
s

fed the stable boy went into the room to him and sai d Sir a shoe
,
-
,

,

i mi ss ing from your horse s left hi nd foo t Shall I take hi m to the



s .

b lacksmith? Let it s till b e wanting answered the man ; the


” “ ”
,

horse can very well hold o ut for the couple of mil es whi ch remain .

I am in haste .

He rode fo th b ut b efore long th e horse began to limp It had


r , .

not limped long before it began to stumb le n d it had no t stumbled ,


a

long b efore it fell dow n and broke it leg Th merchant w forced s . e as

to leave the horse where it was and unbuckle the t unk take it on ,
r ,

hi back and go home o n foot And there he did not arrive unti l
s , .

quite late at ni ght An d that unluck y nail sai d he to himself has


.

,

,

cau ed all thi s di saster


s .

M ke haste slowly
a .

To m T h um b

THE R WA S once a poor count yman who used to it i the chimney


E r s n

com er all eveni ng and poke the fire while hi wi fe t at her spin ,
s sa

ni ng wheel -
.
20 Co mp lete Fai y T les G ri mm s

r a

And he used to y How dull it i without any children ab outsa ,



s

u house i so qui et and other people s houses so noisy and ’

us ; o r s ,

merry ! ”


Y answered hi wife and si ghed if we co uld onl y have
es ,

s , ,

on and that o n ever o li ttle no bigger than m y thumb how


e, e s , ,

happy I shoul d be ! It would indeed be having o ur he art s desire , ,


.

No w it happened that after a whi le the woman had a chi ld w ho


,

was perfe ct in all hi limbs but no bigger than a thumb Then the s ,
.

parents sai d He is just what we wished fo and we love him very


,

r,

much and they named him accordi ng to his stature Tom


,

,

Thumb And though the y gave him plent y o f nou ishm ent he
.

r ,

grew no bigger b ut rem i ned exactly the same size as when he was
,
a

first bo n ; and he had very good facul ties and w a very qui ck and
r , s

prudent that all he di d prospered


,
so .

One day hi father made ready t o go into the forest t o cut wood
s ,

and he sai d a if to himself No w I wish there was some o ne t o


,
s ,

,

bring the cart t o me O father cried Tom Thumb if I can .


” “
,

,

bri ng the cart let me alone for that and in proper ti me t o o !


, , ,

Then the father laughed and sai d H w will yo u manage that ?



, ,
o

Yo u are much t o li ttle to hold the re ins That h nothi ng to do ” “


o . as

wi th it father; whi le my mother goes o n with her spinni ng I will it


, s

in the horse s ear and tell hi m where t o go


Well answered the .


” “
,

father we wi ll try it for once


,

.

When it w a time t o t o ff the mo ther went o n spinni ng after


s se , ,

se tting Tom Thum b in th e horse s ea ; and s o he drove off crying ’

r , ,

Gee up gee w o l
-
,
-

So the horse went o n qui te as if hi master were d ivin g hi m and s r ,

d ew th wagon along the ri ght road t o the wood


r e .

Now it happened jus t as they turned a com er and the li ttle ,

fellow was calli ng out Gee up ! that t wo strange men passed by “


-

.

Look sai d o n of them ho w i thi s ? There goes a wagon and



,

e ,

s ,

th d iver is ca lli ng t o th e horse and y et he i nowhere to b e seen



e r ,
s .


It is very str ange sai d the other; we will follow the wagon and
,
” “
,

see where it b elongs .


And the wagon went ight through the forest up to the p l ace r ,

where the wo od had been hewed When To m Thumb caught sight .

o f hi father he cri ed o ut Look father here am I with the wagon ; “


s , , , ,

now take me down


, .

Th father held the horse wi th hi s left hand and wi th the ri ght


e ,

he li fted down hi s lit tle on o ut o f th horse s ear and T m Thumb s e


, o

sat down o n a stump quite happ y n d content When the two ,


a .

strangers aw hi m they were struck dumb with wonder At last one


s .
Tom Thumb 21

of them taking the other aside sai d to him L ook here the li t tle
, , ,

,

chap woul d make u fortun e if we were to show him in the town


o r

fo money Suppose we buy him



r . .

So they went up to the woodcutter and sai d Sell the li ttle man , ,

t o u ; we will take c re he shall come to no harm No ans wered ” “ ”


s a .
,

the father; he i the apple f my eye and not for all the money in

s o ,

the world would I sell him .


But Tom Thumb when he heard what was going o n cli mbed up
, ,

b y hi father s coat tai ls and p rchi ng hi mself on hi shoul der he


s

, , e s ,

whispered in hi ear Father you might as well let me go I wil l


s ,

, .

soon come back again .


Then the father gave hi m up to the tw o men for a large p i ece f o

money The y asked hi m where he would like to it Oh put me o n


. s .
,

the brim o f your hat said he There I can walk about and view ,

.

the country and be in no danger of falli ng o ff


,
.

So they di d as he wi shed and when To m Th um b had taken leave ,

o f hi s father they set ff all together And the y traveled o n unti l it


,
o .

grew dus k and the lit tle fellow asked to be set down a li ttle while
,

for a change and after some difficul t y they con ented So the man
,
s .

took him down from his hat and set him in a field b y the roads ide , ,

a nd he ran away di rectl y nd after creep ing about among the fur , a ,

rows he slipped suddenly into a mous e hole just what he was look
,
-
,

ing fo r .

Go od eveni ng my masters you can go home wi thout me ! c i ed



, ,

r

he t o them laughin g The y ran up and felt about with thei sticks
,
. r

in the mouse hole b ut in vain To m Th umb crept farther and far


-
,
.

ther in and as it was growi ng dark they had to make the b est of
, ,

their way home full o f vexati on and with empty purses


, ,
.

When To m Thumb found the y were gone he crept o ut o f hi ,


s

hi ding place underground It i dangerous work groping ab out


-
.

s

these holes in the darkness sai d he ; I mi ght easily break my ,


neck .

But by good fortune he came upon an empt y snail shell That s .


“ ’

ll ri ght sai d he Now I can get safely through the ni ght ; and he
” “ ”
a ,
.

sett led himself down in it .

Before he ha d time to get to sleep he heard two men pass by , ,

and n w sayi ng to the other How can we manage t get ho l d


o e as ,
o

f the ri ch parson s go l d n d si lver ? I can tell you h w cried


’ “ ”
o a o ,

T m Thumb How i this ? sai d n f th thi eves quite fright


“ ”
o . s o e o e ,

ened I hear some o ne Speak !


,
“ ”

So they stood sti ll and li stened and T m Thumb spoke again ,


o

Take me wi th y u ; I wi ll show you h w to do i t ! o Where o

are
22 G imm Co mp lete Fai y Ta les r

s r

y u
o then,? asked they ”
Look about n the ground and noti.ce o

where the voice comes from answered he ,



.

At last they found hi m and lifted him up You li t tle elf sai d , .
“ ”
,

the y ho w can you help u ? Lo ok here answered he I can


,

s
” “
, ,

easily creep be t w een the iron bars o f the parson s room and h nd ’
a

u t to you whatever y ou would li ke t o have Very well s ai d ” “ ”


o .
,

they we wi ll try what yo u can do


,

.

So when they came to the parsonage house Tom Th umb crept -


,

into the room but cri ed o ut with all hi might Will you have all

,
s ,

that is here ? S o the thi eves were terri fied and s ai d Do speak

, ,

more softly lest any o ne should be awaked


,
.

But Tom Th umb made as if he di d not hear them and cried out ,

agai n What would you lik e ? Will yo u have all that is here ? o
,
“ ”
s

that the cook w ho w sleeping in a room hard by heard it and


, as , ,

raised herself in b ed and lis tened The thi eves however in their .
, ,

fear of being dis covered had un b ack part f the way but they , r o ,

took courage again thin ki ng that it was only a jest of the lit tle
,

fellow s S o th ey came back and whi s pered t o him to b e serious


.
,

and to hand them out somet hing .

Then T m Th umb called o ut once more as loud as he co ul d Oh


o ,

y I wi ll give it all t o you only put o ut your hand


es , , s .

Then th li steni ng mai d heard him di stin ct ly that time and


e ,

jumped o ut f bed and burst open the door Th thi eves ran ff as
o ,
. e o

if the wi ld huntsman were b ehind them ; but the ma i d as she could ,

s e nothing went to fetch a light And when sh c me b ack with


e ,
. e a

on T m Thum b had taken hi ms elf o ff wi thout b ei ng seen by her


e, o , ,

into the b arn ; and the mai d when he had looked in every hole and ,
s

corner and found nothing went b ack t o b ed at last and thought , ,

that she must have been dreaming wi th her eyes and ears open .

So T m Thum b crept am ong the hay and found a comfo tab le


o , r

nook to sleep in where he intended t o remain unti l it was day and


, ,

then to go home t o hi father and mother But other things were t o


s .

befal l hi m ; indeed there i nothi ng but t rouble and wo ry in thi s


, s r

world !
Th mai d g t up at dawn o f day to feed the cows Th first place
e o . e

she went to was the ba n where she took up an nful f hay and r ,
a rr o ,

it hap pened to be the very heap in whi ch To m Thumb lay a leep s .

And he was f t asleep that he w aware of nothi ng and never


so as , as ,

waked unti l he was in the mouth o f the o w who had taken him up c ,

wi th the hay .

Oh dear cried he how i it that I have got into a mi ll ! but



,

,

s

he soon found o ut where he was and he had to be very ca eful n t ,


r o
24 G imm s Comp let e Fai y Ta les r

r

A t last the father and mother were awakened and the y ran t o the ,

ro om door and peeped through the chi nk and when the y aw a


-
,
s

wolf in occup ati on the y ran and fetched weapons —the man an axe
, ,

and the wife a scythe Stay b ehind s ai d th e man as the y entered


.

,

,

the room ; when I have given him a b low and it does not seem t o

,

have kill ed him then you must cut at him wi th your s cythe
, .

Then Tom Thumb he ard hi s father s voi ce and cri ed D ear fa


’ “
, ,

ther I am here in th e wolf s ins ide


,

.

Then the father cal led o ut ful l o f j o y Thank heaven that we



,

have foun d our dear chil d ! and told hi s wife to keep the scyt he out ”

o f the wa y lest To m Thumb sho uld b e hurt wi th it Th en he drew


,
.

near and struck the wolf s uch a b low o n th e head that he fell
down dead ; an d then he fetched a knife and a p air of scissors slit ,

u p the wolf s b ody and let o ut the little fellow


,
.

Oh what anxiet y we have felt ab out you! sai d the father Ye



,

.

s,

father I h ave seen a go od deal of the world and I am ve y glad to


, ,
r

breathe fresh air again .


And where h ave you b een all this tim e ? asked his father Oh
“ ”
.

,

I have b een in a mouse hole and a snai l s shell in a cow s stomach -


,

and a wolf s in ide ; now I think I wi ll stay at home


s .

A n d we wil l no t p art wi th you fo r all the kingdoms o f the world


“ ”
,

c i ed the parents a the y k issed and hugged their dear li t tle To m


r ,
s

Th umb A nd the y gave him some thi ng t o eat and dri nk and a new
.
,

sui t of clothes as hi s o ld ones were soiled wi th travel


, .

To m T h um b T rav e l s

s

THE RE WAS once a tailor w ho had a on no hi gher than a thum b o s ,


s

he was called Tom Th umb N otwiths tan di ng hi small size he had . s ,

plent y f s pi i t and ne day he s ai d t his father F ather go ut


o r , o o ,

, o

into the world I mu t and wi ll



s .

Very well m y on said the old m n and taki ng a long darning



,
s ,

a ,

needle he put a knob f seali ng wax n the end saying Here i a


,
o -
o , ,

s

sword t take wi th y u n your jou ney


o o o r .

N w the li ttle tailor wanted t o have n more meal first and o


o o e , s

he trotted into the ki tchen t what sort f farewell feast hi o s ee o s

mother had c oo ked fo him It w all ready and the dis h w as r . as ,


To m Thumb s Tra ve ls

25

standing o n the hearth Then sai d he M other what i the fare .


, , s

today? ”

Y o u can see for yourself sai d the mother Th en To m Th um b


“ ”
.
,

ran t o the he arth and peep ed into the dis h b ut as he stretched hi , s

neck t o o far over it the steam caught him and c rried him up the
,
a

chimn ey For a time he floated ab out wi th th e steam in the i but


. a r,

at last he s ank down to the ground Then the little tai lor found him .

self o ut in the wi de world and he wandered about and fin ally en , ,

gaged himself t o a master tai lor but the food w no t good enough , as

fo r him .

M istress b if y u do n t give us b etter i


,
said To m Thum ,

o o v c

t uals I sh all g
, ut early in the morni ng and w ite wi th a p i ece
o o f r o

chalk n the house door Plenty of p otatoes t o eat and but li ttle
o -
,

meat ; goo d b ye M Potato


so -
,
r . .

What are you after gras s hopper? sai d the mi stress and grow

,

,

ing angry she sei zed a piece f rag to beat him o ff; but he crept u m o

d n th her thi m b le and then peeped at her and p ut his tongu e


er ea , ,

o ut at her She too k up th e thim b le and would have seized hi m


.
, ,

b ut he ho pped among the rags and as the mi stress turned them ,

over t find him he step ped into a crack in th e tab le H heel


o ,
.

e-

M is tress ! cri ed he sti ckin g u t hi s head and when she w just g



, o ,
as o

ing t gras p him he j ump ed into the table drawer But in the end
o ,
-
.

sh caught him and drove him o ut f the hou e


e ,
o s .

S o he wandered o n un ti l he came t a great wood ; and there he o

met a gang of robb ers that were going t ob the King s treasu y o r

r .

When the y saw the little tailor the y thought t themselves Such a , o ,

little fellow might eas ily creep through a key hole and serve instead -
,

f a p ick lock Holloa ! cried one y u gi nt Goli ath will y u


” “ ” “
o -
.
,
o a ,
o

come wi th u to the treasure chamb er? You can sli p in and then
s -
,

throw us ut the money o .


T m Thum b cons i dered a little b ut at last he consented and


o ,

went with them t th treas ure cha mb er Th en he looked all over


o e -
.

the door ab ove and b elow but there w as no crack to be seen ; at ,

last he found n broad enough to let him pass and he was get
o e ,

ting through when ne f the sentinels that stood before the door
,
o o

saw hi m and s ai d t the other See what an ugly spider i crawl


, o ,

s

in g there ! I wi ll put an end to hi m Let th e poor creature alone .


” “
,

sai d t h other t h done y u no harm


e ,
r as o .

So T m Thumb got safely through the crack into the treasure


o

chamb er and he opened th wi ndow beneath whi ch th thi eves


, e e
26 G imm Co mp lete F i y T les r

s a r a

were standing and he threw them ut n dollar after another Just


,
o o e .

as he had well settled to the work he heard the Ki ng comi ng to ,

take a look at hi treasu e and o To m Thumb had to creep away


s r ,
s .

Th King presently rema ked that many good dollars were want
e r

in g but could not imagi ne ho w they could have been stolen as the
, ,

locks n d bolts were in good order and everyt hi ng seemed secure


a , .

And he went away saying to the two sentinels Keep good g uard ;
, ,

there i some o n after the money


s e .

When To m Th umb had s t to work anew they heard the chink e , ,

chi nk f the money and has ti ly rushed in to catch the thi ef But the
o ,
.

li ttle tai lor he heard them comi ng was t o quick for them and
,
as ,
o , ,

hi di ng in a co ner he covered himself up with a dollar


r ,
that ,
so

nothi ng of him was to be seen and then he mocked the sentinels , ,

c yi ng Here I am ! They ran about and when they came near him
r ,
“ ”
, ,

he w s soon in another corner under a dollar cryi ng Here I am !


a , ,
“ ”

Then t h senti nels ran towards him and in a moment he was in a


e ,

thi rd corner cryi ng Here I am ! In thi s way he made fools of


“ ”
, ,

them and dodged them so long about the treasure chamber that
,
-
,

they got tired and went away Then he t to work and threw the . se ,

d o l lars ut o f the window one fter the other ti l l the y were all
o ,
a ,

gone ; and when it came to the last as he flung it wi th all hi mi ght ,


s ,

he jumped ni mbly o n it and flew wi th it o ut of the window , .

The rob b ers gave hi m great praise sayi ng Y o u are a most val

, ,

i n t hero ; wi ll yo u be u capt i n ?

a o r a

But Tom Thumb thanked them and s i d he woul d like to see the , a

world first Then they divi ded the spoil ; but the li ttle tailor s sha e
.

r

w as only one far thi ng whi ch was all he w as able to carry , .

Then bi ndi ng hi sword to hi s ide b bi d the robbers good day


s s ,
e ,

and started n hi way He app lied to several ma ter tail ors but
o s . s ,

they would not have an ythi ng to do with him; and at last he hi red
himself as indoor servant at an inn Th mai d ser ants took a great . e -
v

di s like to hi m fo he used to see everyt hi ng they di d without bein g


,
r

seen by them and he told the master and mistress about what the y
,

took from the plates and what they carried away ut of the cell ar
,
o .

And they s i d Wai t a little we wi ll pay y u ut and took coun


a ,

,
o o

,

se l together to play hi m some m ischi e v ous tri ck .

Once when o n f the maids was mowing the grass in the garden
e o

she w Tom Thumb jump ing about and creeping among the cab
sa

bages and h mowed him wi th the gr s ti ed all together in a


, s e; as ,

bun dle and threw it to the cows Among the cows w a big black
,
. as

one who swallowed him down wi thout doing him any harm But
, ,
.
To m Thumb s Tra ve ls

he di d not li ke hi lod ging it was o dark and there w a no candle


s , s , s

to be had When the cow w as b eing mi lked he cried o ut


.
, ,

S t ip s trap st ull “
r , ,
r ,

Will t he pa il o on be full? s

But he w as not understood because o f the noise O f the milk .

Presently the lan dl ord came into the stable and sai d Tomorrow ,

this cow i t o be slaughtered


s .

At that Tom Thumb felt very terrified ; and with hi s shrillest


voice he cried Let me out first; I am sit ting ins ide here !
,
“ ”

The master heard hi m qui te plainl y but could not tell Where the ,

voi ce came from Where are you ? ked he I nside the black
.
“ ”
as .

on

e, answered To m Thumb b ut th e master no t understanding the , ,

meaning of it all went away , .

Th next morni ng the o w was slaughtered Hap pily in all the


e c .
,

cut ting and slashi ng he escaped all harm and he slip ped among the ,

sausage meat When the butcher came near t s et to work he c i ed


- . o , r

with all his mi ght Don t ut o deep don t out so deep I am um


,
“ ’
o s ,

d m th l But for the sound o f the b utcher s knife hi voi ce was


” ’

e ea s

not heard .

No w p oor To m Thum b was in great strai ts and he had to j ump


, ,

ni mbly ut Of the way o f the knife and finally he came through


o ,

Wi th a whole skin But he could not ge t qui te awa y and he had to


.
,

let himself remain with the lumps o f fat t o b e put in a b lack pud
di ng His qu arters were rather narrow and he had to be hun g up in
.
,

the chimney in the smoke and t o remai n th ere a very long while ,
.

At last when winter came he w as taken down for the black pud
, , ,

ding w to b e t b efore a guest And when th e landl ady cut the


as se .

black puddi ng in sli ces he had to great care not t o li ft up hi head


,
s

t o o much o it mi ght b e shaved Off at the neck A t last he saw hi


,
r . s

Opportuni ty took courage and jum ped out


, ,
.

But as things had gone o badl y wi th him in that house To m s ,

Thum b di d n o t mean t o stay there b ut b etoo k hi mself agai n to his ,

wanderings Hi freedom however di d not last long In the Open


. s , ,
.

fields there came a fox who snap p ed him up wi thout think ing .


Oh M Fox cried To m Thumb here I am sti ck n in you
,
r .
,
” “
r

throat ; let me out again Ve y well answered the fox It i true .


” “
r ,
.

s

yo u are no b etter th n noth i ng ; promi se me the hens i nayour f a

t he

rsyard then I will let you go With all my he rt answered
,
.
” “
a

,

To m Thumb you shall have the m a ll I promi se you


“ ”
.
, ,

Th en the fox let hi m go and he ran home When the father w ,


. sa
28 G imm s Co mp lete Fai y T les
r

r a

hi s dear li t tle s on agai n he gave th e fox willi ngly ll the hens that
, a

he had .

An d look b es i des what a fine piece o f mone y I ve go t for y ou !


“ ’ ”
, ,

s ai d Tom Th um b and handed over the farthing whi ch he had


,

earned in his wanderings .

But how you ask coul d the y let the fo devour all the poor
, , x

chi cks ? Why you s illy chi ld you know t hat your father woul d rather
, ,

have yo u than the hens in his y ard !

T h e Y o u ng G i a n t

A L ONG TIME ago a countryman had a on who w as as big as a s

thum b and did no t become any bigger and during sever l years
, , a

di d no t grow o ne hair s b readth O nce when the fat her w as goin g



.

o u t t o plou gh the li ttle o ne sai d


, F ather I will go out with thee ,

,
.

Thou wouldst go out wi th me ? sai d the father S tay here thou


“ ” “
.
,

wi lt b e Of no use o ut there b esides thou mi ghts t get lost ! Then ,


Th umbli ng b egan t o cry and fo the sake o f peace his father put ,
r

hi m in hi s pocket and took him with hi m , .

When he w as outs ide in the field he too k him out again and set , ,

hi m in a freshl y cut fu row -


r .

Whil e he w as there a great gi ant came over the hi ll D ost thou


,
.

se e th at great mon ter? sai d the father for he wanted to f i ghten


s

,
r

th e li ttle fell ow t o make him good He is coming t o fetch thee “ ”


. .

Th e giant however had scarcely taken t wo step s wi th hi s long le gs


, ,

b efore he w as in the fu row He took up li ttle Th umbli ng carefully


r .

wi th t wo fingers e xami ned him and without saying one word went
, ,

away with him His father stood by b ut could no t utter a sound for
.
,

terror and he thought nothing else b ut that hi s chi ld w as lost and


, ,

that as long as he lived he should never et eyes on him agai n s .

Th gi ant h owever carri ed hi m home suckl ed him and Thum


e , , , ,

b ling grew and b ecame tall and strong after the manner o f gi ants .

When two years h d passed the O ld gi ant took him into the forest
a , ,

wanted to try him and sai d Pull up a s tick fo thyself Th en the


, ,

r .

b oy was already so strong that he tore up a young tree ut Of the o

e rth by the roots But the gi ant thought W mus t do better than
a .
,

e

that took him back again and suckled him two years longer

, ,
.

When he tri ed him hi s s t reng th had increas ed so much that he


,
Gi nt 29 The You ng a

could tear an o l d tree ut O f the ground That w as sti ll not enough o .

for the giant; he again suckled him for two years and when he then ,

went wi th him into the forest and said Now just tear up a proper ,

,

stick fo me the boy tore up the strongest o k tree from the ea th


r ,

a r ,

so that it split and that was a mere tri fle t o him Now that wi ll
, .

do sai d the gi ant thou t perfect and took him back to the

, ,

ar

,

field from whence he had brought hi m Hi father was there follow . s

in g the p lough Th e y oung gi ant went up to him and sai d Does “


.
, ,

my father s what a fine man hi on h grown into?


ee s s as

The farmer was alarmed and sai d N thou art not my son ; I “
O,

don t want thee—leave me ! Tm I am your s on ; allow me t o do


, ,
’ ” “

your work I can p lough well as y u nay better NO no thou


, as o , .

, ,

art not my so n and thou canst no t plough—go away ! However as


,

,

he was frai d of thi s great man he left hold of the plough stepped
a , ,

back and stood at one side o f the piece o f land Then the y outh .

took the plough and just pressed it with o ne hand but hi grasp , ,
s

w as so s t rong that the plough went deep into the earth Th farmer . e

cou l d not bear t o ee that and called to hi m I f thou art deter s , ,


mined t o plough thou must no t press so hard o n it that makes b ad


, ,

work Th youth however unharnessed th horses and drew the


.

e , ,
e ,

plough hi mself saying Just go home father and bid m y mother, ,



, ,

make ready a large di sh of food and in the meantime I will go over ,

th e field Th en the farmer went home and ordered hi wife t o


.

,
s

prepare the food ; but the youth ploughed the field whi ch was t wo ,

acres large quite l one and then he harnessed hi mself t o the b


, a ,
ar

row and harrowed the whole o f the land using t wo b arrows at


, ,

once When he had done it he went into th e forest and pull ed up


.
, ,

tw o o k trees lai d them across hi shoulders and h un g o ne b arro w


a , s ,

o n the m b ehi nd and o ne b efore and also o n horse b ehind and o ne ,


e

b efore and car i ed all as if it had b een a bundle o f str aw t o hi


,
r ,
s

parents house ’
.

When he entered the yard hi s mother di d not reco gni ze him and , ,

as ked Who i that horrib le tall man ? The farmer sai d Th at is


,

s

,

o ur o n s She said No that cannot be ou o n we never had such


.

,

,
r s ,

a tall o n ours w a li ttle thi ng She called t o him Go away we


e, as .

,

,

do n t want thee ! Th youth was silent but led hi s horses to the


o

e ,

stable gave them oats and hay and all that th e y wanted When he
, ,
.

had done thi s he went into the parlor sat down on the b ench and
, ,

said M other now I should lik e somethi ng t o eat w ill it soon be


,

, ,

ready ? Then she sai d Yes and brought in t wo immense di shes



,
“ ”
,

full o f food whi ch would have been enough to sati fy herself and
,
s

her hu band for a week Th e y outh however ate the whole of it


s .
, ,
30 G imm s Co mp lete Fa i y Ta les r

r

himself and as ked if he had nothi ng more t o set b efore him No


,
s .

,

h repli ed that is all we have But that was onl y a tas te I must
“ ” “
s e .
,

have more .

She di d not dare t o oppose him and went and put a huge cal ,

dr on full O f food n the fi e and when it was ready carri ed it in


o r , , .


At lengt h come a few crumbs s ai d he and ate all there w as but ”
, , ,

it w as s til l no t ufli ci ent t o appease hi hunger Th en s ai d he Fa



s s .
,

t her I see well th at with thee I shall never have fo od enough ; if


,

thou will get me an iron staff whi ch i strong and whi ch I cannot s ,

break agai nst m y knees I will go o ut into the world , .


Th e f mer w as glad put hi t wo horses in hi s cart and fetched


ar ,
s ,

from the smi th a staff o large and thi ck that the t wo horses co ul d s

Only just bring it away Th e y outh lai d it across hi k nees and snap ! . s ,

he broke it in t wo in the mi ddle like a b ans ti k and threw it away e c , .

The fat her then harnessed four horses and b rou ght a b ar whi ch ,

was o long and thi ck that the four horses coul d only just drag it
s , .

The s o n snapped thi s also in twai n agai nst hi s knees threw it awa y , ,

an d sai d Father this can b e o f no u e to me thou must harness


,

,
s ,

more horses and b ring a st onger staff S O the father harnessed



,
r .

ei ght horses and b rought o ne whi ch w so long and thi ck th at th e


,
as ,

ei ght hors es could only just carry it Wh en the on took it in his . s

hand he b roke a bit from the t o p of it also and sai d F ather I see
, , ,

,

that th ou wilt no t b e able t o procure me any such staff as I want I ,

wi ll rem ai n no longer wi th thee



.

S o he went away and gave o ut that he w as a smi th s apprenti ce



.
,

He arrived at a vi llage wherein lived a smith who was a greedy ,

fellow w ho never did a kindn ess to any o ne but wanted eve ythi ng
, ,
r

for himself Th youth went into the smi thy t o him and asked if he
. e ,

needed a j ourneyman Ye sai d the smi th and looked at hi m and .



s,

, ,

th ought Th at is a strong fellow w ho will s t i ke o ut well and earn


,

r ,

hi s b read S o he as ked How much wages dost th ou want I


” “ ” “
.
,

don t want any at ll he re plied onl y every fortni ght when the

a ,

,

,

other joum eymen are p i d I will g v e thee t wo blows and thou a ,


mu t be ar them Th mi ser was he rti ly satisfied and thought he


s .

e a ,

would thus save much mone y .

Next morni ng the s tr ange journeym an was to begi n to work but


, ,

when the master brought the glowi ng bar and the youth struck hi ,
s

first blow the iron flew asunder and the anvi l sank o deep into the
, ,
s

earth that there was no bringi ng it o ut again Then the miser grew
,
.

angry and sai d Oh b ut I can t make any us e f thee thou t i k t


, ,

,

o , s r es

far to o powerfully ; what wi lt thou have fo the n b l ow ? r o e


Then sai d he I will only give thee quite a small b low that s
,

,

32 G imm C o mp lete F i y T les r

s a r a

ca rt took the shaft s in hi o wn hands and d ew it over and he di d


,
s ,
r ,

thi just as eas ily as if it had been laden with feathers When he
s .

was over he said to the others There you s I have got over
, ,

,
ee ,

qui cker than you and drove o n and the others had to stay where

, ,

the y were In the y d however he took a tree in hi hand showed


. ar , ,
s ,

i t to the bai liff and sai d Isn t that a fine bund l e of wood ? Then
“ ’ ”
, ,

sai d the baili ff to hi wife The servant i a good o ne if he does


s ,

s ,

sleep long he i sti ll home before the others


,
s .

S O he served the baili ff a year and when that w as over and the , ,

other servants were getti ng their wages he said it was tim e for hi m ,

to have hi t o The b ailiff however w as afrai d of the blows whi ch


s o .
, ,

he w a t o receive n d earnestly entreated him to excuse hi m from


s ,
a

havin g them ; for rather than that he himself would b e head ser ,
-

vant and the youth should b e bailiff N s i d he I will no t be a


,
. O,

a ,

bailiff I am head servant and will remai n s o b ut I will admini ster


,
-
, ,

that whi ch we agreed o n Th b ai liff was willing to give him what .



e

soever he demanded b ut it was of no use the head servant sai d no


, ,
-

to everything .

Then the bai liff di d not lm o w what to do and b egged for a fort ,

ni ght s delay for he wanted to find some way to escape Th e head


,
.

servant consented to thi s delay The b ailiff summoned all hi clerks . s

together and they were to thi nk th matter over and fi e him d


,
e ,
v a

vi ce The clerks pondered fo a long time but at last the y s ai d that


. r ,

no n was sure of hi s life wi th the head servant for he coul d ki ll a


o e -
,

man as eas ily as a ni dge and that the b ailiff ought t o make him get
r ,

i nto the well and clean it and when he was down below the y , ,

would roll up ne of the mi ll stones whi ch w as lying there and


o -
,

throw it n hi head ; and then he would never retu n to dayli ght


o s r .

Th e advi ce pleased the b ai liff and the head servant was quite ,
-

wi lling to go dow n the well When he w as stan di ng down below at .

the bottom the y rolled down the l gest mi ll stone and thought
,
ar -

they had broken hi skull but he cried Chase away those hens s , ,

from the well they are scratchi ng in the sand up there and throw
, ,

ing the grains into my eyes s o that I can t s S O the bai liff cri ed
’ ”
,
ee .
,

S h h —and pretended t o f i ghten the hens away


“ ”
-
s r .

When the head servant had fini shed hi work he climbed up and
-
s ,

sai d Just look what a beautiful necktie I have o n and beho l d it


,

,

was the mill stone whi ch he w wearing round hi neck Th head


-
as s . e

servant now wanted t take hi reward but the bailiff again begged o s ,

f a fortni ght s delay Th clerk met together and advi sed hi m to



or . e s

send the head servant to the haunted mi ll to g i nd corn by ni ght


-
r ,

for from thence as yet no man had ever returned in the mo ning r
Yo ung Gi nt 33 The a

alive Th proposal p leased the bailiff he called the head servant


. e ,
-

that ve y evenin g and ordered him t take eight bushe ls of corn to


r , o

the mi ll and g i nd it that ni ght f it w as wanted


,
r ,
or .

So the head servant went t o the loft and put t w o bushels in hi


-
, s

ri ght pocket and two in hi left and took four in a wall et half n
, s , , o

hi s back and half on hi s b reast and thus laden went to the haunted
, ,

mill The miller told him that he could g i nd there very well b y
. r

day but n t b y ni ght for the mill was haunted and that up to the
,
o , ,

present time whosoever had gone into it at ni ght had been found in
the morni ng lyi ng dead inside He said I wi ll manage it j us t you
, .
,

,

go away to bed Then he went into the mi ll and poured ut the


.

,
o

co m .

About eleven o clock he went into the miller s room and sat ’ ’

down o n the bench When he had sat there a whi le a door sud .
,

d nly opened and a large table came in and n the table wi ne


e , , o ,

and roasted meats placed themselves and much good food b esides , ,

but eve ything ca me O f itself for no ne was there to carry it After


r ,
o .

thi s the chairs pu hed themselves up but no people came until all
s , ,

at once he beheld fingers whi ch han dl ed knives and forks and laid , ,

food o n the plates b ut with thi exc pti on he w nothing As he , s e sa .

was hungry and w the food he t o o placed himself at the table


,
sa , , , ,

ate wi th those who were eatin g and enjoyed it , .

When he had had enough and the others also had quite emp ti ed ,

their dishes he di sti nctly heard all the candl es being suddenly
,

snuffed o ut and as it was now pitch d rk he felt somethi ng like a


,
a ,

b o o n the ear Then he sai d If anythin g o f that ki nd comes



x .
,

again I sh ll stri ke o ut in return And when he had re ceived a e


,
a .

s c

o n d b ox o n the ear he t o o struck o u t And so it conti nued the , , ,


.

whole ni ght he took nothi ng without returni ng it but repai d every


, ,

thi ng wi th interest and di d not lay ab out him in vain ,


.

At daybreak however everyt hi ng ceased When the mi ller had


, ,
.

g o t up he wanted t,
o loo k after hi m and wondered i f he were ,

sti ll alive Then the youth said I have eaten my fill have received
.
,

,

some b oxes on the ear but I have given some in return The mi ller ,
.

rejoiced and sai d that the mill was now released from the spell
, ,

and wanted to give him much money as a reward But he sai d .


,

M oney I wi ll no t have I have enough f it S o he t o ok hi meal


“ ”
,
o . s
,

on hi back went home and told the b ailiff that he had done what
s , ,

he had bee n told to do and would now have the reward agreed o n ,
.

Wh en the b i liff heard that he was seriou l y alarmed nd quite


a ,
s a

b eside himself ; he walked b ackw ards and forwards in the room ,

and drops o f pers pirati on ran down from his forehead Th en he .


34 G i mm C o mp let e F i y T les r

s a r a

Opened the wi ndow to get some fresh i but before he was aware a r,

the head servant had giv en him such a ki ck that he flew through
-

t he wi ndow o u t i nto the i and so far away that no n ever w a r, o e sa

him agai n Then sai d the head servant to the b ilifl wife If he
’ “
.
-
a s ,

does no t come back thou must take the other blow She c ie d ,
.

r ,

N no I cann ot bea it and Opened the other window because


“ ”
O, ,
r , ,

drops of persp irati on were runni ng down her forehead Th en he .

gave her such a ki ck that she t o flew ut and as he was lighter ,


o ,
o ,
s

h went much hi gher than her hu band Her husband cri ed Do



s e s .
,

come to me but she repli ed Come thou to me I cannot come to



, ,

,

thee .

They hovered about there in the i and could n o t get t o each a r,

other and whether they are sti ll hovering about not I do not
,
or ,

know but the young gi ant took up hi iron b r and went o n hi


,
s a ,
s

way .

S w ee t P o rri d g e

THE R WAS a poor but good little girl who li ved alone with her
E

mother and they no longer had anyt hi ng t eat S the child went
, o . O

into the forest and there an aged woman met her who was aware
,

Of her sorrow and presented her with a li t tle pot which when h
, ,
s e

said C ook little pot cook would cook good sweet porri dge ; and
,

, , , ,

when she sai d Stop lit tle pot it ceased to cook Th girl took the
,

, ,

. e

pot home to her moth er and now the y were freed from their p ,
ov

erty n d hun ger and ate sweet porri dge as Often as they chose
a , .

Once on a ti me when th gi l had gone ut her mother sai d e r o , ,



C ook li ttle p t cook And it di d cook and she ate ti ll she w
, o , .

as

sat isfied and then she wanted the p t to stop cooki ng b ut di d not
, o ,

k now the word S it went on cooki ng and th porri dge rose over
. O e

the edge and s ti ll it cooked n unti l th ld t h n and whole house


,
o e c e

were full and then the next house and then the who l e street just
, , ,

as if it wanted to satisfy the hunger O f the who l e worl d and there


was the greatest di stress but no one k new how to stop t ,
r .

At la t when only one s ingle hou e remained the chil d came


s s ,

home and just said Stop li ttle pot and it stopped and gave up
,

,

,

cook ing and whosoever wished to re tu n t the town had to eat hi


, r o s

way back .
T h e Elv e s

THE R w once a shoemaker who through no fau lt Of hi w n h


E as , ,
s o ,
e

came poor that at last he had nothi ng left but just enough
so

leather to make pai r Of shoes He cut ut the shoes at night so


o ne . o ,

as to set t work upon them next morni ng ; and as he had a good


o

conscience he lai d himse lf qui etly down in hi bed commi tted


,
s ,

himself to heaven and fe ll asleep ,


.

In the morni ng after he had s i d hi prayers and w going t


,
a s , as o

get to work he found the pair f shoes made and fini shed and
, o ,

standi ng n hi tab l e He was very much astoni shed and cou l d not
o s .
,

tell what to thi nk and he took the shoes in hi hand t examine


,
s o

them more closely ; and they were so well made that every sti tch
w asin it ri ght p l ace just as if they had come from the hand of a
s ,

master workman -
.

Soon fter a purchaser entered and the shoes fit ted him very
a , , as

well he gave more than the usual pri ce for them so that the shoe
, ,

maker had enough money to buy leather f two more pairs f or o

shoes He cut them t at ni ght and intended to set to work the


. ou ,

next mo ning with fresh spiri t ; but that was not to be f when he
r , or

g t up they were a lready fini shed and e v en a customer w


o not , as

lacking who gave him much money that he was able to buy
,
so

leather enough f four new pairs Early next morning he found the
or .

four pairs also fini shed n d so it always happened ; whatever he cut


, a

out in the eve ing was worked up by the morning so that he w


n ,
as

soon in the way Of making a good livi ng nd in the end became ,


a

very well to do - -
.

On ni ght e t long before Ch i stmas when the shoemaker had


,
no r ,

fini shed cutti ng t and before he went to bed he said to hi wife


ou , ,
s ,

How would it be if we were to it up tonight and who it i s s ee s

that does us thi s servi ce ? ”

Hi wi fe agreed and
s t a li ght to burn Then they both hi d i
, se a . n

corner Of the room behind some coats that were hanging up and ,

then they b egan to watch A soon as it was mi dni ght they saw . s

come in two n tly formed naked li t tl e men who seated themselves


ea -
,
36 Comp let e F i y T le Grimm s

a r a s

before the shoemaker s tab le and took up th work th at w al ’

, e as

ready prep ared and began to stitch to pierce and to hammer


, , , so

cleverly and qui ckly wi th thei li ttle fingers that the shoemaker s r

eyes co uld scarcely follow them full f wonder w he And the y , so o as .

never left ff until everythi ng was fini shed and w standin g ready
O as

on th table and then the y jumped up and ran off


e ,
.

Th next mornin g the shoemaker s wife sai d to her husband


e

Th ose li t tle m n have made us ri ch and we ought to show u



e , o r

selves grateful With all their run ning ab out and having nothing t
.
, o

cover them the y mu t be very cold I ll tell y ou what; I wi ll make


,
s .

lit tle shi rts coats wai stcoat and b reeches fo them and k nit each
, ,
s, r ,

of them a pair of stock ings and y u shall make each of them a p ai r , o

f shoes

o .

The hu b and con ented wi llingly and at ni ght when everythi ng


s s , ,

w as fini shed the y lai d the gifts together on the table instead f the
, , o

cut out work and placed themselves


-
,
that they coul d ob serve so

how the lit tle men would b ehave When mi dni ght came they .
,

rushed in ready t t t work b ut when they found instead f the


, o se o , , o

pieces Of prep a ed leather the neat li ttle garments put ready for
r ,

them the y stood a moment in surp ri se and then the y showed the
, ,

greatest deli ght With the greatest swiftness the y took up the pret ty
.

garments and sli p pe d them n singing o , ,


Wha t sp ruc e a nd da nd y b oys a re w e!

No long er co bblers w e w ill be .

en the y hopped and danced about jumping over the chairs


Th ,

and tables and at la t the y danced out at the door


,
s .

From that time the y were never seen again ; but it al ways went
well wi th the shoemaker as long as he li ved and whatever he too k ,

in hand p ros p ered .

THER E was once a poor servant m i d who w very cleanly and a ,


as

indus t i ous ; she swept down the hou s e every day and put the
r ,

sweepings on a great heap by the door One morni ng before she .


,

b egan her work h found a letter and h coul d not read she
,
s e ,
as s e ,

lai d her broom in the com er and took the lett er to her mas ter and ,

mi stress to see what it w about; and it w as n invitati on from the


,
as a

elves w ho wis hed the mai d to come and st nd godmother to o ne of


,
a
Elv es The
37
their chil d en The mai d did not k now wha t to do ; and as she w as
r .
'

told t hat no one ought to refuse the elves anythi ng she made up ,

her mind to go .

S O there cam e three lit tle elves w ho conduct ed her into th mid , e

dl e o f a hi gh mountai n where the li ttle peo ple li ved Here every


, .

thing was Of a very small size but more fine and elegant than can ,

b e told Th e mother O f the child lay in a bed made o f eb ony s tud


.
,

ded with p earls ; the counterp ane w as emb roidered wi th gold the ,

cradle w as of ivory and th e b athi ng tub of gold S O the mai d stood


,
-
.

godmother and w as then for goin g home but the elves begged her
, ,

to stay at least three more days wi th them ; and s o she cons ented ,

and s p ent the time in mirth and j ollit y and the elves seemed very ,

fond of her A t las t when she was ready t o go away they filled her
.
, ,

pockets full Of gold and led her b ack again out Of the mountain
,
.

When she got b ack t o th e house she w as going t o b egin working ,

ag i n and took her b room in her hand—it w as s till standi ng in the


a ,

com er where she had left it —and b egan t o sweep Th en came up .

some strangers and asked her who she w as and what she w s ,
a

doing And h found that ins tead o f three days he had been
. s e , s

seven years wi th the elves in the mountain and that during that ,

time her master and mi st ress had di ed .

THE elves once took a chi ld away from it s mother and left in its ,

place a Changeli ng wi th a big head and starin g eyes who di d noth ,

ing but eat and d i nk Th mother in her trou b le went to h er neigh


r . e

b ors and asked their advi ce Th e neighbors told her to tak e th e .

changeling into th e kitchen and put it ne ar the h ea th and then to r ,

make up the fire and boil water in two egg shells ; th at woul d make
,
-

the changeling laugh and if he laughed it would b e all over with


, ,

hi m S O the woman di d as her nei ghb ors advised And when she set
. .

the egg shells of water o n th e fire the changelin g sai d


-
, ,

Thoug h o ld I be

A fo e t t ee s r s r ,

C o o ki ng in n g g hell neve did I s ee! a e s


-
r

and began t o laugh And di rectl y there came in a crowd o f elves


.

b ringing in the right child ; and they lai d it near the heart h and ,

carried the changelin g away wi th them .


Fai r K a t rin elj e an d P i f—
P af—
P o lt rie

GO O D DAY Father Hollenthe M any thanks Pif paf p o lt i e M y


-
, .
” “
,
- -
r .
” “
a

I be allowed to have your daughter? Oh yes if M other M al ” “


, ,

cho ! Milch cow ! Brother High and M i ghty Sister Ka t aut and
-
,
- -
,

se r ,

fai K tri nelje are wi lli ng you can have her Where i M other
r a , .
” “
s

M l cho then ? She is in the o w house mi lking the c o w


” “ ”
a ,
c -
, .


Good da y M other M alcho M any th anks Pif p af p o lt rie
-
,
.
” “
,
- -
.

M ay I b e allowed t o have y our daughter ? Oh yes if F ather


“ ” “
, ,

H o llenthe Brother H i gh and M i ght y S i ster K a etraut and fair K a


,
- -
,
s ,

t i n lj ar w illi ng yo u can have her


r e e e Where is Brother Hi gh
,
.
” “

and M ighty then ? He is in the room chopping some wood


-
,
” “
.


Good day Brother High and Might y M any thanks Pif paf
-
,
- -
.
” “
,
-

M ay I b e allowed t o have y our s ister ? Oh yes if Fa


” “ ” “
p o lt ir e .
, ,

ther Ho llenthe M other M al ho Sister K as etraut and fair K


,
c , , a

t i n elj e are wi lling yo u can have her


r Where i Sister K a etraut
,
.
” “
s s ,

then ? She i in the garden cutti ng cabbages


” “
s .


Good day S ister K as etr ut M an y thanks Pif p f p olt i
-
,
a .

,
-
a -
r e .

M y I be al l owed to have y our s i ster ? Oh yes if Father Ho l


“ ” “
a , ,

lenthe M other M al ho Brother High and Mighty and fair Ka


, c ,
- -
,

t i n lj are wi lling y ou ma y have her Wh ere is fair K t i nelj e ” “


r e e , . a r ,

then ? She i in the room counting out her farthi ngs


” “
s .

Good day fair K t i nelje M an y thanks Pif p af p o lt i e


“ ” “ ”
-
,
a r .
,
- -
r .


Wilt thou b e my b ri de ? Oh y es if F ather Ho ll nth M other ” “
, ,
e e,

M alob o Brother Hi gh and—


, M ighty and Sister Kas et aut are wi lli ng
-
,
r ,

I am ready .


Fair K t i nelje how much dowry hast thou ? Fourteen far
a r ,

things in ready money three and a half groschen owi ng to me hal f , ,

a pound O f dried ap p les a handful o f fried bread and a handful of , ,

spices .

A nd ma ny o t he r t hings a re mine,
Ha ve I no t a dowry fine ?

paf p o lt i e what is thy trade ? Art thou a tail or? Something


Pi f- -
r ,

better A shoe maker? Somethin g better A hus b an dm an ?


.
” “ ”
.
” “ ”


Something better A joiner? Somethi ng better A smi th? .
” “ ” “
.
” “ ”


Something better A mil ler? Something better Perhaps a .
” “ ” “
.
” “

broom maker? Yes that s what I am i it not a fine t ade ?


-
” “
,

,
s r

40 G imm s Comp lete Fa i y Ta les r

r

good as t o give me what I ought to have fo I wi h t o leave and r s ,

look about me a little more in the w orld .

Y es my good fellow ans wered the O ld mi ser ; yo u h ave served


“ ”
, ,

me indus tri ously an d therefore you shall b e cheerfu lly rewarded


,

and he p ut hi s hand into his p ocket b ut counted o ut onl y th ee far , r

thin gs saying There you have a farthing fo each year ; t hat is


, ,

,
r

large and liberal pay such as you woul d have received from few
,

masters

.

The honest servan t who un derstood li ttle ab out mone y p ut hi


, , s

fortune into hi s pocket an d thought Ah! now that I have my , ,


purse full Why need I trou b le and plague myself any longer wi th
,

hard work! So on he went up hi ll and down dale ; and sang and



,

jumped to hi s he art s content Now it came to p ass that as he w as



.

goin g by a thi cket a lit tl e man stepp ed out and called t o him , ,

Whither away merry broth er? I see you do no t ca rry many cares
, .


Why shoul d I b e s ad? ans wered the servant; I have enough; ” “

three years wages are jingling in m y p ocket



.

Ho w much is y our treas ure ? the dwarf asked him


“ ” “
How .

much? Three farthi ngs sterli ng all told , .



Lo ok here s ai d the dwarf I am a p oor needy man gi ve me

, ,

,

your three farthi ngs ; I can work no longer but you are young , ,

an d ca n e as il y earn y our b read



.

And s the servant had a good heart and felt pit y for the old
a ,

man he gave him the three farthings saying Take them in the
, , ,

name of H eaven I shall no t b e an y the worse for it


,
.

Th en th e lit tle man s ai d As I s ee yo u h ave a good heart I grant



,

y o u thr ee w i s h es o ne fo r each farthi ng,th e y shall all b e f ul fill ed ,


.

Aha ? s ai d th e servant yo u are o ne o f those w ho can work


“ ” “
,

wonders ! Well then if it is to b e so I wis h first for a gun whi ch


, , , , , ,

shall hi t everythin g that I aim at; secondly fo a fiddle which ,


r ,

when I p lay o n it shall comp el all who hear it to dance ; thirdly


, ,

that if I ask a favor o f an y one he s hall not b e ab le t o refus e it .


All th at shal l you have sai d the dwarf ; and put hi s hand into
“ ”
,

the bush; and onl y think there lay a fiddle and gun all ready jus t , , ,

as if the y had b een ordere d Thes e he gave t o the servant and then .
,

sai d to him Wh atever you may a k at any time no m n in the


. ,

s , a

world s hal l b e ab le t o deny you .


Heart alive ! What more can o ne des ire ? sai d the servant to
“ ”

hims elf and went merril y onwards Soon afterw ards he met a Jew
, .

wi th a long go at s b e ard w ho w as st an di ng li steni ng t o the song o f


’ -
,

a bird which w as s it ting up a t the to p o f a t ree Go od heavens he


“ ”
.
,

w as e xclaiming that such a small crea ture should ha ve such a


,

The J ew A mong Tho rns 41
fear qy lo d voice ! If it were but mine ! If only some
u o ne would
spri nkle some salt up on it tail ! s

I f that is all sai d the servant the bird shall soon be dow n

,

,

here ; and taking im he pull ed the t i gger and down fell the bird

a r ,

into the thom bus hes Go you ro g ue he sai d to the Jew and
“ ” “
-
.
, , ,

fetch the bird out f yourself ! or


Oh ! sai d the Jew leave o ut the rogue my master and I wi ll


“ ”
,

, ,

d it at O nce I wi ll get the bird o ut fo r m y self as yo u really have


o .
,

hi t it Th en he lay down o n the groun d and beg an t o crawl into



.
,

the thicket .

When he w as fast among the thorns the good servant s humor o ,


temp ted him that he took up hi fiddle and b egan t o p lay In a mo s .

ment the Jew s legs began to move and to jump into the ai and

,
r,

the more the servan t fiddl ed the b etter went the dance But the .

thorns tore hi s shabby coat for hi m com b ed hi s b eard and p ri cked , ,

and plucked him all over the b ody Oh dear cri ed the Jew .

,

,

what do I want with your fiddling? Leave the fiddl e alone master; ,

I do no t want t o dance .

But the servant did not lis ten t o him and thought You have , ,

fl ee ed people Oft en enough now the th om bus hes shall do the


c ,
-

s me t o you ; and he began to play over agai n o that the Jew had
a

, s

t o jump hi gher than ever and scrap s o f hi s coat were left hangi ng ,

o n the thorns Oh woe s me ! c i ed th Jew ; I will give the gen


“ ’ ” “
.
,
r e

t leman wh atsoever he asks if only he leaves o ff fiddli ng—a p urse


fu ll o f gold I f y ou are o li b eral sai d the servant I will stop
.
” “
s ,

,

m y mu i but thi s I must y to your credit that you dance to it o


s c sa ,
s

well that t is qui te an art ; and having taken the pur se he went his
r

way .

Th Jew stood sti ll and watched the servant qui etl y un ti l he w s


e a

far Off and ut of sight and then he screamed o ut wi th all hi


o ,
s

mi ght You mi serab le musician yo u beer house fiddler ! Wait till I



-
, ,

catch yo u alone I wi ll hun t you till the soles of y our shoes fall Off!
,

Yo u g muffin ! Just put five farthi ngs in y our mouth and then yo u
ra a ,

may b e worth three halfpence ! and went o n ab us ing hi m as fast as ”

he could speak .

A soon as he had refreshed hi mself a li ttle in thi s way n d got


s ,
a

hi b reath again he ran i nto the town to the jus t ice M y lord

s ,
.

judge he s ai d I hav e co me to mak e a complai nt; e how a ras



, ,

s e

cal has robbed and ill treated me o n the pub li c hi ghway ! A stone -

o n the ground mi ght p it y me ; my c l othes all torn my body p i cked ,


r

and scratched my lit tle ll gone wi th my purse—g d ducats each


, a oo ,
42 Comp lete F i y T lesGrimm s

a r a

piece b etter than th e last; f God s sake let the man b e thr own into or

p i son !
r

W it a soldi er sai d the ju dge w h cut y u thus wi th hi s


“ ” “
as , , o o

sabre ? N o thin g f the sort ! sai d the Jew; it w no sword that


” “
o
” “
as

he had but a gun hanging at hi b ack and a fiddle at hi neck ; the


,
s , s

wretch ma y eas ily b e known .


S th e judge sent hi people o ut fter th e man and th ey found


o s a ,

the good serv n t w h had b een going qui te slowly along and they
a ,
o ,

found t oo the purse wi th the money upon him A s soon as he w


, ,
. as

taken before th j udge he sai d I di d not touch the Jew nor take hi
e ,

, s

mone y; he gave it t o me f hi wn free will that I might leave ff o s o , o

fiddli ng b ecause he could not hear m y music Heaven defend u ! .


” “
s

cried the Jew his li es ar as thi ck as flies upon the wall


,

e .

But the judge also did not b elieve hi tale and s ai d This i a s , ,

s

b ad defense no Jew would do that And b ecause he had commit


,
.

ted robb e y Ou the publi c hi ghway b e sentenced the good servant


r ,

t o be hanged As he was b ein g led awa y the Jew agai n screamed


.

after him Yo u vagab ond ! Y u d g o f a fid dl er ! now y u are going



,
o o o

t receive y our well earned reward !



o -

Th servant walk ed qui etly with the hangman up the ladder but
e ,

upon the last step he t urned round and sai d t th judge Grant o e ,

me just o ne re quest b efore I di Y if y u d no t k your life e .


” “
es , o o as ,

said the j udge I d n t k f life answered the servant b ut


.

o o as or ,

,

as

a last favor let me play once more up on my fiddle .


Th Jew rai sed a great cry o f Murder ! murder ! f goodness “ ’


e or

sak e d not allow it ! Do n t al low it ! But the j udge sai d Why


o o

,

shoul d I not let him have thi s short pleas ure ? I t has been granted t o

hi m and he shall have it However he coul d no t have refu sed n



, .
, o

account f the gift whi ch ha d be en bestowed o n the servant


o .

Th en the Jew cri ed Oh ! woe s me ! ti me ti me fast! while


“ ’ ”
, e , e

the good servant took hi fiddle from hi neck and made ready As s s , .

he gave th e first scrape the y all b egan t quiver and shake the ,
o ,

judge hi clerk and th e hangman and hi men and the cord fell
, s , s ,

o ut f the hand of the o n e w h w


o going t o ti the Jew fast At the o as e .

second scrap e all rai sed their legs and the hangman let go hi hold ,
s

of the good servant and made himself ready t dance At the third
,
o .

scrape they all leap ed up and b egan to dance ; the judge and the
Jew being the b est at j umping Soon all w h had gathered in the . o

market place out f curi osit y were dancin g wi th them ; O ld and


-
o

young fat and lean ne wi th another Th dogs likewise whi ch


, ,
o . e , ,

had un there go t up n their hi nd legs and cap ered about; and th


r o e
King Thrus hbeard 43
longer b e played the hi gher sprang the dancers o that the y
, , s

knocked agai nst each other s heads and b egan to sh i ek t ni bly ’

, r e .

At length the j udge cried quite out Of breath I will give you , ,

y our life if you will only stop fiddli ng The good servant thereup on .

had comp as sion took his fiddle and hung it round hi s neck again
, ,

and stepp ed down the ladder Th en he went up to the Jew w ho .


,

was lying up on the ground p anti ng for b reath and s ai d You as , ,



r

cal now confess whence you got the mone y or I will tak e my
, , ,

fiddl e and b e gin t o play agai n I stole it I stole it ! cri ed he ; b ut .


” “
,
” “

you have honestl y earned it S O the judge had the Jew taken to the

.

gallows and han ged as a thi ef .

K i ng Thru s hbea rd

A KING had a daughter who w as beauti ful beyond meas ure b ut o , s

proud and overbea i ng that none o f her s uitors were good enough
r

fo her ; she not onl y refused o ne after the other b ut made a laugh
r ,

ing stock O f them


-
.

Once the King appo inted a great feast and b ade all the mar ,

ri ageable men t o it from far and near An d th e y were all put in .

rows accordi ng t o their rank and station firs t came the Kin gs
, : ,

then the Princes the dukes the earls th e b arons and lastly the
, , , ,

nob lemen Th e Pri ncess was led in front of the rows but he had a
.
,
s

mocking epi thet for each One w as too fat What a t ub! sai d she ;
“ ”
.
,

another too tall L ong and lean i ill to b e s een sai d she; a third
,

s

,

too short F at and short no t fit t o court sai d she A fourth w as


,

, ,

.

too pale—A regular death s head ; a fifth to o red faced—A game


“ ’
-

-

cock s he call ed him The six th w as not well made enough


,

.
-


Green wood ill d i ed ! cri ed he So every one had somethin g
r

s .

agai nst him and he made especi ally merry over a good King who
,
s

was very tall and whose chi n had grown a li ttle peaked Onl y
,
.

look c i ed he laughi ng he has a chin like a thrush s beak



,
r s , ,
“ ’
.

A n d from that time the y called him King Th u hb eard But the r s .

o ld Ki ng when he w that hi daughter mocked e very one and


, sa s ,

scorned all the assembled s ui tors swore in hi anger that she ,


s

should have the first beggar that cam e to the door for a husb nd a .

A few days afterwards came a traveli ng ball ad singer and sang -


,

under the wi ndow in hopes of a small l ms When the Ki ng heard a .


44 G i mm C o mp let e Fa i y Ta les
r

s r

O f it he said that he must come in A nd so the ball ad singer entered


,
.
-

in hi di ty tattered garments and sang b efore the Ki ng and hi


s r , s

daughter ; when he had done he as ked fo a small reward But the ,


r .

Ki ng s ai d Your song h so well pleased me that I will gi ve you


,

as ,

my daughter t o wife .

The Princess was ho i fied ; but the Ki ng sai d I took an oath t o



rr ,

give you to the first beggar that came and o it mu t be done ,


s s .

There w a no remedy Th e pri est was fetched and h had to be


s .
, s e

ma i ed t o the b ll fl inge ut o f hand When all was done the


rr a a ~s r o .
,

King said Now a you are a beggar wife yo u can stay no longer
,

,
s -
,

in my castle f with y u and y our hus b and



of , so o .

Th e b eggar man led her awa y and she was obli ged t o go forth
-
,

wi th him o n foot On th e way they came t a great wood and he


. o ,
s

as ked ,

O h w ho e is t his fo est s o t hick a nd o fine?


“ ”
, s r , s

He answered ,

I t is King Th us hbea d s a nd mig ht ha ve b een t hine


“ ” ”
r r , .

An d she cried ,

O h I w as a s illy young t hing I m a fea ed


“ ’

, ,
r ,

Would I ha d ta ke n t ha t g o o d King Thrus hbea rd!


Th en the y pa sed through a meadow and she asked


s , ,

“ ”
O h w hos e is t his mead ow ,
, so g reen a n d so fine?
He answered ,

“ ”
I t is King Thrus hbeard s , mig ht ha ve been t hine

a nd .

And s he cried ,


I was a s illy youn g t hing , I m

f
a eared,

Wo uld I ha d ta ken t ha t g o o d King Thrus hb ea rd!


T hen they passed through a great town and ,


sh e asked ,


Whos e is t his ci t y, s o g rea t a nd s o fine?

He an wered s ,

mig ht ha v e been t hine



O h it is King Thrus hbea rd s , a nd

.
,

A nd she c i ed
r ,


I was a si lly yo ung t hin g
I m a ea red
,

f ,

Would

I had ta ken t ha t g oo d K ing Thrus hbea rd!
King Thrus hbea rd 45
Th en s i d the b eggar man I t does n t please me to hear you l
a -
,

o a

ways v i hi ng for another husband; am I no t good enough for you ?


v s

A t last they came to a very small house and h sai d , s e ,


O h dea r me! w hat p o or litt le hous e do I s ee?
A nd w ho s e I w ould k now , ma y t he w retc he d h le be?
,

o
Th e man an wered T hat i s ,

s m y house n d yours where we must
a ,

li ve together

.

She had to stoop before she could go in at the door .


Where are the servant ? asked the Kin g s daughter s
” ’

W hat servants ? nswered the beggar man what you want to



a -
,

have done you must do yourself M ake a fi q ui ld y and put o n . re c ,

water and cook me some fo o d ; I am ve y tired


, r .

But the King s daughter understood nothing about fi making


re -

and cooki ng n d the b eggar man had to lend a hand him self in
,
a -

order t o manage it at all And when the y had eaten their poo r fare .
,

the y went t o b ed ; but th e m n called up his wife very early in the a

morni ng in order to clean the house


, .

Fo a few days the y li ved in thi s in different m nner unti l the y


r a ,

came t o the end o f their store Wife sai d the man this will not .
“ ”
, ,

do stop ping here an d earni ng nothing ; yo u mus t make b as ket



,
s .

So he went out and cut wi llows and brought them home ; and ,

s he b egan t o weave them b ut th e hard t wi gs wo unded her tender ,

han ds I see thi s wi ll not do sai d the man you had better try
.

,

,

spinni ng .

S O s he s at her down and t i ed t o sp i n but the harsh thread cut r ,

her soft fingers s o that th b lood flowed Look no w ! sai d the


, e .
“ ”

man you are no good at any so t Of work ; I made a bad bargai n


,

r

when I took you I must e what I can do to make a trade of pots


. se

and ear then vessels ; yo u can it in the market and Offer them for s

sale .


Oh dear ! thought sh suppose whi le I am selli ng in th mar

e, e

ket people b elonging to m y father s ki ngdom should e me how ’


se ,

the y woul d mock at me ! But there w as no help for it ; h had t o ”


s e

submi t or else die of hunger


,
.

The first day all went well ; the people b ought her wares eagerly ,

b ecause h w so b eautiful and gave her whatever she asked


s e as , ,

and some o f them gave her the money and left the pots after all
behind them An d they lived o n these earni ngs as long as they
.

lasted ; and then the man bought a num ber Of new pots So she .

seated herself in a com er f the market and stood th w es before o ,


e ar

her for sale All at once a drunken horse soldi er came p lung ng by
.
-

,
46 G imm s Comp lete F i y Ta les r

a r

and rode str ight into the midst of her pots breaking them into a
a ,

thou and pi eces She coul d do nothing for weeping Oh dear


s . .

,

what will become f me cri ed h ; what wi ll my husband y? o ,



s e

sa

and she hastened home n d told him her mi fo t me a s r r .

Who ever heard of such a thing as sit ti ng in the corner f the



o

market with earthenware pots ! sai d the man ; now l eave off cry ” “

ing ; I s you are not fit for any regul ar work I have been ask ing at
ee .

your father s castle if they want a ki tchen mai d and they y they

-
,
sa

don t mind taking you ; at any rate you will get your vi ctuals free

.

And th King s daughter became a kitchen m ai d to be at the


e

-
,

cook s beck and call and t o do the h rdest work In each f her

,
a . o

pockets she fastened a li ttle pot and brought home in them what ,

ever was left and up on that he and her hus band were fed It hap
,
s .

pened o ne day when the weddi ng Of the eldest Prince w cele


,
as

brated the poor woman went up stairs and stood b y the p arlor door
, ,

to see what w as going o n An d when the place was li ghted up and .


,

the comp ny arrived each person handsomer than the o ne b efore


a , ,

and all w b i lli ancy and splendor he thought o n her own fate
as r ,
s

wi th a ad heart and bewail ed her former p i de and haughtiness


s ,
r

whi ch had b rought her so low and plunged her in s great pove ty ,
o r .

And as the ri ch and deli cate dishes smelling o go od were carried s

to nd fro every now and then the se vants would throw her a few
a ,
r

fragments whi ch she put in her pockets intendi ng t o take home


, ,
.

And then the Prince himself pas sed in clothed in silk and velvet , ,

wi th a gold chai n round hi neck And when he saw the beautiful s .

woman standi ng in the doorway he seized her hand and urged her ,

to dance with him but she refused all trembling fo she saw it was
, , ,
r

Ki ng Th u hb eard w ho had come t court her whom she had


r s ,
o ,

turned away with mocking It w O f no u e her resistin g he drew . as s ,

her into the room ; and all at once the b and to whi ch her pockets
were fas tened broke and the pots fell o ut and the soup ran about , , ,

and th fragment were scattered all round And when the people
e s .

sa w that there w a g eat laughter and mocking


, n d she felt s o
s r ,
a

ashamed that he wis hed herself a thousand fathoms underground


, s .

She rus hed to the door to fly from the plac when a man caught e,

her just on the steps and when she looked at hi m it was King , ,

d again He sai d to her in a ld nd tone Do not be “


Th u hb
r s e ar .
,

afrai d I and the beggar man wi th whom you lived in the wretched
,
-

litt le but are o ne For love f yo u I di sguised myself and it was I


. o ,

who broke your pots in the guise o f a horse sol dier I did all that to -
.

bring down your proud heart and to puni sh your haughtiness , ,

whi ch caused yo u to mock at me .



48 G imm s Comp let e Fai y Ta les r

r

turned the spit briskl y round And now they be g an t o smell o good . s

that Gretel saying I must find o ut whether they really are all
,

ri ght li cked her fingers and then cried Well I never ! the fowls

, , ,

,

are good ; it s a sin and a shame that no one i here to eat them !

s

S O she ran t o the wi ndow t o s ee if her master and hi s gu est were


coming but as she could see nobo dy she went back t o her fowls
, .


Why o ne o f the wings is burning ! s he cri ed presently I had “

, ,

better eat it and get it o ut o f the way SO she cut it o ff and ate it .

up and it tasted good and then she th ought I had b etter cut off
, , ,

the o ther t o o in case the master should mi ss an ythi ng And when


,
.

b oth wings had been disposed of she went and looked for the
mas ter but still he did no t co me
,
.


W ho knows sai d he whe ther the y are comi ng o not ? the y
,

s ,

r

m y have p ut up at an inn A nd after a p ause he s ai d agai n



a . s ,

C ome I may as well make myself happy and first I will make
, ,

sure O f a goo d drink and then o f a g oo d meal and when ll is done , a

I shall b e eas y ; th e g fts of the gods are not t o b e desp ised S o first
'

.

s he ran down in t o the cellar and had a famous drink and ate up ,

o ne o f the fowls wi th great reli h And when that w as done and s .


,

s till the m as ter did not come Gretel e yed the other fowl saying , , ,

What one is the oth er must b e th e tw o belong to each other it is , ,

onl y fair th at they should b e b oth treated alike ; perhap s when I


ha ve had another drink I h all b e ab le to manage it SO she took , s .

a noth er he arty dri nk and then the s econd fowl went the wa y o f the
,

first .

Just she w as in the mi ddle of it the master cam e back M ake


as .

haste Gretel cried he the guest is comi ng directly ! Very well


, ,
” “ ” “
,

mas ter s he answered t wi ll soon be read y Th e master went to


” ”
, ,
r .

s ee th at the ta b le w as prop erl y l ai d and tal in g the great c arving , , c

knife wi th whi ch he meant to ca rve the fowls he sharp ened it up on


'

the st e p Presently came the guest knocking very genteelly and


.
,

softly at th e front door Gretel ran and looked t o ee w ho it w as . s ,

and when she caught sight o f the guest he p ut her finger on her lip s

saying H ush! ma ke the b est haste you c an out of this for if m y


,

,

master catches you it wi ll b e b ad fo r yo u; he asked y ou t o come t o


,

supper b ut he really means t o cut o ff y our ears ! Just listen how he


,

is sharpeni ng his knife !


The gues t he ring the noi se o f the sh arpeni ng made o ff


,
a fast , as

as he co uld g o And Gretel ran screami ng to her master


. A pretty .

g u es t yo u have asked t o the house ! cri ed h H o w o Gretel ?



s e .

s ,

what do you me an ? asked he Wh at indeed ! sai d s he; why he



.
“ ” “
,

Fit che r s B ird 49

has gone and run away with my pair o f fowls tha t I had just di shed
up .


at s p rett y sort o f condu ct ! sai d the master feeling very
Th
’ ”
,

sorry ab out the fowls ; he mi ght at least have left me o ne that I “


,

mi ght have had somethi ng to eat And he called out to him to stop

.
,

but the guest made as if he di d not hear him; then he ran after hi m ,

the knife still in hi s hand crying o ut Only o ne! onl y ne ! mean , ,



o

in g th at the g uest should let hi m have o ne o f the fowls and n o t take


b oth; but the guest thought he meant t o have only one o f hi ears s ,

and he ran so much the faster that he mi ght get home wi th both of

F it c her s B i rd ’

THE R w a s once a wizard who used t take the fo m of a poor man


E o r .

He went t hou es and b egged and caught pre tty gi rl N 0 n


o s ,
s . o e

knew whi ther he carried them f the y were never s een more One ,
or .

day he appeared b efore the door of a m n who had three pret ty a

daughters He looked like a poor weak b eggar and carried a b asket


.
,

on hi b ack as if he meant t o collect cha itable gifts in it He


s ,
r .

begged f a little food and when the eldest daughter came ut


or ,
o

and was just reachi ng him a p iece o f b read he did b ut touch her , ,

and h w as forc d t j ump into hi b asket Th ereup on he hur i ed


s e e o s . r

awa y with long s t i des and carri ed her awa y into a da k forest t
r ,
r o

hi hous whi ch stood in the mi dst Of it


s e, .

Everythi ng in the house was magnificent; he gave her whatsoever


h co uld poss ibly desi e and s i d M y darling thou wi lt ce tainly

s e r ,
a , ,
r

be happ y with me f thou hast everyt hi ng thy he rt can wish for


,
or a .

Thi s lasted a few days and then he s i d I mu t journe y forth and



,
a , s ,

leave thee alone for a short time ; there the keys f the house ; are o

thou mayst go everywhere n d look at everythi ng except into n a o e

room whi ch thi s li ttle ke y here opens nd there I forbid thee to go


, , a

on pain of death He likewi se gave her an egg and sai d Preserve


.

,

the egg careful l y f me and carry it cont inuall y about wi th thee


or , ,

for a great mi sfortune would i se from the loss f it ar o .


She took the keys and the egg and promised to obey him in ,
ev

ery t hi n g W hen he w gone . she went all round the house from
as the
bottom t the t p and un d everythi ng Th rooms shone wi th
o o , ex arr e . e
so Grimm s Comp lete Fa i y T les

r a

silver nd a gold and h thought he had never seen such great


,
s e s

splendor .

At length she came t o the forbi dden door; he wished t p as s it s o

b y but curi osi ty let her have no rest She examined the key it
,
.
,

looked just like any other ; he put it in the keyhole and turned it a s

li ttle and the door sprang Open But what did she s ee when he
,
. s

went in? A great bloody b asi n stood in the mi ddle o f the room and ,

therein lay human b eings dead and hewn to pi eces and hard by ,

w as a b lock o f w o od and a gleami ng axe lay upon t She w as s o


, r .

t ni bly alarmed th at the egg whi ch he held in her hand fell into
e s

the b sin She got it out and washed the blood Off but in vain it ap
a .
, ,

p e ar
ed agai n in a mo m ent She washed and sc ubb ed b ut she . r ,

could no t get it o ut .

It was not long b efore the m n came back from his journey and a ,

the fi st thin gs whi ch he as ked fo were the ke y and the egg She
r r .

gave them to him but she trembled ,


he did o and he saw at as s s ,

once by the red spots that she had been in the bloody chamb er .


Since thou has t gone into the room agains t my will sai d he ,

,

thou shalt go b ack into it against thi ne own Th y life is ended H e . .

threw her down dragged her thi ther b y her h i r cut her head Off
, a ,

o n t he block and hewed her in p ieces s o that her b lood ran o n the
,

ground Th en he threw her into the b asin wi th th e rest


. .

No w I will fetch m yself the second sai d the wi zard and again
“ ”
, ,

he went to the house in the shap e o f a p oor man and begged Th en , .

the second daughter b rought him a piece of b read ; he caught her


li k e th e first b y s imply touching her an d carri ed her away She di d
, , .

n ot fare b etter th a n her s i s ter She allowed herself t o be led awa y .

b y her cu i osit y Opened the doo r of the b loody chamber looked in


r , , ,

and had t o atone fo it with her life on the Wizard s ret urn
r

Th en he went and brou ght the third s ister But she was clever and .

crafty When he had given her the keys and the egg and had left
.
,

her she first put the egg away wi th great care and th en she ex
, ,

ami ned the house an d at las t went into the forbi dden room Alas
,
.
,

what di d he b ehold ! Both her sisters lay there in the b asin cruell y
s ,

murdere d and cut in pi ece s She b egan to gather their lim bs t o


,
.

gether and put them in order head b ody arms n d legs A nd when , , ,
a .

no thi ng further w lacking the limbs began to move and uni te


as ,

themselves together and both t h mai den Opened their eyes and
,
e s

were once more alive Th en they rejoiced and ki ssed and caressed
.

each other .

On hi arrival the man at once demanded the keys and the egg
s , ,
Fit her Bi d 5 c

s r 1

and he could perceive no trace f any b lood n it he sai d


as o o , ,

Th ou hast stood the test thou shalt b e my b ri de He now had no


“ ”
.
,

longer any power over her and w forced to do whats oever h , as s e

desired Oh very well sai d h thou shalt first take a b asketful


.

, ,

s e,

o f gold to m y fa ther nd mother and carry it thy self n thy back ; a ,


o

in the meantime I wi ll prepare for the wedding



.

Th en h ran t her s isters whom he had hi dden in a little


s e o ,
s

chamb er and sai d Th moment has come when I can save y u ,



e o .

Th wretch shall himse lf carry y u home again b ut


e soon y u o ,
as as o

are at home send help t me She put b oth f them in a basket and o .

o

covered them quite over with gold that nothi ng of them was t , so o

b e seen then h called in the wi ard and s i d t hi m Now carry


,
s e z a o ,

the b asket away b ut I shall l ok thr ough my lit tle window and
, o

watch t if thou t p pe t n the way t o stand o t o rest



o s ee s o s o r .

Th wi zard rai sed the ba ket o n his b ack and went awa y wi th it
e s ,

but it weighed him down heavi ly that the perspirati on st reamed so

from hi face Then he t down and wanted t rest awhi le b ut


s . sa o ,

immedi atel y ne f the gi rls in the b a ket cri ed I am looki ng “


o o s ,

through m y li ttle wi ndow and I e that thou art resti ng Wi lt , se .

thou go n at once ? He thought hi b i de was cal li ng that to hi m;


o

s r

and got up on hi legs again Once more he w going t it down


s . as o s ,

but instantly h cri ed I m loo king through m y li ttle window


s e ,

a ,

and I e that thou art resting Wilt thou go n di rectl y?


se . o

Whenever he stood s ti ll she cried this and then he was forced to , ,

g onwards un til at last groani ng and ut o f breath he took the


o , , o ,

basket wi th the gold and the tw mai dens into their parents house o

.

At home however the b i de prepared the m ni g feast and sent


, ,
r a a e- ,

in it u n to the fri ends of the wizard Then h took a sku ll wi th


v a o s . s e

g i nni ng teeth put some orna ments on it and a wreath f flowers


r , o ,

car i ed it up stairs to the garret window and let it look o ut from


r -
,

thence When all was ready h got into a b rel f hone y and
.
, s e ar o ,

then cut the feather b ed open and rolled herself in it until h -


,
s e

looked like a wondrous bird and n on could rec gnize her Then , o e o .

sh went out f the house and n her wa y she met some f the
e o ,
o o

weddi ng guests who asked


-
, ,

0 Fit he
“ ”
bi d how com s t t ho u he ?
’ ’

, c rs r ,
re

me f m Fit che h u q
“ ’

I co uit n ro rs o se e ear .

A nd w h t m y t he y ung b ide be doi ng?


“ ”
a a o r

F o m ll t g t h w p t ll l n

r ce ar o a rre s

e s s e a c ea ,

A nd now f om t he w ind ow he s p ep ing I ween


’ ”
r s e , .
52 G imm s Comp lete Fai y Ta les r

r

At last she met the bri degroom who w as coming slowly b ack He , .
,

li ke the others as ked , ,

0 Fit ak ers bi d how aam s i t hou he e?


“ ’ ’ ”
,
r , r

I co me f om Fit oher hous e q


“ ’
uit e nea
r s r .

“ ”
A nd w ha t ma y t he young b ride be doing ?

F

ro m cella r t o ga rret s he s sw ep t a ll c lea n,

f And now rom t he wi nd ow s he s p eeping , I we en


’ ”
.

Th b ri degroom looked up
e w the de ked ut skul l thought it ,
sa c -
o ,

w hi b ri de and nodded t o her greeti ng her ki n dl y But when he


as s , , .

and hi guest had all gone into th e house th e brothers and ki ns


s s ,

men of the b i de w ho had b een sent t o rescue her arrived Th ey


r , ,
.

lo k d all th e door o f the house th at no o n mi ght esca p e


o e s t fire ,
e , se

t o it and the wi ard nd all hi s c rew were bu ned


, z a r .

T h e R o b b e r B ri de g ro o m

THER E w as once a mill er who had a b eaut iful daughter an d when ,

s he w s g rown up he b ecame anxi ous that she sho uld be well mar
a

ri ed and tak en care o f; s o he t hought I f a decent sort o f man



,

comes an d as ks her in m arri age I will give her t o him ,


.

Soon after a s uitor came forward w ho seemed ve y well t o do r - -


,

and as the mi ller knew nothi ng t o hi s disadvantage he promised ,

him his dau ghter But the girl did no t seem t o love him as a b ri de
.

s hould love her b i degroom; he had no confidence in him; as often


r s

as she s aw him o thought ab out hi m s he felt a chi ll at her heart


r ,
.

One day he sai d t o her You are t o b e m y bri de and yet you ,

,

have never b een t o s ee me The girl answered I do not k now .



,

where y our house is Then he s ai d My house i a long way in the


.

,

s

wood .

She b egan to make excus es and sai d she could no t find the way ,

t o i t ; b ut the b ri degroom sai d Y u must come and pay me a vi sit



,
o

next Sunday ; I have already invi ted company and I wil l strew ,

ashes o n the path through the wood o that you wi ll b e sure t o find ,
s

it .

Wh en
Sunday came an d the gi rl set ut o n her way he felt very
,
o ,
s

uneas y wi th out k nowin g exactl y why ; and h fil led both pockets s e


R o bber B ideg o o m The53 r r

full of peas and lentils Th ere were ashes strewn o n the path .

through the wood but neverthe less at each step h cast to the
, ,
s e

right and left a few peas o n the ground So he went n the whole . s o

day until sh came to the mi ddle o f th e wood where it was darkest


e , ,

and there stood a lonely house n t pleasant in her eyes f it was ,


o , or

di sma l and unhomeli ke She walked in but there was no o n there .


, e ,

and the greatest sti llness reigned Suddenly he heard a voice cry . s ,


Turn b a c k t urn b ack t hou p rett y bri de ,
, ,

Within t his ho us e t hou mus t no t bi de,


For he re do evil t hings bet ide .

gi rl glanced roun d and perceived that the voi ce came from


Th e ,

a bird w ho was hanging in a cage by the wall And agai n it cried .


,


Turn ba ck, turn back , t hou prett y bride ,
Within t his hous e t hou mus t not bi de ,

Fo r he re do evi l t hi ngs betide .

hen the prett y bri de went on from o ne roo m into another


T
through the whole house but it was quite em p ty and no soul to be , ,

found in it At last she reached the cellar and there s t a very O ld


.
,
a

woman nodding her head .

C n yo u te ll me sai d the bri de f my bri degroom liv es here ?


“ ”
a ,
i

Oh poor chi ld answered the o ld woman do you know what


, , ,

has h p p ened to you? Y u are in a place o f cutthroats Y u thought


a o . o

you were a bri de and soon to be marri ed b ut death will b e your


, ,

spouse Look here I have a great ke t tle o f water to et o n and


.
,
s ,

when once they have you in their power the y will cut you in pieces
wi thout mercy cook you and eat you for the y are canniba ls Un
, , ,
.

less I have p ity n yo u and save yo u all i over wi th you !


o , , s

Then the O ld woman hi d her behi nd a great cask where she ,

could n t be seen B as still as a mouse ai d he; do n t move


o .

e ,
s s

o

o go away o else y ou are lost At night when the robbers are


r ,
r .
,

asleep we will esca pe I have been wai ti ng a long t ime for an o p


,
.


p o rt u ni ty .

No sooner w it settled than the wi cked gang entered the house


as .

Th ey b rought another young woman wi th them draggi ng her ,

along and they were drun k and would no t li sten to her cri es and
, ,

groans They gave her wine to d i nk three g lasses full n o f whi te


. r , ,
o e

wine o n f red and o n of ye ll ow and then they cut her in


,
e o , e ,

piece ; the p oor bri de all the whi le shak ing and trembling when
s

she w what a fate the robbers had i ntended fo her


sa r .

One of them noti ced on the lit tle finger Of thei vi ctim a go l den r
G rimm s C o mp let e Fairy Ta les

54
ring and as he coul d not draw it off eas ily he too k an axe and
, ,

chopp ed it o ff but the fin ger jumped away and fell b ehin d the
, ,

cask on th e b i de s lap The robb er took up a li ght to look for it but


r

.
,

he could no t find it Th en sai d o ne of the others Have you looked


.
,

behi nd the great cask? But the Old wom an cried C ome to supp er

,

,

and leave off looki ng ti ll tomo row; the finger cannot run away r .

Th en the ro bbers sai d th e o ld woman w as i ght and the y left Off r ,

searchi ng and at down t o eat and the o ld wom an dropp ed some


,
s ,

sleeping st uff into their wine s o that b efore long the y st retched ,

themselves on the cellar floor sleeping and sno i n g ,


r .

Wh en the b ri de heard that he came from b ehi nd the ca sk and ,


s ,

had t o make her way among th e sleep ers lying all a bout on the
ground and she felt very much afrai d lest she mi ght awaken any of
,

them But b y good luck she passed through and the o ld woman
.
,

with her and they opened the door and they made haste t o leave
, ,

th at house o f murderers Th e wind had carri ed away the ashes from .

the path b ut the p eas and lenti ls had b udded and spnm g up and
, ,

the moonshi ne upon them showed the way An d the y went on .

thr ough the ni ght till in th e morni ng the y reach ed the mi ll Th en


, .

the gir l related t o her father all that had happened to her .

When the weddi ng day came th e f i ends and neighb ors as -


,
r

semb led the mill er h avin g invited them and the bri degroom also
, ,

app eared When the y were all seated at tab le each one had to tell
.
,

a story But the b i de sat still and sai d no thing ti ll at las t the
. r , ,

b i de groom s ai d t o her Now sweethea t do you know no story?


r ,

,
r ,

Tell us somethi ng

.

S he ans wered I will tell you my dream I was going alone


,

.

through a woo d and I came at last t o a house in whi ch there w s


,
a

no li vin g soul b ut by th e wall w as a b ird in a cage w ho cri e d


, , ,

Turn ba c k t urn back t hou p rett y bride,


, ,

Wit hin t his hous e t hou mus t not bide ,



For he re do ev il t hings be tide .


An d then again it sai d it Sweethe art the dream is no t ended .
,
.

Th en I went thr ough all the rooms and they were all emp t y and it , ,

w as s o lonely and wretched At last I went down i nto the cellar .


,

and there t an o ld o ld woman noddi ng her head I asked her if


sa ,
.

m y bri degroom li ved in that house and she answered Ah poor , ,


chi ld you have come into a place o f cut throat ; your bri degroom
,
s

does li ve here but he will ki ll you and ut y ou in pieces and then


,
o ,

cook and eat you Sweetheart the dream i not ended But the Old
.

,
s .

woman hi d me behind a great ca k and no sooner had she done o s ,


s
56 G imm s C omp le t e F i y T les r

a r a

going t o die at once but there i ne thing I should like t o do be


,
s o

fore my end—I should li ke t o hear the parson s sermon that he is ’

goin g to preach today On that the peas ant sai d Ah my chi ld do .



,

, ,

no t do i t—yo u mi ght make yourself worse if yo u were t o get up .

Look I wi ll go to the sermon and will attend to it very ca refully


, , ,

and wi ll tell yo u everyt hi ng the p a son says r .


Well sai d the woman go then and pay great attenti on and
“ ” “
, , , , ,

repeat t o me all that you hear S O the peasant went to the sermon .

,

and the p arson began to preach and sai d if any o ne had at home a ,

sick chil d a si ck hus b and a sick wi fe a sick father a si ck mother a


, , , , ,

si ck sister b rother or any o ne else and would make a p ilg i mage t o


, ,
r

the GOck e li hil l in Ital y where a p eek of laurel leaves costs a


r ,
-

kreuzer the sick child si ck hus b and sick wife s ick father sick
, , , , ,

mother sick sister b rother or whosoever else it mi ght b e would b e


, , , ,

restored t o health ins tantl y; and whosoever wished t o undert ake


the jo urne y was t o go t o him after the servi ce w as over and he ,

woul d give hi m the sack for the laurel leaves and the k reuzer -
.

No o n e w s more rejoi ced than the p eas ant and after the servi ce
a ,

w as over he went at once t o the parson w ho gave him the b ag fo r


, ,

the laurel leaves and the k reu zer After that he went home and
-
.
,

even at the hous e door he cri ed Hurrah ! dear wi fe it is now al ,



,

most the same thi ng as if yo u were well ! The p arson has p reached
today that whosoever had at home a sick child a s ick husband a , ,

si ck wife a sick fath er a sick mother a si ck s ister b rother o w ho , , ,


r

ever it nught b e and would make a pilg i mage t o the GOc k e li hill
,
r r

in I taly where a peck o f laurel leaves costs a kreuzer the s i ck


,
-
,

chi ld s ick hus b an d s ick wife sick father sick mother sick s ister
, , , , , ,

brother o whosoever else it w as would b e ured im mediately ; and


,
r ,
c

n o w I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson ,

and wi ll at once b egin my j ourne y s o that you may get well the
faster and thereupon he went away He w as however hardly

, .
, ,

gone b efore the women go t up and the parson w s there direct ly ,


a .

But now we wi ll leave these tw o for a whi le and follow th e peas ,

ant w ho wal ked Ou qui ckly without stopping in order to get the
, ,

sooner to the GO k e li hi ll ; and on hi way he met hi gossip His


c r s s .

gossip was an egg merchant and was just comi ng from the market
-
, ,

where he had sold hi eggs M y yo u be b lessed sai d the gossip s .



a , ,

where are you Off to o fast? s

T o all ete ni ty m y fri end sai d the peasant m y wife i ill and
“ ”
r , , ,
s ,

I have b een today to he the parson s sermon and he preached ar


that if any n had in hi s house a sick chi ld a si ck hus band a sick


o e , ,
O ld Hildebra nd 57
wife a sick fath er a sick mother a sick sister brother o any o n
, , , , r e

else and made a pilgrimage to the GO k li hi ll in It l y where a


,
c er a ,

peck o f laurel leaves costs a k reuzer; the sick chi ld the sick hus
-
,

b and the sick wife the si ck father the sick mother the s ick s ister
, , , , ,

brother o whosoever else it w s would b e cured immedi ate ly ; and


, r a ,

s o I have got the bag f r the la urel leaves and the kreuzer from the o -

pa son and now I am b g nning my pilg i mage But li ten gos


r ,
e r
” “
s ,

s ip

,sai d the egg—merchant to the peasant are yo u then stup id ,

, ,

enough to b eli eve such a thi ng as that? Don t yo u know what it ’

means ? Th e parson want to spend a whole day alone with y our s

wife in peace so he has given you thi s job to do to get yo u o ut of


,

the way .

My word ! sai d the p easant Ho w I d like to kn ow if tha t s


“ ” “ ’ ’
.

true ! ”


C ome then said the gossip I ll tell you what to do Ge t into
, ,

,
“ ’
.

m y egg b asket and I will carry yo u home and then you will e for
-
,
s e

yourself S o that w a settled and the gossip put the peasant into
.

s ,

hi egg bas ket and ca rri ed hi m home


s -
,
.

When the y got to the house hurrah ! b ut all w as going merri ly ,

there ! Th e woman had al eady had nearly eve ything killed that r r

w as in the farmy ard and had made pancakes ; and the parson was ,

there and had b rought his fiddl e wi th him The gossip knocked at
,
.

the door and the woman as ked w ho w as there It is I gossip


, .

, ,

sai d th e egg merch nt give me shelter this ni ght; I have not sold
-
a ,
‘‘

my eggs at the market s o no w I have t o ca ry them home ag i n ,


r a ,

and the y are s o heavy that I shall never b e ab le to do it for it i ,


s

dark already .


Indeed m y frien d said the woman yo u come at a very incon
, ,

,

veni ent time fo me b ut as you are here it can t be helped ; come in


r ,

and t ke a seat there on th e b ench by the stove Then she placed


a .

the gossip and the b asket whi ch he carried on hi b ack o n the s

b ench by the stove Th parson however and the woman were as . e , ,

merry as possib le At length the parson sai d Listen my dea .


,

,
r

friend you can sing beauti fully ; sin g something to me Oh sai d


,
.
” “
,

the woman I c nnot si ng n w in my young days indeed I cou l d


,

a o ,

sing well enough but that s all over n w Come s i d the parson,

o .
” “ ”
,
a

once more do sing some little song,



.

Th en th e woman sang ,

I ve s ent my hus ba nd awa y f o m me


“ ’
r

To t he GOckerli hill in Ital y

.
58 G imm Co mp lete F i y Ta les r

s a r

Thereupon the parson sang ,

befo e he a me back

I w i h tw

ye s as a ar r c ,

I d ne e as k him fo t he la u e l le f ac k

v r r r -
a s .


Ha lleluja h .

hen the gossip who was in the b ackground be gan to sing ! but
T , ,

I ought to te ll you the peasant was call ed Hildeb rand ! o the gos ,
s

sip sang ,

Wh t t t hou d oing my Hilde b nd dear



a ar , ra ,

The re on t he b enc h b y t he s t ove s o ne a r?



H a lleluja h .

Th en the peasant sang from hi basket s ,

ha ll h t e f om

A ll si nging I eve r s a r t his da y ,

A nd he re in t his bas ke t

no long er I ll s t a y .

Ha lleluj a h .

And he go t out of the basket and drove the p son ar o ut

hous e .

T h e S i ng i ng B o n e

A CERTAIN COUN TRY w as greatly troubled by a wi ld boar that t a

tacked workers in the fi elds ki lled men and tore them t pieces , , o

with it terrib le tusks Th Ki ng of the coun t y had Offered rich


s . e r re

ward to any one who woul d id the land of thi s terror But the
s r .

beast was so huge and ferocious that no man could even b e per
su d d to enter the forest where the ani mal made it home
a e s .

At last the King made a p roclamati on that he woul d give hi s only


daughter in mar i age t o any man w ho would b ring th wild b oar t o
r e

him dead o alive


,
r .

There li v ed two b rothers in that coun t ry the sons o f a poor man , ,

who gave noti ce of their readi ness t enter on thi s pe i lous under o r

taking Th elder who was clever and crafty was influenced by


. e , ,

pri de ; the youn ger who was innocent and simp le Offered hi mself
, ,

from ki ndness of hea t r .

Thereupon the King advi sed that as the best and safest way ,

wou l d be to take oppos ite direct ions in the wood the elder w t ,
as o

go in the evening and the younger in the mornin g .


S inging B o ne 59 The

Th y ounger had not gone f when a li ttle fairy stepped up to


e ar

him He he l d in hi hand a b lack spear and sai d I wi ll gi ve y u



. s , , o

this spear because your heart i innocent and good With this yo u s .

can go o ut and di scover the wil d boar and he shall no t be able to ,

harm you .

He thanked the li t tle man took the spear placed it o n hi shoul , , s

der and without delay went further into the forest It was n t long
,
. o

before he espied the animal comi ng toward him and fi erce ly mak ,

i ng ready t spri ng But the youth stood sti ll and held the Spear
o .

firml y in front of hi m In wi ld rage the fierce beast ran vi o lently to


.

ward him and w met by the spear o n the point o f which he


,
as ,

threw himself and as it pierced hi heart he fell dead


, ,
s , .

Then the youngster took the dead monster o n hi shoulder an d s

went to find his brother A s he approached the other side Of the .

wood where stood a large hall he heard music and found a num
, , ,

ber o f people dan cing d i nking wi ne and making merry Hi elder ,


r ,
. s

brother was among them for he thought the wild boar would n t ,
o

run far away and he wi shed t get up hi s courage for the evening
,
o

by cheerful company and wine .

When he caught si ght O f hi s younger brother coming o ut o f the


forest laden wi th hi booty the most restless jealousy and mali ce
s ,

rose in hi heart But he di sgui sed his bitter feeli ngs and spoke
s .

ki ndly to his b rother and sai d Come in and stay wi th us dear , ,



,

brother and rest awhi le and get u p your strength by a cup of


, ,

wine .

So the youth not suspecting anything wrong carried the dead


, ,

b oar into hi s brother s hou e and told hi m o f the li ttle man he had

s ,

met in th wood who had given hi m the spear and how he had
e , ,

killed the wild ani mal .

Th elder brother persuaded him t o stay and rest till the eveni ng
e ,

and then the y went o ut together in the tw ili ght and wal ked by the
river ti ll it became quite dark A li ttle b idge lay across the river . r ,

over whi ch they had to pass and the elder brother let the young ,

o n ego b efore him When they arrived at the mi ddle o f the s tream
.

the w icked man gave hi youn ger brother a blow from behi nd and s ,

he fell down dead instantly .

But fearing he mi ght n t be quite dead he th ew the body over o ,


r

the bridge into the river and through the clear waters aw it sink ,
s

into the sand After thi s w i cked deed he ran home qui ckly took the
. ,

dead wi ld boar o n hi shou l ders and car i ed it t o the King wi th s ,


r ,

the pretense that he had ki lled the ani mal and that therefore he ,
60 Grimm s Comp lete Fa iry Ta les

could claim the Prin cess as his wife according


t o the Kin g s ,
'

promi se .

But these dark dee ds are not often concealed fo somethi ng hap ,
r

pens to brin g them t o light Not many ye a s after a herdsman


. r , ,

p as sing over the b ridge wit h hi flock s aw beneath him in the sand
s ,

a little b one as whi te as snow and thought th at it would mak e a


,

very nice mouthpiece fo his horn r .

As soon as the flock p assed over the b ri dge he waded into the ,

mi ddl e of the stream—fo the water was very shallow—took up the


r

b one and carried it home t o make a mouthpiece for hi horn


,
s .

B ut th e fir st time he b lew th e b orn after the b one w as in it it ,

filled the herds man wi th wonder and amazement ; for it b egan t o


sin g o f i tself and these were the words it sang
,


A h! dear s he p herd you are b lowing your horn
,

With one of my bone s, w hich nig ht and mo m


Lie st ill unburied beneat h t he wav e
,

Where I was t hrown in a sand y g rav e .

I killed t he wi ld b oar, and my brot her s lew me ,


P
And gaine d t he rincess by p ret end ing t was he
” ’
.

What a wonderful horn s ai d the shepherd that can s ing of it



,

,

s elf ! I mus t ce tainl y ta k e it t o my lord the King



r , .

A s soon the h orn was brought before the King and blown by
as

the shepherd it at once b egan t sing the same ong nd the same
,
o s a

words .

Th e Ki ng w as at first s u p i sed b ut hi s u p i ci on be ing arouse d


r r ,
s s ,

he ordered th at the sand under the b i dge should be examin ed im r

medi ately and then the ent ire skeleton f the m urdered man was
,
o

di scovere d and th e wh ole wi ck ed deed came to li ght


,
.

Th e wi cked brother could n o t deny the deed He was therefore .

ordered t be tied in a s ack n d drowned whi le the remain f hi


o a ,
s o s

murdered b rother were carefull y carried t o the churchy ard and ,

l ai d t o rest in a b eautiful g ave r .

M a i d M a l ee n

THER w a s once a Ki ng who had a n w ho asked in marri age the


E so

daughter of a mi ghty Kin g ; h w s called M ai d M al een and w


s e a ,
as
M a id M a leen 61

very beautiful A her father wi shed to give her to another the


. s ,

Prince w rejected; but as they both loved each other wi th all their
as

hearts the y would n t give each other up and M ai d M aleen sai d to


, o ,

her father I can and will tak e no other for my husb and
,

.

Then the Ki ng flew into a passi on and ordered a dark tower to ,

b e bui lt into which no ray of sunl ight o moonl ight shoul d enter
,
r .

When it was finished he s i d Th erein shalt thou be imprisoned ,


a ,

for seven years and then I wi ll come nd ee if thy perve se sp i i t


,
a s r r

i b roken M eat and d i nk for the seven years were carried into th

s . r e

t ower and then he and her wai ting woman were led into it and
,
s -

walled up and thus cut off from the sky and from the earth Th ere
, .

they t in the darkness and knew n t when day o ni ght began


sa , o r .

Th Ki n g s o n often went round and roun d the tower and called


’ '

e s ,

their n m es but no sound from without pierced through the thi ck


a ,

walls What else could the y do b ut lament and complain ?


.

M eanwhi le the time passed and b y the diminuti on o f the food ,

and d i nk they knew that the seven years were comin g t o an end
r .

The y thought the moment o f the ir de liverance was come ; but no


stroke o f the hammer w as heard no stone fell o ut o f the wall and it , ,

seemed t o M ai d M aleen that her father had forgotten her As they .

onl y had food for a short time l onger and s w a mi serable death ,
a

awai ti ng them M ai d M al een said W must t y ou last chance


, ,

e r r ,

and see if we can break thr ough the wall She took the bread .

knife and picked and bored at th mortar o f a stone and when she
,
e ,

was t ired the wai ting maid took her turn With great labor the y
,
-
.

succeeded in getting ut o ne stone and then a second and third o , , ,

and when three days were over the first ray of li ght fell o n their
d rk ness and at la t the openi ng was o lar ge that they could look
a ,
s s

o ut .

Th e s kywas b lue and a fresh breeze played on their faces ; but


,

how melancholy everythi ng looked all around ! H er father s castle ’

lay in ruins the town and the vi llages were so far as could b e seen
, , ,

destroyed by fire the fields far and wide lai d to was te and no
, ,

human being was visib le When the openi ng in the wall w large . as

enough for them t o sli p th ough the waiting maid sprang down r ,
-

first and then M aid M aleen followed But where were they to go ?
,
.

Th enemy had ravaged the who l e ki ngdom d i ven away the Ki ng


e ,
r ,

and s l ai n all the i nhabitants They wandered forth to seek another .

country but nowhere di d they find a shelter o a human being to


, ,
r

give them a mouthful f b read and their need w o great that O ,


as s

they were forced to appease their hunger wi th nettles When after .


,
62 G imm Comp lete F i y T les r

s a r a

long jou neying t hey came into another country they t ied to get
r , ,
r

work e verywhere ; but wherever the y knocked they were turned


away and no o n would have pity n th em At last the y arrived in
, e o .

a large city and went to the royal palace There also they were . or

dered t o go away b ut at last the cook sai d that t hey might stay in
,

the ki tchen and b e scul li ons .

Th son O f the King in whose kingdom they were w as however


e , , ,

the very man who had been betrothed t M aid M a leen Hi father o . s

had chosen another bri de f hi m whose face was as u gly as her or ,

heart w as wi cked Th wedding w as fixed and the mai den had al


. e ,

ready ar i ved ; because o f her great ugli ness however he shut her
r , ,
s

self in her room and allowed no on to see her and M ai d M aleen


, e ,

h d to take her her meal from the ki tchen When the da y came for
a s .

the bri de and the b ri degroom to go to church he w as ashamed Of ,


s

her ugliness and frai d that if she showed herself in the streets she
,
a ,

would be mocked and laughed at by the people .

Then sai d he t o M ai d M aleen A great p iece o f luck h



s b efal ,
as

len thee I have sprained m y foo t and cann ot well w lk th ough


.
,
a r

the streets ; thou shalt put o n my wedding clothes and take my -

place ; a greater honor than that thou can t not have ! M aid M a s

leen howe ver refu ed it and said I wis h f no honor whi ch is


, , s , ,

or

n t sui table for me


o It was in vain t o that the bri de Offered her
.
,
o,

gold At last he sai d angri ly I f thou dost not obey me it shall


. s ,

,

cost thee thy life I have but to speak the word and thy head will
.
,

li at thy feet Then she was forc d to O bey and put n the

e . e ,
o

bri de s magni ficent clothes and all her jewels When she entered

the royal hall every o n was amazed at her great b eaut y and the
, e ,

King sai d to hi s o n Thi s i the bri de whom I have chosen for


s ,

s

thee and whom thou must lead to church Th e bri degroom w as


, .

astoni shed and thought She i like my M aid M aleen and I


, ,

s ,

should b eli eve that it w a he herself but she ha long b een shut s s ,
s

up in the tower dead He took her by the hand and led her t o
,
or .

church On the way was a nettle plant and sh sai d


.
-
,
e ,


Oh ,
ne tt le-p la nt,
Litt le nett le-p la nt ,
Wha t do s t t hou here al one?
I ha ve k no w n t he time
When I a te the e unb oiled ,

When I a t e t hee unro as t ed



.

Wh at art thou saying ? asked the Ki ng s



Nothing she ” “ ”

s on .
,

repli ed I was only thi nki ng f M ai d M aleen He was surprised


,

o .

64 G imm s Comp let e F i y T les r

a r a

what I sai d t o the ne t tle and h rep eated the words which h ,

s e s e

had just heard But what di dst thou s y t o the foot bridge when
.

a -

we went over it ? asked the King s o n To the foot bridge ? he


” ’
s .

-

s

answered; I don t talk to foot b i dges Th en thou t not the true


“ ’
-
r .
” “
ar

b i de She again said


r .

,


I mus t g o ou t unt o my ma id,
Who keeps my t hou hts for me g ,

and ran o ut and found M ai d M aleen Girl what di dst thou ,



,
s ay to
the foot bri dge ? I sai d nothi ng but
-
” “
,

Fo ot brid g e do no t b e k ‘
-
, r a ,

m no t t he t rue bride

I a .


at costs thee th y life ! cried the b ride but she hurri ed into
Th

,

the room and sai d I know now what I sai d t o the foot b ri dge
, ,

-
,

and she rep eated the words But what didst thou say to the .

church door? To the chu ch door? she repli ed ; I don t talk t o


-
” “
r -
” “ ’

church doors Then thou art not the true b ride


-
.
” “
.

She went o ut and found M ai d M aleen and said Gi l what , ,



r ,

di dst thou ay t o the church door ? I sai d no thi ng b ut


” “
s -
,

C hu ch do or b eak not “
r -
,
r ,

I am not t he t rue b ide r .

That will b reak thy neck fo r thee ! cri ed the bri de and flew into
“ ”
,

a te ib le p assion b ut she hastened b ack into the room and sai d I


rr , , ,

know now what I s id t o the church door and she repeated the
a -
,

words But where hast thou the jewel whi ch I gave thee at the
.

church door ? What jewel? she an swered ; thou di dst not give
-
” “ ” “

me any jewel I myself put it ro und thy neck and I m yself fas
.
” “
,

tened it ; if thou dost no t know th at thou art not the t ue bri de He ,


r .

drew the veil from her face and when he aw her imm easurab le ,
s

ugline ss he s prang b ack ter i fi ed and sai d How comest thou


,
r , ,

here ? Who art thou? I am thy b etrothed bri de b ut b eca use I


” “
,

feared lest the p eople should mock me when the y s w me o ut of a

doors I commanded the scullery mai d to dress herself in my


,
-

clothes and t o go to church in tead f me Where i the girl ?


,
s o .
” “
s

said he ; I want to ee her go and b i ng her here She went out



s ,
r .

and told the servants that the scullery mai d was an impostor and -
,

th at the y must take her out into th court yard and st i ke o ff her e - r

head The servants laid hold o f M aid M aleen and wanted to d ag


. r

her out but she screamed so loudl y for help that the King s s on
, ,

The G o o e Gi ls -
r 65

heard her voice hurried u t ,


o Of hi chamber and ordered them to
s

set the m i den free i nstantly


a .

Li ghts were brought and then he saw n her neck the gold chain
,
o

whi ch he had given her at the church door Thou a t the t ue -


.

r r

b i de sai d he who went wi th me to church ; come with me now


r ,

,

to my room When they were both alone he sai d On the way to


.
, ,

the church thou di d t name M ai d M aleen who was my betrothed


s ,

b i de ; if I coul d beli eve it possible I should think he w as standing


r s

before me—thou art like her in every respect She answered I am


,
” “
.
,

M ai d M aleen who for thy sake w ,


impri soned seven ye s in the as ar

darkness who suffered hunger an d thi rst and has lived so long in
, ,

want and poverty Today however th e sun is shi ning o n me once


.
, ,

more I was married to thee in the church and I am thy lawful


.
,

wi fe Then they ki ssed each other and were happ y all the days o f
.

,

their lives Th false b ri de was rewarded fo what he had done b y


. e r s

havi ng her head cut o ff .

Th e tower in whi ch M ai d M aleen had been impri soned rem ai ned


standi ng for a long tim e and when the child en p assed by it they
,
r

sang ,


K ling , k la ng, g lo ria .

Who sits wi t hin t his t ower?



g
A Kin s da ug ht er, s he s it s w i t hin,
A s ig ht of he r I ca nno t wi n,
The w a ll it wi ll no t brea k,
The s t o ne ca nno t b e pierc ed .

Litt le Ha ns , wi t h your coa t s o ga y,


F o llo w me ,
fo llow me f ,
as t as yo u ma y .

T h e G o o s e Gi rl -

THER E w a s once upon a ti me an O ld Queen whose husband had


b een dead for man y years and h had a beauti ful daughter When ,
s e .

the Princess grew up she was betrothed to a Prince who li ved at a


great di stance Wh en the ti me came for her to be married and she
.
,

had to journe y forth into the di stant ki ngdom the aged Queen ,

packed up for her many costly vessels of silver and gold and t i n ,
r

ket al so o f gold and silver nd cups and jewels ; in short e verythin g


s ,
a ,
66 G imm s Complete Fai y Ta lesr

r

which appertained t o a royal dowry fo she loved her chi ld wi th all ,


r

her heart She likewi se sent her mai d in waiting w ho w s t o ri de


.
, a

with her and hand her over to the bridegroom and each had a
, ,

horse for the j ourney but the horse of the Kin g s daughter w as
,

call ed Falada and could sp eak S O when the hour o f partin g had
,
.

come the aged mother went into her bed room took a small kni fe
,
-
,

and cut her finger with it until it b led then she held a whi te hand ,

kerchi ef to it into whi ch he let three drops o f b lood fall gave it t o


s ,

her daughter and said De ar chi ld preserve thi s carefully ; it will


,

,

b e of service to you o n your way .


S o they too k a sorrowful leave o f each o ther; the Princess put th e


piece o f cloth in her b osom mounted her horse and then went , ,

away t o her bri degroom A fter she had ri dden for a while sh felt a
. e

burning thi rst and sai d t o her wai t ing mai d Dis mount and take
,
-
,

,

my cup whi ch yo u have brought for me and get me some water ,

from the stream for I shoul d like to drink If yo u are thirs ty


,
.
” “ ”
,

s aid the waiti ng mai d get off your horse y ourself and li e down
-
,

,

and drink out of the water I don t choos e to be your servant S O in ,



.

her great thi rst the Pri ncess alighted b ent down over the water in ,

the stream and drank and w as not allowed t o d ink out o f the
,
r

golden cup Then he sai d Ah Heaven ! A nd th e three d op s o f


. s ,

,

r

b lood ans wered If your mother knew this her heart would
,

,

break But the Ki ng s daughter w as humb le s ai d nothin g and


.
” ’

, ,

mounted her horse agai n .

She rode some iles fur ther b ut the day w as warm the sun
rrr , ,

scorched her and she was thirsty once more and when the y came
, ,

t o a stream o f water he ag ai n cried t o her wai ti ng mai d Dis



,
s -
,

mount and give me some water in my golden cup for she had
,

,

long ago forgotten the girl s ill words But the waiting mai d sai d ’
.
-

still more haughtil y If yo u wish t o drink dri nk as you can I don t


,

, ,

choose t o b e y our mai d Then in her great thirst the King s daugh
.
” ’

ter alighted b ent over the flowing tream we p t and sai d Ah


, s , ,

,

Heaven! And the drops Of b lood agai n replied If your mother



,

knew thi s her heart would break And as she w as thus drinking
, .

and leaning ri ght over the stream the handkerchi ef with the th ee ,
r

drops o f blood fell o ut O f her b osom and floated away with th e ,

water wi thout her O bserving it o great w her trouble , s as .

Th e wai ti ng mai d however had seen it and s he re j oi ced t o thi nk


-
, , ,

th at she had no w power over the b i de for since the Princess had r ,

lost the drop s o f b lood h had become weak and powerless : So


,
s e

no w when s he wanted t o mount her horse again the o ne that was ,


G o o e Gi l 67 The s -
r

called Falada the w i ting mai d said Falada i more sui table f
,
a -
,

s or

me and my nag wi ll do for y u and the Princess had to be con


,
o

,

tent wi th that Then t h waiti ng mai d with many hard words bade
. e -
, ,

the Princess exchange her royal apparel for her own shabby
clothes ; and at length she w compelled to swear b y the clear k y as s

above her that sh would n t say one word of thi s to an y o n at


, e o e

the royal cou t and if she had not taken thi s oath she would have
r ,

b een ki lled o n the spot But Falada w all thi s and Observed it . sa ,

well .

Th wai ting mai d now mounted Falad


e -
and the tru e bride the a,

b ad horse and thus they traveled onwards un ti l at length they n


, , e

t e d th royal palace There were great rejoicings over her ar i val


re e . r ,

and the Prince sprang fo rward to meet her lifted the wai ting maid ,
-

from her horse nd thought she was hi cons ort She w s con
, a s . a

ducted upstai s but the real Prin cess w left standin g below Then
r ,
as .

the old Kin g looked ut o f the window and saw her standi ng in the
o

courtyard and how dain ty and deli cate and b eauti ful sh w as and
,
e ,

ins tantl y went t o the royal apartment and asked the b i de about ,
r

the gi l she had wi th her who w as stand n down b elow in the


r

cou t yard and who she w as I pi cked her up on my way fo a


r ,
.

r

comp ni on ; give the girl something t o work at that she may not
a ,

stand idl e .

But the o ld King had no work for her and k new o f none s he , ,
o

s i d I have a little b oy who tends the geese she may help hi m


a ,

,
.

Th e b o y was called C onrad and the true b i de had t o help hi m ,


r

tend the geese Soon afterw rds the false b i de sai d t o the young
. a r

King D earest hus b and I beg you to do me a favor He an


,

,
.

swered I wi ll do most wi llingly Then send fo the knacker


,

so .
” “
r ,

and have the head of the horse o n whi ch I rode here cut o ff fo it ,
r

vexed me o n the way In reality he was frai d that the horse .



, s a

mi ght tell how she had b ehaved to the King s daughter Then she ’

succeeded in making the Ki ng promise that it shoul d b e done and ,

the fai thful Falada w to die as .

Thi s came to the ears f the real P i ncess and h secretly prom o r ,
s e

i sed to pay the kn acker a p i ece o f gold if he would pe form a smal l r

servi ce for her Th ere was a great dark looking gateway in th


.
- e

town through whi ch morni ng and evening she had to pass with the
,

geese ; would he be good as to nai l up Falada s head n it so that


so

o ,

she mi ght see him agai n more than once Th e kn acker s man prom ,
.

ised to do that and cut O ff the head and nai led it fast beneath the
, ,

dark gateway .
68 Co mp lete F i y T les
Grimm s

a r a

Early in the morni ng when she and Con ad d ove ,


r r out their flock
beneath thi s gateway she said in pa sing ,
s ,

A l s F l da ha nging t h

! a ,
a a ,
ere

Then the head answered ,

A las young Qu en how i ll y u f



,
! e ,
o a re

If t his you r t ende r mo t her knew,


H er heart w o uld su rely brea k in t w o .

hen they went still fur ther o ut o f the town and drove their
T ,

geese into the co untry And when they had come to the meadow
.
,

sh t down and unbound her hair whi ch was like pure gold and
e sa ,

Conrad saw it nd deli ghted in it bri ghtness and wanted t pluck


a s ,
o

ou t a few hai rs Then s he sai d .


,


B lo w blow , t hou g ent le
, wi nd, I s a y,

Bl w o C
onra d s li tt le ha t

a w a y,

A nd ma ke him chas e it he re a nd t he re ,

Unti l I ha v e bra ided a ll my ha ir,


A nd bo und it up a g a in .

And there came such a vi olent wind that it blew Conrad s hat far ’

away across count y and he w as forced to run after it Wh en he


r , .

came back he had fini shed combing her hair and was putting it up
s

ag ai n and he could not get any of it Then Conrad was angry and
, .
,

would not speak to her and thus they watched the geese until the
,

eveni ng and then th ey went home


, .

Next day when they were dri ving the gees e out through the dark
gateway the mai den sai d
, ,

A la s F la d ha ng ing t he e!
“ ”
,
a a, r

Falada answere d ,

Al young Que en how ill you f e!



as , , ar

If t his yo ur t ender mo t her k new,


H er hea rt w uld s urely brea k in t wo o .

And he t down agai n in th field and began t o comb ou t her


s sa e

hair and C onrad ran and tried to clutch it so she sai d in haste
, , ,

B low blow t hou gent le wi nd I


, y , ,
sa ,

B lo w C on d li t t le h t w y

ra s a a a ,

A nd ma ke him c has e it here a nd t he re ,

Unt il I ha v e b ra ide d a ll my ha ir ,

A nd b ound it up a g a in .
G o o e Gi l 69 The s -
r

Then t he wi nd blew and blew hi li ttle hat ff hi head and far ,


s o s

away and Conrad w forced to run after it and when he came


, as ,

back her hai r had been put up a long time and he could get none
, ,

o f i t and so they looked after the i geese ti ll eve ni ng came


,
r .

But in the e ve ni ng after they had got home Conrad went to the ,

ld Ki ng nd sai d I won t tend the geese wi th that girl any “ ’


o , a ,

longer ! Why not? inquired the aged Kin g Oh because she


” “ ”
.

,

vexes me th whole day long Then the aged King commanded


e .

him to relate what it was that h di d t o him And Conrad sai d In



s e .
,

the morni ng when we pass beneath the dark gateway wi th the


flock there i a sorry horse s head n the wall and she says to it
,
s

o , ,

A las , Fa la da , ha ng ing t here!


‘ ’

And the head replies



,

A las , you ng Q ueen ho w i ll you a re!


, f
t his your t ende r mot he r kne w
If ,

Her hea rt w ould surely brea k in t w o .

An d Con ad went o n t o relate what happened n the goose p


r o as

ture and h w when there he had to chase hi hat


,
o s .

Th aged Ki ng commanded hi m to d ive hi flock o ut again next


e r s

day and s soon as mornin g came he placed hi mse lf behi nd the


, a ,

dark gateway and heard how the maiden spoke to the head of
,

Falada and then he t went into the country and hi d hi mself in


,
oo ,

the thi cket in th meadow There he soon w wi th hi wn eyes


e . sa s o

the goose girl and the goose boy b rin ging their flock and how after
- -
,

a whi le she sat down and un pl i ted her hair whi ch shone wi th ra di a ,

ance And soon he said


. s ,


B low , blow, t hou g ent le wi nd , I s a y,
B low C ’
o nra d s litt le ha t a wa y ,

A nd ma ke him chas e it he re a nd t he re,


Until I
ha v e bra id ed a ll my ha ir,
A nd b o und it up a g a in .

Then came a blast o f wi nd and carried o ff C onrad s hat so that ’

he had to run far away whi le the m i den quietly went on combing ,
a

and p l ai ting her hair all of which the King obse ved Then qu ite ,
r .
,

unseen he went away and when the goose gi rl came home in the
, ,
-

ev ening he call ed her aside and asked why she di d a ll these ,

thi ngs I may n t tell you that and I dare no t lament my sorrows
. o ,

to any human being f I have sworn not to do so by th heaven ,


or e

whi ch i above me ; if I had not done that I shou l d have lost my


s ,
70 C omp lete F i y Ta les Grimm s

a r

life He urged her and left her no peace but he cou l d draw noth
.

,

in g from her Then sai d he If you will not tell me anythi ng tell
.
,

,

y our sorrows t the iron stove there and he went away


o -
,
.

Then she crept i nto the iron stove and began t o weep and la -
,

ment and emptied her whole heart and sai d Here am I deserted
, , ,

by the whole world and y et I am a Kin g s daughter an d a false,


wai ti ng maid has b y force brought me t o such a pass that I have


-

b een compell ed to put o ff my royal apparel and she has tak en m y ,

place with my bridegroom and I have t o perform meni al service as ,

a go o se girl If m y mother di d b ut know that her heart woul d


-
.
,

break .

The aged King however w as standi ng outsi de b y the p ipe o f the


, ,

stove and w as lis tening t o what h sai d and heard it Then he


,
s e ,
.

came back again nd b ade her come o ut o f the stove And royal
, a .

garments were placed o n her and it w as marvelous how beautifu l ,

she was ! The aged Ki ng s ummoned hi o n and revealed t o him s s ,

that he had got the false bri de w ho w as only a wai tin g mai d b ut -
,

that the true o ne was standi ng th ere a the sometime goose girl , s - .

The youn g Ki ng rejoi ced wi th all hi hea t when he saw her b eauty s r

and youth and a great feast w as made ready to whi ch all the p eo
,

ple and all good friends were invi ted .

At the head o f the table t the bridegroom with the Kin g s sa


daughter at o ne side f him and the wai ting mai d o n the other but o ,
-
,

the wai ti ng mai d w s b linded and di d n t recogni ze the Prin cess


-
a ,
o

in her dazzli ng array When the y had eaten and d un k and were . r ,

merry the aged Ki ng asked the wai ting maid as a riddl e what a
,
-
,

person deserved w ho had behaved in such and s uch a way to her


master and at the same tim e related the whole story and asked
, ,

what sentence such an on merited e .

Then the false b ride sai d She deserves no b etter fate th an t o b e



,

stripped entirely naked and put in a b arrel whi ch is studded in ide , s

with pointed nails and tw o whi te horses shoul d be harnessed t o it


, ,

whi ch will drag her along through o n street after another till she e ,

is dead It i you sai d the aged Ki ng and yo u have p o


” “ ” “
. s , , r

d y ou ow n entence and thu shall it be done unto you



n o un ce r s , s .

When the sentence had been carri ed ut the young Ki ng marri ed o ,

hi t ue bri de and b oth o f them re i gned over their ki ngdom in


s r ,

peace and happiness .


72 Comp le te F i y T le
Grimm s

a r a s

a box n the ear and cri ed ng il y Why art thou snatchi ng m y


o , a r ,

piece away from me ? I have n t snatched it away said the ” “


o ,

other a sharp shooter must have shot it away from thee Th


,

.

e

gi ant took another piece b ut could not however keep it in hi , , , s

hand for the hunts man shot it out Then the gi ant sai d Th at must
,
.
,

be a good shot to sho ot the bit out of one s very mouth such an on ’

, e

would b e useful to u And he cried aloud Come here thou s



.
,

,

sharpshoo ter s ea t thyself at the fir b eside u and eat thy fill we


, e s ,

will not hurt thee ; but if thou wilt n t come and we h ave to b ing o , r

the b y force thou art a los t man !


e ,

At thi s invitation the youth went up t them and told them he o

was a skilled hunts man and that whatever he aimed at with his ,

gun he w certain to hi t Then they sai d if he would go wi th them


,
as .

he should b e well treated and they told him that outside the forest ,

there w a great lake b ehi nd whi ch stood a tower nd in the


as , ,
a

tower w as imp i soned a lovely Prin cess whom the y wi shed very
r ,

much t o ca rry off Yes sai d he I wil l s o on ge t her fo you


“ ” “ ”
.
, , r .

Then the y added But t here is still some thin g else ; there i a tin y

,
s

lit tle do g whi ch b egi ns to b ark di ectl y any on goes near and
, r e , as

soon as it b arks every one in the royal palace wakens up and f r , o

thi s reason we cannot get there ; cans t thou undertake to shoot it


dead? Yes s ai d he that w ill b e a li ttle bit f fun fo me Aft er
” “ ”
, ,

o r .

thi s he got into a b oat and rowed over the lake and soo n as he , as

landed the little do g c ame m nnin g ut and w as about to b rk but


,
o , a ,

the hun t sman took hi air gun and shot it dead When the gi ants
s -
.

w that the y rej oice d and tho ught the y alread y had the Kin g s

sa , ,

daughter safe b ut the hunts man wished first to see how matte s
,
r

stoo d and told them that the y mus t stay outside until he c alled
,

them Then he went into th castle and all w as perfectly quiet


. e ,

withi n and every one w as as leep


, .

When he opened the door of the firs t room a sword w h angi ng ,


as

o n th e wall whi ch was made of pure s ilver and t here w as a golden ,

st ar n it and the name of the Kin g and on a tab le near it lay a


o , ,

seal ed letter which he broke open and ins ide it w as writt en that ,

whosoever had the word co ul d kill everything whi ch opposed him


s .

S o he took the sword from the wall hung it at his s i de and went ,

onwards ; then h e entered the room where the King s daughter was ’

lying sleepin g and she w as ,


beautiful that he stood still and so ,