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Microsoft Windows XP

1

Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

Microsoft Windows XP 1 Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP Objectives You will have mastered the material

Objectives

You will have mastered the material in this chapter when you can:

Start Microsoft Windows XP, log on to the computer, and identify the objects on the desktop

Perform the basic mouse operations:

point, click, right-click, double-click, drag, and right-drag

Display the Start menu and start an application program

Open, minimize, maximize, restore, move, size, scroll, and close a window

Display drive and folder contents

Create a folder in Windows Explorer and a WordPad document

Browse the Web using Windows Internet Explorer 7.0, a URL, and tabbed browsing

Download folders from scsite.com

Copy, move, rename, and delete files

Search for files using a word or phrase in the file or by name

Use Help and Support

Log off from the computer and turn it off

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Microsoft Windows XP

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Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

What Is an Operating System?

An operating system is the set of computer instructions, called a computer program, that

controls the allocation of computer hardware such as memory, disk devices, printers, and CD and DVD drives, and provides the capability for you to communicate with the computer. One

of the most popular and widely used operating systems is Microsoft Windows. Microsoft

Windows XP allows you to communicate with and control your computer. Windows XP simplifies the processes of working with documents and applications, transferring data between documents, organizing the manner in which you interact with the computer, and using the computer to access information on the Internet or an intranet.

Project Planning Guidelines

Working with an operating system requires a basic knowledge of how to start the operating system, log on and log off the computer, and identify the objects on the Windows desktop. As a starting point, you must be familiar with the Start menu and its commands, and be able to start an application. You will want to know how to manipulate windows as well as create a folder, display folder contents, recognize a disk drive, and download information from the Internet. You should be able to copy, move, rename, delete, and search for files. If you encounter a problem, Help and Support is available to answer any questions you may have.

Versions of the Microsoft Windows XP Operating System

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system is available in different versions: Microsoft Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition, Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition, Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition, and Microsoft Windows XP 64-Bit Edition. Microsoft Windows XP Professional is the operating system designed for businesses of all sizes and for advanced home computing. Microsoft Windows XP Professional (called Windows XP for the rest of the chapter)

is an operating system that performs every function necessary for you to communicate with

and use the computer. In business, Windows XP Professional is commonly used on standalone computers, client computers, and portable computers. A client is a computer connected to a server.

A server is a computer that controls access to the hardware and software on a network

and provides a centralized storage area for programs, data, and information. Figure 1–1 illustrates a simple computer network consisting of a server, three client computers, and a laser printer connected to the server.

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Microsoft Windows XP

Microsoft Microsoft Windows XP Windows XP Microsoft Windows XP client client client server laser printer
Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows XP
Windows XP
Microsoft
Windows XP
client
client
client
server
laser
printer

Figure 1–1

Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition is designed for entertainment and home use. Home Edition allows you to establish in the home a network of computers that share a single Internet connection, share devices such as a printer and a scanner, share files and folders, and play multicomputer games. Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition is designed for use with a Media Center PC. A Media Center PC is a home entertainment desktop personal computer that includes a mid- to high-end processor, large capacity hard disk, CD and DVD drives, a remote control, and advanced graphics and audio capabilities. Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition is designed for use on a special type of notebook computer, called a tablet PC. A tablet PC allows you to write on the device’s screen using a digital pen and convert the handwriting into characters the tablet PC can process. A Windows XP 64-Bit Edition also is available for individuals solving complex scientific problems, developing high-performance design and engineering applications, or creating 3-D animations.

Overview

As you read through this chapter, you will learn how to use the Windows XP commands by performing these general tasks:

• Start the Microsoft Windows XP operating system.

• Log on to the computer and log off from the computer.

• Perform basic mouse operations.

• Display the Start menu and start an application program.

• Open, minimize, maximize, restore, move, size, scroll, and close a window.

• Display drive and folder contents.

• Create folders and download folders from the Internet.

• Copy, move, rename, delete, and search for files.

• Use Help and Support.

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Windows XP Chapter 1

Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

Microsoft Windows XP Professional

Windows XP simplifies the process of working with documents and applications by transferring data between documents, organizing the manner in which you interact with the computer, and using the computer to access information on the Internet or an intranet. Windows XP is used to run application programs, which are programs that perform an application-related function such as word processing.

Windows XP Service Pack 2

Periodically, Microsoft releases a free update to the Windows XP Professional operating system. These updates, referred to as service packs, contain fixes and enhancements to the operating system. The latest service pack, Windows XP Service Pack 2, was released in August, 2004. Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) contains advanced security features that protect a computer against viruses, worms, and hackers. A table summarizing the new features contained in the Windows XP Service Pack 2 is available on the Internet.

The Windows XP Interface Some older interfaces, called command-line interfaces, required you to type keywords (special words or phrases the computer understood) or press special keys on the keyboard to communicate with the interface. Today, graphical-user interfaces incorporate colorful graphics, a mouse, and Web browser-like features, which make them more user friendly than their command-line predecessors.

What Is a User Interface?

A user interface is the combination of hardware and software that you use to communicate with and control the computer. Through the user interface, you are able to make selections on the computer, request information from the computer, and respond to messages that are displayed by the computer.

Hardware and software together form the user interface. Among the hardware devices associated with a user interface are the monitor, keyboard, and mouse (Figure 1–2). The moni- tor displays messages and pro- vides information. You respond by entering data in the form of a command or other response using the keyboard or mouse.

monitor mouse keyboard
monitor
mouse
keyboard

Figure 1–2

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The computer software associated with the user interface consists of the programs that engage you in dialogue (Figure 1–2 on the previous page). The computer software determines the messages you receive, the manner in which you should respond, and the actions that occur, based on your responses. The goal of an effective user interface is to be user-friendly, which means the software can be used easily by individuals with limited training. A graphical user interface, or GUI (pronounced gooey), is a user interface that displays graphics in addition to text when it communicates with the user.

Starting Microsoft Windows XP

When you turn on the computer, an introductory black screen consisting of the Microsoft Windows XP logo, progress bar, copyright messages (Copyright © Microsoft Corporation), and the word, Microsoft, are displayed. After a short time, the Welcome screen is displayed (Figure 1–3).

Welcome screen Microsoft user icons XP logo and names instructions Turn off computer icon instructions
Welcome
screen
Microsoft
user icons
XP logo
and names
instructions
Turn off
computer icon
instructions

Figure 1–3

The Welcome screen shows the names of every computer user on the computer. Clicking the user icon or user name begins the process of logging on to the computer. The list of user icons and names on the Welcome screen on your computer will be different. Clicking the Turn off computer icon at the bottom of the screen initiates the process of shutting down the computer.

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The Windows XP User Interface

To communicate with the operating system, you can use a mouse. A mouse is a pointing device used with Windows XP that may be attached to the computer by a cable or may be wireless. Among others, Windows XP supports the use of the Natural Wireless Laser Mouse 6000 (Figure 1–4).

The Mouse The mouse, although invented in the 1960s, was not used widely until the Apple Macintosh computer become available in 1984. Today, the mouse is an indispensable tool for every computer user.

wheel button allows you to scroll side to side and up and down secondary primary
wheel button allows
you to scroll side to side
and up and down
secondary
primary
mouse button
mouse button
battery life
indicator

Figure 1–4

Using the mouse, you can perform the following operations: point, click, right-click, double-click, drag, and right-drag. These operations are demonstrated on the following pages. Many common tasks, such as logging on to the computer or logging off, are performed by pointing to an item and then clicking the item. Point means you move the mouse across a flat surface until the mouse pointer rests on the item of choice. As you move the mouse across a flat surface, the optical sensor on the underside of the mouse senses the movement of the mouse, and the mouse pointer moves across the computer desktop in the same direction. In Office 2007, you can point to buttons on the Ribbon in a window and observe a live preview of the effect of selecting that button. Click means you press and release the primary mouse button, which in this book is the left mouse button. In most cases, you must point to an item before you click it.

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Logging On to the Computer

After starting Windows XP, you must log on to the computer. Logging on to the computer opens your user account and makes the computer available for use. In the following steps, the Brad Wilson icon and the Next button are used to log on to the computer. If you are using a computer to step through the project in this chapter and you want your screen to match the figures in this book, you should change your screen’s resolution to 1024 768. For information about how to change a computer’s resolution, read Appendix E.

Determine a User Name and Password

Plan

Before logging on to the computer, you must have a unique user name and password.

Ahead

1. Choose a password that no one could guess. Do not use any part of your first or last name, your spouse’s or child’s name, telephone number, street address, license plate number, Social Security number, and so on.

2. Be sure your password is at least six characters long, mixed with letters and numbers.

3. Protect your password. Change your password frequently and do not disclose it to anyone or write it on a slip of paper kept near the computer. E-mail and telemarketing scams often ask you to disclose a password, so be wary if you did not initiate the inquiry or telephone call.

To Log On to the Computer

The following steps illustrate how to log on to the computer using the Brad Wilson icon (or your icon) and type the 32lake password (or your password).

1
1

Click the Brad Wilson icon (or your icon) on the Welcome screen to display the ‘Type your password’ text box.

What is a text box?

A text box is a

rectangular area

in which you can

enter text.

Type 32lake (or your password) in the ‘Type your password’ text box as shown in Figure 1–5.

Brad Wilson icon and name highlighted Type your password text box Next Help button button
Brad Wilson
icon and name
highlighted
Type your
password
text box
Next
Help
button
button
bullets and
insertion point
in text box

Figure 1–5

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2

Click the Next button to log on to the computer and display the Windows XP desktop (Figure 1–6).

What if my computer displays a different desktop design?

Windows XP offers many standard desk- top designs, so any design is fine. The background design shown in Figure 1–6 is called Bliss.

Can I change the appearance of the desktop?

Yes. You may use a different desktop design and icons on the desktop by changing the desktop properties.

Recycle Bin contains deleted items and objects Start button allows you to start a program
Recycle Bin contains
deleted items and
objects
Start button allows
you to start a
program quickly,
find or open a
document, change
the computer’s
settings, obtain
Help, and shut down
the computer
mouse pointer allows you
to point to objects on the
desktop - it can change shape
based on where it points
taskbar contains
Start button, taskbar
button area, and
notification area
taskbar button
area contains no
taskbar buttons
current time is displayed
in notification area
and provides access to
computer programs
Show hidden
icons button

Figure 1–6

computer programs Show hidden icons button Figure 1–6 Notification area shows hidden icons and current time

Notification area shows hidden icons and current time - your notification area might show different objects

If I log on to the computer and I leave the computer unattended what will happen?

After ten minutes, the Welcome screen will appear and you will have to log on to the computer again to gain access to your account.

The Windows XP Desktop

Nearly every item on the Windows XP desktop is considered an object. Even the desktop itself is an object. Every object has properties, that are unique to that specific object and may affect what can be done to the object or what the object does. For example, a prop- erty of an object may be the color of the object, such as the color of the desktop. You can change the properties and move objects on the desktop.

To Display the Start Menu

A menu is a list of related commands and each command on a menu performs a specific action, such as searching for files or obtaining Help. The Start menu allows you to access objects on the computer and contains commands that allow you to connect to and browse the Internet, start an e-mail program, start application programs, store and search for documents, customize the computer, and obtain Help on thousands of topics. The following steps display the Start menu, display the All Programs submenu, display the Accessories submenu, and then close the Start menu.

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• Point to the Start button on the
taskbar to display the ToolTip,
‘Click here to begin’.
user icon
pinned items list contains Web
browser program (Internet
Explorer) and E-mail program
(Windows Live Mail)
and name
Start menu
two columns
• Click the Start button on the Windows
taskbar to display the Start menu
(Figure 1–7).
icon and command
name - commands
can represent
an application
program, a folder,
or an operation
What is a ToolTip?
A
ToolTip is a short on-screen note
associated
with the
right arrows indicate that
pointing to the command
will display a submenu
object
to which
you are
most frequently used
programs list contains
three programs but can
contain up to six - when
programs are executed,
they are placed on this list
pointing.
separator
A
ToolTip is
lines
displayed on the desktop for
approximately five seconds.
All Programs
command
What are the various sections
on the Start menu?
ellipsis indicates more
information is required
to execute the command
The top section contains the
user icon and name, the
Log Off icon
logs off the
computer
Turn Off Computer
icon turns off the
computer
middle section contains two
columns of commands, and the
bottom section contains two icons
(Log Off and Turn Off Computer).
pointing to the Start
button displays a
ToolTip momentarily
Figure 1–7
2
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Windows XP Chapter 1

Point to All Programs on the Start menu to display the All Programs submenu (Figure 1–8).

Accessories command All Programs submenu All Programs command
Accessories
command
All Programs
submenu
All Programs
command

Figure 1–8

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3

Point to Accessories on the All Programs submenu to display the Accessories submenu (Figure 1–9).

What happens when I click a command on the Accessories submenu that contains an application name such as WordPad?

Clicking a command on the Accessories submenu that con- tains an application name such as WordPad starts the WordPad application.

Accessories command is selected Accessories submenu All Programs submenu WordPad command
Accessories command
is selected
Accessories
submenu
All Programs
submenu
WordPad
command
4
4

Click an open area on the desktop to close the Start menu, Accessories submenu, and All Programs submenu (Figure 1–10).

Figure 1–9

mouse pointer Start menu, Accessories submenu, and All Programs submenu close open area on the
mouse pointer
Start menu,
Accessories submenu,
and All Programs
submenu close
open area
on the desktop

Figure 1–10

Other Ways 1. Press CTRL+ESC 2. Press WINDOWS
Other Ways
1. Press CTRL+ESC
2. Press WINDOWS

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Folders

A folder is a named location on a disk where files are stored. Each

folder is identified by a folder icon and folder name. Some folders include a symbol. In Figure 1–11, the Freshman folder consists of a yellow folder icon and folder name (Freshman) and the My Music folder consists of a yellow folder icon, folder name (My Music), and symbol (musical note).

folder icons symbol folder names
folder
icons
symbol
folder
names

Figure 1–11

To Add an Icon to the Desktop

You may want to add additional icons to the desktop. For example, you may want to add the My Computer icon to the desktop so you can view the contents of the computer easily. One method of adding the My Computer icon to the desktop is to right-click the My Computer command on the Start menu. Right-click means you press and release the secondary mouse button, which in this book is the right mouse button. As directed when using the primary mouse button to click an object, normally you will point to the object before you right-click it. The following steps add the My Computer icon to the desktop.

1
1

Click the Start button to display the Start menu.

Right-click My Computer on the Start menu to select the My Computer command and display a shortcut menu (Figure 1–12).

What is a shortcut menu?

A shortcut menu appears when you right-click an object and includes commands specifically for use with the object clicked.

highlighted My Computer command Show on Desktop command nine commands on shortcut menu Start button
highlighted My Computer
command
Show on Desktop
command
nine commands
on shortcut menu
Start button
Start menu

Figure 1–12

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2

Click Show on Desktop to close the shortcut menu and display the My Computer icon on the desktop (Figure 1–13).

Why should I use a shortcut menu? A shortcut menu speeds up your work and
Why should I use a shortcut menu?
A shortcut menu speeds up your
work and adds flexibility to your
interaction with the computer.
3
Q&A

Click an open area on the desktop to close the Start menu.

My Computer left corner of the desktop Start menu My Computer command shortcut menu closes
My Computer
left corner of the desktop
Start menu
My Computer
command
shortcut
menu closes
open area on
the desktop

Figure 1–13

Other Ways

1. Right-click desktop, click Properties on shortcut menu, click Desktop tab, click Customize Desktop, click icon title, click OK button, click OK button

To Open a Window by Double-Clicking a Desktop Icon

When a window icon is displayed on the desktop, you might want to open the window to examine the window contents. One method to open a window from the icon is to double-click the icon. Double-click means you quickly press and release the left mouse button twice without moving the mouse. In most cases, you must point to an item before you double-click. The step on the following page opens the My Computer window on the desktop by double-clicking the My Computer icon on the desktop.

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My Computer
My Computer
• Double-click the
My Computer icon
on the desktop by
quickly pressing and
releasing the left
mouse button twice
without moving the
mouse (Figure 1–14).
icon
icon and
window title
My Computer is active
window - the active
identifies the
window
window is the window
that currently is selected
Maximize and
Standard
Close buttons
menu bar
Buttons toolbar
Minimize
Address bar
button
What is displayed in
the taskbar
button area?
The recessed
three areas
in left pane
dark blue My
Computer button
is displayed in the
taskbar button area.
three groups
of icons in
right pane
What does the My
Computer window
allow me to do?
double up arrow
button indicates the
area is expanded
windows
borders
The My Computer
window allows you
to view the contents
of the computer.
the four objects
shown in the window
are called out on the
status bar
status bar
recessed dark blue
My Computer button
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Windows XP Chapter 1

Other Ways

1. Right-click desktop icon, click Open on shortcut menu

2. Press WINDOWS+E

The Contents of the My Computer Window Because windows can be easily customized, your My Computer window may not resemble the window shown in Figure 1–14. For example, different toolbars may display below the menu bar, icons may display smaller, icons may not be grouped, and different areas may be displayed in the left pane of the window.

Figure 1–14

The My Computer Window

Clicking the icon at the left on the title bar will display the System menu, which contains commands to carry out the actions associated with the My Computer window. On the far right of the title bar are the Minimize button, Maximize button, and Close button that can be used to specify the size of the window or close the window. The menu bar is below the title bar and contains a list of menu names: File, Edit, View, Favorites, Tools, and Help. The Standard Buttons toolbar is displayed below the menu bar and allows you to perform often-used tasks more quickly than when you use the menu bar. Each button on the Standard Buttons toolbar contains an icon. Three buttons contain a text label (Back, Search, and Folders) that identifies the function of the button. The Address bar below the Standards Buttons toolbar allows you to start an application, display a document, open another window, and search for information on the Internet. The Address bar shown in Figure 1–14 displays the Address box containing the My Computer icon, window title, down arrow, and Go button. The area below the Address bar is divided into two panes. The System Tasks, Other Places, and Details areas are displayed in the left pane. A button appears to the right of the title in each area to indicate whether the area is expanded or collapsed. A button identified by a double up arrow indicates the area is expanded. A button identi- fied by a double down arrow indicates the area is collapsed. When you click the double

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Organizing Windows Window management on the Windows XP desktop is important in order to keep the desktop uncluttered. You will find yourself frequently minimizing windows and then later reopening them with a click of a button in the taskbar button area.

up arrow button, the area collapses. When you click the double down arrow button, the area expands and the entire contents of the area are visible. Pointing to a task in the System Tasks area or a folder name in the Other Places area underlines the task or folder name and displays the task or folder name in light blue. Underlined text, such as the task and folder names, is referred to as a hyperlink, or simply a link. Pointing to a link changes the mouse pointer to a hand icon, and clicking a link displays information associated with the link. The right pane of the My Computer window contains three groups of icons. The Files Stored on This Computer group contains the Shared Documents and Brad Wilson’s Documents folder icons. The Hard Disk Drives group contains the Local Disk C drive icon. The Devices with Removable Storage group contains the DVD-RW Drive D drive icon and label.

To Minimize and Redisplay a Window

The Minimize and the Maximize buttons on the title bar of a window, allow you to control the way a window is displayed on the desktop. The following steps minimize and then redisplay the My Computer window.

1
1

Click the Minimize button on the title bar of the My Computer win- dow to minimize the My Computer window (Figure 1–15).

What happens to the My Computer window when I click the Minimize button?

The My Computer window is still available, but it is no longer the active window.

non-recessed medium blue My Computer button shows that My Computer window is reduced to a button on the taskbar

My Computer window is reduced to a button on the taskbar Figure 1–15 2 • Click

Figure 1–15

2
2

Click the My Computer button in the taskbar button area to display the My Computer window (Figure 1–16).

Why does the My Computer button on the taskbar change?

After you click it, the My Computer button on the taskbar is recessed and the color is medium blue to indicate that the My Computer win- dow is the active window. Notice too that when you move the mouse pointer off the taskbar button the button changes to dark blue, just like the title bar of the My Computer window.

Other Ways

1. Click icon on left side of title bar, click Minimize

2. Right-click title bar, click Minimize

3. Press WINDOWS+M

My Computer window is active window Maximize button My Computer button is recessed mouse pointer
My Computer
window is active
window
Maximize
button
My Computer
button is
recessed
mouse pointer
is displayed

Figure 1–16

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To Maximize and Restore a Window

Sometimes when information is displayed in a window, the information is not completely visible. One method of displaying more content in a window is to enlarge the window using the Maximize button, so the window fills the entire screen. The following steps maximize and restore the My Computer window.

1
1

Click the Maximize button on the title bar of the My Computer window to maximize the My Computer window (Figure 1–17).

What happens to the Maximize button on the title bar when I click it?

The Restore Down button replaces the Maximize button on the title bar. You can click the Restore Down button to return the window to its size before maximizing.

When a window is maximized, can I also minimize it? Yes. Click the Minimize button
When a window is maximized, can
I also minimize it?
Yes. Click the Minimize button to
minimize the window.
2
Q&A

Click the Restore Down button on the title bar of the My Computer window to return the My Computer window to its previous size (Figure 1–18).

What happens to the Restore Down button when I click it?

The Maximize button replaces the Restore Down button on the title bar.

My Computer window is maximized Restore Down button replaces the Maximize button My Computer button
My Computer
window is
maximized
Restore Down
button replaces the
Maximize button
My Computer
button is
unchanged

Figure 117

button is unchanged F i g u r e 1 – 1 7 My Computer window
My Computer window returns to previous size and position on the desktop Maximize button replaces
My Computer window returns
to previous size and position
on the desktop
Maximize button
replaces Restore
Down button
Close
button
My Computer
button is
unchanged

Figure 1–18

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To Close a Window

You can click the Close button on the title bar of a window to close the window and remove the taskbar button from the taskbar. The following step closes the My Computer window.

1
1

Click the Close button on the title bar of the My Computer window to close the My Computer window (Figure 1–19).

What happens to the My Computer window when I click the Close button?

The My Computer window closes and the My Computer button no longer is displayed in the taskbar button area.

Start My Computer closes and button is no longer displayed button
Start
My Computer
closes and
button is no
longer displayed
button

Figure 119

To Open a Window Using the Start Menu

Other Ways 1. Click icon on left side of title bar, click Close 2. Right-click
Other Ways
1. Click icon on left side of
title bar, click Close
2. Right-click title bar, click
Close on shortcut menu
3. Press ALT+F4

Previously, you opened the My Computer window by double-clicking the My Computer icon on the desktop. Another method of opening a window and viewing the contents of the window is to click a command on the Start menu. The following steps open the My Documents window using the My Documents command on the Start menu.

1
1

Display the Start menu (Figure 1–20).

Start menu My Documents command recessed dark green Start button
Start menu
My Documents
command
recessed
dark green
Start button

Figure 1–20

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My Documents window is the
central location for the storage
and management of documents
• Click My Documents on the
Start menu to display the My
Documents window (Figure 1–21).
What happens if I click a folder icon
in the right pane?
right pane contains
three folder icons
The icon is highlighted and the
left pane might change.
What happens if I
double-click a folder
icon in the right pane?
left pane contains
three areas, each
containing a title
and two areas
containing tasks
The contents of the
folder are displayed in
the right pane, and the information
in the left pane is changed.
Details area is collapsed
and can be displayed by
clicking the double down
arrow button
recessed dark blue My Documents
button indicates the My Documents
window is the active window
Q&A
Q&A
Windows XP Chapter 1

Figure 1–21

To Move a Window by Dragging

Other Ways

1.

Click Start button, right- click My Documents icon, click Open on shortcut menu

Drag means you point to an item, hold down the left mouse button, move the item to the desired location, and then release the left mouse button. You can move any open window to another location on the desktop by pointing to the title bar of the window and then dragging the window. The following steps drag the My Documents window to the center of the desktop.

1
1

Point to the My Documents window title bar.

Hold down the left mouse button, move the mouse so the window moves to the center of the desktop, and release the left mouse button (Figure 1–22).

drag My Documents window title bar to center of desktop Details area is collapsed double
drag My Documents window
title bar to center of desktop
Details area is
collapsed
double down
arrow button

Figure 1–22

Other Ways

1.

Click icon on left side of title bar, click Move, drag window

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To Expand an Area

The Details area in the My Documents window is collapsed and a double down arrow button appears to the right of the Details title. The following step expands the Details area in the left pane of the My Documents window.

1
1

Click the double down arrow button in the Details area to expand the Details area in the left pane of the My Documents window (Figure 1–23).

What happens when I click the double up arrow?

Only the area title and a double down arrow are displayed.

Details area expands
Details area
expands
top of left pane is no longer visible up scroll arrow scroll bars appear when
top of left pane is
no longer visible
up scroll
arrow
scroll bars appear when the
contents of a pane or window
are not completely visible
double up
arrow
double down arrow
button changes to double
up arrow button
window title and folder
type are displayed in the
expanded Details area

Figure 1–23

To Scroll Using Scroll Arrows

Another method of viewing information that is not visible in a window is to scroll in the window. Scrolling can be accomplished in three ways: (1) click the scroll arrows; (2) click the scroll bar; and (3) drag the scroll box. The following steps scroll the left pane using the scroll arrows.

1
1

Click the up scroll arrow two times on the vertical scroll bar to scroll the left pane down (Figure 1–24).

Why doesn’t my window include a scroll bar?

If your window was resized the last time it was opened, it may not include a scroll bar.

Is scrolling a window the best way to view objects in a window?

Sometimes it is your only option but maximizing the window is more efficient.

up scroll arrow text previously not visible is now visible left pane scrolls down
up scroll
arrow
text previously not
visible is now visible
left pane
scrolls down

Figure 1–24

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2
Click the up scroll arrow two more
times to move the scroll box to the
top of the scroll bar (Figure 1–25).
contents at top
of left pane
are displayed
up scroll
arrow
scroll box
Windows XP Chapter 1

Figure 1–25

To Size a Window by Dragging

You can change the size of the window by dragging the border of a window, as the following steps demonstrate.

1
1

Point to the bottom border of the My Documents window until the mouse pointer changes to a two-headed arrow.

Drag the bottom border downward until the Details area on your desktop resembles the Details area shown in Figure 1–26.

Can I drag other borders to enlarge the window?

You can drag the left, right, top, and bottom borders and any window corner.

scroll bar no longer is displayed double up arrow button Details area is visible two-headed
scroll bar no longer
is displayed
double up
arrow button
Details area
is visible
two-headed
arrow dragged
downward

Figure 1–26

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To Collapse an Area

When a Details area of a window is expanded, a double up arrow is displayed. You can collapse the area by clicking the double up arrow, as the following step shows.

1
1

Click the double up arrow button in the Details area to collapse the Details area (Figure 1–27).

Is there another way to collapse an area?

Yes. You can click the area title to collapse the area.

Should I keep the areas expanded or collapsed?

If you need to use the links within an area, it is handy to keep the area expanded. The Details area often is collapsed because the details information often is not needed.

Close button Details area is collapsed hand icon pointing to double down arrow button
Close
button
Details area
is collapsed
hand icon pointing
to double down
arrow button

Figure 1–27

Other Ways

1. Click area title

To Resize a Window

After moving and resizing a window, you may wish to return the window to approximately its original size. The following steps return the My Documents window to about its original size.

1
1

Position the mouse pointer over the bottom border of the My Documents window border until the mouse pointer changes to a two-headed arrow.

2
2

Drag the bottom border of the My Documents window up until the window is the same size as shown in Figure 1–21 on page WIN 17 and then release the mouse button.

To Close a Window

After you have completed work in a window, normally you will close the window. The following step closes the My Documents window.

1
1

Click the Close button on the right of the title bar in the My Documents window to close the My Documents window.

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The Windows XP Desktop

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To Delete a Desktop Icon by Right-Dragging

Sometimes, you will want to remove an icon from the desktop. One method to remove an icon from the desktop is to right-drag the icon to the Recycle Bin icon on the desktop. Right-drag means you point to an item, hold down the right mouse button, move the item to the desired location, and then release the right mouse button. When you right- drag an object, a shortcut menu is displayed. The shortcut menu contains commands specifically for use with the object being dragged. The following steps delete the My Computer icon by right-dragging the icon to the Recycle Bin icon. A dialog box is displayed whenever Windows XP needs to supply information to you or wants you to enter information or select among several options. The Confirm Delete dialog box is used in the following steps.

1
1

Point to the My Computer icon on the desktop, hold down the right mouse button, drag the My Computer icon over the Recycle Bin icon, and then release the right mouse button to display a shortcut menu (Figure 1–28).

My Computer icon Recycle Bin is an area on the hard disk that contains all
My Computer
icon
Recycle Bin is an area
on the hard disk that
contains all the items
you have deleted; you
can recover deleted
items before emptying
the Recycle Bin
shortcut menu
Move Here
command
Cancel button will terminate
the operation and reset
anything you have done

Figure 1–28

2
2

Click Move Here on the shortcut menu to close the shortcut menu and display the Confirm Delete dialog box (Figure 1–29).

Why should I right-drag instead of simply dragging?

Although you can move icons by dragging with the primary (left) mouse button and by right-dragging with the secondary (right) mouse button, it is strongly suggested you right-drag because a shortcut menu appears and, in most cases, you can specify the exact operation you want to occur. When you drag using the left mouse button, a default operation takes place and that operation may not be the operation you intended to perform.

3
3
question Confirm Delete dialog box message Yes button No button terminates operation
question
Confirm Delete
dialog box
message
Yes button
No button
terminates
operation

Figure 1–29

Click the Yes button to delete the My Computer icon and close the Confirm Delete dialog box.

Other Ways

1. Drag icon to Recycle Bin

2. Right-click icon, click Delete, click Yes button

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Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

Summary of Mouse and Windows Operations

You have seen how to use the mouse to point, click, right-click, double-click, drag, and right-drag in order to accomplish certain tasks on the desktop. The use of a mouse is an important skill when using Windows XP. In addition, you have learned how to move around and use windows on the Windows XP desktop.

The Keyboard and Keyboard Shortcuts

The keyboard is an input device on which you manually key in, or type, data. Figure 1–30 illustrates the rechargeable Wireless Entertainment Desktop 8000 keyboard designed for use with Microsoft Office and the Internet. You can press the Windows Start button on the keyboard to display the Start menu, search the contents of the computer or the Internet, use the wireless Navigation Pad to work from a remote location, and use the Windows Gadget button to search for contacts, stocks, weather, and slide shows. In addition, you can press the Windows Live Call button to access the Windows Live Messenger list, select an online contact, and initiate a video conversation. The My Favorites hot keys allow you to access files, folders, and Web pages.

Four USB ports on back of keyboard
Four USB ports on
back of keyboard
Windows Live Call button
Windows
Live Call
button

Figure 1–30

Navigation pad
Navigation pad
Windows Gadgets button
Windows
Gadgets
button

Many tasks you accomplish with a mouse also can be accomplished using a keyboard. To perform tasks using the keyboard, you must understand the notation used to identify which keys to press. This notation is used throughout Windows XP to identify a keyboard shortcut. Keyboard shortcuts consist of (1) pressing a single key (such as press the ENTER key); or (2) pressing and holding down one key and pressing a second key, as shown by two key names separated by a plus sign (such as press CTRL+ESC). For example, to obtain help about Windows XP, you can press the F1 key and to display the Start menu, hold down the CTRL key and then press the ESC key (press CTRL+ESC). Often, computer users will use keyboard shortcuts for operations they perform frequently. For example, many users find pressing the F1 key to start Help and Support easier than using the Start menu as shown later in this chapter. As a user, you probably will find the combination of keyboard and mouse operations that particularly suits you, but it is strongly recommended that generally you use the mouse.

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Starting an Application Program

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Starting an Application Program

One of the basic tasks you can perform using Windows XP is starting an application program. A program is a set of computer instructions that carries out a task on the computer. An application program is a set of specific computer instructions that is designed to allow you to accomplish a particular task. For example, a word processing program is an application program that allows you to create written documents; a presentation graphics program is an application program that allows you to create graphic presentations for display on a computer; and a Web browser program is an application program that allows you to search for and display Web pages. The default Web browser program (Internet Explorer) appears in the pinned items list on the Start menu shown in Figure 1–31. Because the default Web browser is selected during the installation of the Windows XP operating system, the default Web browser on your computer may be different. In addition, you can easily select another Web browser as the default Web browser. Another frequently used Web browser program is Mozilla Firefox.

Application Programs Several application programs (Internet Explorer, Movie Maker, Media Player, and Windows Messenger) are part of Windows XP. Most application programs, such as the Microsoft Office applications, must be purchased separately from Windows XP, however.

What Is Internet Explorer?

Internet Explorer is a Web browsing program that allows you to search for and view Web pages, save pages you find for use in the future, maintain a list of the pages you visit, send and receive e-mail messages, and edit Web pages. The Internet Explorer appli- cation program is included with most Microsoft Windows operating system software and Microsoft Office software, or you can download it from the Internet.

To Start an Application Using the Start Menu

A common activity performed on a computer is starting an application program to accomplish specific tasks. You can start an application program by using the Start menu. To illustrate the use of the Start menu to start an application program, the following steps start Internet Explorer using the Internet command on the Start menu.

1
1

Display the Start menu (Figure 1–31).

Is Internet Explorer listed on the All Programs submenu?

Yes. All application programs stored on the computer are listed on the All Programs submenu. Internet Explorer is on the pinned items list because it is used often, but you can start Internet Explorer from the All Program submenu as well.

Internet icon default Web browser pinned items list Start menu Start button
Internet icon
default Web
browser
pinned
items list
Start menu
Start
button

Figure 1–31

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2
2

Click the Internet icon in the pinned items list on the Start menu to start the Windows Internet Explorer program (Figure 1–21).

What is displayed in the Windows Internet Explorer window?

A title bar, an Address bar, the Command Bar, a scroll bar, the status bar, and a display area where pages from the World Wide Web display.

each Web page has a unique address, called a URL (Uniform Resource Locator), which distinguishes it from all other pages on the Internet

title bar Address bar display area
title bar
Address bar
display
area
Command Bar scroll box status bar scroll bar
Command Bar
scroll box
status bar
scroll bar

Figure 1–32

Other Ways

1. Click Start button, in frequently used program list click Internet Explorer

2. Click Start button, point to All Programs, click Internet Explorer

3. Press CTRL+ECS, press I

Uniform Resource Locator

Any computer connected to the Internet that contains Web pages you can reference

is called a Web site. The MSN.com Web page shown in Figure 1–32 is the first Web page you see when you access the MSN.com Web site and is, therefore, referred to as a home page, or start page. A Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is the address on the World Wide Web where a Web page is located. It often is composed of three parts (Figure 1–33). The first part is the protocol. A protocol is a set of rules. Most Web pages use the Hypertext Transfer Protocol. Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) describes the rules used to transmit Web pages electronically over the Internet. You enter the protocol in lowercase as http followed by a colon and two forward slashes (http://). If you do not begin a URL with a protocol, Internet Explorer will assume it is http, and automatically will append http:// to the front of the URL.

colon, forward slashes, and periods are required punctuation file specification or path of Web page
colon, forward slashes,
and periods are
required punctuation
file specification
or path of Web page at
Web site
http://www.scsite.com/ie7/greatoutdoors
protocol used to
transfer page from
Web site to your
computer
domain name
of Web site

Figure 1–33

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Browsing the World Wide Web

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The second part of a URL is the domain name. The domain name is the Internet address of the computer on the Internet where the Web page is located. The domain name in the URL in Figure 1–33 is www.scsite.com. The last part of the domain name (com in Figure 1–33) indicates the type of organization that owns the Web site. Table 1–1 shows the types of organizations and their extensions.

Table 1–1 Organizations and their Domain Name Extensions

Organization

Extension

Commercial

.com

Educational

.edu

Government

.gov

Military

.mil

Major network support

.net

Organizations not covered above

.org

International

.int

The optional third part of a URL is the file specification of the Web page. The file specification includes the file name and possibly a directory or folder name. This infor- mation is called the path. If no file specification of a Web page is specified in the URL, a default Web page is displayed.

Browsing the World Wide Web

One method to browse the World Wide Web is to find URLs that identify interesting Web sites in magazines or newspapers, on television, from friends, or even from just browsing the Web. URLs of well-known companies and organizations usually contain the company’s name and institution’s name. For example, ibm.com is the IBM Corporation URL, and umich.edu is the URL for the University of Michigan.

To Browse the Web by Entering a URL

The SC Site - Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site contains student resources for use with Shelly Cashman Series textbooks. The URL for this Web page is www.scsite.com. When you find the URL of a Web page you want to visit, enter the URL into the Address bar. The following steps show how to display the Web page from the Shelly Cashman Series. You are not required to provide the leading http:// protocol when typing the URL. Internet Explorer will insert http:// and assume the www automatically, if you do not supply it. The following steps browse the Web by entering a URL.

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1
1

Click the Address bar to select the URL in the Address bar (Figure 1–34).

What happens when I click the Address bar?

Internet Explorer selects the URL in the Address bar and the mouse pointer changes to an I-beam.

2
2

Type www.scsite.com in the Address bar to display the new URL in the Address bar (Figure 1–35).

Must I type www.?

No. If you only type scsite.com, Internet Explorer automatically will add www.

selected URL in Address bar I-beam mouse pointer
selected URL
in Address bar
I-beam
mouse
pointer
Figure 1–34 new URL Go to button inserted
Figure 1–34
new URL
Go to button
inserted

Figure 1–35

SC Site – Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources

Web site

3
3
new URL is displayed in Address bar
new URL is displayed in
Address bar

SC Site - Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site

Instant Search box Refresh button SC Site – Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site
Instant Search box
Refresh button
SC Site – Shelly Cashman
Series Student Resources
Web site

Click the Go to button to display the SC Site - Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site (Figure 1–36).

The Go to button changes after I click it. Why?

When you type the URL, the button changes to the Go to button. After the page is displayed, the button changes to the Refresh button. When you click the Refresh button, the Web page is downloaded again from the Web server, resulting in the most up-to-date version of the page being displayed.

SC Site – Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web page taskbar button
SC Site – Shelly Cashman
Series Student Resources
Web page taskbar button

Other Ways

1. On File menu click Open, type URL in Open box, click OK button

2. Press CTRL+O, type URL in Open box, click OK button

3. Press ALT+F, press O, type URL in Open box, press ENTER key

Figure 1–36

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Browsing the World Wide Web

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To Open a Link in a New Tab

You can view multiple Web pages in a single window using tabbed pages. A tabbed page consists of a tab in the Internet Explorer window and the associated Web page. When you start Internet Explorer only one tab is displayed, but you can open as many tabbed pages as you want. The following steps use the Instant Search box and the Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series link to open a Web page on a new tabbed page.

1
1

Click the Instant Search box and type Shelly Cashman Series in the Instant Search box (Figure 1–37).

What is an Instant Search box?

It is a text box in which you can type

a term which then can be searched for

by a search engine. Internet Explorer provides an Instant Search box in the upper-right corner of the window.

Shelly Cashman Series typed in Instant Search box Search button
Shelly Cashman
Series typed in
Instant Search box
Search
button
Cashman Series typed in Instant Search box Search button 2 • Click the Search button to
2
2

Click the Search button to the right of the Instant Search box to display the results of the Web search (Figure 1–38).

Figure 1–37 Live Search: Shelly Cashman Series Web page title new URL Live Search: Shelly
Figure 1–37
Live Search: Shelly
Cashman Series
Web page title
new URL
Live Search: Shelly
Cashman Series tab
Live Search: Shelly
Cashman Series
Web page
Course Technology –
Shelly Cashman
Series link

Figure 1–38

3
3

If necessary, scroll to view the Course Technology –Shelly Cashman Series link.

Right-click the Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series link to display a shortcut menu (Figure 1–39).

What happens when I just click a link?

The Web page will open on the same tabbed page as the search results and will replace the search results.

Open in New Tab command shortcut menu
Open in New
Tab command
shortcut menu

Figure 1–39

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4
4

Click the Open in New Tab command on the shortcut menu to close the shortcut menu and display the Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series tab (Figure 1–40).

Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series appears as new tab
Course Technology –
Shelly Cashman Series
appears as new tab

Figure 1–40

To Switch Between Tabs

Other Ways

1. While holding down CTRL, click link

You can display the contents of any tabbed page by clicking the tab, as shown in the following step.

1
1

Click the Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series tab to activate the tab and display The Shelly Cashman Series® in the display area (Figure 1–41).

Live Search: Shelly Cashman Series tab is inactive Course Technology- Shelly Cashman Series tab is
Live Search: Shelly
Cashman Series
tab is inactive
Course Technology-
Shelly Cashman
Series tab is active
Close Tab button New URL
Close Tab
button
New URL

Figure 1–41

What if I don’t want to use tabbed browsing?

You can disable the tabbed

browsing feature. To do so, click the Tools button on the Command Bar, click Internet Options, click the General tab, in Tabs section click Settings, clear Enable Tab Browsing check box, and then click OK twice.

Course Technology – Shelly Cashman Series in display area

To Close a Tab

You can keep as many tabbed pages open as necessary. If you no longer have a need for the tabbed page to be open, you can close the tab using the following steps.

1
1

Click the Close Tab button in the Course Technology –Shelly Cashman Series tab to close the Course Technology –Shelly Cashman Series Web page (Figure 1–42).

2
2

Click the Close button on the title bar to close the Live Search:

Close new URL button Live Search: Shelly Cashman Series tab is active the tab is
Close
new URL
button
Live Search: Shelly
Cashman Series
tab is active
the tab is closed and the
displayed Web page no
longer is available.

Figure 1–42

Shelly Cashman Series - Windows Internet Explorer window.

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Windows Explorer

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Windows Explorer

Windows Explorer is an application program included with Windows XP. It allows you to view the contents of the computer, the hierarchy of drives and folders on the computer, and the files and folders in each folder. In this section, you will use Windows Explorer to expand and collapse drives and folders, display drive and folder contents, create a new folder, copy a file between folders, and rename and then delete a file. These are common operations that you should understand how to perform.

To Start Windows Explorer and Maximize Its Window

First, you must start the Windows Explorer application. The following steps start Windows Explorer using the Folders button in the My Computer window.

1
1

Display the Start menu (Figure 1–43).

2
2

Click My Computer on the Start menu to display the My Computer window (Figure 1–44).

My Computer
My Computer
Figure 1–43 My Computer title bar
Figure 1–43
My Computer
title bar

Figure 1–44

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3
3

If necessary, double-click the My Computer title bar to maximize the My Computer window.

If the status bar is not located at the bottom of the My Computer window, click View on the menu bar, and then click Status Bar to display the status bar (Figure 1–45).

View menu Folders name button Restore Down button appears when window is maximized Standard Buttons
View menu
Folders
name
button
Restore Down
button appears
when window
is maximized
Standard
Buttons
status bar
toolbar

Figure 1–45

4
4

Folders title Desktop folder is the top level of the hierarchy minus sign indicates folders
Folders title
Desktop folder
is the top level
of the hierarchy
minus sign
indicates folders
and devices
indented below
are found in the
My Computer
folder
plus signs indicate
the associated
drive or folder has
more folders or
devices but they
are not visible
Folders button Close button in Folders pane icons appear in Titles view, grouped by file
Folders
button
Close button in
Folders pane
icons appear in
Titles view, grouped
by file type
Folders pane
objects in
three groups
My computer
of icons
folder
other objects
no small
box for
Recycle Bin
bar separates panes -
drag this bar to change
the size of the panes
right pane contains
four objects
status bar contains
information about
documents, folders,
and programs

FIGURE 1–46

Click the Folders button on the Standard Buttons toolbar to display the Folders pane (Figure 1–46).

What is the Folders pane?

The Folders pane displays the hier- archy of folders and drives on your computer.

Is it possible to display my folders and drives in the right pane differently than what is shown in Figure 1–46?

You can display files and folders in the right pane in several different views. Currently, the drives and folders in the right pane are displayed in Tiles view using Large Icons format.

pane are displayed in Tiles view using Large Icons format. I Experiment • Click a plus

I Experiment

Click a plus sign in the Folders pane and observe the changes in the window. Then click the minus sign to return the window to its previous status. Do the same thing for another plus sign.

Other Ways

1. Click Start button, right-click My Computer, click Explore on shortcut menu

2. Right-click Start button or any desktop icon, click Explore on shortcut menu

3. Click Start button, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, click Windows

Explorer, click My Computer

4. Press WINDOWS+E

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Windows Explorer

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Using a Hierarchical Format to Organize Files and Folders

An important task is to be able to create and organize the files and folders on the computer. A file may contain a spreadsheet assignment given by the computer teacher, a research paper assigned by the English teacher, an electronic quiz given by the Business teacher, or a study sheet designed by the Math teacher. These files should be organized and stored in folders to reduce the possibility of misplacing a file and to quickly find a file. Assume you are a freshman taking four classes (Business, Computer, English, and Math). You want to design a series of folders for the four classes you are taking in the first semester of your freshman year. To accomplish this, you arrange the folders in a hierarchical format. The hierarchical structure of folders for the Freshman year is shown in Figure 1–47.

Removable Disk Freshman 1st Semester Business Computer English Math Class Class Class Class Access Excel
Removable
Disk
Freshman
1st
Semester
Business
Computer
English
Math
Class
Class
Class
Class
Access
Excel
PowerPoint
Windows
Word

Figure 1–47

The hierarchy contains five levels. The first level contains the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive, the second level contains the Freshman folder, the third level contains the 1st Semester folder, the fourth level contains four folders (Business Class, Computer Class, English Class, and Math Class), and the fifth level contains five folders (Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Windows, and Word). The vertical and horizontal lines in the hierarchy chart form a pathway that allows you to navigate to a drive or folder. Each pathway is a means of navigation to a specific location on a computer or network. A path consists of a drive letter and colon (C:), a back- slash (\ ), and one or more folder names. Each drive or folder in the hierarchy chart has a corresponding path. When you click a drive or folder icon in the Folders pane, the corre- sponding path appears in the Address box on the Address bar. Table 1–2 on the following page contains examples of path names and their corresponding drives and folders.

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Table 1–2 Path Names and Corresponding Drives and Folders

Path

Drive and folder

E:\

Drive E (UDISK 2.0 (E:)

E:\ Freshman

Freshman folder on drive E

E:\ Freshman\ 1st Semester

1st Semester folder in Freshman folder on drive E

E:\ Freshman\ 1st Semester\ Computer Class\ Word

Word folder in Computer Class folder in 1st Semester folder in Freshman folder on drive E

When this hierarchy is created, the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive is said “to contain” the Freshman folder, the Freshman folder is said “to contain” the 1st Semester folder, and so on. In addition, this hierarchy can easily be expanded to include folders from the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years and any additional semesters.

Removable Media and Network Drives

A removable media (USB flash drive) is ideal for storing files and folders on a

computer. A USB flash drive, sometimes called a keychain drive, is a flash memory storage device that plugs into a USB port on a computer. A USB port, short for uni- versal serial bus port, can be found on either the front or back of most computers. USB flash drives, like the one shown in Figure 1–48, are convenient for mobile users because they are small and lightweight enough to be transported on a keychain or in a pocket.

USB ports USB flash drive
USB ports
USB flash drive

Figure 1–48

A network is a collection of computers and devices connected together for the

purpose of sharing information between computer users. In some cases, students might be required to store their files on a network drive found on the school’s computer net- work. A network drive is a storage device that is connected to the server on the computer network. A server controls access to the hardware, software, and other resources on the network and provides a centralized storage area for programs, data, and information. If student files reside on the network drive on the school’s network, files may be accessed from a school computer, or from a personal computer with permission from the school. Ask your teacher if the school requires you to use a network drive.

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Windows Explorer

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To Plug a USB Flash Drive into a USB Port

Although other removable media may be used for storage, the USB flash drive is one of the more popular drives. To store files and folders on the USB flash drive, you must plug the USB flash drive into a USB port on the computer. Plugging a USB flash drive into a USB port causes the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window to display on the desktop. The removable media drive name on your computer may be different. The following steps plug a USB flash drive into a USB port.

1
1

Plug the USB flash drive into a USB port on the computer to display the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window (Figure 1–49).

What does UDISK mean?

UDISK is the name of the particular type of USB drive used. The name of your USB drive might be different.

What is drive E?

It is the drive identification; it is similar to C for the hard disk drive on your computer, and your drive identifier may be different.

2
2

In the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window, click the Folders button on the Standard Buttons toolbar to display the Folders pane (Figure 1–50).

UDISK 2.0 (E:) window Folders button UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon My Computer button UDISK 2.0
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
window
Folders
button
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
icon
My Computer
button
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
button

Figure 1–49

Folders button Standard Buttons toolbar UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon selected Folders button
Folders
button
Standard Buttons
toolbar
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
icon selected
Folders
button

Figure 1–50

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3
3

Click the Close button in the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window to close the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window (Figure 1–51).

window to close the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window (Figure 1–51). Figure 1–51 When you create a

Figure 1–51

When you create a folder, such as the Freshman folder in Fig-

ure 1–47 on page WIN 31, you must name the folder. A folder name should be descrip- tive of the folder. A folder name can contain up to 255 characters, including spaces. Any uppercase or lowercase character is valid when creating a folder name, except a backslash (\ ), slash (/), colon (:), asterisk (*), question mark (?), quotation marks (‘’), less than sym- bol (<), greater than symbol (>), or vertical bar (|). Folder names cannot be CON, AUX, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, PRN, or NUL. The same rules for naming folders apply to naming files.

Naming a Folder

To Create a Folder on a Removable Drive

To create a folder on a removable drive, you must select the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive icon in the Folders pane and then create the folder in the right pane. The following steps create the Freshman folder on the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive.

1
1

Click the UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon in the Folders pane to select the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive.

2
2

Right-click an open area of the right pane to display a shortcut menu.

Point to New on the shortcut menu to display the New shortcut menu (Figure 1–52).

Why is there no plus sign next to the UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon?

The UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive contains no folders or files.

open area path to UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive shortcut menu UDISK 2.0 (:E) icon selected
open area
path to
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
drive
shortcut
menu
UDISK 2.0 (:E)
icon selected
no plus
Folder
sign
command
New command
selected
New
submenu

Figure 1–52

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FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only Windows Explorer WIN 35 3 • Click Folder
FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only
Windows Explorer
WIN 35
3
• Click Folder on the New submenu
to display the selected new Folder
folder.
folder name
• Type Freshman in the folder icon
highlighted area to name the
folder.
typed here
• Press the ENTER key to create the
Freshman folder in the UDISK 2.0 (E:)
drive (Figure 1–53).
Freshman folder
is created on
UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
Freshman folder
remains selected
plus sign in
box next to
drive indicates
Freshman
folder added to
drive
Windows XP Chapter 1

Figure 1–53

Downloading a Hierarchy of Folders into the Freshman Folder

After creating the Freshman folder on the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive, the remaining folders in the hierarchical structure (see Figure 1–47), starting with the 1st Semester folder, should be downloaded to the Freshman folder. Downloading is the process of a computer receiving information, such as a set of files or folders from a Web site or from a server on the Internet. To make the task of creating the folders easier, the folders have been created and stored in a hierarchical structure on the SC Site - Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site. While downloading the structure, a program called WinZip is used. WinZip compresses, or zips, larger files into a single smaller file, allowing the folders to be downloaded more easily and quickly.

Other Ways

1. On File menu point to New, click Folder, type file name, press ENTER

2. Press ALT+F, press W, press F, type file name, press ENTER

3. Click Folders button, click Make a new folder in File and Folder Tasks area, type file name, press ENTER

To Download a Hierarchy of Folders into the Freshman Folder

The following steps download the folders in the hierarchical structure into the Freshman folder.

1
1

Start Internet Explorer by clicking the Start button on the taskbar and then clicking Internet on the Start menu.

2
2

Click the Address box on the Address bar, type scsite.com, and then click the Go button.

3
3

When the SC Site - Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site is displayed, locate the Browse by Subject navigation bar, click Office Suites, and then click Microsoft Office 2007.

4
4

In the center of the screen, locate your textbook and click the title (for example, Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory Concepts and Techniques, Windows XP Edition).

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5
5

Scroll down to display the Data Files for Students (Windows) area and then click the Windows XP Chapter 1 Data Files link.

6
6

When the File Download – Security Warning dialog box is displayed, click the Run button.

7
7

When the Internet Explorer – Security Warning dialog box is displayed, click the Run button.

8
8

When the WinZip Self-Extractor dialog box is displayed, type the removable media drive letter of your removable media drive followed by a colon, backslash, and folder name (Freshman) (for example, E:\ Freshman).

9
9

Click the Unzip button.

10
10

When Windows displays the WinZip Self-Extractor dialog box, click the OK button.

11
11

Click the Close button in the WinZip Self-Extractor dialog box.

12
12

Click the Close button in the SC Site – Shelly Cashman Series Student Resources Web site window.

Freshman folder is selected Windows XP Chapter 1 Data Files are downloaded from SC Site
Freshman folder
is selected
Windows XP Chapter 1 Data Files are
downloaded from SC Site – Shelly Cashman
Series Student Resources Web site to the
Freshman folder in the right pane
plus sign in small box to
left of UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon
in Folders pane

Figure 1–54

Even though you cannot see the folders and files in the Freshman folder, the folders and files are contained in the Freshman folder. Some folders contain files to be used later in this chapter.

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Windows Explorer

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To Expand a Drive

Windows Explorer displays the hierarchy of items in the Folders pane and the contents of drives and folders in the right pane. You might want to expand a drive to view its contents in the Folders pane. The following step expands a drive.

1
1

Click the plus sign in the small box to the left of the UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon in the Folders pane to display the Freshman folder (Figure 1–55).

minus sign indicates UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive is expanded expansion of UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
minus sign indicates
UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive is
expanded
expansion of
UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
plus sign indicates
more files are stored
in Freshman folder

Figure 1–55

To Expand a Folder

Other Ways

1. Click drive icon in Folders pane

2. Select drive to expand using ARROW keys, press PLUS on numeric keyboard

3. Select drive to expand, press

RIGHT ARROW

When a plus sign in a small box is displayed to the left of a folder icon in the Folders pane, you can expand the folder to show all the folders it contains. The following step expands the Freshman folder to view the contents of the Freshman folder.

1
1

Click the plus sign in the small box to the left of the Freshman icon to expand the Freshman folder (Figure 1–56).

Why is the 1st Semester folder indented below the Freshman folder in the Folders pane?

The folder is indented below the Freshman icon to show that the folder is contained within the Freshman folder. A folder with a plus sign contains more folders.

The Freshman folder is displayed in Tiles view using Large Icons format minus sign indicates
The Freshman folder is
displayed in Tiles view
using Large Icons format
minus sign
indicates folder
is expanded
1st Semester
folder icon
1st Semester
folder contains
more folders

Figure 1–56

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Windows XP Chapter 1

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To Display the Contents of a Folder

Clicking an icon in the Folders pane displays the contents of the drive or folder in the right pane, expands the hierarchy in the Folders pane, and displays the path in the Address Path text box. The following step displays the contents of the 1st Semester folder.

1
1

Click the 1st Semester icon in the Folders pane to display the contents of the 1st Semester folder (Figure 1–57).

1st Semester window path to 1st Semester folder minus sign 1st Semester indicates 1st folder
1st Semester
window
path to 1st
Semester folder
minus sign
1st Semester
indicates 1st
folder is
Semester folder
selected
is expanded
contents of 1st
Semester folder
expansion of
1st Semester
folder
1st Semester four objects button in folder
1st Semester
four objects
button
in folder

Figure 1–57

Other Ways

1. Right-click 1st Semester icon, click Explore on shortcut menu

About WordPad WordPad was first included with the Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. More advanced than NotePad, but not as complex as Microsoft Word, WordPad can format and print text, but does not have a spell checker or thesaurus.

Creating a Document and Folder Using WordPad

Previously, the Freshman folder was created in the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive using Windows Explorer. You also can create a folder anytime you save a file in a Windows application. For example, you can use WordPad to create a document and then save the new document in a folder. WordPad is a word processing program included with Windows XP that allows you to create a limited variety of personal and business documents. The following section illustrates how to start WordPad, type text into a WordPad document, save the document in a new folder, and verify the document was saved in the folder.

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Creating a Document and Folder Using WordPad

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To Start WordPad

Assume you want to create a document that lists your homework for Friday, April 11 using the WordPad application. The first process is to start the WordPad application. The following steps start WordPad based on a typical installation. You may need to ask your instructor how to start WordPad on your system.

1
1

Display the Start menu.

To display the All Programs submenu, point to All Programs on the Start menu.

Point to Accessories on the All Programs submenu to display WordPad on the Accessories submenu (Figure 1–58).

What are Accessories?

Accessories are application programs that accomplish a variety of tasks commonly required on a computer. For example, the Accessories programs include Accessibility programs to help people view a monitor screen and enter data into a computer; Communication programs that aid in installing and maintaining computer communications; and System Tools programs that provide information about the computer; and maintenance tools for maintaining the computer.

2
2

Click WordPad to start the

WordPad application and display

a

new blank document in the

WordPad window (Figure 1–59).

If

the WordPad window is not

maximized, click the Maximize button next to the Close button on its title bar to maximize the window.

All Programs submenu Accessories Accessories command submenu All Programs command WordPad command
All Programs
submenu
Accessories
Accessories
command
submenu
All Programs
command
WordPad
command

Figure 1–58

maximized WordPad window
maximized
WordPad
window
document title an insertion point is a blinking vertical bar that indicates where text will
document title
an insertion point is a
blinking vertical bar that
indicates where text will be
inserted as you type
1st Semester folder
available as task bar
button
I-beam pointer
Document – WordPad
Button on task bar

Figure 1–59

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Windows XP Chapter 1

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To Type Text

After starting WordPad, you can enter the text in the Friday, April 11 WordPad document. To enter text in the document, you type on the keyboard. The following steps show the process of entering the text of the Friday, April 11 WordPad document.

1
1

Type Friday, April 11 and then press the ENTER key twice.

Type Finish - The Bike Delivers Data Base and then press the ENTER key.

Type Read - Next Project and then press the ENTER key (Figure 1–60).

Save button Toolbar text inserted
Save button
Toolbar
text inserted

Figure 1–60

What if I make an error while typing?

You can press the BACKSPACE key until you have deleted the text in error and then retype the text correctly.

To Save a WordPad Document in a New Folder

After typing the text of a WordPad document, you can create a folder in which to save the document, and then save the document in the created folder. The following steps save the Friday, April 11 document in a created folder named Homework. The Homework folder is created within the Computer Class folder (see the hierarchy in Figure 1–47 on page WIN 31).

1
1

Click the Save button on the Toolbar to display the Save As dialog box (Figure 1–61).

Why is the Document file name selected in the File name text box?

The Document file name is selected in the File name text box as the default file name. You can change the default file name by immediately typing the new name.

Save button Save As dialog box My Documents entry in Save in box three folders
Save button
Save As
dialog box
My Documents
entry in
Save in box
three folders are
displayed in
Save As dialog box
default document file
name can be changed
to a more suitable
document name
File name
text box

Figure 1–61

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Creating a Document and Folder Using WordPad
WIN 41
2
• Type Friday, April 11 in the
File name text box. Do not press
the ENTER key after typing the file
name (Figure 1–62).
What happens if I press the
ENTER key after typing the
file name?
Save in box
arrow
If you press the ENTER key, the Save
As dialog box closes and the file
will be saved in the My Documents
folder. If you want to save the
file in a folder other than the My
Documents folder, you must select
the desired folder.
new file name
Q&A
Windows XP Chapter 1
3
3

Click the Save in box arrow to display a list of available drives and folders in which you can save the document (Figure 1–63).

Is it okay if my list of drives and folders is different than the one in Figure 1–63?

Yes. The folders and drives can be unique for each computer.

Figure 1–62

drives and folders in Save in list UDISK 2.0 (E:) icon
drives and folders in
Save in list
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
icon

Figure 1–63

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4
4

Click UDISK 2.0 (E:) in the Save in list to display the contents of the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive in the Save As dialog box (Figure 1–64).

5
5

Double-click the Freshman folder in the Save As dialog box to display the Freshman folder name in the Save in text box and display the contents of the Freshman folder in the Save As dialog box (Figure 1–65).

UDISK 2.0 (E:) entry in Save in list Freshman folder is contained on the UDISK
UDISK 2.0 (E:) entry
in Save in list
Freshman folder
is contained on
the UDISK 2.0 (E:)

Figure 1–64

Freshman folder in the Save in list 1st Semester folder within Freshman folder hierarchy
Freshman folder
in the Save in list
1st Semester folder
within Freshman
folder hierarchy

Figure 1–65

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FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only Creating a Document and Folder Using WordPad WIN
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Creating a Document and Folder Using WordPad
WIN 43
6
• Double-click the 1st Semester
folder icon in the Save As dialog
box to display the 1st Semester
folder name in the Save in text
box and display the contents of
the 1st Semester folder in the
Save As dialog box (Figure 1–66).
1st Semester
folder in Save
in text box
Computer
Class folder
four folders are
contained in the
1st Semester folder
Windows XP Chapter 1
7
7

Double-click the Computer Class folder icon in the Save As dialog box to display the Computer Class folder name in the Save in text box and display the contents of the Computer Class folder in the Save As dialog box (Figure 1–67).

Figure 1–66

Computer Class folder in Save in text box Create New Folder button five folders are
Computer Class folder
in Save in text box
Create New
Folder button
five folders are contained in
the Computer Class folder

Figure 1–67

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8
8

Click the Create New Folder button on the Save As dialog box toolbar to create a new folder within the Computer Class folder.

Type Homework as the name of the folder and then press the ENTER key (Figure 1–68).

9
9

Click the Open button in the Save As dialog box to open the Homework folder.

Click the Save button in the Save As dialog box to save the Friday, April 11 file to its new location in the Homework folder.

Click the Close button in the Friday, April 11 - WordPad window to close the window (Figure 1–69).

Homework folder is contained within the Computer Class folder Create New Folder button new Homework
Homework folder
is contained within
the Computer Class
folder
Create New
Folder button
new Homework
folder created
Open button
opens the
selected folder

Figure 1–68

title bar reflects name of document after being saved WordPad task bar button reflects new
title bar reflects
name of document
after being saved
WordPad task bar
button reflects new
document name

Figure 1–69

Close button
Close
button

Other Ways

1. On File menu click Save As, type file name, click Save in box arrow, select drive, click Create New Folder button on toolbar, type folder name, click Open button in Save As dialog box, click Save button in Save As dialog box, click Close button

2. Press CTRL+S, type file name, click Save in box arrow, select drive, click Create New Folder button on toolbar, type folder name, click Open button in Save As dialog box, click Save button in Save As dialog box, click Close button

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File Management in Windows Explorer

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To Verify the Contents of a Folder

After saving the Friday, April 11 document in the Homework folder, you can verify that the document was correctly saved in the Homework folder. The following step verifies the Homework folder contains the Friday, April 11 document.

1
1

Click the plus sign in the small box next to the Computer Class icon in the Folders pane to display the folders within the Computer Class folder.

Click the Homework icon in the Folders pane to select the Homework folder and display the contents of the Homework folder in the right pane (Figure 1–70).

path to Homework folder Friday, April 11 document saved in Homework folder Homework icon
path to
Homework
folder
Friday, April 11
document saved in
Homework folder
Homework
icon

Figure 1–70

File Management in Windows Explorer

Being able to manage the files on the computer is one of the more important computer skills a computer user can possess. File management includes copying, moving, renaming, and deleting files and folders on the computer.

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To Copy a File in Windows Explorer by Right-Dragging

When copying files, the drive and folder containing the files to be copied are called the source drive and source folder, respectively. The drive and folder to which the files are copied are called the destination drive and destination folder, respectively. In the following steps, the Access folder is the source folder, the Homework folder is the destination folder, and the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive is both the source drive and the destination drive. The Access folder contains two of the eleven Access database files (SciFi Scene and The Bike Delivers) required to perform the lab assignments in the Access section of this book. The following steps show one method of copying files in Windows Explorer - right-drag a file icon from the right pane to a folder or drive icon in the Folders pane.

1
1

Click the Access icon in the Folders pane to select the Access folder and display its contents in the right pane (Figure 1–71).

2
2

Right-drag the The Bike Delivers icon from the right pane onto the top of the Homework folder icon in the Folders bar to open the shortcut menu (Figure 1–72).

3
3

Click Copy Here on the shortcut menu to copy The Bike Delivers file to the Homework folder.

path to right-dragging lets you copy or move files from one location to another Access
path to
right-dragging lets
you copy or move
files from one
location to another
Access
folder
UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
contains both
the source and
destination folders
Access folder contains two
of nine Access database
files required to perform
the lab assignments in the
Access section of this book
Access
Access folder
is the source folder
and is selected
icon
Homework folder is
the destination folder

Figure 1–71

The Bike Delivers icon Copy Here command duplicates the source file in the destination folder
The Bike
Delivers icon
Copy Here command
duplicates the
source file in the
destination folder
Move Here moves the source file
from its current folder to the
destination folder and removes the
source file from the source folder
Homework
icon
shortcut
menu

Figure 1–72

Other Ways

1. Right-click file to copy, click Copy on the shortcut menu, right-click Homework icon, click Paste on the shortcut menu

2. Click file to copy, on Edit menu click Copy, click Homework icon, on Edit menu click Paste

3.

Select file to copy, press CTRL+C, select Homework icon, press

CTRL+V

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File Management in Windows Explorer

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To Display the Contents of a Folder

After copying a file, you might want to examine the folder or drive where the file was copied to ensure it was copied properly. The following step displays the contents of the Homework folder.

1
1

Click the Homework icon in the Folders pane to display the contents of the Homework folder (Figure 1–73).

Can I copy or move more than one file at a time?

Yes. To copy or move multiple files, select each file to be copied or moved by clicking the file icon while holding down the CTRL key. Then, right-drag the selected files to the destination folder using the same technique as right-dragging a single file.

window title changes path to Homework folder Homework folder is selected The Bike Delivers file
window title
changes
path to
Homework
folder
Homework folder
is selected
The Bike Delivers
file has been copied
to the Homework
folder
button title
Word folder
changes

Figure 1–73

To Rename a File

In some circumstances, you may want to rename a file or a folder. This could occur when you want to distinguish a file in one folder or drive from a copy, or if you decide you need a better name to identify a file. The Word folder in Figure 1–74 contains the three Word documents (Barn and Silo, Fall Harvest, and Lake at Sunset) required to perform the lab assignments in the Word section of this book. In this case, you decide to change the Fall Harvest name to Great Fall Harvest. The following steps change the name of the Fall Harvest file in the Word folder to Great Fall Harvest.

1
1

Click the Word folder in the left pane to display the Barn and Silo, Fall Harvest, and Lake at Sunset files in the right pane.

Right-click the Fall Harvest icon in the right pane to select the Fall Harvest icon and display a shortcut menu (Figure 1–74).

window title changes path in Address box changes shortcut menu displays options for working with
window title
changes
path in
Address box
changes
shortcut menu
displays options
for working
with the file
Word folder
Rename
is selected
command
button title
changes

Figure 1–74

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2
2

Click Rename on the shortcut menu to select the file name for renaming.

Type Great Fall Harvest and then press the ENTER key (Figure 1–75).

Are there any risks to renaming files that are located on the hard disk?

If you inadvertently rename a file that is associated with certain programs, the programs may not be able to find the file and, therefore, may not execute properly. Always use caution when renaming files.

file renamed from Fall Harvest to Great Fall Harvest Lake at Sunset file
file renamed from
Fall Harvest to
Great Fall Harvest
Lake at
Sunset file

Figure 1–75

Other Ways

1. Right-click icon, press M, type name, press ENTER

3. Select icon, on File menu click Rename, type name,

4. Select icon, press ALT+F, press M, type name, press

2. Select icon, press F2, type name, press ENTER

press ENTER

ENTER

To Delete a File by Right-Clicking

A final operation you may want to perform in Windows Explorer is to delete a file. Exercise extreme caution when deleting a file or files. When you delete a file from a hard drive, the deleted file is stored in the Recycle Bin where you can recover it until you empty the Recycle Bin. If you delete a file from removable media, the file is gone permanently once you delete it. The following steps delete the Lake at Sunset file.

1
1

Right-click the Lake at Sunset icon in the right pane to select the icon and display a shortcut menu (Figure 1–76).

Why are some of the items on my shortcut menu different than the ones shown in Figure 1–76?

Depending on the software installed on your computer, the shortcut commands can differ. The Delete command always is available.

shortcut menu is displayed when file icon is right-clicked Lake at Sunset selected Delete command
shortcut menu is
displayed when file
icon is right-clicked
Lake at Sunset
selected
Delete
command

Figure 1–76

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Q&A

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only File Management in Windows Explorer WIN 49 2
FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only
File Management in Windows Explorer
WIN 49
2
• Click Delete on the shortcut menu
to begin the delete process by
displaying the Confirm File Delete
dialog box (Figure 1–77).
Confirm File
Delete dialog box
question
Yes button
Windows XP Chapter 1

Figure 1–77

3
3

Click the Yes button in the Confirm File Delete dialog box to remove the Lake at Sunset file (Figure 1–78).

minus sign to left of Computer Class icon
minus sign to
left of Computer
Class icon
(Figure 1–78). minus sign to left of Computer Class icon Can I use this same technique

Can I use this same technique to delete a folder?

Yes. Right-click the folder and then click Delete on the shortcut menu. When you delete a folder, all the files and folders contained in the folder you are

deleting, together with all the files and folders on the lower hierarchical levels, are deleted as well.

Figure 1–78

Again, you should use extreme caution when deleting files and folders to ensure you do not delete something you may not be able to recover.

Other Ways

1. Drag icon to Recycle Bin

2. Click icon, on File menu click Delete, click Yes button

3. Select icon, press ALT+F, press D, press Y

Copyright © 2008 by Course Technology. All rights reserved. This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission in writing from Course Technology.

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only

WIN 50

Windows XP Chapter 1

Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

To Close Expanded Folders

Sometimes, after you have completed work with expanded folders, you will want to close the expansions while still leaving the Windows Explorer window open. The following steps close the Computer Class folder, 1st Semester folder, Freshman folder, and UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive.

1
1

Click the minus sign to the left of the Computer Class icon in the left pane to collapse the Computer Class folder (Figure 1–79).

minus signs plus sign indicates Computer Class folder hierarchy is collapsed
minus signs
plus sign indicates
Computer Class folder
hierarchy is collapsed
Close button right pane does not change when a minus sign is clicked
Close
button
right pane does not
change when a minus
sign is clicked

Figure 1–79

2
2

Click the minus sign to the left of the 1st Semester icon to collapse the icon.

Click the minus sign to the left of the Freshman icon to collapse the icon.

Click the minus sign to the left of the UDISK 2.0 (E:) to collapse the icon.

Other Ways

1. Click expanded folder icon, press MINUS SIGN on numeric keypad

2. Click expanded folder icon, press LEFT ARROW

To Quit Windows Explorer

When you have finished working with Windows Explorer, you can quit Windows Explorer by closing the Folders pane or by closing the Windows Explorer (UDISK 2.0 (E:)) window. The following step quits Windows Explorer by closing the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window.

1
1

Click the Close button on the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window title bar to close the UDISK 2.0 (E:) window.

Copyright © 2008 by Course Technology. All rights reserved. This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission in writing from Course Technology.

Windows XP Chapter 1

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only

Finding Files or Folders

WIN 51

Finding Files or Folders

You know the location of files you use often and can locate the folder that contains them. In some cases, however, you may know you have a certain file on the computer but you have no idea in what folder it is located. Search Companion allows you to search for files and folders by name, type, or size. You can search for a file based on when you last worked on the file or search for files containing specific text. You also can choose to search with the help of an animated character.

To Search for a File by Name

If you know the name or partial name of a file, you can use Search Companion to locate the file. The following steps search for a file on the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive.

1
1

Display the Start menu (Figure 1–80).

Search command
Search
command

Figure 1–80

Copyright © 2008 by Course Technology. All rights reserved. This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission in writing from Course Technology.

Q&AQ&A

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only

WIN 52

Windows XP Chapter 1

Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

maximized Search Results window Search button selected message in right pane Search Companion balloon All
maximized Search
Results window
Search
button
selected
message in
right pane
Search
Companion
balloon
All files and
folders entry
animated dog
2
2

Click Search on the Start menu to display the Search Results window.

Search Companion pane
Search
Companion
pane

If necessary, maximize the Search Results window (Figure 1–81).

What are all the items in the Search Companion balloon?

They are links you can click to select different search criteria or to find other information. As you use Search, the items in the balloon will change based on the tasks you perform.

Figure 1–81

3
3

Click the ‘All files and folders’ entry in the Search Companion balloon to display an insertion point in the ‘All or part of the file name’ text box.

Type Great Fall Harvest in the ‘All or part of the the file name’ text box (Figure 1–82).

Do I have to know the exact name of a file to search for it?

No. If you know only a portion of a file’s name, you can use an asterisk in the name to represent the remaining characters. For example, if you know the file starts with the letters, win, you can type win* in the text box. All files that begin with the letters win, regardless of what letters follow, will be displayed.

contents of balloon change Great Fall Harvest inserted as search criteria Local Hard Drives (C:)
contents of
balloon change
Great Fall Harvest
inserted as search
criteria
Local Hard Drives (C:)
appears in Look in box
Look in
box arrow
double down arrows
identify additional
search criteria
Search
button

Figure 1–82

Copyright © 2008 by Course Technology. All rights reserved. This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission in writing from Course Technology.

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only Finding Files or Folders WIN 53 4 •
FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only
Finding Files or Folders
WIN 53
4
• Click the Look in box arrow in the
Search Companion pane to display
the list of locations in which to
search (Figure 1–83).
Look in box
Look in
box arrow
Look in list
displays list of
locations
Local Hard Drives (C:)
entry selected
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
entry
Figure 1–83
5
Windows XP Chapter 1

Click UDISK 2.0 (E:) in the Look in list to close the Look in list and select the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive name in the Look in box (Figure 1–84).

UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive name selected criteria for searching files and folders include by modification
UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
name selected
criteria for searching files
and folders include by
modification data, file
size, and advanced options
which search system folders,
hidden files or folders, and
subfolders, and perform
case-sensitive searches
Search
button

Figure 1–84

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Q&A

BTW

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only

WIN 54

Windows XP Chapter 1

Introduction to Microsoft Windows XP

6
6

Click the Search button to search drive E: for the Great Fall Harvest file (Figure 1–85).

What does the progress bar demonstrate?

While the search continues, Windows momentarily displays a message as well as the locations being searched.

Close button file path one file found After a search is complete, you can open
Close
button
file path
one file
found
After a search is complete, you
can open the found file by
double-clicking the file name
or file icon, or by right-clicking
the file icon and then clicking
Open on the shortcut menu
Yes, finished
searching option
contents of
Search Companion
balloon changes
If search results are
unsatisfactory, you
can refine the search
using these options
Back button

Figure 1–85

Finding Files Some would argue that Search is the handiest Windows XP tool. If an application is not represented on the Start menu, many people use Search to display the icon in the Search Results window, and then double-click the icon to start the program.

7
7

Click the Close button on the Search Results window title bar to close the Search Results window.

Other Ways

1. Open Windows Explorer, click Search button on Standard Buttons toolbar, click All files and folders, select search criteria, click Search button

2. Press F3 or WINDOWS+F, select search criteria, press ENTER

Any operation you can accomplish from My Computer or from Windows Explorer can be performed on the files displayed in the right pane of the Search Results window. If the file you are searching for is an executable program file, you can start the program by double-clicking the file icon in the right pane of the Search Results window.

To Search for a File Using a Word or Phrase in the File

If you want to search for a file knowing only a word or phrase in the file, you can search by typing the word or phrase in the ‘A word or phrase in the file’ text box in the Search Companion balloon. Assume you want to find all files containing the word, apply, on the UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive. The following steps search for all files containing the word, apply.

1
1

Display the Start menu.

Click the Search button on the Start menu to display the Search Results window.

If necessary, maximize the Search Results window.

Click ‘All files and folders’ in the Search companion balloon to begin a search (Figure 1–86).

insertion point already in the All or part of the file name text box performs
insertion point already
in the All or part of the
file name text box
performs searches
based on a word
or phrase

Figure 1–86

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Q&AQ&A

FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only Finding Files or Folders WIN 55 2 •
FINAL - For Fall 2007 Use Only
Finding Files or Folders
WIN 55
2
• Click the ‘A word or phrase in
the file’ text box to prepare to
type text.
• Type apply in the ‘A word or
phrase in the file’ text box.
term to
search for
• Click the Look in box arrow to
display the Look in list.
• Click UDISK 2.0 (E:) in the Look in
list to designate UDISK 2.0 (E:) drive
as the drive to search (Figure 1–87).
UDISK 2.0 (E:)
entry selected
in Look in box
Search
button
Windows XP Chapter 1
3
3

Click the Search button in the Search Companion balloon to perform a search (Figure 1–88).

What if my results are different from those shown in Figure 1–88?

If your results are different, you may have mistyped the search term. To determine if this is the case, click the Back button, review your search criteria, and if necessary, perform the search again.

Click the Close button on the Search Results window title bar to close the Search Results window.

Remove the USB flash drive from the USB port.

Why does the computer make a sound when I unplug the USB flash drive?

Windows XP produces many different sounds for various events. When a device is unplugged, your computer produces a sound to alert that this has happened.

Figure 1–87

Close button three files are displayed three files found
Close
button
three files
are displayed
three files
found

Figure 1–88

Other Ways

1. Open Windows Explorer, click Search button on Standard Buttons toolbar, click All files and folders,

select search criteria, click Search button

2. Press F3 or WINDOWS+F