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Lesson: Unit One - Elements of a Short Story - Literary Analysis

Minutes for Lesson: 0
09/02/2014-09/04/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target  
(Student will be
able to...): Writing 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts,
  and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Writing 3.d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Language 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading,
or listening.
Reading Literature 2. [for literary text] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze
its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting,
and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [OR] Reading Informational Text 2. [for
informational text] Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Reading Literature 3. [for literary text] Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a
story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. [OR]
Reading Informational Text 3. [for informational text] Analyze how a text makes connections
among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons,
analogies, or categories).
Reading Literature 4. [for literary text] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are
used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. [OR] Reading
Informational Text 4. [for informational text] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as
they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the
impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other
texts.
Reading Literature 6. [for literary text] Analyze how differences in the points of view of the
characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create
such effects as suspense or humor. [OR] Reading Informational Text 6. [for informational text]
Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author
acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
Reading Informational Text 2. [for informational text] Determine a central idea of a text and
analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting
ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. [OR] Reading Literature 2. [for literary text]
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the
text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Reading Informational Text 3. [for informational text] Analyze how a text makes connections
among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons,
analogies, or categories). [OR] Reading Literature 3. [for literary text] Analyze how particular
lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character,
or provoke a decision.
Reading Informational Text 4. [for informational text] Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings;
analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or
allusions to other texts. [OR] Reading Literature 4. [for literary text] Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings;
analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or
allusions to other texts.
Reading Informational Text 6. [for informational text] Determine an author's point of view or
purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting
evidence or viewpoints. [OR] Reading Literature 6. [for literary text] Analyze how differences in
the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of
dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Writing 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts,
and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Writing 3.d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Language 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading,
or listening.

 
Skills/Objectives:

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  Day One -Two

identify and analyze theme, central idea, plot, conflict and resolution
Students will recognize and understand the elements of fiction and nonfiction writing. Students
will recognize and appreciate the various forms of fiction and nonfiction. Students will learn how
to determine themes in fiction, including works with multiple or universal themes. 
Students will learn how to determine central ideas in nonfiction. Students will read and analyze
examples of fiction and nonfiction.

 
Learning Day One-Two
Activities: Facilitate a close read of the fiction Model text for the class, walking through the annotations
  modeling the skill.

Have students apply the skills to the Independent Practice fiction selection as they answer the
prompts.

Facilitate a close read of the nonfiction Model text for the class, walking through the annotations
modeling the skill.

Have students apply the skills to the Independent Practice nonfiction selection as they answer
the prompts.

After students have completed the Independent Practices, instruct them to complete the After
You Read exercises.

Days One-Three

Introduce the Writing Assignment.

Introduce the Prewriting/Planning Strategy

Have students apply the strategy to gather details.
Introduce the Drafting Strategies.

Have students apply the strategies as they draft.

Introduce the Revising Strategies.

Have students apply the strategies as they revise.

Teach the Writer's Toolbox feature on conventions.

 
Formative Participation
Assessments: Teacher Observation
  Assessment of "Independent Practice" selection
Assessment of the "After You Read" exercise
Character Sketch
 
Differentiation - Pacing 
Enrichment Less modeling
Options/Materials: Independent Writing
   
Differentiation - Extra modeling
Remediation Direct instruction for exercise
Options/Materials: One-on-One Writing Conference
   
STANDARDS

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 Lesson: Unit One -Predicting - Reading Skill
Minutes for Lesson: 0
09/02/2014-09/10/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target  
(Student will be
able to...): Reading Literature 2. [for literary text] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze
  its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting,
and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [OR] Reading Informational Text 2. [for
informational text] Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Language 4.b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the
meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
           
Writing 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts,
and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Writing 3.d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Language 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
Reading Literature 2. [for literary text] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze
its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting,
and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [OR] Reading Informational Text 2. [for
informational text] Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading,
or listening.
Language 3.a. Use verbs in the active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive
mood to achieve particular effects (e.g., emphasizing the actor or the action; expressing
uncertainty or describing a state contrary to fact).
Speaking and Listening 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-
one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Speaking and Listening 1.a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material
under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or
issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Speaking and Listening 1.b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track
progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
Language 4.b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the
meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
Speaking and Listening 1.c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and
respond to others' questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.
Speaking and Listening 1.d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
Speaking and Listening 4. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused,
coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use
appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
Speaking and Listening 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating
command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Writing 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts,
and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Writing 3.d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 
Skills/Objectives:  
 
Reading Skill: Make Predictions
Reading Strategy: Support Your Predictions
Literary Analysis: Plot
Develop vocabulary.
Writing: Work in Progress: Description of a Person
Compose a New Ending

 
Learning Introduce the Reading Skill: Make Predictions.
Activities: Distribute copies of the appropriate graphic organizer for the Reading Skill.
  Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Plot.

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Distribute copies of the appropriate graphic organizer for Literary Analysis.
Teach the selection vocabulary.
Introduce the Word Study skill

Build background with the Background feature.
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with Writing About the Big Question
Prepare students to read with the Activating Prior Knowledge activities (TE).
Informally monitor comprehension while students read.
Use the Reading Check questions to confirm comprehension.
Develop students' ability to make predictions the Make Predictions questions.
Develop students' understanding of plot using questions
Reinforce vocab with notes

Have students complete the Conventions lesson.
Extend learning by having students complete the Speaking and Listening activity, a radio
broadcast.

Have students complete the Writing activity and write a new ending. (You may assign as
homework.)
Have students complete the Word Study activities

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )

 
Formative Participation
Assessments: Assessment of graphic organizer
  Vocab HW
Word Study Skill HW
monitoring reading
Assess students' comprehension and mastery of the skills by having them answer the Critical
Thinking, Reading Skill, and Literary Analysis questions.
Have students complete the Vocabulary Acquisition and Use activities.
Composition - new ending

 
Differentiation -
pacing
Enrichment
Read Retrieved Reformation
Options/Materials:
 
 
Differentiation -
Remediation Read Raymond's Run (tiered rdg)
Options/Materials:  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 1 Week 3 Author's Purpose & Mood
Minutes for Lesson: 0
09/08/2014-09/12/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
09/15/2014-09/19/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target cite textual evidence that supports what the text says explicitly as well as draw inferences
(Student will be from the text
able to...): determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze it
  write a narrative to develop real or imagined experiences
use common greek or latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of the word.

Skills/Objectives: STATE: PA Common Core Standards (2012-2013)
  CC.1.4.8.M Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or  
(Advanced) events.
CC.1.4.8.O Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, description,  

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(Advanced) reflection, and pacing, to develop experiences, events, and/or
characters; use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive
details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey
experiences and events.
CC.1.4.8.P Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically  
(Advanced) using a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to
convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting
to another and show the relationships among experiences and
events; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on
the narrated experiences or events.
CC.1.4.8.Q  
Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of writing.
(Advanced)
CC.1.4.8.T With some guidance and support from peers and adults,  
(Advanced) develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing
on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
CC.1.4.8.U Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish  
(Advanced) writing and present the relationships between information and
ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with
others.
CC.1.5.8.G Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English  
(Advanced) when speaking based on grade 8 level and content.
STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
E08.A-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an  
(Advanced) analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences,
conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its  
(Advanced) development over the course of the text, including its
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an
objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story,  
(Advanced) drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).

 
Instructional Lesson Pacing  TM p. 110a-110b
Procedures: Unit Selections TM p. 110-155
 
Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 
Unit 1 Resources p 134-137 or 152-155
Introduce Reading Skill: Author's Purpose
Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Mood
Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework: Making Predictions and Word/Vocabulary Study

Day 2-3  Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for Unit

Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension
Develop students' ability to understand Author's Purpose with the Author's Purpose questions.
Develop students' undeerstaing of mood using Mood Questions
Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4  Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5
Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 1 Resources pp. 146-151 or 167-172)
Students complete Conventions lesson
 

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Read " The CSI Effect" in Reality Central 

Write a personal narrative

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )
 
Formative Selection Test A or B (Unit 1 Resources pp 146-151 or 167-172)
Assessments:
  Grade Personal Narrative
 
Differentiation -
Enrichment Students can act out a tv commercial for The Sherlock Holmes Detective Agency. TM p141
Options/Materials:  
 
Differentiation - Reading Kit practice worksheets pp 26,30,36, 38,46
Remediation
Options/Materials: Graphic Organizers for literature unit pp.21 & 24
 
Modified Selection Assessment
Extended time
small group instruction
Extra time
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 1- Week 6 Author's Purpose & Style
Minutes for Lesson: 0
09/29/2014-10/03/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Student will be able to...
(Student will be
able to...): determine central idea and analyze it's development
 
determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text ( connotative, figurative, technical)

write informative/explanitory text

use technology to share, write and publish

use common grade appropriate greek or latin affixes

 
Skills/Objectives:
  Skills/Objectives
Enduring Readers interpret text by reading thoroughly and with purpose to determine main ideas and the
Understandings facts and details used to support them.
/ Big Ideas:
Readers continually monitor and check their interpretations of the author’s intent and meaning.

Background knowledge supports understanding of text.

Informational and expository text is written differently than imaginative and literary text and makes
different demands on the reader.

Essential How does what you know help you understand text?
Questions: How does thinking about the author’s purpose and message deepen understanding?
How do text features and characteristics of informational and literary text influence reader
interpretation?

STANDARDS
STATE: PA Common Core Standards (2012-2013)
CC.1.4.8.M (Advanced) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
CC.1.4.8.O (Advanced) Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, description, reflection, and pacing,
to develop experiences, events, and/or characters; use precise words and

Page 6 of 54
phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action
and convey experiences and events.
CC.1.4.8.P (Advanced) Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically using a variety
of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from
one time frame or setting to another and show the relationships among
experiences and events; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on
the narrated experiences or events.
CC.1.4.8.Q (Advanced) Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of writing.
CC.1.4.8.T (Advanced) With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been
addressed.
CC.1.4.8.U (Advanced) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and
present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to
interact and collaborate with others.
CC.1.5.8.G (Advanced) Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking
based on grade 8 level and content.
STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
E08.A-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the
(Advanced) text says explicitly as well as inferences, conclusions, and/or generalizations
drawn from the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over
(Advanced) the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and
plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story, drama, or poem
(Advanced) propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph, a word’s
(Advanced) position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or
phrase. b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as
clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede

 
Learning Lesson Pacing TM p. 156a-156b
Activities: Unit Selections TM p. 156-179
 
Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 
Unit 1 Resources p 173-176 or 191-194
Introduce Reading Skill: Author's Purpose
Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Author's Style
Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework

Day 2-3 Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for Unit 1 
Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension
Develop students' understanding of author's purpose using author's purpose  Questions
Develop students' understanding of author's style using author's style questions
Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4 Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5
Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 1 Resources pp. 185-190 or 206-211)
Writing Activity: Writing Observational Journal  TM p 131 
Students complete Conventions lesson

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)

Page 7 of 54
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )
 
Formative Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 1 Resources pp. 185-190 or 206-211)
Assessments: Writing Activity: Writing Observational Journal TM p 131 
  Students complete Conventions lesson
 
Differentiation -
Read "At First Sight" and "American Dreaming" in Reality Central   Write and essay that compares/contrasts the two
Enrichment
articles.
Options/Materials:
 
 
Differentiation -
Remediation Reader's Notebook adapted version and graphic organizers p. 28-31
Options/Materials:  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 2- Week 7
Minutes for Lesson: 0
10/06/2014-10/10/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target  
(Student will be
able to...): determine a theme or central idea and analyze its development
 
develop the topic with relevant facts, definition, concrete details. quotation or other information
and example

implement appropriate speaking skills

demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English

use common grade appropriate greek or latin affixes

 
Skills/Objectives: STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
  E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its  
(Advanced) development over the course of the text, including its
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an
objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story,  
(Advanced) drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-C.2.1.1 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters  
(Advanced) and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of
dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
E08.A-C.2.1.2 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts, and  
(Advanced) analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to
its meaning and style.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or  
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
E08.B-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an  
(Advanced) analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences,
conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.
E08.B-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). c.
Determine the meaning of technical words and phrases used in
a text.

 
Learning Lesson Pacing TM p. 244a-244d
Activities: Unit Selections TM p. 247-275
 
Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 

Page 8 of 54
Unit 2 Resources p 248-261 or 236-275
Introduce Reading Skill: Compare and Contrast
Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: setting
Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework

Day 2-3 Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for
Unit 2 
Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension
Develop students' understanding of setting and using setting  Questions
Develop students' understanding of compare and contrast using compare and contrast questions
Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4 Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5
Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B 
Writing Activity 
Students complete Conventions lesson

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )
 
Formative Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B 
Assessments: Writing Activity
  Students complete Conventions lesson
 
Differentiation - Complete the Research and Technology activity, an oral report. 
Enrichment
Options/Materials: Assign in Reality Central - "Games People Play" or "Cyber Friends"
 
 
Differentiation -
Remediation Reader's Notebook adapted version and graphic organizers
Options/Materials:  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 2- Week 8
Minutes for Lesson: 0
10/13/2014-10/17/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target  
(Student will be
able to...): determine a theme or central idea and analyze its development
 
develop the topic with relevant facts, definition, concrete details. quotation or other information
and example

implement appropriate speaking skills

demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English

use common grade appropriate greek or latin affixes

Page 9 of 54
 
Skills/Objectives: STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
  E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its  
(Advanced) development over the course of the text, including its
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an
objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story,  
(Advanced) drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-C.2.1.1 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters  
(Advanced) and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of
dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
E08.A-C.2.1.2 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts, and  
(Advanced) analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to
its meaning and style.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or  
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
E08.B-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an  
(Advanced) analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences,
conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.
E08.B-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). c.
Determine the meaning of technical words and phrases used in
a text.

 
Learning Lesson Pacing TM p.276a-276b
Activities: Unit Selections TM p. 276-305
 
Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 
Unit 2 Resources p 62-65 or 80-83
Introduce Reading Skill: Compare and Contrast
Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Character Traits
Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework

Day 2-3 Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for
Unit 2 
Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension
Develop students' ability to compare and and contrast using compare and contrast questions
Develop students' understanding of character traits using character traits questions.
Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4 Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5
Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B 
Writing Activity Response to Literature: Critical Review TM p. 326

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )

Page 10 of 54
 
Formative Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 2 Resources pp. 74-79 or 95-1 
Assessments: Writing Activity Critical Review
   
Differentiation - Analyze quote: " For what are possessions but things you keep and guard for fear you may need
Enrichment them tomorrow." Kahlil Gibran 
Options/Materials:
  Provide 3 examples from the story to support your opinion of the meaning of the quote.

 
Differentiation -
Remediation Reader's Notebook adapted version and graphic organizers
Options/Materials:  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 2- Week 9
Minutes for Lesson: 0
10/20/2014-10/24/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target  
(Student will be
able to...): Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel action, reveal
  aspects of a character or provoke decisions

implement appropriate speaking skills

demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English

use common grade appropriate greek or latin affixes

 
Skills/Objectives: STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
  E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its  
(Advanced) development over the course of the text, including its
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an
objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story,  
(Advanced) drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-C.2.1.1 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters  
(Advanced) and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of
dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
E08.A-C.2.1.2 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts, and  
(Advanced) analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to
its meaning and style.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or  
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
E08.B-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an  
(Advanced) analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences,
conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.
E08.B-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). c.
Determine the meaning of technical words and phrases used in
a text.

 
Learning Lesson Pacing TM p.276a-276b
Activities: Unit Selections TM p. 276-305
 
Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 
Unit 2 Resources p 62-65 or 80-83

Page 11 of 54
Introduce Reading Skill: Compare and Contrast
Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Character Traits
Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework

Day 2-3 Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for
Unit 2 
Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension
Develop students' ability to compare and and contrast using compare and contrast questions
Develop students' understanding of character traits using character traits questions.
Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4 Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5
Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B 
Writing Activity Response to Literature: Critical Review TM p. 326

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )
 
Formative Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 2 Resources pp. 74-79 or 95-1 
Assessments: Writing Activity Critical Review
   
Differentiation - Analyze quote: " For what are possessions but things you keep and guard for fear you may need
Enrichment them tomorrow." Kahlil Gibran 
Options/Materials:
  Provide 3 examples from the story to support your opinion of the meaning of the quote.

 
Differentiation -
Remediation Reader's Notebook adapted version and graphic organizers
Options/Materials:  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: The Life and Work of Edgar Allan Poe
Minutes for Lesson: 0
10/27/2014-10/31/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
11/03/2014-11/07/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target The student will be able to work in a group to create a game show, talk show or game activity
(Student will be that is based on the life and literary works of Edgar Allan Poe with  research done throughout
able to...): the unit.
   
Skills/Objectives:
  PA.CC.RL.8.   Reading Standards for Literature
 
    Key Ideas and Details
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of
RL.8.1.  
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its
development over the course of the text, including its relationship to
RL.8.2.  
the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the

Page 12 of 54
text.
    Craft and Structure
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a
text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact
RL.8.4.  
of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or
allusions to other texts.
    Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of
events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious
RL.8.9.  
works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is
rendered new.
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including
RL.8.10.   stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text
complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
PA.CC.RI.8.   Reading Standards for Informational Text
 
    Key Ideas and Details
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of
RI.8.1.  
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
 
PA.CC.W.8.   Writing Standards
 
    Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Apply grade 8 reading standards to literature (e.g., ''Analyze how a
modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or
W.8.9(a)  
character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such
as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new'').
 
PA.CC.L.8.   Language Standards
 
    Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning
L.8.4.   words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing
flexibly from a range of strategies.
Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a
L.8.4(a)   word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or
L.8.4(d)   phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a
dictionary).
Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and
domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge
L.8.6.  
when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or
expression.

For a more in-depth look at CCSS that align to this resource, visit the full version of the
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies,
Science, and Technical Subjects.

 
Learning Groups will be set for final project by a lottery method in which they will select a ticket with a
Activities: number written on it. All people with "like" numbers will make up the group. 
 
Group #1  Talk Show
Students will be asked to write a script for an imaginary talk show in which Edgar Allan Poe is a
guest. The hosts of the show will ask relevant questions regarding Poe's life & works. The show
should include special guests who played a part in Poe's life or could be characters from his
poems or stories. Each student must have an active speaking role and help to research questions
and correct responses.
The show will be video taped using an Ipad to present to other 8th grade students at BMS who
are studying Poe.

Group #2  Game Show 1

Page 13 of 54
Students will be asked to create a Game Show of their choice ( Jeopardy, $1,000 Pyramid, Who
Wants to be a Millionaire etc..) in which all of the questions have something to do with Edgar
Allan Poe. All group members must have an active role in the creation of the show and all
research for the questions. 3-4 students will be asked to play contestants while the remaining
group members will be Game Show hosts or host companions. The game show will be video
taped for other 8th grade students to watch.

Group # 3 Game Show 2
Students will be asked to create a game show that differs in format from Game Show #1. They
must follow the same guidelines as above but have a different type of game. The game show
will be video taped for other students to watch.

Group #4 Poe-esque Short Film
Students will be asked to write a script for a short film that has some of the characters from his
famous works, or his personal life based on the research conducted about him. The plot of the
film should have a sullen tone and may include costumes as seen fit by the group. The mini-
movie will be filmed with an Ipad and shown to other 8th grade students studying Poe.

 
Formative Students will be graded using the following Rubric:
Assessments:
                                  Possible Score    Earned Score
       Creativity                       10                                                     
       Research              15  
       Group Participation                5  
       Individual Participation              10  
       Time Management              10  

 
Differentiation - *Lesson created for Enrichment class. Students completed research component individually or
Enrichment with a partner using a Glogster page created by teacher.
Options/Materials:
 

 
Differentiation - Periods 5-6   will be given option to create games rather than shows. Board Games or Smart
Remediation Board Games  with a game template.
Options/Materials:
  * Poesque Script eliminated
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Unit 2- Week 10
Minutes for Lesson: 0
11/10/2014-11/14/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
11/17/2014-11/21/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Determine Central Idea
(Student will be
able to...): Analyze different points of view.
 
demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English

use common grade appropriate greek or latin affixes

 
Skills/Objectives: STATE: PA Common Core Anchors and Eligible Content (May 2012)
  E08.A-K.1.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its  
(Advanced) development over the course of the text, including its
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an
objective summary of the text.
E08.A-K.1.1.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story,  
(Advanced) drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a decision.
E08.A-C.2.1.1 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters  
(Advanced) and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of
dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Page 14 of 54
E08.A-C.2.1.2 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts, and  
(Advanced) analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to
its meaning and style.
E08.A-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or  
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
E08.B-K.1.1.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an  
(Advanced) analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences,
conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.
E08.B-V.4.1.1 a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
(Advanced) paragraph, a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to
the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). c.
Determine the meaning of technical words and phrases used in
a text.

 
Learning Lesson Pacing TM 332a-332b
Activities:
  Unit Selections TM p. 332-383

Day 1 Preteach
Reading and Vocabulary Warm-Ups 

Unit 2 Resources p 127-130 or 145-148

Introduce Reading Skill: Make Inferences

Introduce the Literary Analysis concept: Point of View

Teach the selection vocabulary
Introduce Word Study Skill 
Distribute Homework

Day 2-3 Preteach/Teach
Build background with Background feature
Develop thematic vocabulary and thematic thinking with writing about the Big Question for
Unit 2 
Activate prior knowledge for selection reading
Use Reading Check Questions to confirm comprehension

Develop students' ability to infer using inference questions

Develop students' understanding of point of view using point of view questions

Reinforce vocabulary with the vocabulary notes
Reinforce unit standards using the Spiral Review prompts

Day 4 Assess
Answer the Critical Thinking, Reading Skill and Literary Analysis Questions
Complete Vocabulary Practice Activities
Complete Word Study Activities
Collect Homework given Day 1

Day 5

Administer Selection Assessment Test A 139-144 or B 160-165

Writing Activity Response to Literature:Write A Dialogue

Bloom's Taxonomy Levels 
Remembering ( Access Prior Knowledge)
Understanding (Identify)
Applying (Find examples, apply prior knowledge, identify authors purpose
Analyze ( distinguish, list, theme, relationships, examine, compare)
Evaluating ( Determine, compare, support explain)
Creating ( predict, suppose, create )
 
Formative Administer Selection Assessment Test A or B ( Unit 2 Resources pp. 139-144 or 160-165)
Assessments:

Page 15 of 54
 
 
Differentiation - Unit 2 Resources p.156
Enrichment
Options/Materials: Enrichment pp.135-153
 
Research and Technology pp.383

 
Differentiation - TM pp. 332b Tier 2 Intervention
Remediation
Options/Materials:
   
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Two Thanksgiving Day Gentleman-O.Henry
Minutes for Lesson: 0
11/24/2014-11/24/2014 Period(s): 01, 01, 02, 02, 05, 05, 08

Learning Target
(Student will be ThanksgivingDayGentsbyOHenry.pdf
able to...):  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: The Most Dangerous Game
Minutes for Lesson: 0
12/02/2014-12/05/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
12/08/2014-12/12/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target
(Student will be 8aMostDangerousGame.pdf
able to...):  
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Character Analysis
Minutes for Lesson: 0
12/15/2014-12/19/2014 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
01/05/2015-01/09/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
01/12/2015-01/13/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target analyze character traits and identify actions that correspond to each trait.
(Student will be interview a classmate, using STEAL, to collect information needed to identify traits
able to...): compose an introductory paragraph that includes a hook, identification of title and author, and a 
  thesis sentence
compose a character analysis using the constructed response model (8th grade - Mrs. Jones from 
the short story “Thank You Ma’am” by Langston Hughes. Choose three adjectives that describe this 
character. These adjectives, or character traits, will be the basis of your five-paragraph essay. 7th 
grade-Mary Malone from "Lamb to the Slaughter")

 
Skills/Objectives:  
 

 
Instructional 1. Students will analyze twenty character traits.  For each trait students will do the following.
Procedures:  

    1.  Define the term trait. 
  2.  Describe an action or behavior that would show this character trait.
 
2. Create 10 questions focused on discovering character traits of classmates.
 

Page 16 of 54
3.  Use the following site to create an introduction.  It will also be used as a guide to composing the essay.  
Teacher will model as students compose.
 
http://www.slideshare.net/mtalspaugh/character-analysis-essay-presentation
  
4.  Read respective short stories.  While reading, highlight quotes that indicate character traits.
 
5.  Refer to slide show to compose a character analysis essay.  Use ACES as a guide along with teacher 
modeling.

 Create 10 questions that focus on discovering character traits of classmates.

2. 

 
Formative Character Trait project
Assessments:
  Interview questions and responses

Introductory paragraph

Character Analysis essay

 
Differentiation - Academic students can choose a different character 
Enrichment
Options/Materials: Less teacher modeling
 
 
Differentiation - Three paragraph essay (if needed)
Remediation
Options/Materials: More teacher modeling
 

 
STANDARDS
STATE: PA Common Core Standards (2012-2013)
CC.1.3.7.B (Advanced) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says  
explicitly as well as inferences, conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from
the text.
CC.1.3.8.B (Advanced) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the  
text says explicitly as well as inferences, conclusions, and/or generalizations
drawn from the text.
CC.1.4.7.A (Advanced) Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,  
concepts, and information clearly.
CC.1.4.7.B (Advanced) Identify and introduce the topic clearly, including a preview of what is to follow.  
CC.1.4.7.C (Advanced) Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details,  
quotations, or other information and examples; include graphics and
multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CC.1.4.7.D (Advanced) Organize ideas, concepts, and information using strategies such as definition,  
classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; use appropriate transitions
to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts;
provide a concluding statement or section; include formatting when useful to
aiding comprehension.
CC.1.4.7.E (Advanced) Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.  
CC.1.4.7.F (Advanced) Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard  
English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
CC.1.4.8.A (Advanced) Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,  
concepts, and information clearly.
CC.1.4.8.B (Advanced) Identify and introduce the topic clearly, including a preview of what is to follow.  
CC.1.4.8.C (Advanced) Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions,  
concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples; include
graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CC.1.4.8.D (Advanced) Organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; use  
appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the
relationships among ideas and concepts; provide a concluding statement or
section; include formatting when useful to aiding comprehension.

Page 17 of 54
CC.1.4.8.E (Advanced) Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.  
CC.1.4.8.F (Advanced) Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard  
English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
CC.1.5.7.G (Advanced) Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking  
based on grade 7 level and content.
CC.1.5.8.G (Advanced) Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking  
based on grade 8 level and content.

 Lesson: THIEVES
Minutes for Lesson: 0
01/14/2015-01/23/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives: STUDENT OBJECTIVES


 
Students will
Brainstorm previewing strategies

Be able to identify the elements of the THIEVES acronym by configuring a semantic map or web

Demonstrate their abilities to use the THIEVES strategy by completing a self‐directed worksheet

Demonstrate their understanding of the THIEVES strategy by explaining it in the writing of a letter to a friend

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SESSION 1: MODEL LESSON

1. Announce to students that they are about to become thieves. Explain that they will learn how to "steal"
information from texts before they actually read a chapter or article. If students are familiar with the
termpreviewing, encourage them to share strategies they use to preview a chapter. If they are not familiar with
previewing, ask them to brainstorm ideas on how they might look through a chapter before they begin reading
to get an idea of what it is about. Discuss why previewing is a helpful reading strategy. Lead them to discover
that previewing will help them activate prior knowledge, set a purpose for reading, and set expectations for
reading so that they can better understand the concepts they are about to encounter.

2. Display the transparency for the Becoming THIEVES handout on an overhead projector. Give each student a copy
of the handout as well. While brainstorming, encourage students to peruse a chapter they are about to
encounter in their social studies or science textbook. With their help and suggestions, identify the elements
that make up the THIEVES acronym. Students should fill in the handout as the teacher fills in the transparency
interactively with the class. Inform students they will be using the Becoming THIEVES handout to perform
THIEVES on future texts throughout the school year so they should take careful notes and ask questions as
necessary. Emphasize to students that they may not find all of the THIEVES elements in every nonfiction text
that they read.

3. After each element is identified, configure a semantic map or web of the elements by drawing lines out from
each element and adding details to describe what information could be gathered from each one. Add details
appropriate to the level of the class. Students should copy the semantic map or web on the back of their
Becoming THIEVES handout to use for future reference.

4. Next, tell students that you will think aloud for them while you perform THIEVES on the chapter they have been
perusing. Encourage them to listen carefully because they will be performing the strategy themselves on Session
2 of the lesson and throughout the rest of the school year. To guide you, put the transparency for The Elements
of THIEVES handout on the projector. Answer the questions on the sheet and literally think out loud so students
can follow your logic as you apply the strategy.

5. Summarize with students what they have learned about previewing texts using the THIEVES strategy.
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SESSION 2: PRACTICE LESSON

1. Review the elements of previewing a text using the THIEVES strategy (refer to the Becoming THIEVES handout
completed in Session 1). Ask students why previewing is a helpful reading strategy.

2. Assign students to work with a partner. Using a chapter that students will encounter soon in their textbooks or a
sample online chapter listed under the Resources and Preparation tab, have students complete The Elements of
THIEVES handout. Each student should receive and complete his or her own worksheet. Partners may have the
same answers since they are working together.

3. Stop partner work 10 minutes before the lesson is over and go over what students "stole" from the chapter. Help
students verbalize a summary of what they think the chapter is about and how previewing the chapter could
prove helpful to understanding the text when they read it.

4. Collect The Elements of THIEVES handout from each student and evaluate student's responses by providing
helpful comments and feedback for each student.
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SESSION 3: ASSESSMENT

Page 18 of 54
1. Return The Elements of THIEVES handout to students. Describe and discuss those areas where students
generally need further help.

2. Assign students to write a friendly letter to their partner describing why previewing is a helpful reading strategy
and explaining how to use the THIEVES approach. Encourage students to use the two handoutsBecoming
THIEVES and The Elements of THIEVES for reference. Each student should compose his or her own letter
individually. Encourage thoroughness and inclusion of details without simply reiterating notes from the
handouts. Students should describe how to use THIEVES by specifically describing, not just listing, each of the
elements. Tell students to flavor their letters with their personal voice to make the letters interesting and fun.
If students do not finish the letter in class, they can complete it for homework and hand it in the next day.
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EXTENSIONS
Assign students increasingly difficult texts on which to perform the THIEVES strategy. Include texts across the
content areas. Encourage students to challenge themselves and see how much information they can gather from
texts above their reading comprehension level.

If necessary, focus on one or more of the elements to strengthen students' ability to glean information from them.
For example, students may find it difficult to gather information from headings. If so, ReadWriteThink's lesson
plan on Exploring How Section Headings Support Understanding of Expository Texts would be a useful extension.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS
Session 1. Teacher observation of student's participation in the class discussions; completion of the Becoming
THIEVES handout

Session 2. Teacher observation of the student's involvement in partner work; completion of The Elements of
THIEVES handout

Session 3. Assign a grade to the student's letter by evaluating the number of elements described accurately. For
example, if a student lists 6 or 7 elements, the grade would be an A, and so on. Letters must also include the
purposes for previewing a text.

STANDARDS

 Lesson: The Fog Horn by Ray Bradbury Text Dependent Analysis
Minutes for Lesson: 0
01/26/2015-01/30/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
02/02/2015-02/06/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives:
Title: The Fog Horn
 

Suggested Time: 5 days

Common Core ELA Standards: RL.8.1, RL.8.2, RL.8.3; W.8.2, W.8.4, W.8.9;
L.8.1, L.8.2, L.8.3; SL.8.1

Teacher Instructions
Preparing for Teaching
1.      Read the Big Ideas and Key Understandings and the Synopsis. Please do not read this to the
students. This is a description for teachers about the big ideas and key understanding that
students should take away after completing this task.

Big Ideas and Key Understandings
·          Loneliness and unrequited love can lead to feelings of anger and destruction.
·          The past and present are not always compatible.
Synopsis
Johnny, the narrator, and McDunn, the lighthouse keeper (Johnny’s boss), are working in a
lighthouse on a November evening.  McDunn shares his experience of witnessing strange
sea mysteries, including the sighting of a monster that appears at this time each year. The
monster has been attracted by the lighthouse foghorn and mimics the sound while
McDunn and Johnny watch the exchange.  McDunn turns off the fog horn, and the monster
destroys the lighthouse in anger as the two lighthouse workers escape. The lighthouse is
rebuilt within a year with McDunn as the new master.  The creature never returns to the
light house, and McDunn mentions that it is probably waiting until man has left the world
in order to search for companionship.

Page 19 of 54
2.      Read the “The Fog Horn” and “Ray Bradbury is on Fire” in The Elements of Literature keeping
in mind the Big Ideas and Key Understandings.
3.      Re-read the texts while noting the stopping points for the Text Dependent Questions and
teaching Tier II/academic vocabulary for both pieces.

During Teaching
1.      Read aloud the story to students while the students finger read along with the story. During
the reading, have students complete the chart below to assist with a basic comprehension of
the short story.
Characters Setting: Conflict Resolution
Time period and
location
 
2.      Students reread the first seven paragraphs of “The Fog Horn” independently and answer the
guiding question, “What mood is created by the author’s word choice?  Highlight significant
mood words or phrases and share with a partner.” You may take this opportunity to answer
the first text-dependent question as a whole class using the gradual release model.
3.      Teacher reads “The Fog Horn” aloud while students follow along or students take turns
reading aloud to each other.
4.      Students and teacher re-read the text while stopping to respond to and discuss the questions,
continually returning to the text.  A variety of methods can be used to structure the reading
and discussion (i.e., whole class discussion, think-pair-share, independent written response,
group work, etc.)
5.      After reading and analyzing the questions and vocabulary in “The Fog Horn,” students read
“Ray Bradbury is on Fire” independently or in pairs.
6.      Then have students work alone or in groups to gather evidence from the article.  Focus the
search for students by asking them to highlight or underline any insight about Ray Bradbury
and his thoughts about technology.

Text Dependent Questions
Text-dependent Questions Evidence-based Answers
Who is the narrator of this story? From what The story is told in first person point of view
point of view is the story told? from the narrator, Johnny. Students can
illustrate the point of view from sample
sentences with “I.” On page 445 McDunn states,
“You been here now for three months, Johnny,
so I better prepare you.”

How does the narrator’s description of the The setting depicts an eerie mood of loneliness
setting on the first page (or first six and isolation. Phrases such as, “out there in the
paragraphs) of the story set the mood for cold water, far from land,” and “feeling like two
the remainder of the story? birds in the gray sky” in the first paragraph
immediately set the mood. The author
continues in paragraph six with phrases such as
“a cold November evening,” and “the high throat
of the tower.” In addition the author notes “there
wasn’t a town for a hundred miles down the
coast, just a road that came lonely through dead
country to the sea……two miles of cold water
out to our rock.”

Reread paragraph seven and use textual The lighthouse has a significant impact on the
evidence to explain the significance of the creatures of the sea. McDunn tells the
lighthouse on the creatures of the sea. Whatmysterious story of millions of fish leaving the
does the Fog Horn symbolize for the fish? sea and surfacing at the shore. The text states,
What is Bradbury saying about the Fog Horn “something made them swim in and lie in the
through the use of this symbol? bay, sort of trembling and staring up at the
tower.” McDunn shares, “I kind of think maybe,
in some sort of way, they came all those miles
to worship. Strange. But think how the tower
must look to them, standing seventy feet above
the water, the God-like flashing out from it, and
the tower declaring itself with a monster voice.”
The paragraph ends with McDunn asking
Johnny if “they thought they were in the
Presence” suggesting the lighthouse could be a
deity in the eyes of the creatures of the sea.
What effect does the repetition of “the Fog “The Fog Horn Blew” is repeated seven times.
Horn blew” throughout the story have on the The author brings in the phrase at important

Page 20 of 54
advancement of the plot? points to advance the plot. The first time it is
introduced (page 446) it immediately follows
the words “I’ll make me a sound and an
apparatus and they’ll call it a Fog Horn and
whoever hears it will know the sadness of
eternity and the briefness of life.” The phrase is
predominantly used to show the connection of
the sea creature to the lighthouse and illustrate
how the actions of the sea creature are a direct
response to the sound of the Fog Horn. The text
notes, “The monster cried out at the tower. The
Fog Horn blew. The monster roared again. The
Fog Horn Blew.”
The following statements are possible Answers will vary. A student who explores
themes for the short story. Select one or loneliness might cite the following textual
create a statement on your own and use evidence: The setting depicts an eerie mood of
textual evidence to support the statement as loneliness and isolation. Phrases such as, “out
the theme. there in the cold water, far from land,” and
“feeling like two birds in the gray sky” in the
·          Loneliness and unrequited love can lead to first paragraph immediately set the mood. The
feelings of anger and destruction. author continues in paragraph six with phrases
such as “a cold November evening,” and “the
·          The past and present are not always high throat of the tower.” In addition the author
compatible. notes “there wasn’t a town for a hundred miles
down the coast, just a road that came lonely
through dead country to the sea…two miles of
cold water out to our rock.” When McDunn is
asked if he is used to the loneliness, he
responds, “Yes”. The story continues, showing
how the characters McDunn and the sea creature
respond to loneliness. While McDunn appears to
have accepted it, the sea creature is seeking to
end its loneliness. The creature seems to view
the fog horn and lighthouse as a beacon of
hope that others of its kind still exists. The sea
creature responds each time the Fog Horn
blows. “The Fog Horn Blew. And the monster
answered. A cry came across a million years of
water and mist. A cry so anguished and alone
that it shuddered in my head and my body. The
monster cried out at the tower. The Fog Horn
blew. The monster roared again,” notes the
narrator. The sea creature seeks out the
lighthouse and the fog horn to end his
loneliness. In the end, the sea creature
discovers the Fog Horn is not a beloved mate,
and is hurt. The creature mourns the loss of the
fog horn, its only hope of companionship, and
begins the slow descent to its home at the
bottom of the sea. McDunn ends up “master of
the new lighthouse” and perpetuates the
loneliness.
How does the repetition of the phrase “the The repetition of the phrase continually draws
Fog Horn blew” relate to the theme(s) of the attention to the disconnect between the living,
story? feeling creature and the unfeeling technology of
the fog horn. The phrase emphasizes the
misunderstanding and loneliness caused by the
differences between the “past” (the monster)
and the “present” (the Fog Horn): “A cry came
across a million years of water and mist…Lonely
and vast and far away. The sound of isolation, a
viewless sea, a cold night, apartness. That was
the sound.”
Explain what happens when the repetition of When the repetition of this phrase is interrupted
the phrase “the Fog Horn blew” is the lighthouse is destroyed. The author details
interrupted (page 449). What are the the response to the loss of the Fog Horn (an
immediate effects of this interruption? attack on the lighthouse) on pages 448 and
449. When McDunn and Johnny resume the Fog
Horn the text describes it as “the Fog Horn
cried; the monster cried.” The text continues,
describing the monster’s emotional response:
“The monster stopped and froze. Its great
lantern eyes blinked. Its mouth gaped. It gave a
sort of rumble, like a volcano. It twitched its
head this way and that way, as if to seek the
sounds now dwindled off into the fog. It peered
at the lighthouse. It rumbled again. Then its

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eyes caught fire. It reared up, threshed the
water, and rushed at the tower, its eyes filled
with angry torment.”  
As the sea creature becomes visible, McDunn This discussion can be found on page 447.
replies to Johnny’s cry of “It’s impossible!” by McDunn feels the past and present are not
stating, “No, Johnny, we’re impossible” compatible. He states, “It’s like it always was ten
(page 447). Explain why “we’re impossible” millions years ago. It hasn’t changed. It’s us and
from McDunn’s perspective. the land that’ve changed, become impossible.
Us!” McDunn challenges us to think about how
we have changed and perhaps made things
worse or at least not aligned with how things
were in the past. For example, student
responses could include evidence about creating
a sound that would cause a creature to feel love
and then intense pain. “I’ll make me a sound
and an apparatus and they’ll call it a Fog Horn
and whoever hears it will know the sadness of
eternity and the briefness of life.” He makes the
reader wonder if the changes are for the better
by stating that it us who are impossible.

Reread the paragraph that begins “But the The sea creature believes the lighthouse is
sound of the Fog Horn comes and goes…” another sea creature, a potential mate. The sea
on page 448.  Based on the sea creature’s creature recognizes the sound. The text notes,
perception, what does it believe the “But that Fog Horn comes through a thousand
lighthouse to be?  Why is it taking the miles of water, faint and familiar, and the
journey from the bottom of the Deeps to furnace in your belly stokes up.” McDunn
reach the lighthouse?  What textual evidence describes how the lighthouse looks like the sea
supports your analysis? creature. “with a long neck like your neck
sticking way up out the water, and a body like
your body, and, most important of all, a voice
like your voice.”

Describe the emotions felt by the creature at The sea creature starts off feeling lonely. It
the beginning, middle, and end of the story. could be the last of his kind and longs to find
Support your answer with specific incidents another. McDunn notes, “All year long, Johnny,
from the story. that poor monster there lying far out, a
thousand miles at sea, and twenty miles deep.”
It then moves to excitement and anticipation
over hearing the Fog Horn and the possibility of
finding a mate, another sea creature like
himself. The text notes, “the furnace in your
belly stokes up” and describes the treacherous
journey the sea creature must endure but is
willing to do. Finally the sea creature ends up
tormented, anguished and returns to his
loneliness. The text describes the sea creature
as having “eyes caught fire. It reared up,
threshed the water, and rushed the tower, its
eyes filled with angry torment.” The text
continues with “The huge eyes on the right side
of its anguished head …”

“That’s life for you,” said McDunn, “Someone This reveals McDunn’s feelings of isolation and
always waiting for someone who never loss. McDunn notes, “always someone loving
comes home…” (page 449). What does this some thing more than that thing loves them.”
paragraph from the text reveal about This quote shows how McDunn is identifying
McDunn’s understanding about the creature with the creature. Students might cite additional
and himself? evidence about McDunn’s loneliness and
parallels to the sea creature from the beginning
of the story, when he tells Johnny that “it’s your
turn on land tomorrow,” to which Johnny
replies, “What do you think, McDunn, when I
leave you out here alone?” “On the mysteries of
the sea.”

In the article, the author notes, “Bradbury is In Ray Bradbury is on Fire, the author shares
a consistent champion of things human and that Bradbury stated, “Why go to a machine
real” (page 430). What evidence in the when you can go to a human being” when
article supports this understanding of Ray asked about what he thought of ATMs. In Fog
Bradbury?  What evidence in the story also Horn, this is presented in McDunn’s inability to
supports this belief? see the present world honoring the past.
McDunn states that we and the land (including
conditions, technology, relationships, etc.) have
changed and calls us “impossible.” In Fog Horn,
this is also evident in McDunn’s connection with
the sea creature. McDunn feels his loss noting,

Page 22 of 54
“And after a while, you want to destroy
whatever that thing is, so it can’t hurt you no
more.”
Explain Bradbury’s beliefs on technology The article makes it clear Bradbury is a critic of
after reading the article “Ray Bradbury is on modern technology. The articles talks about how
Fire.” Use evidence from the article to Bradbury claims he has never driven a car, and
support your answer. “he is scornful of the Internet.” In addition, the
article talks about how Bradbury is not
interested in computers stating, “I have two
typewriters. I do not need another one.”
Now that you have read “Ray Bradbury is on Answers will vary. The technology Bradbury
Fire” and The Fog Horn, find an instance in explores in the Fog Horn is the lighthouse and
the story that reflects Bradbury’s views on the Fog Horn itself. In the story, the lighthouse
technology.  What effect does this incident and Fog Horn are destroyed by the sea creature.
have on the outcome of the story? It is interesting to note this occurs when the sea
creature (the past) is finally about to meet up
the lighthouse (the present). McDunn decides to
“switch the Fog Horn off” (page 449). This
emphasizes the belief that the present and past
are not compatible and challenges us to think if
the present is better than the past (modern
technology). This is echoed in the incident of
the text when McDunn states, “It’s us and the
land that’ve changed, become impossible. Us!”
(page 447). Other possible responses might
include a reference to the monster’s eyes: “As
the light hit them, the monster’s eyes were fire
and ice, fire and ice” (which brings
life/elemental qualities to the artificial lights of
the lighthouse), or “One of the monster eyes
caught and held and flashed back our immense
light, red, white, red, white, like a disk held
high and sending a message in primeval
code”(referencing the existence of
language/communication before technology) –
or even a reference to the personification of the
Fog Horn when it “cried.”
Based on what we have learned about Answers will vary. Both have demonstrated a
Bradbury from the article, what are some belief that the past and present are not
commonalities between McDunn, the compatible and that modern things (technology)
character, and Bradbury, the author? are not always good things. The story
Additionally, what does McDunn do that is challenges us to think of McDunn as a
uncharacteristic of Bradbury? manifestation of Bradbury and a reflection of his
beliefs. Bradbury is speaking to the reader
through McDunn.  By choosing to rebuild the
lighthouse from an even newer technology,
McDunn deviates from Bradbury’s views on
technology. The new lighthouse again has a Fog
Horn which “sounded like the monster calling”.
This perhaps is a commentary about the
inevitability of technological advancement.

Tier II/Academic Vocabulary
These words require less time to These words require more time to
learn learn
(They are concrete or describe an (They are abstract, have multiple meanings, are
object/event/ a part

process/characteristic that is familiar to of a word family, or are likely to appear again in
students) future texts)

Page 23 of 54
Meaning Page 445 – daft Page 446 – plain
can be
learned Page 445 -- ascended Page 447 – subterranean
from
context Page 447 -- froth Page 448 -- faint

Page 448 -- isolation Page 450 -- torment

Page 449 -- brooding Page 450 -- buckled

Page 450 -- anguished Page 451 -- specifications

Page 450 – abruptly RBF article

Page 450 -- dwindled Page 430 -- championed

Page 451 -- reeked Page 430 -- stunning

RBF article

Page 429 -- scornful
Meaning Page 446 -- apparatus Page 447 -- primeval
needs to
be Page 447 -- flicker Page 449 -- ensuing
provided
Page 449 -- pressurizing Page 450 -- gnashed

Page 451 -- lament Page 450 -- concussions*

Page 451 -- bewilderment RBF article

RBF article Page 430 -- human condition

Page 430 -- consistent

Page 431 -- dispersed

Culminating Writing Task
·          Prompt
The Fog Horn is a reflection of Ray Bradbury’s beliefs on technology and its impact on
humanity as discussed in the article “Ray Bradbury is on Fire.”  Identify the technology that
Bradbury uses in the story and explain the emotional impact of the technology on both the
creature and McDunn using one or both of the identified themes for the unit. Compare and
contrast this effect on both characters.  
·          Teacher Instructions
1.      Students identify the requirements of the writing task from the prompt provided by
highlighting the key verbs and breaking down each component through a full-class
discussion. 
2.      Students complete an evidence chart as a pre-writing activity. Teachers should remind
students to use any relevant notes they compiled while reading and answering the text-
dependent questions.
Evidence Page Elaboration / explanation of how
number this evidence supports ideas or
Quote or paraphrase argument
The setting depicts an eerie mood of p. 444 The depiction of the setting creates the
loneliness and isolation. Phrases such mood of loneliness and isolation. The
as, “out there in the cold water, far mood is maintained throughout the
from land,” and “feeling like two birds piece and is connected to the character
in the gray sky” in the first paragraph of McDunn.
immediately set the mood. The
author continues in paragraph six McDunn states he is used to the
with phrases such as “a cold loneliness and even tells stories about
November evening,” and “the high the “mysteries of the sea” to enrich his
throat of the tower.” In addition the lonely existence. He compares his
author notes “there wasn’t a town for existence as a separate level from
a hundred miles down the coast, just mankind. Finally, in the end when
a road that came lonely through dead faced with the destruction of the
country to the sea…two miles of cold lighthouse, McDunn waits for it to
water out to our rock.” return and becomes “master” of the
new lighthouse. McDunn refuses to
When the reader meets McDunn he move on from the loneliness.
explains his comfort in this solitude (supports loneliness theme)
describing how is now used to the
loneliness and tells tales “on the
mysteries of the sea”. One such story
depicts the lighthouse as a “Deity” in

Page 24 of 54
the eyes of fish. McDunn notes, “I
think they came all those miles to
worship.”

McDunn shares, “I kind of think       p. 445 This explains, as one example, how


maybe, in some sort of way, they the lighthouse (technology) is not
came all those miles to worship. compatible with the past and present.
Strange. But think how the tower (supports past and present technology
must look to them, standing seventy theme)
feet above the water, the God-like
flashing out from it, and the tower
declaring itself with a monster voice.”

“The Fog Horn Blew” is repeated p. 446 The author brings in the phrase at


seven times. important points to advance the plot.
The first time it is introduced it
immediately follows the words “I’ll
make me a sound and an apparatus
and they’ll call it a Fog Horn and
whoever hears it will know the
sadness of eternity and the briefness
of life.” The phrase is predominantly
used to show the connection of the
sea creature to the lighthouse and
illustrate how the actions of the sea
creature are a direct response to the
sound of the Fog Horn. The text
notes, “The monster cried out at the
tower. The Fog Horn blew. The
monster roared again. The Fog Horn
Blew.” (supports loneliness theme)
“It’s like it always was ten millions       p. 447 This offers insight about McDunn and
years ago. It hasn’t changed. It’s us his beliefs about us and the land
and the land that’ve changed, (technology) and the impact it has on
become impossible. Us!” the past. (supports past and present
technology theme)
“The ensuing minute of silence was       p. 449 The Fog Horn is turned off and the
so intense that we could hear our author chooses to emphasize what can
hearts pounding in the glassed area now be heard when the technology is
of the tower, could hear the slow removed. We are challenged to think
greased turn of the light.” about what is being missed (the past
taken for granted) because of modern
technology. (supports past and present
technology theme)
The sea creature responds each time p. 449 The creature, however, seems to view
the Fog Horn blows. “The Fog Horn the fog horn and lighthouse as a
Blew. And the monster answered. A beacon of hope that others of its kind
cry came across a million years of still exists. The sea creature seeks out
water and mist. A cry so anguished the lighthouse and the fog horn to end
and alone that it shuddered in my his loneliness. (supports loneliness
head and my body. The monster theme)
cried out at the tower. The Fog Horn
blew. The monster roared again,”
notes the narrator.

“And after a while, you want to p. 449 This shows McDunn’s connection to


destroy whatever that thing is, so it the sea creature and his understanding
can’t hurt you no more.” of the destroyed lighthouse. McDunn
identifies with the sea creature and
feels his sense of loss and isolation.
(supports loneliness theme)
 
3.      Once students have completed the evidence chart, they should look back at the writing
prompt in order to remind themselves what kind of response they are writing (i.e.
expository, analytical, argumentative) and think about the evidence they found.
(Depending on the grade level, teachers may want to review students’ evidence charts
in some way to ensure accuracy.) From here, students should develop a specific thesis
statement. This could be done independently, with a partner, small group, or the entire
class. Consider directing students to the following sites to learn more about thesis
statements: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/545/01/ OR
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/ thesis_statement.shtml.
4.      Students compose a rough draft. With regard to grade level and student ability,
teachers should decide how much scaffolding they will provide during this process (i.e.
modeling, showing example pieces, sharing work as students go).

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5.      Students complete final draft.
 
 
 
 
 
 
·          Sample Answer
o   Note that the sample answer integrates both themes of the story. Students are asked to
write about one or both themes
o   Optional Graphic Organizer:  (Students will fill in responses. Some answers have been
completed to assist teachers with understanding how to utilize the graphic organizer.)
Identify Technology Select Theme from Big Ideas
The Fog Horn/Lighthouse Loneliness and unrequited love can
lead to feelings of anger and
destruction.
Compare and Contrast Impact on Characters
McDunn The Creature

1.      1.     

The impact of technology is often a theme in Ray Bradbury’s writing. In the “Fog Horn,”
Ray Bradbury illustrates through the characters of McDunn and a sea creature that the impact of
technology is loneliness, which leads to feelings of anger and destruction. The author uses the
fog horn as the catalyst to show the impact of technology on both mankind through the character
of McDunn and nature through the sea creature, yielding differing emotional responses between
the two characters.

When the lighthouse is first introduced, Bradbury describes the setting where the
lighthouse is situated and the process the narrator must take to reach the destination. The setting
depicts an eerie mood of loneliness and isolation. Phrases such as, “out there in the cold water,
far from land,” and “feeling like two birds in the gray sky” in the first paragraph immediately set
the mood. The author continues in paragraph six with phrases such as “a cold November
evening,” and “the high throat of the tower.” In addition the author notes “there wasn’t a town for
a hundred miles down the coast, just a road that came lonely through dead country to the sea…
two miles of cold water out to our rock.”  When the reader meets McDunn he explains his comfort
in this solitude describing how is now used to the loneliness and tells tales “on the mysteries of
the sea”. One such story depicts the lighthouse as a “Deity” in the eyes of fish. McDunn notes, “I
think they came all those miles to worship.” The creature, however, seems to view the fog horn
and lighthouse as a beacon of hope that others of its kind still exists. The sea creature responds
each time the Fog Horn blows. “The Fog Horn Blew. And the monster answered. A cry came
across a million years of water and mist. A cry so anguished and alone that it shuddered in my
head and my body.” notes the narrator. The sea creature seeks out the lighthouse and the fog
horn to end his loneliness.

Once the creature nears the fog horn, a sense of urgency is created by the repetition of the
blowing of the fog horn, calling the creature closer. The first time it is introduced it immediately
follows the words “I’ll make me a sound and an apparatus and they’ll call it a fog horn and
whoever hears it will know the sadness of eternity and the briefness of life.” The phrase is
predominantly used to show the connection of the sea creature to the lighthouse and illustrate
how the actions of the sea creature are a direct response to the sound of the fog horn. The text
notes, “The monster cried out at the tower. The fog horn blew. The monster roared again. The
fog horn blew.” As the creature nears, McDunn passionately conveys his understanding of the
creature’s lonely existence and the need to seek companionship. His empathy for the creature and
nature is addressed in his excitement upon seeing the creature emerge by yelling, “No, we’re
impossible! It’s like it always was ten million years ago. It hasn’t changed. It’s us and the land
that’ve changed, become impossible. Us!” McDunn’s statements show his understanding that
technology has created confusion in nature and the loneliness the creature is experiencing, and
give the reader a glimpse of the creature’s long, lonely existence.

Once the creature begins calling out to the fog horn, McDunn responds by turning off the

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fog horn.  The moment forces both characters to face the loneliness and shows the difference in
how each responds. The text shows the importance of this moment by stating, “the ensuing
minute of silence was so intense that we could hear our hearts pounding in the glassed area of
the tower, could hear the slow greased turn of the light.” It can be inferred that McDunn silences
the fog horn to help the creature realize it truly is alone and to abandon hope, or he simply wants
the creature to accept the loneliness as McDunn has over his years in the lighthouse. However, the
creature responds to the silence of the fog horn in confused anger by destroying the lighthouse,
which forces McDunn to take refuge in the cellar under the stones of what was his fortress of
solitude. The creature morns the loss of the fog horn, its only hope of companionship, and
begins the slow descent to its home at the bottom of the sea.

While McDunn never mentions the creature and the reason behind the lighthouse’s
destruction, he decides to stay on as the lighthouse keeper of the newly constructed, concrete
reinforced home of the fog horn. McDunn returns to life as he knew it before without the hope of
seeing the creature again, and the creature returns to its solitary home with a broken heart.
McDunn states at one point “And after a while, you want to destroy whatever that thing is, so it
can’t hurt you no more.” in which shows that both he and the creature struggle with the same
affliction of loneliness. McDunn also notes, “That’s life for you. Someone always waiting for
someone who never comes home”. Although the characters of McDunn and the sea creature
respond differently, both feel a sense of loneliness in relation to the lighthouse.

Additional Tasks
·          Technology has advanced since Bradbury wrote “The Fog Horn” in the 1950’s, but many
would argue that his theme of isolation/loneliness continues with modern technology. Provide
an example of a current technology and discuss how Bradbury’s theme does or does not hold
true today.

o   Answer:  Answers will vary. In an argumentative essay, students should identify a
current technology and make a claim about whether the technology contributes to a
sense of loneliness/isolation for humanity. Students should provide details about the
technology and discuss how it is or is not contributing to a sense of loneliness for
humanity. For example, some might argue a smart phone’s texting capabilities are
resulting in even fewer communication opportunities. Some individuals, in fact, may
prefer to communicate by text and remove the personal interaction. Is this technology
contributing to a sense of isolation for humanity? Is a tool meant to bring individuals
closer together in fact bringing them farther apart? The argumentative paper should
also address counterclaims.

·          Read at least one additional short story by Ray Bradbury in The Elements of Literature (“The
Flying Machine” and/or “The Dragon”) and identify how the technology advances the plot and
impacts the characters in the story. 
o   Answer:  Students select one of the two additional short stories to read and analyze.
Students are expected to revise the essay created during the culminating writing task
for The Fog Horn using support and textual evidence from a second story by Ray
Bradbury. Students must identify the technology explored in the text and cite examples
of how the technology affects the plot and impacts the characters. Students should be
reminded of the activities and discussions that occurred during the analysis of the Fog
Horn and the requirements of the writing task. 

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Words We Live By- Guide to the Constitution Text Dependent Analysis
Minutes for Lesson: 0
02/09/2015-02/13/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
02/16/2015-02/20/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05
02/23/2015-02/27/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Page 27 of 54
Skills/Objectives: Linda R. Monk, Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the
 
Constitution - Grade 8
Originally published in New York: Hyperion, 2003.

Learning Objective: The goal of this one to two day exemplar is to give students the
opportunity to observe the dynamic nature of the Constitution through the close reading and
writing habits they’ve been practicing.  By reading and re-reading the passage closely, and
focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will
explore the questions Monk raises and perhaps even pursue additional avenues of inquiry.
When combined with writing about the passage, not only will students form a deeper
appreciation of Monk’s argument and the value of struggling with complex text, but of the
Preamble of the Constitution itself.

Reading Task: Re-reading is deliberately built into the instructional unit.
Students will silently read the passage in question on a given day— first
independently and then following along with the text as the teacher and/or
skillful students read aloud. Depending on the difficulties   of a given text and
the teacher’s knowledge of the fluency abilities of students, the order of the
student silent read and the teacher reading aloud with students following might
be reversed. What is important is to allow all students to interact with
challenging text on their own as frequently and independently as possible.
Students will then re-read specific passages in response to a set of concise, text-
dependent questions that compel them to examine the meaning and structure of
Monk’s argument.

Vocabulary Task: Most of the meanings of words in this selection can be
discovered from careful reading of the context in which they appear. Where it is
judged this is not possible, underlined words are defined briefly for students in
a separate column whenever the  original text is reproduced. At times, this is
all the support these words need. At other times, particularly with abstract
words, teachers will need to spend more time explaining and discussing these
words. Teachers can use discussions to model and reinforce how to learn
vocabulary from contextual clues. Students must be held accountable for
engaging in this practice. In addition, for subsequent readings, high value
academic (‘Tier Two’) words have been bolded to draw attention to them.
Given how crucial vocabulary knowledge is to students’ academic and career
success, it is essential that these high value words be discussed and lingered
over during the instructional sequence.

Sentence Syntax Task: On occasion students will encounter particularly difficult
sentences to decode.  Teachers should engage in a close examination of such sentences
to help students discover how they are built and how they convey meaning.  While many
questions addressing important aspects of the text double as questions about syntax,
students should receive regular supported practice in deciphering complex sentences.  It
is crucial that the help they receive in unpacking text complexity focuses both on the
precise meaning of what the author is saying and why the author might have
constructed the sentence in this particular fashion.  That practice will in turn support
students’ ability to unpack meaning from syntactically complex sentences they encounter
in future reading.

Discussion Task: Students will discuss the passage in depth with their
teacher and their classmates, performing activities that result in a close reading
of Monk’s text.  The goal is to foster student confidence when encountering
complex text and to reinforce the skills they  have acquired regarding how to
build and extend their understanding of a text. A general principle is to always
re-read the portion of text

Page 28 of 54
that provides evidence for the question under discussion. This gives students
another encounter with the text, reinforces the use of text evidence, and
helps develop fluency.

Writing Task: Students will paraphrase Thurgood Marshall’s quote and then write
an explanation of Monk’s text in response to one of three prompts.  Teachers might
afford students the opportunity to rewrite their explanation or revise their in-class
paraphrase after participating in classroom discussion, allowing them to refashion
both their understanding of the text and their expression of that und
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Using Poetry to Enrich Writing
Minutes for Lesson: 0
03/02/2015-03/06/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives:
  STUDENT OBJECTIVES
Students will

Examine models of classic poetry and use them to develop their own personal writing style

Analyze and interpret poetry by making personal connections to poems using their own individual perspectives and
by listening to the perspectives of their classmates

Develop an enhanced perception and appreciation of poetry through class and small‐group discussions and exposure
to cross‐cultural poetry

Demonstrate improved writing ability through the collaborative construction of a writing prompt or "link" and
experimentation with various styles and forms of poetry

Demonstrate higher‐level thinking through thoughtful, analytical reflection on and experimentation with classic
poetry

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SESSION 1: BEFORE READING AND PREPARATION

1. Gather a collection of classic poems to use with this lesson. (See the Poetry Selection Tips and the Suggested
Classic Poems for assistance in finding appropriate poems for your students.)

2. Select one poem for students to read, examine, and analyze as a prewriting activity. The poem "The Lamb"from
William Blakes' Songs of Innocence is used as an example in this lesson, but any poem can be substituted as the
model.

3. Place the selected model poem, "The Lamb," on an overhead projector for the class to view together. After
reading the poem aloud, discuss what the lamb personifies or symbolizes, leading students to the idea that the
lamb in Blake's poem is a symbol of innocence. Discuss the language conventions used in the poem and how it
might be written today.

4. Read the poem aloud again, and instruct students to reflect silently (closing their eyes), as you give verbal
prompts, such as, "What did you think when...? Try to visualize.... What did you see when...?"

5. Write your own reflections to these verbal prompts on the overhead projector or board to model the thought
process for students. "I saw a small little lamb in a large pasture. I heard a sheep caller in the distance, with a
high voice that echoed."

6. After modeling the process, prompt students to begin writing their own reflections in their response journals.
Some students will begin writing automatically, while others will wait for direction from you. You may have
students use the Link Helper to generate ideas for their reflections.

7. Have students share their journal responses or responses from the Link Helper, and record their ideas,
impressions, and thoughts in short phrases on the overhead or board. Encourage collaborative discussion among
students as you are recording their responses.

8. Gather students into small groups to brainstorm ideas for an open‐ended writing prompt or "link" that the class
may choose to respond to in a poetry writing session. Students can again use the Link Helper and the ideas
listed on the overhead or board to brainstorm ideas for the writing prompt.

9. Give each group an opportunity to present their idea for a writing prompt to the class, and then have the class
decide on two or three ideas from which they will choose. Using a semantic map method, facilitate a narrowing
down of prompt ideas, helping students make one or two choices.

10. Once you have settled on one or two general ideas, distribute the Link Prompts Sampler for students to refer to
as they develop the details for each of the writing prompts. Leave the links as open‐ended as possible so as not
to limit students' experimentation and creativity. Ideas include:

a. Experiment with the content of the poem by adding a character or changing the ending

b. Write messages you may have heard on a voicemail or an answering machine or typical

Page 29 of 54
b. Write messages you may have heard on a voicemail or an answering machine or typical
messages one would leave and arrange them to create a poem

c. Experiment with dialogue in poetry by either changing the dialogue used in the poem (if
it had dialogue) or adding dialogue (if it did not have any)

d. Explore a particular sense, such as taste or sound, by rewriting the poem to focus on this
one sense

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SESSION 2: DURING WRITING

1. Model explicitly how to begin writing a draft of the poem in response to the writing prompt selected, by placing
a blank sheet on an overhead projecter, then writing in response to the selected prompt. You will be ad‐libbing
so that students can view first‐hand the writing process.

2. Encourage your students to begin writing at the same time. This will enable reluctant or struggling writers to
watch and begin their own writing when they're ready.

3. When you have completed your draft and students are focused on their own writing, circulate around the room
to confer individually with students, check their progress, and coach them as needed.

4. When students are finished writing, have them share their drafts with partners and use the Great Poetry
Rubric (peer portion) to evaluate their partner's work.

5. Give students an opportunity to revise their poems based on the peer feedback and then use the Great Poetry
Rubric (self portion) to evaluate their own writing.

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SESSION 3: STUDENT SHARING

1. Gather as a whole class and have each student read his or her poem aloud. Do not allow students to give
negative feedback; rather, this will be a sharing session of critical "helpful" feedback. Set the ground rules.
Instruct students to use only "I" statements, such as the following:

I heard...

I felt...

I saw...

Continue to facilitate this feedback by fielding questions to students that relate directly to the selected prompt,
such as: "What conversation did you hear?", "Was there a new character introduced into the poem?", "Who (or
where) was the new character?", "Where was alliteration used?", "What senses were the strongest?"

2. Use the teacher portion of the Great Poetry Rubric to evaluate and offer individual feedback on each student's
poem. Write in comments and circle relevant sections on the rubric for students to review independently.
Individual conferences can also be scheduled as students continue to work independently.

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EXTENSIONS
You can repeat this lesson using contemporary poems or student poems from area elementary schools, and a wider
variety of poetry to reflect different cultures and traditions. Students may also like the opportunity to choose the
model poems you use, by asking family members to recommend their favorite poems or by searching the Web for
poems that interest them.
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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS
Observe students during the class discussions in Session 1 to assess their abilities to analyze and interpret the
poem you presented to them as a model. Evaluate also their participation in generating ideas and collaboration
throughout the development of the writing prompt or "link."

Use the Great Poetry Rubric to evaluate students' finished poems (see Session 3). You may also want to check the
self and peer portions of the rubric to see how well students are able to conduct these forms of self and peer
evaluation (see Session 2).

Repeat this lesson with other poets and poetic styles, and then facilitate a class discussion about the entire
process:
Was the process easy or difficult?

Did this activity improve their writing?

Did they like or dislike this approach? Why or why not?

How do they feel about themselves as writers?

How do they feel about classic poetry now as compared to before?

Page 30 of 54
Which poets do they relate to or appreciate the most?

Which poet was their favorite and why?

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Poetry - 1
03/16/2015-03/20/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Identify unique characteristics of the poetry genre
(Student will be Practice poetry writing skills such as rhythm, rhyming and descriptive vocab
able to...): Follow the writing process to create original poetry
  Identify and analyze figurative language to improve comprehension
 
Instructional shmoop.com
Procedures:
  Poetry Unit:

Activity One:  Metaphors/Similes

Directions:  Compare/contrast yourself to the following.  Explain why you choose the noun you
choose.

Are you. . .

a mountain or a valley

a lion or a tiger

an oak tree or an apple tree

a stream or a river

taffy or  a gobstopper

 Activity Two:

Terms:

http://www.quia.com/jg/1145663.html  (terms)

http://daisyane.myweb.uga.edu/6200/project/game.html  (this is kind of childish but
has good terms)

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/  (different types of poems)

Activity Three:

Sonnet:

A sonnet is a lyric poem of fourteen lines, usually written in the rhythmical pattern known as iambic
pentameter.

The English sonnet is organized with three quatrains (four –line stanzas) followed by a couplet (pair
of rhyming lines).  The rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg

1.        Read poem

Sonnet 18 is the best known and most well-loved of all 154 sonnets. It is also one of the most
straightforward in language and intent. The stability of love and its power to immortalize the poetry and
the subject of that poetry is the theme.

The poet starts the praise of his dear friend without ostentation, but he slowly builds the image of his
friend into that of a perfect being. His friend is first compared to summer in the octave, but, at the start
of the third quatrain (9), he is summer, and thus, he has metamorphosed into the standard by which true
beauty can and should be judged.

Page 31 of 54
 

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? 
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date: 
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; 
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest: 
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

 Sonnet 18  by William Shakespeare

Use the “Poem Machine” to write a sonnet with the class.

http://www.surfnetkids.com/games/funnypoems-sw.htm

3.       Review any words that are not known.

temperate (1): i.e., evenly-tempered; not overcome by passion.

the eye of heaven (5): i.e., the sun.

every fair from fair sometime declines (7): i.e., the beauty (fair) of everything beautiful (fair)
will fade (declines).
Compare to Sonnet 116: "rosy lips and cheeks/Within his bending sickle's compass come."

nature's changing course (8): i.e., the natural changes age brings.

that fair thou ow'st (10): i.e., that beauty you possess.

in eternal lines...growest (12): The poet is using a grafting metaphor in this line. Grafting is a
technique used to join parts from two plants with cords so that they grow as one. Thus the
beloved becomes immortal, grafted to time with the poet's cords (his "eternal lines"). For
commentary on whether this sonnet is really "one long exercise in self-glorification", please see
below.

  Analyze and rewrite: 

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Shall I compare you to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate: You are more lovely and more constant:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, Rough winds shake the beloved buds of May

And summer's lease hath all too short a date: And summer is far too short:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, At times the sun is too hot,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; Or often goes behind the clouds;

And every fair from fair sometime declines, And everything beautiful sometime will lose its beauty,

By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; By misfortune or by nature's planned out course.

But thy eternal summer shall not fade But your youth shall not fade,

Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor will you lose the beauty that you possess;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, Nor will death claim you for his own,

When in eternal lines to time thou growest: Because in my eternal verse you will live forever.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long as there are people on this earth,

So long lives this and this gives life to thee. So long will this poem live on, making you immortal.

5    Poem #2

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171621
http://www.leavingcert.net/skoool/junior.asp?id=1469
Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Day”
Analyze and discuss poem.

Page 32 of 54
 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Poetry
03/23/2015-03/27/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Identify unique characteristics of the poetry genre
(Student will be Practice poetry writing skills such as rhythm, rhyming and descriptive vocab
able to...): Follow the writing process to create original poetry
  Identify and analyze figurative language to improve comprehension
 
Instructional shmoop.com
Procedures:
  Poetry Unit:

Activity One:  Metaphors/Similes

Directions:  Compare/contrast yourself to the following.  Explain why you choose the noun you
choose.

Are you. . .

a mountain or a valley

a lion or a tiger

an oak tree or an apple tree

a stream or a river

taffy or  a gobstopper

 Activity Two:

Terms:

http://www.quia.com/jg/1145663.html  (terms)

http://daisyane.myweb.uga.edu/6200/project/game.html  (this is kind of childish but
has good terms)

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/  (different types of poems)

Activity Three:

Sonnet:

A sonnet is a lyric poem of fourteen lines, usually written in the rhythmical pattern known as iambic
pentameter.

The English sonnet is organized with three quatrains (four –line stanzas) followed by a couplet (pair
of rhyming lines).  The rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg

1.        Read poem

Sonnet 18 is the best known and most well-loved of all 154 sonnets. It is also one of the most
straightforward in language and intent. The stability of love and its power to immortalize the poetry and
the subject of that poetry is the theme.

The poet starts the praise of his dear friend without ostentation, but he slowly builds the image of his
friend into that of a perfect being. His friend is first compared to summer in the octave, but, at the start
of the third quatrain (9), he is summer, and thus, he has metamorphosed into the standard by which true
beauty can and should be judged.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? 
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Page 33 of 54
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date: 
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; 
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest: 
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

 Sonnet 18  by William Shakespeare

Use the “Poem Machine” to write a sonnet with the class.

http://www.surfnetkids.com/games/funnypoems-sw.htm

3.       Review any words that are not known.

temperate (1): i.e., evenly-tempered; not overcome by passion.

the eye of heaven (5): i.e., the sun.

every fair from fair sometime declines (7): i.e., the beauty (fair) of everything beautiful (fair)
will fade (declines).
Compare to Sonnet 116: "rosy lips and cheeks/Within his bending sickle's compass come."

nature's changing course (8): i.e., the natural changes age brings.

that fair thou ow'st (10): i.e., that beauty you possess.

in eternal lines...growest (12): The poet is using a grafting metaphor in this line. Grafting is a
technique used to join parts from two plants with cords so that they grow as one. Thus the
beloved becomes immortal, grafted to time with the poet's cords (his "eternal lines"). For
commentary on whether this sonnet is really "one long exercise in self-glorification", please see
below.

  Analyze and rewrite: 

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Shall I compare you to a summer's day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate: You are more lovely and more constant:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, Rough winds shake the beloved buds of May

And summer's lease hath all too short a date: And summer is far too short:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, At times the sun is too hot,

And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; Or often goes behind the clouds;
And every fair from fair sometime declines, And everything beautiful sometime will lose its beauty,

By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; By misfortune or by nature's planned out course.

But thy eternal summer shall not fade But your youth shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor will you lose the beauty that you possess;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, Nor will death claim you for his own,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest: Because in my eternal verse you will live forever.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long as there are people on this earth,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee. So long will this poem live on, making you immortal.

5    Poem #2

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171621
http://www.leavingcert.net/skoool/junior.asp?id=1469
Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Day”
Analyze and discuss poem.

 
STANDARDS

Page 34 of 54
 

 Lesson: Reciprocal Revision
Minutes for Lesson: 0
03/30/2015-04/02/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives:
 
STUDENT OBJECTIVES
Students will

Use reciprocal teaching strategies (predicting, summarizing, clarifying, and questioning) during the peer feedback
and revision stage of the writing process

Offer peer feedback and suggestions on writing in a positive and respectful manner

Develop substantive revisions of their writing based on application of the reciprocal teaching strategies and peer
feedback

Evaluate the quality of their writing after use of the reciprocal teaching strategies by comparing their initial and
final drafts and assessing their own progress

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SESSION 1: MODELING
Plan to model the reciprocal questioning process with students, especially if they have no previous experience with
these strategies. This session is optional.

1. Prepare a computer viewing or an overhead transparency of the painting Peasant Wedding by Pieter Bruegel.

2. Hold a class discussion of the painting using the four reciprocal teaching strategies.

Summarizing. Lead students to summarize what is happening in the painting.

Questioning. Guide students to question the artist's choices or the opinions of other students.

Clarifying. Help students clarify details in the painting.

Predicting. Have students predict why the painter chose this subject or what might happen next if this were
a series of paintings as in a picture book narrative.

3. As you proceed through the discussion, make sure to point out which strategy the student commenting is
implementing. ("So you want to clarify what the little boy in the corner is doing?") It may also be helpful to ask
students to take note of new things about the painting they notice during the conversation with their
classmates.

4. Wrap up the class discussion by informing students that they will practice these four strategies individually in
the next activity.

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SESSION 2: SMALL‐GROUP ACTIVITY

1. Divide the class into small groups of three to four students each, and assign each group to a computer in the
computer lab. (In a classroom setting with only a few computers, small groups of students can sit together, and
you can choose one image to project for all students to view.) Each student should have a notebook.

2. Direct students to access the online art from preset bookmarks (see Preparation, 3). For the initial lesson, it
may be easiest to start with only one or two paintings so that you will be familiar with the art being discussed in
the students' writing.

3. Ask students to write a brief response to the art without talking to their peers. You may offer the following
guiding questions, as necessary, to help students with their responses:

What is the first thing you notice in the painting?

Can you describe or summarize what is happening in the painting?

What mood has the artist established in the painting? What details in the painting contribute to the mood?

What are some questions that you have about the painting?

It is helpful to set a time limit of no more than 15 minutes to ensure that students remain quiet and focused
while viewing the art and writing their initial responses.

4. When initial responses are complete, invite one student in each group to describe and comment on the art
aloud.

5. Encourage the other students in the group to interrupt the description by using the four reciprocal teaching
strategies modeled in Session 1.

Page 35 of 54
Summarizing. Do you agree with the reader's interpretation of the painting? Do you like the painting? Give
specific reasons why.

Questioning. What questions do you have about the painting or the reader's interpretation?

Clarifying. Can you help the reader clarify any questions he or she has about the painting? Did you notice
details in the painting that the reader missed?

Predicting. Can you predict why the artist chose this subject? How do your predictions compare with others
in your group?

You may wish to provide a guide sheet for students to help them recall the four strategies and how they can be
used in the questioning process. Provide 5 to 10 minutes for students to discuss the art in their small groups.

6. After all students in the group have had a chance to contribute to the discussion, have students spend the
remaining time expanding and revising their initial responses using the information from their group
discussions as a guide.

7. Ask students to come prepared for the next class session with both their initial and revised responses.

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SESSION 3: PARTNER ACTIVITY

1. Discuss and debrief the writing process used during Session 2 when viewing the online art (i.e., initial draft,
peer feedback using reciprocal teaching strategies, revision). What did students find interesting about this
exercise? Was it helpful or not helpful? Were their second attempts at responding to the art more descriptive
and better developed than their first attempts? Why or why not?

2. Ask students to select a partner who was not initially in their group, but who has viewed the same piece of art.
It is helpful to enable students to view the online art again while completing these activities.

3. Direct one student at a time to read aloud his or her response to the art. As with the previous group discussion,
encourage the partner to interrupt during the reading to ask questions, clarify statements, make predictions,
and summarize opinions.

4. Direct the student reading to take notes on suggestions or comments offered by his or her partner. Any new
information or differing viewpoints may be especially helpful to a later revision.

5. Have the students switch roles and repeat the process so that each student receives peer feedback on his or her
response to the art.

6. Debrief the process again with students, focusing on the idea that revision is "re‐seeing" a piece of writing. Ask
students to create a third and final draft of their responses to the art, using the most recent peer conversation
as another way to "see" their paper and the painting in a new way.

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EXTENSIONS
After using the art activity as a teaching experience, students could be encouraged to use the reciprocal teaching
strategies to offer and receive peer feedback on other writing, especially during writing workshop.

As an alternative to working with partners, students could work in groups of three, with one student reading aloud
his or her writing, one student providing feedback using the reciprocal teaching strategies, and a third student
taking notes for the author of the piece. For more information on how this strategy might work, refer to the
following article from the National Writing Project Reading Practices as Revision Strategies: The Gossipy Reading
Model.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS
Final drafts of student responses are evaluated in comparison with their initial responses to determine the depth
of revision and the student's ability to incorporate peer feedback into the revision process in a meaningful and
substantive way. The Student Evaluation of Written Art Responses worksheet provides students with a rubric for
evaluating their work at the initial and final stages. You can ask students to evaluate their initial drafts beforethe
first revision or evaluate both the initial and final drafts at the end of the sequence

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Literature and Film
Minutes for Lesson: 0
04/13/2015-04/17/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives: LEARNING GUIDE TO:

Page 36 of 54
 
THE SANDLOT

SUBJECTS — Sports/Baseball; ELA Discussion and Writing Exercises;
SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING — Friendship; Leadership;
MORAL-ETHICAL EMPHASIS — Caring.

Age:10 - 14; MPAA Rating, PG; Comedy, Drama; 1993; 101 Minutes; Color. Available
fromAmazon.com. 

Note to teachers: This Learning Guide is designed to provide ELA discussion
questions and assignments for middle school and junior high. The
Sandlotappears to be a lightweight comedy, but the film provokes an empathic
reaction in virtually all viewers. It can be of use in addressing the values and
feelings young people experience during times of change in their lives. In
addition, it will lead students to do their best in response to assignments
requiring the exercise of skills described in The Common Core State Standards
for English Language Arts for Writing and for Speaking and Listening. 

Description:     A not very athletic boy nicknamed "Smalls" moves into a new neighborhood and  
seeks to find friends. The Sandlot describes a summer of baseball, friendship, and growing up as
Benny, the best player on the local team, takes Smalls into his circle. The team shares
adventures dealing with a ferocious ball-eating dog behind the homerun fence. The story shows LEARNING GUIDE MENU
how relationships develop, including the relationship between Smalls and his stepfather.  Benefits of the Movie
Possible Problems
Benefits of the Movie:     Children of virtually all ages identify with the difficulties addressed in Parenting Points
the film and learn valuable lessons about how to treat newcomers, how to adjust to change, Selected Awards & Cast
and the power of friendship. Therefore, they will be interested in writing and other assignments Film Study Worksheet
relating to the movie. 
Helpful Background
Discussion Questions:
Possible Problems:    None.        Subjects (Curriculum Topics)
      Social-Emotional Learning
      Moral-Ethical Emphasis
            (Character Counts)
Parenting Points:     It is best not to interfere with the flow of the film as your child watches,
Bridges to Reading
but you may want to comment on the problems associated with chewing tobacco or provide
information about Babe "The Bambino" Ruth. Ask and help your child to answer the Quick Links to the Internet
Discussion Question. Assignments, Projects & Activities

Selected Awards, Cast and Director:  QUICK DISCUSSION QUESTION:   What
did you learn from this movie that you
Selected Awards: 1994 Young Artist Award: Outstanding Youth Ensemble in a Motion Picture  can use in your own life? 

Featured Actors: Tom Guiry, Mike Vitar, Denis Leary, James Earl Jones. 
Suggested Response: There are several
Director: David Mickey Evans.  lessons from this film. Describing any
one of them is a good response. There
are probably more that are not
mentioned here. One is that it is worth
risking embarrassment and rejection to
  find friends. Think of how much Smalls
would have missed if he had stayed in
his room that summer. Another lesson is
that you should first assume that
people will be helpful and considerate.
Had the boys just asked for the ball,
the old man would have given it to
them. Another lesson is that if you
have an important goal, don't give up.
The team never abandoned its efforts
to get the ball. Another lesson is that
practicing a lot will make you a winner.
That's how the team beat the rich kids
who had uniforms and a real baseball
diamond to play on.

Helpful Background: 

George Herman Ruth, known universally as Babe Ruth, remains an iconic sports figure more than Click here for TWM's viewing worksheet
75 years after he retired from the New York Yankees. Ruth was a major factor in popularizing for this film. The worksheet is suitable
Major League Baseball. His charismatic personality, coupled with his ability to hit home runs, to be printed and reviewed with the
changed baseball forever. In 1927 he hit 60 home runs, a record that remained unbroken until class before seeing the movie and is
1961. Ruth was also called "the Bambino" and the nickname Babe stayed with him long after he designed to focus students' attention
retired. Babe Ruth died of cancer in 1948. In the minds of sports fans, not just fans of baseball, on the story. For a worksheet suitable
Ruth ranks with Muhammad Ali and Michael Jordon as all-time greats in their games.  for use in English Language Arts
classes for any filmed work of fiction,
In Greek and Roman mythology, Hercules (Herakles in the Greek) was the son of the most see TWM's generic film study
beautiful and accomplished of all mortal women and Zeus, the King of the gods and ruler of   worksheet. 
Olympus. Hercules was a great warrior, possessing superior strength and skill. His enemy was
Hera, the wife of Zeus, who was angry at Zeus for his infidelity. Hera sent Hercules into a blind

Page 37 of 54
frenzy in which he killed his wife and his children. Upon regaining his sanity, Hercules went to
the oracle at Delphi for advice. He was told that to atone for his sins, he had to serve the king
of Mycenae and perform twelve tasks, known as the twelve Labors of Hercules. The twelve BUILDING VOCABULARY: "in a pickle,"
tasks were very difficult and seemed impossible, giving rise to expression "a Herculean task."  omen, "John Hancock," "rubber legs,"
legend, "rub salt in a wound,"
Suggestions for Teachers: Introduce the figure of Babe Ruth by having students who know "Murderer's Row."
about him describe his career for the class. Make sure that the information in the Helpful
Background section is included in the discussion. Also, introduce the mythological character
ofHercules. 

Select questions that are
appropriate for your students. 
Discussion Questions: 

1.  See Discussion Questions for Use With any Film that is a Work of Fiction.

2. Smalls' mother pushes him to find friends out of doors, even though he is not especially Become a TWM Fan on
interested in sports. What kind of pressure does this put on Smalls and what is revealed in his  
character by his efforts to meet new friends on the baseball field? Suggested Response: Smalls
does not want to disappoint his mother and even though he knows he will be embarrassed on
the baseball diamond, he pushes himself forward. This shows respect for his mother, resilience,
and the ability to take risks.

3. How is baseball tied into Smalls' efforts to establish a relationship with his stepfather?
Suggested Response: Smalls' mother encouraged her son and his new father to practice
throwing and catching together, but there was clearly no enthusiasm in this relationship. Smalls' Give us your feedback! Was
stepfather owned a prized baseball that had been signed by Babe Ruth and everything grew the Guidehelpful? If so, which sections
complicated when Smalls used the prized baseball during a game. were most helpful? Do you have any
suggestions for improvement? Email
4. What seems to motivate Benny in his efforts to include Smalls' in the games? Suggested us! 
Response: Benny simply likes Smalls — and he can always use an outfielder for ball games which
are a vehicle for Benny to practice his skills. With Smalls, the team will have nine players. Benny  
behaves with respect and fairness toward every boy on the team. He shows patience and
generosity. Benny is one of those rare persons whose maturity easily translates into leadership.
Are you concerned that time will be
5. The imaginative and creative side of young boys can be seen in the way they behave in two wasted if you are absent from
episodes in the film. What is imaginative and creative in the scene involving the sleepover and class? Worry no more  .  .  .   Check out
the efforts to get the ball from the dog known as "the Beast"? Suggested Response: At the TeachWithMovies'Set-Up-the-Sub.
sleepover, the tall tale of the Beast is recited and the story serves to hold the boys together.
There are several attempts to retrieve the baseball involving contraptions made from scraps of
tin, vacuum cleaners, and devices using ropes to lower one of the boys into the yard.

6. What ironies can be found in the way the film ends? Suggested Response: The boys learn
that the Beast is not a mean dog after all and that his owner, Mr. Mertle, used to play baseball
in the Negro Leagues and had been a friend of Babe Ruth. Although Mr. Mertle was blinded by a
stray pitch back when he played, he is able to see into the problems Smalls faces with his
stepfather. He offers the solution to the problem by giving Smalls his "Murderer's Row" ball,
signed by the best Yankee players in the team's prime. In exchange, the boys will visit with the
old man and talk baseball. At the end of the film, Benny is a star baseball player and although
Smalls never became a good player, he learned enough in his days in the sandlot to establish a
fine career as a sports broadcaster.

Social-Emotional Learning Discussion Questions: 

FRIENDSHIP
 
See Discussion Questions #2 and #6. 

LEADERSHIP

See Discussion Questions #4 and #6.

     

Moral-Ethical Emphasis Discussion Questions (Character Counts)
Teachwithmovies.com is a Character
Discussion Questions Relating to Ethical Issues will facilitate the use of this film to teach ethical Counts"Six Pillars Partner" and uses The
principles and critical viewing. Additional questions are set out below.  Six Pillars of Character to organize
ethical principles. 
CARING  
Character Counts and the Six Pillars of
(Be kind; Be compassionate and show you care; Express gratitude; Forgive others; Help people Character are marks of the CHARACTER
in need)  COUNTS! Coalition, a project of the
Josephson Institute of Ethics.
See Discussion Questions #4 and #6. 

 
Links to the Internet: The Life and Times of Hercules.

Assignments, Projects and Activities: 

1. See Assignments, Projects, and Activities for Use With any Film that is a Work of Fiction.

Page 38 of 54
2. Look up information about Babe Ruth and make a presentation to the class that includes
some of the changes in baseball statistics and teams since the days when The Bambino
charmed the public with his ability to hit home runs. 

The following prompts can lead students to write a narrative of their own experiences. Before
giving these assignments, consider having the class perform some of the exercises from
TWM's Narrative Writing Lesson Plan. 

3. Write about a time when you pushed yourself to try something new, as did Smalls when he
went to the sandlot. Be sure to include what you learned from the experience.

4. Write about a friend you have known that behaved toward you as Benny behaved toward
Smalls or about an experience when you played the role of Benny to someone else's Smalls. How
did this friend help you adjust to something new? What kinds of fun activities did you enjoy
together? What has happened to your friendship over time?

5. Write about which sport or physical activity such as football, basketball, baseball, or dance
brings out the best in you. Describe your role in the sport.

6. Try to remember a time when you and friends or siblings got creative and made up stories or
games or built something special. Be sure to use details so that your reader will be able to see
and feel what is going on in your story.

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Soldier X
Minutes for Lesson: 0
04/27/2015-05/01/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives: Intermediate Guided Reading Lesson Plan
 
Title: Genre: Text Level:
Soldier X by Don Wulffson; ISBN 978-1- Historical Structure:                               Z          
413-11604-5 fiction     Narrative         Informational
Literacy Core Objective: Enduring Understanding: Purpose for reading
Comprehension.  Students understand, interpret, and  
analyze narrative and informational grade level text. World War II impacted people in European
  countries other than Germany.
 
  “I Can Statements” - Essential Questions:
 
What are the characteristics of individuals
ELL Strategies: who produced change throughout history,
Students reading at this level are likely to be quite fluent and how can people today continue to
speakers of English although they may need more promote positive advances in our global
support with idioms, expressions, vocabulary, and community?
multiple meaning words.  This will affect their ability to
What are the civic responsibilities of
draw conclusions and infer from the text.  Encourage
individuals and groups in our global
these students to use sticky notes or a notebook to jot
questions they have while reading to be community?
discussed/clarified at the guided reading table during
How do systems of power, authority and
the following session.
governance impact societies in the 20th
 
century?
Other ELL strategies can be found at
http://coe.sdsu.edu/people/jmora/pages/4x4activity.htm What are students’ rights and responsibilities
and tailored to the individual needs of your students.
in this interconnected world?

 
 
Before Reading
Vocabulary:
Tier 2 Vocabulary Words are high frequency words that are found across a variety of domains. At a
minimum, provide student-friendly explanations that tell what a word means in everyday connected
language.  A wide range of vocabulary resources are available at
http://t4.jordan.k12.ut.us/cbl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=40&Itemid=35.
ornate
decrepit
idiom
refuge
emaciated
grotesque
quavering
contempt
chartreuse
propaganda

Page 39 of 54
cliché
partisans
 
 
Activate/Build Prior Knowledge:
Using a map such as this one http://www.mapsofworld.com/world-maps/world-war-ii-map-of-
europe.html, help students see the geographic relationship between Germany and Russia.  Provide
students with an overview of the relationship between Germany and Russia
http://www.worldwariihistory.info/in/USSR.html.
 
 
Comprehension Strategy:
Dealing with unknown words – there are a lot of military terms and foreign language phrases in this
book.  Remind students that they can use the context to figure out some of these words, especially
since after the foreign language phrases there is almost always an English translation.  For the average
reader it is probably not important to translate, or even know the correct pronunciation of the foreign
words.
 
During Reading
Using appropriate Guided reading strategies, students will be reading at their own pace and teachers
will be listening to students read, monitoring, giving feedback, taking anecdotal notes and running
records.
 
Attend to Comprehension Within, Beyond, & About the text.
 
 
After Reading
Attend to Comprehension Within, Beyond, & About the text:
 
Discussion questions:
·          Use the phrase, “ornately decrepit” to discuss oxymorons. (p. 3)
·          How would you feel if growing up you had been told by your country’s leaders that “You were born
to die for Germany.” (p. 4)
·          Point of information: Vilsburg is not a real city in Germany, although Nuremberg is.  You could use
Google maps to show the area.
·          Would you be more like Jakob or Erik on the train ride? (p. 10)
·          What do you think of the military training Erik received? (p. 11)
·          What does Oskar mean when he says “if they aren’t criminals, we are”? (p. 16)
·          The duck in the Mercedes on page 21 is a good place to discuss irony.
·          Talk about Erik’s feelings after his first battle (p. 25).
·          Stop and react to the battle on page 29.
·          At page 32 remind/teach students that 18km is about 10 miles that the soldiers will have to travel
by foot.
·          What do you think about Dobelman? (p. 35)
·          How would you have responded to finding out you had just eaten rat? (p. 40)
·          Do you agree or disagree with the statement that it unwise to have friends because they just get
killed anyway.  (p. 44)
·          Page 49: Infer what the prisoners will be digging.
·          By the time you have gotten to page 56 has your opinion of Dobelman changed? 
·          Before reading page 67, talk about the “fight or flight response” and the automatic nervous system.
·          Who is the “we” on page 79?
·          Can you relate to Erik’s feelings on page 95 about being caught in a lie?
·          Discuss the relationship between Nikolai and Erik.  Why do you think Nikolai would say that “X” fits
him? (p. 101)
·          X finds that he relates to the parlyzed man across the aisle (p. 103).  Have you ever been in a
similar circumstance where on the outside it would like you and someone don’t have anything in
common, but you feel a likeness to them in some way?
·          Talk about the author’s choice of the phrase “not a few” on the top of page 107.  Why do you think
he chose to describe the soldiers’ reactions in that way?
·          Why doesn’t the paralyzed man want his medal?  How do you feel when Tamara removes it for
him? (p. 109)
·          What does X think Nikolai is thinking (p. 117)?
·          What do you want X to do after he receives the letter from “home” (p. 123)?
·          On page 128 we find out more about Tamara.  Are there things that surprise you?
·          The scene between Tamara and X on page 132 that ends with the loudspeaker blaring is another
place to talk about irony.
·          Do you agree with Zoya’s advice on page 135?
·          Why is X ashamed when the others are waved away (p. 138)?
·          Were you expecting X to confess as nonchalantly as he does on page 150, “I’m a deserter.”
·          On page 156, talk about juxtaposition and how the author first uses words like spectacular,
tranquil, colorful sweeps and then describes the skeleton arms sticking up out of the ground.
·          Are you surprised to see that Tamara thinks it is impossible for a German to care about a Russian
during X’s confession on page 168? 
·          On page 181, X describes himself as having the “eyes of a man”.  What does that mean?
·          “There is something dark and tangled in all of us” – do you agree? (p. 187)

Page 40 of 54
·          Are you surprised that X and Tamara decide to help with the wounded on page 196?
·          How has Tamara changed by the time we get to page 210?
·          The author lets us think that Tamara has died on page 215.  Then she is alive on page 219.  X tries
to send her away and break up with her.  Yet in the end they are married and move to America and
in some way “live happily ever after”.  Why do you think the author made the choice to have their
relationship be so tumultuous there at the end of the story?
 
Content Core Integration:(Science, Soc. St., Math, etc.)
Assessment: Activities:
   
Write a diamante poem about Dobelman, X and Tamara World War II information is available at
that shows how they changed over the course of the http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/
war.  Use the diamante interactive tool at and at http://www.brainpop.com
http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/diamante/. (subscription required).
   
Other activities and assessment ideas are
available at
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/3118.html.
 
*Not all activities will be done in each lesson.  Some lessons may take multiple days to complete. However,
all students should be reading each time you meet.

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: The Outsiders
Minutes for Lesson: 0
04/27/2015-05/01/2015 Period(s): 08

STANDARDS

 Lesson: WWII
Minutes for Lesson: 0
05/04/2015-05/08/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Student Objectives


(Student will be The Week Preceding the Unit
able to...): Session One: Introduction to the Holocaust
  Session Two: Online Inquiry
Session Three: Focused Online Inquiry
Session Four: Oral Presentations
Session Five: Focused Group Inquiry
Session Six: Continued Group Inquiry
Sessions Seven and Eight: Publication
Extensions
Student Assessment/Reflections

STUDENT OBJECTIVES
Students will
read a range of Holocaust resources, from different genres and media.

use a variety of resources to gather and synthesize knowledge about the Holocaust.

work collaboratively to investigate questions about a specific topic.

present information orally and in a group newspaper.

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THE WEEK PRECEDING THE UNIT


1. Each day, ask students to write a response to one of the prompts on the Journal Entries list, so that students have
responded to all five prompts by the end of the week.

2. Discuss responses as desired, but do not mention the connection to the Holocaust unit so that students are not
tempted to make comparisons or guess the “right” response in connection to the forthcoming project.
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SESSION ONE: INTRODUCTION TO THE HOLOCAUST

Page 41 of 54
1. Begin this session by having the students discuss what it means to be a child, recalling entries that they’ve written
in the journals over the course of the previous week as relevant. Guiding questions for the discussion might
include:

What do you remember most about your childhood?

Did you have a special place?

What kinds of things were you afraid of?

What helped you feel safe?

2. Read Chana Byers Abells’s The Children We Remember.

3. After you read, facilitate a brief discussion by asking students to compare the lives of the Jewish children during
the Holocaust to their own lives today. Encourage students to consider both the details from the images and the
statements from the text.

4. Tell students that you will be sharing another text about the Holocaust. Read “First They Came for the Socialists” by
German Lutheran Pastor Niemoller.

5. Write “innocent bystander” on the board and ask students to freewrite, connecting the words “innocent bystander”
to the content of the poem.

6. Have a few students share their writing and have a discussion on roles we play in intense situations. (You may bring
up bullying or crime as examples.)

7. Connect the class discussion to the journal entries from the previous week on bullying and standing up for others.

8. If desired, present background information on the Holocaust, using the background notes or similar information
from a class text.
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SESSION TWO: ONLINE INQUIRY


1. Divide students into small groups and ask each group to compile a list of things that they know and things that they
want to find out about the Holocaust, using the K‐W‐L Chart.

2. Then ask students to explore the Holocaust Websites and to use Internet search engines to pursue answers to their
questions.

3. Remind students to record their new learning in the last column of the K‐W‐L Chart.

4. As students work, circulate through the classroom, answering questions and providing help.
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SESSION THREE: FOCUSED ONLINE INQUIRY


1. Answer any questions students have from the previous session.

2. Direct students to the Online Holocaust Inquiry page and explain the options for each of the sites.

3. Depending upon your class time, ask students to pursue their research on the Holocaust by completing one or more
of the activities listed.

4. Encourage students to explore additional options and activities as well. Welcome additional projects or customizing
of the ideas to fit students' interests.

5. Allow students the remainder of the class session to pursue their questions.

6. As students work, circulate through the classroom, answering questions and providing help.

7. With approximately five minutes remaining in the session, pass out the rubric and explain that students will present
one of their projects to the class during the next session.

8. Answer any questions about the oral presentations.


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SESSION FOUR: ORAL PRESENTATIONS


1. Allow students several minutes at the beginning of the session to prepare their presentations.

2. Spend the remainder of the class session asking students to each present one of their projects to the class.

3. Use the rubric to assess oral presentations.

4. For homework, ask students to reflect on their research and the projects that have been presented in their journals
or writer’s notebooks. Responses should focus on issues that sparked students’ interest and questions that still
linger in their minds about the Holocaust.
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Page 42 of 54
SESSION FIVE: FOCUSED GROUP INQUIRY
1. Begin the session by asking students to share the questions and interests they recorded in their homework writing.

2. As students share ideas, record the ideas on the board or chart paper.

3. After students have offered their reflections, explain that students will have a chance to work in small groups to
investigate a Holocaust topic in more detail and that they will publish their findings in a focused newspaper or
similar format.

4. Read back over the list of topics and issues recorded during the session, and ask students if they have any
additional topics that they want to add to the list (e.g., Jewish laws, propaganda, Hitler youth, Kristallnacht, Non‐
Jewish Holocaust victims, Ghettos, concentration camps, liberators, and the aftermath).

5. Ask students to choose one of the available topics and arrange them into groups based on their choices.

6. Pass out a piece of chart paper to each group, or ask students to work in their notebooks.

7. On the chart paper or in their notebooks, each group of students should write their topic at the top.

8. Ask groups to brainstorm questions to guide their research, listing the questions on their chart paper or in their
notebooks.

9. If students need an example to guide their brainstorming, share the following example, for the group exploring the
role of the liberators in the Holocaust:

What resistance occurred inside the camps themselves? Outside the camps?

Who were some of the rescuers of Jewish people (individuals, groups, and countries)?

Who are the “righteous gentiles”? Who are same famous ones?

What was the affect on liberators?

10. Assist any groups that have a difficult time devising questions.

11. Once students have collected their initial research questions, share the additional resources that are available for
their inquiry project, including items from the Text Resources for Groups list.

12. Explain that students should create a bibliography of the sources that they explore as they work, providing
instruction from the Purdue Online Writing Lab as necessary.

13. Using both print and online sources, students can spend the remaining time researching their topic.

14. Encourage students to find at least one visual and one primary source as they complete their research.

15. If appropriate, take advantage of the opportunity for a minilesson on the difference between primary and secondary
sources.
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SESSION SIX: CONTINUED GROUP INQUIRY


1. Remind students of the resources that are available for their inquiry project and answer any questions that they
have.

2. Explain that students will be producing their focused newspaper during the next session, so they should use the
current session to complete their research and begin planning their presentation of the information that they’ve
found.

3. Allow students the remainder of the class session to pursue their questions.

4. As students work, circulate through the classroom, answering questions and providing help.
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SESSIONS SEVEN AND EIGHT: PUBLICATION


1. Explain that during the next two sessions, groups will create a newspaper filled with articles focusing on their
specific topic.

2. Ask students to prepare a group newspaper and a complete bibliography of the resources that they used to gather
information.

3. Ask each group member to write at least one article about their topic.

4. Pass out the Newspaper Rubric and explain the requirements of the final project.

5. To help students with planning, suggest that they spend one session creating their drafts and the second session
working on layout and publishing their work.

6. Demonstrate the ReadWriteThink Printing Press, which students will use to publish their group newspaper.

Page 43 of 54
7. Explain that group members will work together on revision, edit, layout, and publishing their newspaper.

8. Ask students to print a copy of their newspaper for everyone in the class.

9. Allow for a sharing time for students to present and distribute copies of their newspapers.
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EXTENSIONS
Read Terrible Things: An Allegory for the Holocaust by Eve Bunting, or a similar book, to conclude the unit,
discussing the book and making comparisons to other things they have seen and read throughout the unit. You can
find additional texts on the Holocaust Book and Movie List.

Supplement the lesson plan with The Holocaust: Studying Lessons of the Past, a ReadWriteThink lesson plan further
using the book Terrible Things.

Have your students read or listen to additional stories from Holocaust survivors .

Ask students to turn their attention to a social action project, which extends the lessons:

Visit the Jewish Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive and select one or more movies to play for the class.

Maintain silence in the room.

When the movie ends, write the words “What now?” on the board as a prompt.

Ask the students to reflect on the question, “Now that I know what I know about the Holocaust, what now?” in their journals or notebooks.

Once students have had adequate time to gather their ideas, ask students to share their reflections with the class.

Based on the suggestions that students have made, choose one or more projects that students can complete to extend the project and their exploration
of the Holocaust further. If desired, students can visit Tolerance.org for more information about fighting bigotry and intolerance on many topics.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS
Evaluate students’ participation during group discussions to assess the development of critical thinking skills, during
discussion, group projects, research, and writing.

Evaluate the oral delivery of group presentations, using the rubric.

Evaluate group newspapers using the Newspaper Rubric.

Learning Lesson Plan
Activities:
  Holocaust: What Do You Know?

Students learn about the Holocaust with use of a KWL chart and literature circles.

 
By Renea Shuey

Survivors

By Allan Zullo
 

About this book

Grade Level Equivalent:
Lexile Measure: 970L
Guided Reading Level:
Age: Age 11, Age 12, Age 13
Genre: General Nonfiction
Subject: Character and Values, European, World History
Overview

Students complete a KWL chart showing what they know about the Holocaust, what they want
to know, and what they learned. Through participation in literature circles, students will
become more familiar with the causes and effects of the Holocaust. The recommended
book: Survivors: True Stories of Children in the Holocaust by Allan Zullo and Mara
Bovsun.

Objective

Page 44 of 54
Students will:

Use brainstorming techniques
Organize information
Integrate and use information
Read for literacy experience
Participate in a literature circle
Read a non-fiction book
Analyze a book for its elements
Discuss and take notes on what they have read
Learn about the Holocaust
Complete a KWL chart

Materials

Classroom copies of Survivors: True Stories of Children in the Holocaust by Allan
Zullo and Mara Bovsun
Copies of Non-Fiction Literature Circle Response Sheet (PDF)
Pencil/Pen

Set Up and Prepare

Become familiar with the key events in Hitler's rise to power in 1933 through the collapse
of the Nazi regime in 1945. Information regarding these events can be read in the, "Brief
History of the Holocaust," available at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Website.
Know vocabulary relating to the Holocaust:  genocide, tolerance, persecution,
concentration camp, Nazi, death camp, holocaust, resistance, and prejudice.
Other helpful websites:

Teacher's Guidelines for Teaching the Holocaust
Holocaust Teacher Resource Center
Holocaust Activities
Holocaust History Resources

Directions
Day 1

Step 1: Introduce the lesson by having students brainstorm what they know about the
Holocaust. Ask the students if they have ever studied the Holocaust, the cause and effects of
the Holocaust, and how to prevent a Holocaust in the future.

Step 2: Create a KWL chart on the board. Ask the students if they have used a KWL chart
before and what it is used for?

Step 3: Guide the students through the KWL chart. Encourage students to discuss the KWL
chart, first the "What I know about the Holocaust," second the "What I want to know about
the Holocaust," and finally explain to the students that tomorrow they will be working in
Literature Circles and reading the non-fiction book, Survivors: True Stories of Children in
the Holocaust, by Allan Zullo and Mara Bovsun to complete the "What they learned" section
of the KWL chart.

Days 2–4

Step 1: Create Literature Circles of 4–5 students per team. The students will read together
the non-fiction book, Survivors: True Stories of Children in the Holocaust.

Step 2: Distribute books to each literature circle.

Step 3: Read the introduction to the students on pages 1 through 4, Survivors: True
Stories of Children in the Holocaust. This will give students background about Hitler and
the Holocaust.

Step 4: Distribute one copy of the Non-Fiction Literature Circle Response Sheet (PDF) to each
group. Explain to the class that in this book there are eight different true stories of children in
the Holocaust — after they have read one story, they are to complete a response sheet, and so
on. By the end of the book, each team should have eight response sheets filled out and ready
to turn in. (Have a stack of response sheets available for when students need them.)
Encourage students to use the response sheets to help complete the last section of the KWL
chart.

Page 45 of 54
Day 5

Step 1: After completing the literature circle reading of the non-fiction book, guide students
through the last section of the KWL chart.

Step 2: Engage students in a classroom discuss of the KWL chart. Encourage students to
brainstorm ideas on how to prevent another Holocaust.

 
Supporting All Learners

Students having difficulty with this lesson will be given more time to read Survivors: True
Stories of Children in the Holocaust and complete response sheet.  ESL students may
complete the KWL chart and response sheet in their language

Lesson Extensions

Students take a skills test such as AR, SRC, etc over the non-fiction book to accumulate points
towards their yearly goal.

Home Connection

Once the KWL charts are completed have the students take the chart home and have
parents/guardians add more information and return to class for further discussion.

Assignments

Complete KWL chart.
Read Survivor: True Stories of Children in the Holocaust.
Brainstorm and discuss the Holocaust.

Evaluation

Was the KWL chart helpful in organizing the Holocaust information?
Did the students achieve the knowledge that you wanted them too?
Did the students stay on task in the literature circles?
Was three days long enough for the literature circle?

 
Assess Students

For assessment, use participation and completion of the KWL chart, participation in the
literature circle, and completion of the Non-Fiction Literature Circle Response Sheet (PDF).

 
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Diary of Anne Frank - 1
Minutes for Lesson: 0
05/11/2015-05/15/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05

Learning Target Students will:


(Student will be identify elements of revision given an original and revised passage.
able to...): select a piece of their own writing to revise based on audience considerations.
 
collaborate with a partner to develop a revision strategy.
revise a piece of writing based on the audience and using the elements of revision.

back to top

SESSION ONE
1. After reading or viewing the The Diary of Anne Frank, provide students with copies of the The Diary of Anne Frank:
Revised Passages handout and project it for the class to view as well.

Page 46 of 54
2. Before reading the original passage, tell students they will be asked to write a one sentence summary of the event
Frank describes.
3. Read the original version of the diary entry aloud and instruct students to take a few minutes to write a one
sentence summary of the event. Students may be confused as to the actual happenings described by Anne in this
passage as she has omitted vital explanatory information. You may need to provide additional clarification and
explain to students that they will see additional information in the revision.
4. Ask students to share their summary with a partner before asking for volunteers to share their summary with the
class.
5. As a class, discuss what Anne actually describes here and address the portions that students find confusing.
6. Repeat steps 2‐5 for the revised passage.
7. Guide students to identify the details that have been added in the revised version. Students should use their
highlighters to identify these details/new additions. Focus on how the details have affected their overall
understanding of the events.
8. Prompt the students to discuss the reasons behind such changes. Students should notice that she adds explanatory
information about what a “call up” means; she clarifies that her sister was the one that called up, rather than her
father as she was originally told; she identifies Mr. Van Daan.
9. At this point, students may start to identify stylistic differences as well. Using highlighters, ask students to
continue to highlight the differences they see in the revised version.
10. Prompt students to share the differences they have highlighted while you record them for the class on the board or
chart paper. Students will likely identify differences such as: sensory details, imagery, dialogue, definitions,
rhetorical questions, emotive language, and descriptive language.
11. Finally, end this session prompting the students to discuss why these changes have been made. Students will
probably suggest that the revised version is written for an audience other than Anne Frank herself. Ask students to
think about the differences between writing for self and writing for others. As students discuss these differences,
write their responses on chart paper or the board for students to refer to later when they do their own writing.
back to top

SESSION TWO
1. Begin by asking the students how one’s personal writing changes when the audience is no longer oneself. Lead
students to the conclusion that one’s purpose is largely determined by one’s audience.
2. Ask students to get out their writer’s notebooks/journals and spend a few minutes skimming through a few entries.
3. Pass out and review the Revision Reflection handout. Students should have identified most of the elements in the
previous session.
4. Ask students to pick one entry that they wouldn’t mind sharing with their partner. Students will then exchange
entries and complete the Revision Guide handout. Refer students to the chart paper/board that describes the
differences in writing for self and writing for others (from Session One).
5. Allow 10‐15 minutes for the completion of the handout and subsequent partner discussion session.
6. Students will then pick an audience for their revision and make a revision plan. Point out that Anne Frank revised
her diary after hearing Gerrit Bolkestein, an exiled Dutch government official, state that he would document
holocaust testimonials after the war. Audience suggestions include: the principal, parents, teachers, upcoming
middle school students, a younger sibling, an older sibling, a middle school aged student in another country.
7. Before the next session, students need to review their partner's comments and draft a revision of the chosen entry.
You may also choose to do this step as a separate in‐class session before the final session listed (Session Three).
back to top

SESSION THREE
1. Begin the session by asking what the revision experience was like. Ask students questions such as the following:
What kinds of things did they change, add, and omit? With what did they have difficulty? Did they experience any
roadblocks? Were they able to solve them?
2. Ask students to exchange their original and revised entries with their partners and ask the partners to identify the
elements that were changed from the original piece. Students may wish to use the Revision Guide handout as a
guide for helping them look for things in their partner's work that have changed. Students should discuss the
improvements made with the entries as well as the problems they experienced.
3. The partners should develop a continued revision plan for a third and final draft. Explain to students that they will
complete their final draft in the next session.
back to top

SESSION FOUR
1. Ask students to meet with their partner from the previous session and discuss their revision plan for their third
draft. Allow time for the students to make revisions for their third and final draft while you circulate the room
providing assistance where necessary.
2. After students complete their final draft, they should and complete the Revision Reflection to be turned in for an
assessment of their knowledge gained throughout the exercise. Additionally, you may wish to ask students to share
their final piece with their classmates.
back to top

EXTENSIONS
Have the students revise the same journal entry for another audience.
Have the students revise a text message, blog post, email, or status update to get familiar with the 21st century
version of revision!

back to top

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Page 47 of 54
Ask students to reflect on their writing process by completing the Revision Reflection. As students continue to revise
other pieces of writing, look for evidence of the elements of revision such as: use of descriptive language, sensory
details, imagery, clarifying information, dialogue, definitions or explanations.
Students will:

identify elements of revision given an original and revised passage.


select a piece of their own writing to revise based on audience considerations.
collaborate with a partner to develop a revision strategy.
revise a piece of writing based on the audience and using the elements of revision.

back to top

SESSION ONE

After reading or viewing the The Diary of Anne Frank, provide students with copies of the The Diary of Anne
Frank: Revised Passages handout and project it for the class to view as well.
Before reading the original passage, tell students they will be asked to write a one sentence summary of the
event Frank describes.
Read the original version of the diary entry aloud and instruct students to take a few minutes to write a one
sentence summary of the event. Students may be confused as to the actual happenings described by Anne in this
passage as she has omitted vital explanatory information. You may need to provide additional clarification and
explain to students that they will see additional information in the revision.
Ask students to share their summary with a partner before asking for volunteers to share their summary with the
class.
As a class, discuss what Anne actually describes here and address the portions that students find confusing.
Repeat steps 2‐5 for the revised passage.
Guide students to identify the details that have been added in the revised version. Students should use their
highlighters to identify these details/new additions. Focus on how the details have affected their overall
understanding of the events.
Prompt the students to discuss the reasons behind such changes. Students should notice that she adds
explanatory information about what a “call up” means; she clarifies that her sister was the one that called up,
rather than her father as she was originally told; she identifies Mr. Van Daan.
At this point, students may start to identify stylistic differences as well. Using highlighters, ask students to
continue to highlight the differences they see in the revised version.
Prompt students to share the differences they have highlighted while you record them for the class on the board
or chart paper. Students will likely identify differences such as: sensory details, imagery, dialogue, definitions,
rhetorical questions, emotive language, and descriptive language.
Finally, end this session prompting the students to discuss why these changes have been made. Students will
probably suggest that the revised version is written for an audience other than Anne Frank herself. Ask students
to think about the differences between writing for self and writing for others. As students discuss these
differences, write their responses on chart paper or the board for students to refer to later when they do their
own writing.
back to top

SESSION TWO

Begin by asking the students how one’s personal writing changes when the audience is no longer oneself. Lead
students to the conclusion that one’s purpose is largely determined by one’s audience.
Ask students to get out their writer’s notebooks/journals and spend a few minutes skimming through a few
entries.
Pass out and review the Revision Reflection handout. Students should have identified most of the elements in the
previous session.
Ask students to pick one entry that they wouldn’t mind sharing with their partner. Students will then exchange
entries and complete the Revision Guide handout. Refer students to the chart paper/board that describes the
differences in writing for self and writing for others (from Session One).
Allow 10‐15 minutes for the completion of the handout and subsequent partner discussion session.
Students will then pick an audience for their revision and make a revision plan. Point out that Anne Frank
revised her diary after hearing Gerrit Bolkestein, an exiled Dutch government official, state that he would
document holocaust testimonials after the war. Audience suggestions include: the principal, parents, teachers,
upcoming middle school students, a younger sibling, an older sibling, a middle school aged student in another
country.
Before the next session, students need to review their partner's comments and draft a revision of the chosen
entry. You may also choose to do this step as a separate in‐class session before the final session listed (Session
Three).
back to top

SESSION THREE

Begin the session by asking what the revision experience was like. Ask students questions such as the following:
What kinds of things did they change, add, and omit? With what did they have difficulty? Did they experience any
roadblocks? Were they able to solve them?
Ask students to exchange their original and revised entries with their partners and ask the partners to identify
the elements that were changed from the original piece. Students may wish to use the Revision Guide handout as
a guide for helping them look for things in their partner's work that have changed. Students should discuss the
improvements made with the entries as well as the problems they experienced.
The partners should develop a continued revision plan for a third and final draft. Explain to students that they
will complete their final draft in the next session.
back to top

SESSION FOUR

Page 48 of 54
Ask students to meet with their partner from the previous session and discuss their revision plan for their third
draft. Allow time for the students to make revisions for their third and final draft while you circulate the room
providing assistance where necessary.
After students complete their final draft, they should and complete the Revision Reflection to be turned in for an
assessment of their knowledge gained throughout the exercise. Additionally, you may wish to ask students to
share their final piece with their classmates.
back to top

EXTENSIONS

Have the students revise the same journal entry for another audience.
Have the students revise a text message, blog post, email, or status update to get familiar with the 21st century
version of revision!

back to top

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Ask students to reflect on their writing process by completing the Revision Reflection. As students continue to
revise other pieces of writing, look for evidence of the elements of revision such as: use of descriptive language,
sensory details, imagery, clarifying information, dialogue, definitions or explanations.

Students will:

identify elements of revision given an original and revised passage.


select a piece of their own writing to revise based on audience considerations.
collaborate with a partner to develop a revision strategy.
revise a piece of writing based on the audience and using the elements of revision.

back to top

SESSION ONE

After reading or viewing the The Diary of Anne Frank, provide students with copies of the The Diary of Anne
Frank: Revised Passages handout and project it for the class to view as well.
Before reading the original passage, tell students they will be asked to write a one sentence summary of the
event Frank describes.
Read the original version of the diary entry aloud and instruct students to take a few minutes to write a one
sentence summary of the event. Students may be confused as to the actual happenings described by Anne in this
passage as she has omitted vital explanatory information. You may need to provide additional clarification and
explain to students that they will see additional information in the revision.
Ask students to share their summary with a partner before asking for volunteers to share their summary with the
class.
As a class, discuss what Anne actually describes here and address the portions that students find confusing.
Repeat steps 2‐5 for the revised passage.
Guide students to identify the details that have been added in the revised version. Students should use their
highlighters to identify these details/new additions. Focus on how the details have affected their overall
understanding of the events.
Prompt the students to discuss the reasons behind such changes. Students should notice that she adds
explanatory information about what a “call up” means; she clarifies that her sister was the one that called up,
rather than her father as she was originally told; she identifies Mr. Van Daan.
At this point, students may start to identify stylistic differences as well. Using highlighters, ask students to
continue to highlight the differences they see in the revised version.
Prompt students to share the differences they have highlighted while you record them for the class on the board
or chart paper. Students will likely identify differences such as: sensory details, imagery, dialogue, definitions,
rhetorical questions, emotive language, and descriptive language.
Finally, end this session prompting the students to discuss why these changes have been made. Students will
probably suggest that the revised version is written for an audience other than Anne Frank herself. Ask students
to think about the differences between writing for self and writing for others. As students discuss these
differences, write their responses on chart paper or the board for students to refer to later when they do their
own writing.
back to top

SESSION TWO

Begin by asking the students how one’s personal writing changes when the audience is no longer oneself. Lead
students to the conclusion that one’s purpose is largely determined by one’s audience.
Ask students to get out their writer’s notebooks/journals and spend a few minutes skimming through a few
entries.
Pass out and review the Revision Reflection handout. Students should have identified most of the elements in the
previous session.
Ask students to pick one entry that they wouldn’t mind sharing with their partner. Students will then exchange
entries and complete the Revision Guide handout. Refer students to the chart paper/board that describes the
differences in writing for self and writing for others (from Session One).
Allow 10‐15 minutes for the completion of the handout and subsequent partner discussion session.
Students will then pick an audience for their revision and make a revision plan. Point out that Anne Frank
revised her diary after hearing Gerrit Bolkestein, an exiled Dutch government official, state that he would
document holocaust testimonials after the war. Audience suggestions include: the principal, parents, teachers,
upcoming middle school students, a younger sibling, an older sibling, a middle school aged student in another
country.

Page 49 of 54
Before the next session, students need to review their partner's comments and draft a revision of the chosen
entry. You may also choose to do this step as a separate in‐class session before the final session listed (Session
Three).
back to top

SESSION THREE

Begin the session by asking what the revision experience was like. Ask students questions such as the following:
What kinds of things did they change, add, and omit? With what did they have difficulty? Did they experience any
roadblocks? Were they able to solve them?
Ask students to exchange their original and revised entries with their partners and ask the partners to identify
the elements that were changed from the original piece. Students may wish to use the Revision Guide handout as
a guide for helping them look for things in their partner's work that have changed. Students should discuss the
improvements made with the entries as well as the problems they experienced.
The partners should develop a continued revision plan for a third and final draft. Explain to students that they
will complete their final draft in the next session.
back to top

SESSION FOUR

Ask students to meet with their partner from the previous session and discuss their revision plan for their third
draft. Allow time for the students to make revisions for their third and final draft while you circulate the room
providing assistance where necessary.
After students complete their final draft, they should and complete the Revision Reflection to be turned in for an
assessment of their knowledge gained throughout the exercise. Additionally, you may wish to ask students to
share their final piece with their classmates.
back to top

EXTENSIONS

Have the students revise the same journal entry for another audience.
Have the students revise a text message, blog post, email, or status update to get familiar with the 21st century
version of revision!

back to top

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Ask students to reflect on their writing process by completing the Revision Reflection. As students continue to
revise other pieces of writing, look for evidence of the elements of revision such as: use of descriptive language,
sensory details, imagery, clarifying information, dialogue, definitions or explanations.

STANDARDS

 Lesson: Review for Finals
Minutes for Lesson: 0
05/18/2015-05/18/2015 Period(s): 01, 01, 02, 02, 05

Skills/Objectives: Final_Exam_Grade_8_Study_Guide_2015.docx
   
STANDARDS

 Lesson: Diary of Anne Frank
Minutes for Lesson: 0
05/18/2015-05/18/2015 Period(s): 05, 08
05/20/2015-05/22/2015 Period(s): 01, 02, 05, 08

Learning Target Students will


(Student will be Work cooperatively in pairs
able to...):
  Access and view specific sites on the Internet related to the topic they are studying

Make observations that reflect thoughtful examination of each site's features and content

Hold a "silent conversation," that is, an exchange of comments and ideas written on paper

Share their questions and thoughts about the sites together as a class

back to top

INSTRUCTION AND ACTIVITIES

Page 50 of 54
Session 1

Before students begin the exploration activities, post the banner paper with the headings "World War II," the
"Holocaust," and "Anne Frank." Encourage students to share what, if anything, they already know about the three topics
and note their thoughts on the chart. Explain how students will use the Observation and Inquiry Sheet and the Silent
Conversation Sheet during the lesson.

Gather students in pairs. All pairs should open the article about Anne Frank on the Microsoft Encarta Online
Encyclopedia, and the class should go through the article together. Make sure that students click on the hypertext links
to "World War II" and the "Holocaust," and then read the first paragraph or two from each of those entries. Ask students
what they want to add to the chart from the information they have read in the article and from the hypertext links. Add
this new information to the chart.

Give each pair a copy of the Observation and Inquiry sheet with one of the web addresses highlighted in yellow.
Although students will briefly visit each of the sites in the order listed, they will then go back to their designated site
for a close viewing. Students should take turns writing their responses on the Observation and Inquiry sheet.

Session 2

During the second session, gather students in pairs and give them the Silent Conversation sheet. They should open one
of the websites that they did not do the observation and inquiry work on and ask them to complete a "silent
conversation" about it. This conversation should include at least four comments or questions written by each partner.

When all pairs have completed their "silent conversation," the class will go through the websites in numerical order first
sharing their observations about the sites and then asking their questions about them by referring to their Observation
and Inquiry sheets. Observations or questions that directly relate to the original three topics on the chart should be
added under the comments from Session 1. Post the completed Silent Conversation sheets up on chart or banner paper
screens so that classmates can read one another's discussions, and compare others pairs' thoughts to their own.

Use the chart with the three categories to lead the class into a study of the "human face" of World War II and the
Holocaust via excerpts from Anne Frank's diary.
back to top

EXTENSIONS
Students write their own diary entries about a significant event or period in their own lives modeling it after Anne's
style.

Students write a diary entry from the point of view of an adolescent living in Europe during World War II and
incorporate information that they learned throughout the unit.

Students research a specific aspect of the Holocaust, by framing a question about it to guide their research. For
example, students might ask:

‐Where are the memorials to Holocaust victims located in the United States?
‐What has become of the original concentration camps?
‐What worldwide groups or organizations have been established to help Holocaust survivors or their surviving
relatives?

Students visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website, take an online tour, and write a follow‐up
reflection of their experience.

Students read another work of historical fiction that pertains to this period, then write a follow‐up reflection on how
that reading contributed to their knowledge of the Holocaust. Suggestions for such readings include: Number the
Stars by Lois Lowry and The Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen.

The lesson Anne Frank: One of Hundreds of Thousands can be used as an extension to this lesson because it invites
students to connect Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl to the historical events of World War II.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Successful navigation to and through the various sites

Completed Observation and Inquiry sheet for assigned site that includes specific references to details and elements
on the site that support students' observations and opinions

Completed Silent Conversation sheet that includes specific references to details and elements on the site that
support students' observations and opinions; also check for correct coding of comments to see if students understand
what kind of thinking they are doing

Teacher observation and anecdotal notes on class discussions

STANDARDS

 Lesson: Reader's Theater
Minutes for Lesson: 0
05/25/2015-05/25/2015 Period(s): 01, 01, 02, 02, 05, 05

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Skills/Objectives: STUDENT OBJECTIVES
 
Students will

Develop listening comprehension skills by using and adapting reading comprehension strategies to understand
audio texts

Identify vocal qualities that make audio texts more understandable and interesting

Evaluate audio texts in terms of genre and vocal qualities by listening to the texts and recording their ideas

Apply what they have learned about vocal qualities and sound effects to create their own podcasts

Use Readers Theatre as a strategy to develop story understanding and reinterpretation

Work collaboratively to create a podcast

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SESSION 1
This session uses the story "The Purloined Letter" but any other mystery story with corresponding downloadable audio
file can also be used.

1. Predicting. Before listening to the audio file, activate students' background knowledge and predicting skills.
Ask students what they know about Edgar Allan Poe. Facts for you to mention are that he is given credit for
being the first mystery writer as well as being the originator of the series character, the amateur detective,
narration by a sidekick (à la Dr. Watson), and the locked‐room puzzle as a key element of a mystery. You may
choose to use some of the Poe websites you bookmarked (see Preparation, Step 5) to further engage students
and capture their attention.

Have students discuss current mysteries they like either in books, television, or movies. Ask them to name
some common elements of mysteries, trying to get them to mention setting, detective, crime/mystery,
victim, clues, and solution.

Share the title of Poe's story (or the title of the story you selected for this lesson), and ask students what they
think the story might be about.

Discuss the fact that students will be listening to an audio version of the story. Ask them how they think they
would read a story with this title. Have them predict what tone and other vocal qualities they might hear.

2. Asking questions. Distribute the first page of the Before, During, and After Listening sheet. Students should use
it to review the six mystery concepts from the Mystery Cube tool and generate detail‐searching questions about
the story to help guide their reading.

3. Making connections. Ask students to make the following connections:


Did they ever receive a mysterious letter, email, or text‐message? (Text‐to‐self)

Do they know any other books or movies about letters? (Text‐to‐text)

What effects could letters published in the newspaper or on the Internet have on large groups of people (Text‐
to‐world)?

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SESSION 2

1. Have students review their predictions, questions, and connections from the previous session.

2. Making connections. Distribute the second page of the Before, During, and After Listening sheet. Ask students
to continue making connections as they listen.

3. Visualizing. Ask students to make mental pictures about what is happening while they listen. Tell them to keep
the questions they generated in Step 2 about setting, detective, victim, crime, clues, and solution close at hand
so they can do a Quick Draw or Quick Write as they imaging the setting, characters, and plot. (See Quick
Write/Quick Draw for an explanation of this strategy.)

4. Knowing how words work. Remind students to jot down any words they do not know as they listen and to use
context clues to figure out what the words mean. They should keep a bank of these words to explore with the
group after listening.

5. Monitoring. Have students ask themselves if the story makes sense. They should be able to follow the sequence
of the story. Encourage them to jot down notes or create a map as they listen.

6. Play "The Purloined Letter"; students listen and take notes.

7. Summarizing. As soon as the story is finished, distribute page 3 of the Before, During, and After Listening
sheet. Ask students to fill it out and then to participate in a large‐group discussion about any difficulties they
may have had with comprehension or unfamiliar vocabulary. Ask students to share their best comprehension
strategies. Questions for discussion include:
What helped you understand the story?

What connections did you make to other stories or personal events that helped you understand the story?

How did you decode or understand unfamiliar words from the story?

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How did you organize your Quick Writes or Quick Draws to help you remember key parts of the story?

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SESSION 3
During this session, have students work in guided groups of four. Because students will be participating in a creative
collaborative project they should be allowed to choose their own groups. Ideally this session takes place in a computer
lab.

1. Summarizing: Have students work in their groups to fill in the Mystery Cube summarizing the text using their
notes from Session 2. They should print and assemble their cubes when they are finished.

2. Once students have filled out the cube, have them participate in summarizing discussions in their small groups.
Move from group to group assisting students with their questions and guiding their conversations. Next, ask the
groups to share their ideas with the whole class. Questions you might ask include:
Who are the characters and what roles did they play?

What is the main problem?

Did you notice any specific clues?

Were there any false clues (red herrings) in the story?

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SESSION 4

1. Evaluating. Have students listen again to "The Purloined Letter", this time reading along in the hard copy and
answering questions from the Evaluating the Audio sheet. Students should work on this independently and then
share their ideas once the audio is finished.

2. After students evaluate the audio, have them explore how the audio could have been different by asking "what
if" questions. For example, what would have made the recording more interesting? What sound effects could
have been used? What areas could have been more interesting or understandable with a different tone of voice?
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SESSIONS 5 AND 6
These sessions include student‐centered guided comprehension routines and teacher‐facilitated whole‐group
reflection. Students use their completed Mystery Cubes and their completed Evaluating the Audio sheets as well as
any notes they took on the text version to plan their script.

1. Explain to students that they will make their own audio recording of a section of the story, which will be
evaluated using the questions on the Evaluating the Audio sheet.

2. Have students get into their groups and choose a section of the story that includes dialogue to record. Next,
have them practice some of the sound effects from the Sound Effects Practice sheet. Talk about what effects
they might use in their recording. Remind them to consider where in the story they might use the effects. You
might want to have them review their printed version of the story and mark where the effects should go.

3. Next, groups of students will prepare to read the story as a Readers Theatre. Using their printouts of the story,
they should decide on parts (both narration and specific characters), tone of voice, and sound effects they will
use in their audio recording. Remind them to focus on the elements of mystery and accentuate these with
proper tone of voice or sound effects that add to the meaning of the story, the feeling of the setting, the
suspense of the mystery, the emotions of the victim, and change in atmosphere throughout the story.

4. Help students record their stories. These can either be recorded on a tape recorder, digital recorder, or directly
onto the computer to create MP3 files.

5. Once students have recorded their scripts, have them spend time listening to their classmates' recordings and
comparing them with their own versions. As a group, they should use the Evaluating the Audio sheet to evaluate
at least two other recordings.

6. Have a whole‐class reflection where students share their experiences. Questions for discussion include:
What strategies helped them with comprehension?

What elements of audio helped with meaning?

What elements of audio made the text more interesting and enjoyable?

How did sound effects help or hinder the different versions of the story?

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EXTENSIONS
Students can use the Mystery Cube and create an outline for their own mystery, write a script, and follow the same
format as outlined in Sessions 5 and 6 to create an audio recording.

Scaffold students' reading using another one of Poe's works. This time, give less assistance to students. Have
them work in guided‐listening groups, working through the listening as you circulate among the groups. Provide
them with a framework with questions for the specific story.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS
Collect and review the Evaluating the Audio sheets to see how well students were able to review the work of their
peers and how well they understand the qualities that make a strong audio presentation of a story. After comparing
your evaluations with those of students, meet individually with each group to discuss ways to make their podcasts
more interesting and understandable.

Use the Before, During, and After Listening sheets to evaluate individual student’s understanding of the story.

Have students complete self‐assessments using the Readers Theatre Self‐Evaluation and the Working With My
Group form.

STANDARDS

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