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Direct questions – yes / no questions in English.

1. He likes swimming.
2. He can swim long distances.
3. He is a good swimmer.

To make sentence 1 into a question, you need to add does. The does goes before he.

Does is only used if the subject is he, she or it – in all other cases, use do.

The verb like goes after the subject, but it doesn't have an 's' on the end.

Remember: after auxiliary verbs (like do, does, have, can, etc.) the verb is in the infinitive,
without 'to'.

"Does he like swimming?" Not "Does he likes swimming?" or "Do he like swimming?"

If the sentence is in the past tense (he liked swimming), we use the past form of 'do' or
'does', which is did. The verb 'like' is still in the infinitive without 'to'.

For example, "Did he like swimming?" Not "Did he liked swimming?"

To make sentence 2 into a question, you don't need to use 'does' because you already have
an auxiliary verb – can. So you put the can before he.

"Can he swim long distances?" Not "Can swim he long distances?" or "Does he can swim
long distances?"

To make sentence 3 into a question, use is as the auxiliary.

"Is he a good swimmer?" Not "Does he is a good swimmer?" or "Does he be a good


swimmer?"

Direct questions – "wh" questions

What is your name?


Why do you want this job?
How much do you earn?
How soon can you start?
When did you see the advertisement?
Where do you live?
Which newspaper did you see the advertisement in?
Who gave you my name?

After the "wh word" (what, why, how, when, etc) comes the auxiliary (do, does, did or
can), then the subject (you) , then the rest of the question.
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Note: if 'who', 'which' or 'what' are the subject of the question, you do not need an auxiliary.

For example, "What happened?" Not "What did happen?" The thing that happened is what
– the subject of the question.

"Who saw you?" Someone saw you – who was it?

Compare with "Who did you see?" You saw someone – who was it?)

"Which company made a profit?" A company made a profit – which company was it?

Compare with "Which company did you work for?" You worked for a company – which
one was it?

Indirect questions in English

If you want to ask a question that is quite sensitive, try using one of the indirect phrases
below:

Can you tell me…


Could you tell me…
I'd be interested to hear…
I'd like to know…
Would you mind telling me…

These questions are followed by either about, a "wh word" or if. Then you add the subject,
then the sentence.

You don't need an 'auxiliary', such as 'do', 'does', 'did', or 'can'.

"Can you tell me what you like most about your present job?" Not "Can you tell me what
do you like?"

"I'd be interested to hear about your experiences."

"Would you mind telling me if you have applied for a similar position before?"

Grammar

Unit 66 - Indirect Questions

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Indirect questions are polite, longer forms of normal questions. For example:
- Where's the department store? - Direct question
- Could you tell me where the department store is, please? - Indirect question
- What's his name? - Direct question
- Do you know what his name is? - Indirect question

Form

Indirect questions are formed of two parts: a polite expression, and a question which has
no subject/verb inversion like a normal question. For example:
- What's his name? >>
- Do you know what his name is? - Indirect question
Here the polite expression is "Do you know...", and the question part is "...what his name
is?". Note that the subject and verb have not changed place in the question part. So if you
said "Do you know what is his name?", this would be incorrect.

Another example:
- What's the time? >>
- Do you have any idea what the time is? - Indirect question
The polite expression is "Do you have any idea...?", and the question is "...what the time
is?".
The question is not "...what is the time?" - you don't invert the subject and verb kike a
normal question.

Auxiliary Verb "To do"

The auxiliary verb "to do"is used in questions when there is no other auxiliary verb. For
example:
- You like Chinese food. >>
- Do you like Chinese food?

Indirect questions do not use the auxiliary verb "to do" in the main question. For example:
- When does the next train arrive? - Direct question
- Do you know when the next train arrives? - Indirect question
- Do you know when does the next train arrive? - Incorrect

Another example:
- When does the restaurant close? - Direct question
- Could you tell me when the restaurant closes? - Indirect question
- Could you tell me when does the restaurant close? - Incorrect

There are infinite ways to make indirect questions. Not all indirect questions are questions
at all, rather they are polite statements which encourage some kind of response. Some
common polite expressions include:
- I wonder if/whether...?
- I can't remember if/whether...?
- Could you tell me if/whether...?
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- Would you mind telling me if/whether...?
- Would it be possible for you to...?
- Is there any chance you could...?
- I don't suppose you could...
- I'd like to know if/whether...
- I can't remember...

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EXERCISES.
ACTIVITY I.

Instructions: Choose the correct answer.

Q1 - I have no idea ____.


where she's
where she is
where is she
Q2 - Could you tell me ____ gone?
where she's
where is she
where has she
Q3 - I asked them where ____ going.
were they
they were
Q4 - Can you tell me how much ____ cost?
will it
it will
Q5 - Do you have any idea how long ____ me to do it?
did it take
it took
took it
Q6 - Has she told you whether ____ help?
will she
she will
Q7 - Can you explain why ____ so expensive?
is it
it's
Q8 - She asked me where ____ from.
do I come
come I
I come
Q9 - I was wondering why ____ take the train; it'll be quicker.
don't we
we don't

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Q10 - Can you remember _____?
what did she say
what she said

ACTIVITY II.

Indirect Questions Exercise at Auto-English

"What's this?"
"Do you know what this is?"

Fill the gaps.

1 "Where's the station?"


"Can you tell me ___________________________________________ ?"
2 "Are you coming to the party?"
"Can you let me know if ___________________________________________ ?"
3 "How does it work?"
"Can you explain ___________________________________________ ?"
4 "What's the the matter?"
Please tell me ___________________________________________ ."
5 "Where are you from?"
"I'd like to know ___________________________________________ ."
6 "How long does it take to get there?"
"Do you know ___________________________________________ ?"
7 "Has she reached a decision yet?"
"Has she told you whether ___________________________________________ ?"
8 "What time are you leaving?"
"Do you know ___________________________________________ ?"
9 "Does Annie know about computers?"
"I wonder whether ___________________________________________ ."
10 "Excuse me. How do you get to the post office from here?"
"Could you tell us ___________________________________________ ?"
11 "What are you doing?!"
"Do you have any idea ___________________________________________ ?!"
12 "Could you lend me 50 Euros?"
"I don't suppose ___________________________________________ ."
13 "Could you take me to the airport?"
"Is there any chance ___________________________________________ ?"

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14 "Does Susana like classical music?"
"I can't remember if ___________________________________________ ."

ACTIVITY III.

Write indirect questions.

1. Have you ever been to Kapadokya?

          I wonder ………………………………………………………..

    2.   Who scored Fenerbaçe’s first goal last night?

          Do you know………………………………………………….?

    3.   When is Hakan going to move to Ankara?

          I have no idea …………………………………………………

    4.   Who brought this computer to the office?

          I want to know………………………………………………..

    5.   Does your new girlfriend smoke?

         I wonder…………………………………………………………

    6.  How many times has Mel been to Bodrum?

        Could you tell me ……………………………………………?

    7.  Can she play the guitar?

         I wonder …………………………………………………………

    8.  What were you doing when the earthquake happened?

         I don’t remember………………………………………………

    9. Has Aylin moved to Izmir?

        I don’t know……………………………………………………….

  10.  What time did Osman leave the office?

        I don’t remember………………………………………………….

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READING.

Queen Elizabeth II

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary),


styled HM The Queen, born April 21, 1926, is the Queen
regnant and Head of State of the United Kingdom of Great
Britain and Northern Ireland and fifteen other Commonwealth
countries. She is Head of the Commonwealth, Supreme
Governor of the Church of England, Commander-in-Chief of
the UK Armed Forces, and she is the Lord of Mann.

She has reigned since February 6, 1952. About 125 million


people live in the countries of which she is head of state.
Before her succession, she held the titles of a British princess
and by marriage, Duchess of Edinburgh.

The Queen has never given press interviews, and her views
on political issues are largely unknown except to those few heads of government who have
private conversations with her. She is also regarded privately as an excellent mimic.

Rather conservative in dress, the Queen is well-known for her solid-colour overcoats and
decorative hats, which allow her to be seen easily in a crowd. Although she attends many
cultural events as part of her public role, in her private life the Queen is said to have little
interest in culture or the arts. Her main leisure interests include horse racing, photography,
and dogs, especially her Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

In diplomatic situations the Queen is extremely formal, and royal protocol is very strict.
Though some of the traditional rules for dealing with the British Monarch have been
relaxed during her reign (bowing is no longer required, for example) other forms of close
personal interaction, such as touching, are still discouraged. In 1992, the Australian Prime
Minister Paul Keating was dubbed the "Lizard of Oz" by the British press for touching the
Queen on the back, and in 2000 his successor John Howard had to deny that he too had
touched the Queen. A similar flap occurred when Newfoundland and Labrador premier
Brian Tobin was photographed touching the Queen's back as he accompanied her up a
flight of stairs; he protested he was merely attempting to help an elderly lady avoid falling.
The queen is also notably the subject of the Sex Pistols 1977 song "God Save the Queen".

Her former prime ministers speak highly of her. Since becoming Queen, she spends an
average of three hours every day "doing the boxes"—reading state papers sent to her from
her various departments, embassies, and government offices.

Having done so since 1952, she has seen more of public affairs from the inside than any
other person, and is thus able to offer advice to Tony Blair based on things said to her by
Harold Wilson, Harold Macmillan, Edward Heath, Winston Churchill and many other
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senior leaders. She takes her responsibilities in this regard seriously, once mentioning an
"interesting telegram" from the Foreign Office to then-Prime Minister Winston Churchill,
only to find that her prime minister had not bothered to read it when it came in his box!

Questions about the text

1. Queen Elizabeth II was born in

1926.

1952.

We don't know.

2. Queen Elizabeth II never wears hats.

True.

False.

We don't know.

3. What animals does HM The Queen love?

Cats.

Horses.

Dogs.

4. Sex Pistols wrote a song about the Queen.

True.

False.

We don't know.

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5. She spends three hours every day reading newspapers.

True.

False.

We don't know.

6. Queen Elizabeth started her reign in

1923.

1952.

1978.