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FOG HORN a Twobirds Flying Publication 31 December 2010 By: Sal Palma ( Follow me

FOG HORN a Twobirds Flying Publication

31 December 2010

By: Sal Palma (Follow me on Twitter)

Supe Up Your Insight Technologies X2 or X2L Into a Blazing Tactical Light.

Technologies X2 or X2L Into a Blazing Tactical Light. Insight Technologies, now an L3 company, requires

Insight Technologies, now an L3 company, requires little in the way of introduction. Since the early 80’s, the company has been producing advanced weapon sights and weapon mounted lighting. Their M3X and M6X have a dominant position in the Special Forces Community and they have built a sterling reputation for quality, reliability and customer service. More recently, the company recognized a need for a more robust and waterproof mini red dot sight and addressed it with the introduction of the, now, highly regarded Insight MRDS. The company’s M3 and M6 / M6X weapon mounted lights attached to any available Picatinny rail; however, their larger footprint required more real estate than the smaller frame pistols entering the market could provide. Insight responded by introducing two subcompact models, the X2 and X2L. The lights were quickly accepted and found their way to a variety of configurations and

platforms where tactical lighting requirements are less demanding. The X2 and X2L (laser equipped) are especially compact and use an incandescent bulb that produces 40 lumens of intensity. This is not much more than an incandescent flashlight; however, it served the needs of consumers or users needing a small footprint over high intensity. On the other hand, we know from countless training and combat scenarios that light intensity is a harnessable advantage, and in

numerous instances a less lethal solution to

a potentially lethal confrontation.

In 2010, Insight Technologies recognized the need to beef up the X2 and X2L,

especially in light of Streamlight’s TLR-3 and introduced two new models the X2 L.E.D.

and X2L L.E.D

The offering accomplished a

number of things. First, it gave Insight Technologies a more competitive offering; secondly, it delivered a significant increase in intensity from a wimpy 40 lumens to a whopping 80 lumens.

It also increased the light’s run time, durability and overall reliability. The new X2 L.E.D. and X2L L.E.D. are a great improvement; however, they leave the legacy X2 and X2L customers holding the proverbial bag, and shortly after the L.E.D. models were introduced Insight announced an upgrade kit for legacy X2 and X2L owners

– a brilliant move, I thought. However, the

production gods had a different thought in

mind and here we are, into 2011, with no upgrade kit to be had.

Copyright 2011, Sal Palma, d.b.a. Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved.

As luck would have it and through the kindness of Insight Tech Gear, I was

As luck would have it and through the kindness of Insight Tech Gear, I was able to obtain an X2 L.E.D., which I quickly dissected after its arrival.

an X2 L.E.D., which I quickly dissected after its arrival. Figure 1. L.E.D. Module Exposed The

Figure 1. L.E.D. Module Exposed

The X2 L.E.D. retains its compact footprint, but where there once was an incandescent lamp now lives an L.E.D. module in a circuit pack that is about .5 inches high. The module houses all of the electronics needed to regulate the light, and produces a glorious 80 lumens of kick-ass tactical lighting.

a glorious 80 lumens of kick-ass tactical lighting. Figure 2. L.E.D. module outside of the housing.

Figure 2. L.E.D. module outside of the housing.

Note the RAIL marking on the top of the module; it indicates how the module is to be oriented in the housing. Remember that light emitting diodes are solid-state devices and they are polarity sensitive; in order for them to operate

FOG HORN a Twobirds Flying Publication

correctly they have to be biased appropriately. Here, Insight demonstrates their maturity by clearly labeling the module so that a child can install it properly. There are no special requirements when handling the module; however, I suggest that you ground yourself to mitigate the risk of a static charge damaging the L.E.D. or its circuitry. The next component that differs from the legacy X2 or X2L is the bezel and parabolic reflector.

the legacy X2 or X2L is the bezel and parabolic reflector. Figure 3. Bezel, reflector and

Figure 3. Bezel, reflector and L.E.D. module.

The reflector is a highly polished and steep parabola tightly focusing the beam to produce an excellent hot spot with an abundance of peripheral lighting.

hot spot with an abundance of peripheral lighting. Figure 4. Hot spot and peripheral lighting Copyright

Figure 4. Hot spot and peripheral lighting

Copyright 2011, Sal Palma, d.b.a. Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved.

FOG HORN a Twobirds Flying Publication Exactly when the L.E.D. upgrade kits will become available

FOG HORN a Twobirds Flying Publication

Exactly when the L.E.D. upgrade kits will become available is yet to be determined. M.S.R.P. was rumored to be at or around the $60 price point, but I wouldn’t hold my breath. Insight is well aware that the upgrade kit will cut into their X2 L.E.D. and X2L L.E.D. sales, so we may not see an upgrade kit until the L.E.D. models have matured a bit more. This would be a downright shame, and a game I hope Insight will not play; there is a real need and subsequent demand for L.E.D. upgrade kits for both the X2 / X2L and M6 /M6X families. This is Insight’s chance to say to its customers, “we won’t burn your investment.” I can speculate to my heart’s content but it’s too soon to say, with any degree of certainty, what path they’ll take. My money is on Insight. They are a class act; miracles have been known to happen, especially after a SHOT Show. One can only hope!

to happen, especially after a SHOT Show. One can only hope! -SP Copyright 2011, Sal Palma,

-SP

Copyright 2011, Sal Palma, d.b.a. Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved.