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THE

TENJIN SHINYŌ RYŪ


JŪJUTSU GOKUI KYŌJU ZUKAI

The Illustrated Instruction of the Secrets of Jujutsu


in the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods

by Yoshida Chiharu and Iso Mataemon (1893)

Corrected Version (2019)


天神眞楊流柔術極意敎授圖解
TENJIN SHINYŌ RYŪ
JŪJUTSU GOKUI KYŌJU ZUKAI
The Illustrated Instruction Of The Secrets Of Jujutsu
In The School Of The Willow Tree Of The High Gods
by Yoshida Chiharu and Iso Mataemon (1893)

Published Privately By
Logan (JT) Weymouth Shihan (6D)
Austin, MN

As An Amateur Translation
For The Interests Of
THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF JUJUTSU

In Association With
Mr. Christian Flament
Dojo-Shu of the Jikan Dojo
Kishin Juku Aikijutsu Society, Europe

AND ALSO

In Association With
Mr. Stephane Belbeze
of the
Judo Club Beaugency
Beaugency, France

DECEMBER
2018
TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE:

Blue font color was used to make further distinction between the actual body of the text and this
Translator's Preface (as well as any Translator Notes that I place in the body of a translated text.)
Quite frequently I do not write a Translator's Preface (since it seems unnecessary) but I thought it
advisable in this case and some few others besides.

It was necessary to include a Translator's Preface due to the facts of this particular text, in that it is a
book made at the Turn-of-the-Century but the Japanese language found in the text is entirely
inconsistent with 19th and early 20th Century Japanese. This is most certainly not by mistake. It is
rather poor judgment to assume that such an author (of any subject at all) has merely written in an
archaic form of the language, trying to look consistent with the older scrolls and texts of their school
or artifice. The Japanese never really do that (and the mistakes in language that they would certainly
make would also be rather apparent indeed.). It's a completely different phenomenon what we are
observing in the rather archaic language of the text. Prior to a date of 1945, the Japanese themselves do
not usually speak their own mind, even when writing a book they alone authored. Back then, they
simply do not like to change the words of their ancestors. This entire text is quite often to be thought
of as merely a reference set of quotations and adaptive quotations and adaptations made off of these.
Straight out of the scrolls and texts of the parent schools of the Tenjin shinyō ryū, as well as relevant
adaptation of the Sino-Japanese classics, wherever that might occur in the body of the text. We must
remember the tenets of Shintoism in that some of the Gods are the ancestors of the modern Japanese.
In some senses, to alter or add to the words of the ancestors is to risk adding to and altering the very
word of the Gods themselves. This is somewhat unthinkable.

This among other reasons is why the set of four or five books that this text belongs to are listed as
actual documents of the school (the core of the text comes from the scrolls and books of the parent
schools of the Tenjin shinyō ryū itself.) It is the school. I thought it best to speak a piece about the
subject, since anyone with minimal familiarity can recognize that the language in this text looks
obviously far too archaic give the time period in which the book was written. A simple explanation to
an obvious dilemma.

Logan (JT) Weymouth


Rokudan Shihan, AFJ
May 27th, 2018
序章

天 神
眞楊流

柔術極意敎習圖解序
凡ソ社會ノ進歩ハソノ百般ノ事物相湊合シテ進歩スルニ外ナラズ而シテ事物ノ
進歩ハ各々其經驗研究ノ結果タリ故ニ苟モ世ヲ益シ人ヲ利シ以テ社會ヲ稗補ス
ルモノアラバ永クソノ消滅セザヲンコトヲ務メザルベカヲズ我ガ邦柔術ノ如キ
モ亦是ナリ盖シソノ發達シタル既往三百年間我ガ邦一種ノ思想家ノ練磨研究セ
シ結果ニシテ世界ノ思想發達ノ歷史上亦一種ノ奇觀タリ今天神眞楊流ハ即チソ
ノ一大流泒ニシテ予モ往年第三世磯氏及ヒ福田氏ニ就キテソノ流義ヲ修メタル
コトアリ而メ其敎旨中ニハ自ラ玄奧ノ義アリ盖シ深遠ナル研究ノ結

Jojō Preface
Tenjin Shinyō Ryū
Jūjutsu Gokui Kyōshū Zukai-jo
The Preface of the Illustrated Secret Teachings of
the Jujutsu in the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods

Regarding the progress of society in general, at the Port harbours is where every kind of affair meets and
this is none other than progress itself in motion. Thereafter progress proceeds through the results of
research and experience in these affairs, and consequently not the least of which are those that benefit
society and are an advantage to the peoples. Society makes what appointees it will, who carry on these
lengthily affairs to their termination. These people often have no other duties, much like we ourselves in
our native Jujutsu and this is somewhat perhaps for the development such affairs. In the past three hundred
years, the practices of our own nation's philosophers have sewn seeds, the consequences of which had
caused now historical advancement in the philosophies of the world. Again the wonderful sight of such a
variety of things, and now comes the Tenjin shinyo ryu ("School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods"),
namely in that it is one of the greats among the various schools. And this being despite that Mr. Iso
[Mataemon] in his earlier years having been one of the less fortunate himself, and besides this also Mr.
Fukuda much the same, which is all reflected in the practices of the school's customs. Also the doctrines
held by them include such profound and honourable customs, which are perhaps the rather profound
results of having been honest with themselves about it.

Translator's Note: The title of the text in the Preface is given as “天神眞楊流柔術極意教習図解” whereas the older version of the
title is given as “天神眞楊流柔術極意教授図解”it is only a variation of the same.
果タルコトヲ信ゼリ今日予ガ講ズル所ノ講道舘柔道モソノ一部ハ實ニコノ奥義
ヲ應用シタルモノニシテコノ流ノ永ク世ニ傳ハリ廣ク人ノ學バンコトハ予ノ深
ク希望スル所ナリ吉田千春及磯又右衛門ノ二君亦コゝニ感ズルアリ頃日天神眞
楊流柔術極意教習図解ヲ著シテ序ヲ予ニ問ハル吉田君ハ久シクソノ教授ニ從事
セラレ磯君ハ先師ノ令孫タリコノ書ノ世ヲ益シ人ヲ利シソノ流義ヲシテ永ク世
ニ傳ハヲシメンコト予ノ深ク希望スル所ナリ是ニ於テ序ス
明治廿六年十一月下旬

講道舘師範嘉納治五郎識

These days now, even in the lectures given by the Kodokan Judo, there is this one section, and really it
is the subject of how to obtain and make practical usage of the Secrets (o(-ku)gi). A great deal of the
lengthiness and vastness of the school is this way as it is taught for those people whom are learning it,
being a little more than profound in it's aspirations. Yoshida Chiharu and Iso Mataemon having the
sense of being two masters of it, recently finished writing the Tenjin Shinyō Ryū Jūjutsu Gokui Kyōshū
Zukai ("the Illustrated Instruction of the Jujutsu in the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods")
and it's preface, in hopes of answering the questions about it. Concerning Master Yoshida, he has
taught and engaged in its practices for quite a length. As for Master Iso, he is the grandson of the
Former master, and has the benefit of the letters to this effect as would be of much advantage to the
peoples whom carry on these traditions at length. And so being of such profound aspirations, this
preface was finished in 26th year of the Meiji era (1868-1912 [1894?]), on the last day of November.

Kōdōkan Shihan Kanō Jigorō Shiki


The Fellow Acquaintance Jigoro Kano, Master Instructor of the Kodokan
夫レ柔術ハ自己ノ一身ヲ保護スルノミナラス一朝事ァルニ際シテ其功ヲ國家ニ
奏スル┌實ニ多シ故ニ今日爭攘ノ世ニアリテハ一日モ欠ク可カラザルナリ然ル
ニ我カ天神眞楊流ノ諸國ニ傳播スルモノヲ見ルニ往々流祖柳關齋遺停ノ法式ヲ
錯マリ其風ヲ乱ルモノ少ナカラス此武技隆盛ノ時ニ當リテ其傳ノ流弊此ノ如シ
今ニシテ矯正セザレハ或ハ國家保護ノ目的ヲ誤ルモ測ル可ラス予ヤ弱冠未タ其
技ニ達スルヲ得ス此ヲ以テ猶素志ヲ遂グル┌能ハス然ルニ會々吉田千春氏一書
ヲ著シ以テ其

Regarding this Jujutsu, it was meant to allow one to protect themselves and their interests should the
need to do so arise. It is a recorded merit that our country has it, and indeed there are many┐,
consequently there is a great deal of violent contest in the world, it ought not to but it is chipping
away at us day after day. Still, one sees that the Tenjin shinyo ryu is being taught in various countries,
and sometimes even according to the legitimate traditions of the school founder Ryūkansai Itei, even
though that is a bit of a turbulent wind indeed. These martial arts techniques (bugi) have at times
flourished, much as have the traditions of those schools of bad habit which are quick to attack. Now,
having corrected the flaws which one ought to do, yet sometimes there is some errors in the
objectives of those whom are custodial [of the school] amid the nations. One ought to measure things
carefully, and moreover those young people under the age of 20 seeking to obtain its techniques must
do so by such [careful] means. And further still, carry it out to its lengthily conclusion.┐ Sometimes
however, by merging into unity with this single book written by Mr. Yoshida Chiharu one can
generally correct the errors of the school of bad habits.

Translator's Note: The Introduction to the text is not evidenced in every form of the text. Making it more interesting
though, it is an obvious adaptive variation of the introductory statement off of several densho scrolls from various related
schools. I though it best to point that out?
流弊ヲ嘱正セ矯正セントシ之ヲ予ニ謀ル余大ニ其擧ヲ賛シ謭劣ヲ省ミス聊カ愚
意ヲ加ヘ合著トナシテ世ニ公ニス盖シ其意專ヲ其實ヲ知ヲシムルニアリ故ニ文
ノ重複ヲ嫌ハス又修飾ヲ加ヘス乞フ讀者行文ノ拙ナルヲ咎ムル┐ナカレ

明治廿六年十一月下旬

眞楊流五世孫

磯又右工門撰

When attempting any more than this, one runs the risk of discovering afterwards that one has agreed with
rather shallow sensibilities. And it would lead to increasing these in our humble opinions, and so even we
formed into joint authorship over matters involving informing the public, thinking that perhaps one knows
what the reality of what such specialised sentiments can cause. Therefore, it was quite disagreeable to
merely duplicate the written materials, and even more so to embellish upon them. I invite the readers to
point out the errors in [any of] our writings┐ but there shouldn't be any?

26th year of the Meiji era (1868-1912 [1894?]) last week of the month of November.
5th Generation grandson of the Shinyō ryū.

Signature of Iso Mataemon


凡ソ技術ク何タルヲ問ハス其妙ヲ極メント欲セハ其良師ヲ撰ヒ其敎ニ從ヒテ修
練スヘキハ論ヲ待タス然レトモ山村僻邑ニアルモノ其技ヲ學ハント欲スルモ良
師ニ乏シキニ苦シム是レ有志ノ徒ノ常ニ遺憾トスル所ナリ魁眞樓主人モ亦茲ニ
感アリ曾テ柔術劔棒圖解ヲ著ス而ルニ猶足ヲサル所アリ誤謬モ亦随テ多シ此ニ
於テ又磯君ト謀リ更ニ其不足ヲ補ヒ其誤謬ヲ正シ百二十四番ノ捕合手ノ摸形及
ヒ死者蘇生法等ニ至ルマテ審カニ圖解ヲ加ヘ以テ彼ノ山村僻邑良師ニ乏シキノ
徒ヲシテ一見其法ヲ得セシメント欲シ上梓シテ以テ世ニ公ニス有志ノ

Generally what questions there might be about the techniques and art really extends to the subjects of
how far the cleverness really goes and as to which written compilations by which good instructors are
to be studied when one is pursuing the practice oneself that would allow one to better grasp the
doctrines upon which it's founded. Certainly it is like being in a remote mountain village wishing that
one had access by which to study such techniques. But despite strong desire and despite good
instructors when suffering the likes of such poverty there is the regrettable fact that it's usually in vain
to sympathise with those whom suffer this. Even if charging ahead to the front of a waiting line to
greet the masters and owners, it's much the same. Again here was the sense of it earlier in time when
they authored the Jūjutsu Kenbō Zukai ("the Illustrated Arts of Sword and Staff in Jujutsu"). Further
still, in what steps were taken given the circumstances, the mistakes made [in the text] notwithstanding
that there were many like this that had to be tended to. What had already been planned out by Master
Iso and the others trying to fill in what gaps there were and having to question the errors in it, trying to
handle the copying of kata patterns numbering some 124 techniques of the Toriai section, and the likes
of Resuscitation of dying persons (shisha sosei-hō). The approach to it being on a trial basis and also
the addition of illustrations, one saw that the methodology was rather like having the advantage of
being good instructors in that remote mountain village and the futility of its poverty. Wishing for what
one could have but doesn't. There was a good deal of it done by wood block printing, ...
徒辛ニノ微衷ヲ採ラレンコトヲ

今も猶我學なる此業の

道の中端も得あそ知られぬ
明治廿六年十一月下旬

吉田千春題

...which is done pretty much with the sense of vanity in being difficult to convey the true sense of it.

So even now, one whom seeks to learn it does not know when they
have reached the middle point along the roadway that leads to these techniques.

26th year of the Meiji era (1868-1912 [1894?]) last week of the month of November

Address of Yoshida Chiharu


柔術極意教授図解目録
Jūjutsu Gokui Kyōju Zukai Mokuroku
Table of Contents of the Illustrated Instruction of Jujutsu

・ 第一 日本柔術之起源
Dai-ichi Nihon Jūjutsu No Kigen
Number One The Origins of Japanese Jujutsu

・ 第二 天神眞楊流之起源
Dai-ni Tenjin Shinyō Ryū No Kigen
Number Two Origins of the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods

・ 第三 眞楊流元祖之畧傳
Dai-san Shinyō Ryū Genso No Ryakuden
Number Three Biography of the Founder of the School of the True Willow

・ 第四 藝術進達ニ必要ナル心法
Dai-yon Geijutsu Shintatsu Ni Hitsuyō Naru Shinpō
Number Four The Advancement of the Arts Through the Indispensable Mental Arts

・ 第五 柔術之大意
Dai-go Jūjutsu No Tai-i
Number Five A Summary of Jujutsu

・ 第六 形之意味幷ニ力之論
Dai-roku Kata No Imi Narabini Chikara No Ron
Number Six The Meaning of Kata Patterns in the Theories about Strength

・ 第七 眞之位之說
Dai-shichi Shin No Kurai No Setsu
Number Seven Theories about the True Positions

・ 第八 弱能ク强ニ勝ツノ理
Dai-hachi Yowai Yoku Tsuyoi Ni Katsu No Ri
Number Eight The Principle of the Victory of the Weaker over the Stronger

・ 第九 形ヲ敎フルノ要
Dai-kyu Kata Wo Oshifuru No Kaname
Number Nine The Vital Points of the Teachings About Kata Patterns
・ 第十 氣ト体トノ說
Dai-Jū (I)Ki To Karada Tono Setsu
Number Ten The Theories about Spirit and the Body

・ 第十一 志ト氣ト力トノ區別
Dai-Jūichi Kokorozashi To (I)Ki To Chikara Tono Kubetsu
Number Eleven The Differences between the Will, Spirit and Power

・ 第十二 氣ヲ滿ル事
Dai-Jūni Ki Wo Michiru (No) Koto
Number Twelve The Subject of Becoming Agitated or Over Excited

・ 第十三 位之意味
Dai-Jūsan Kurai No Imi
Number Thirteen The Meaning of Postures

・ 第十四 不動心ノ說
Dai-Jūyon Fūdōshin No Setsu
Number Fourteen the Theories of the Steadfast Heart

・ 第十五 無我無心之說 畢
Dai-Jūgo Muga Mushin No Setsu
Number Fifteen the Theories of Being Undistracted and Having No Self-Concern

・ 身体ノ備へ樣ノ事
Karada No Sona(h)e Yōno Koto
The Subject of How to Make Physical Preparation

・ 手解 拾二手
Te-Hodoki Jūnite
Elementary Introductions ("Hand Releases") Twelve Techniques

・ 初段居捕拾手 立合拾手
Shodan Idori Jūtte Tachiai Jūtte
The Initial Level Seated Techniques Ten Techniques Standing Techniques Ten Techniques

・ 中段居捕拾四手 立合拾四手
Chūdan Idori Jūyon-te Tachiai Jūyon-te
The Middle Level Seated Techniques Fourteen Techniques Standing Techniques Fourteen Techniques

・ 投捨 二十手
Nagezute Nijū-te
Sacrifice Throws Twelve Techniques
・ 試合口之事 三手
Shiai-guchi No Koto San-te
The Commencement of a Bout Three Techniques

・ 別レ崩シ之事 三手
Wakare Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Splitting and Breaking Balance Three Techniques

・ 橫車崩之事 三手
Yoko Guruma Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Breaking with a Side Wheel Three Techniques

・ 突込崩之事 三手
Tsukikomi Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Breaking an Incoming Sword Thrust Three Techniques

・ 眞之位崩之事 三手
Shin No Kurai Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Breaking (by) True Postures Three Techniques

・ 居別崩之事 三手
Ibetsu Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Breaking and Dividing Three Techniques

・ 袖車崩之事 三手
Sode Guruma Kuzushi No Koto San-te
The Subject of Breaking by a Sleeve Wheel Three Techniques

・ 裸体捕之事 三手
Ratai Dori No Koto San-te
The Subject of Capture when Naked Three Techniques

・ 極意上段立合十手 居捕十手
Gokui Jōdan Tachiai Jūtte Idori Jūtte
The Upper Level Secrets of Standing Captures Ten Techniques Seated Captures Ten Techniques
天 神
眞楊流

柔術極意教授圖解觧
吉田千春
五世 合著
磯又右衛門

第一 日本柔術之起源
抑モ柔術なる者ハ神代ヨリ己ニ其萠芽アリテ鹿島香取ノ兩神東夷ヲ征代シタマ
イシ時柔術ノ意味ヲ以テ敵ヲ搦メ取リシト云然レトモ此頃ヨリ北修執權ノ時代
迄ハ一流ヲ立テ柔術ト稱フル事モナカリシ樣ニ見ユ其後戰塲ニテ組打ヲ爲ス節
弱力ノ者强力ノ者ヲ容易ク組伏テ勝利ヲ得タル際ノ形狀ナドヲ集メテ基本トナ
シ諸先生ノ追々ニ工夫ヲ加遂ニ柔術ノ諸流ヲ起シタル者ノ如シ尤モ往古ハ總
テ流名無キニ依テ考フレバ何藝ニヨラズ武術流儀ノ創始ハ皆斯ノ如キ者ナラン
ト覺フ近頃陳元賓ヲ柔術ノ元祖ナリトドゝ云者ハ大

七十

Tenjin
Shinyō Ryū
Jūjutsu Gokui Kyōju Zukai

The Illustrated Instruction of Jujutsu


in the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods

Yoshida Chiharu

Gosei Kaccho Co-authored by Fifth Generation Practitioner

Iso Mataemon

Dai'ichi Nihon Jūjutsu No Kigen


Item One The Origins of Japanese Jujutsu
Most originally the Jujutsu used by practitioners came from the Age of the Gods, and that is where and
when it had sprung up. Both the Gods of Kashima and Katori bound them [with divine obligations]
during the rebellious generations of the Warriors of Eastern Japan. At that time, they say that the
meaning of Jujutsu was to apprehend and bind an enemy with. And certainly this was the case even up
to more modern times, up through the period of the Northern Regent(s) to the Shogunate, but a single
school of Jujutsu had prevailed, by name and reputation. And in light of this as well, there was later
grappling (kumi-uchi) made on the battlefields. The person of greater strength then would easily
grapple with and subdue the person of lesser strength when taking victory over them. And the
collections of Kata patterns surely reflected this circumstance at the time. There was however some
lack of Kihon Basics, which were gradually added over some length of time by various Sensei
teachers, which eventually arose as the ever increasing number of various Ryūha schools, much as [the
numbers of] it's practitioners [had increased]. Naturally, in ancient times, the various ryuha schools
lacked names, depending upon how well thought of that they were. Whichever artifices did and did not
make their way into the founding of the School customs of the Bujutsu martial arts, much as with
everything else here, was according to what was and was not carried on by the practitioners, as one
must remember about it. More recently, the founders of Jujutsu tended to be foreign visitors to the
country, for instance. But sometimes there are some...

17

Translator's Note: The text entry, and others like it in the book, are an obvious adaptation of the passages of remarks and commentaries
found in various Densho scrolls, in this particular case: more the Introductory statements. Even in the Translation of the Prefaces, the
author(s) commented on this adaptive quotation as a practice saying: “Therefore, it was quite disagreeable to merely duplicate the written
materials, and even more so to embellish upon them.” We must understand these statements, then, as being adaptive quotations and
paraphrasing from the (expanded) listings of the Parent Schools of the Tenjin shinyō ryū. Namely about four to six forms of the Yōshin
ryū (some called instead Yūshin ryū whereas others were Yuishin ryū, for example. All being grouped under the singular term “Yōshin
ryū”, some were Akiyama type Yōshin ryūwhereas others were not.) The Kitō ryū and the Shin No Shintō ryū. The original historical
statements being adapted and paraphrased in this text all stem from a date of writing about 1550-1650 c.e. more or less.
ADDENDUM: Someone recently asked me if the style formatting (specifically, the use of katagana and older kanji) would be
considered more original for the Historical original scroll passages that most of this book seems to have come from. YES, most certainly
so. Specimen examples on record in the Japanese libraries and the Museum pieces available “on line” look exactly like this. The usage of
Katagana and not Hiragana and also specific older style of Classical kanji (a lot of the rare archaic variants used.) TO BE QUITE
TRUTHFUL WITH EVEYONE, until rather recently,one would not likely have been able to reproduce this text into Computer font the way
we have done here, to offer translation to any interested party. Fact is that, until rather recently, there was no computer font available for
over half of the Rare Archaic and the Rare Archaic Variants that one finds in this text!! It would not have been possible to fully
reproduce the text as it actually appears, due to this fact.
ナル誤リト云フヘシ

第二 天神眞楊流之起源

我ガ眞楊流ノ柔術ハ元ト楊心流ト眞之神道流トヲ合幷セシ者ナリ故ニ眞楊流ノ
起源ヲ探ラントセバ先ジ右二流ノ起源ヲ說カザルベカラズ抑モ楊心流ノ元祖ハ
長崎表ニ秋山四郎兵衞由時ト云小兒醫師アリシが醫學修業ノ爲ニ漢土ニ渡リシ
際博轉ト云者ニ就テ柔術ノ三手ヲ習ヒ得タリ尤モ唐土ニテハ唯蹴ルト突クトノ
ミヲ專ラニシテ日本當時ノ柔道トハ頗ル異ナル者ナリ由時ハ右三手ノ柔術ヲ熟
練シテ尚活生法二拾八種ノ傳授ヲ得而シテ歸朝ノ后之ヲ敎授シタレトモ其手數
少ナキ故ニ學ビ習フ者皆半途ニシテ廢絶ス因テ由時之ヲ歎キ筑紫大宰府ノ天滿
宮ニ百日ノ間祈願シテ手數ヲ工夫シ之ヲ三百三手ト成ス亦神廟ノ前ニ柳樹在リ
テ大雪ノ際ニモ其枝ニ雪ノ積ラザルヲ見テ感悟シ遂ニ楊心流ト號ス亦眞ノ神道
流ハ大坂御

八十

..big mistakes in what the practitioners say about this subject.

Daini Tenjin Shinyō Ryū No Kigen


Item Two The Origins of the School of the Willow Tree of the High Gods

About me and the Jujutsu of the Shinyō Ryū ("School of the True Willow"), it was my foundation and
also as a practitioner I combined the Yōshin Ryū ("School of the Willow Heart") and the Shin No
Shintō Ryū("School of the True Footpath of the Gods"). Consequently, I had also previously researched
the origins of the Shinyō Ryū ("School of the True Willow"), but it would not really be included when
explaining the previously mentioned two schools. And so, to begin with, about the founders of the
Yōshin Ryū ("School of the Willow Heart"), it was recorded on what causes that Akiyama Shirobee had
resided in Nagasaki (city), and that he was a Pediatrician and general practitioner of the Medical arts
which had come across from China and which had brought in its wake the establishment of doctorates,
as had been told by it's practitioners. It had produced three techniques of Jujutsu that were being
learned and acquired, although Tang Dynasty China had made similar thrusts to which people devoted
themselves, despite its own selfishness. At that time Judo very much came into vogue, differenced
among it's practitioners across all Japan. The causes for this at the time was the proficiency afforded by
the previously mentioned three techniques. And further still they had also been acquiring the 28 types
of the Kassei-hō Resuscitation methods, having returned to Japan and receiving direct instruction,
surely it was no small bother. And those whom had been learning and practicing it were sometimes
required by circumstance to desist from continuing. This was met with some grief indeed, and the
Dazaifu governmental offices at Tsukushi [(provinces of Chikuzen and Chikugo in northern Kyushu)] made
supplications at the Tenmangu shrine for some 100 days which turned out to be quite a cunning device
in all this bother as it had caused the establishment of some 303 techniques. And also before the very
Shrine of the Deity itself there came the occasion of snow on the branches of a willow tree. Despite the
severity of the snow storm and the volume of snow on the branch, it never broke. With a sense of
having gained an enlightenment from this, finally in the end [he founded] the Yōshin Ryū ("School of
the Willow Heart") and that was its chosen ensign. Again as they say, regarding the Shin No Shintō Ryū
("School of the True Footpath of the Gods") Mr. Oshiro...

18

Translator's Note: The text entry on this page is parallel to the Tenjin Shinyō Ryū Tōryū Tai-Iroku (consult the abridgment we
translated) at Page Two, similarly recounting the history of the school and it's parent the Yōshin Ryū. Examining the two texts reveals that
they are not identical at all (quite different in some places). They share commonality of language and characters (enough to call them a
loose adaptation of each other, and most likely an adaptation of an earlier Yōshin Ryū textual statement.) It could be just a little confusing
when comparing the translation of the two different versions of these statements, since one wants them to be rather identical... but they
aren't. Quick review of any given line of the two text statements show that, really, they only share the same kanji constructs and etc.
There do not seem to be any identical lines of text.
城同心山本民左衞門ト云人元祖ナリ最モ元來楊心流ヨリ工夫シテ分別シタル流
儀ナル故ニ手形手數ノ名稱ナドモ同樣ナル事多ク在テ三百三手ノ内ヨリ擇ビ拔
テ初段中段上段ト級格テ定メ其手數六十八手トナス是則チ眞之神道流ノ起源ナ
リ而シテ我ガ夭神眞楊ハ右ノ二流ヲ合幷シタル者ニシテ柳關齋先生ハ則チ其流
祖ナリトス

第三 眞楊流元祖ノ畧傳

柳關齋源正足先生ハ元來勢州松坂ノ産ニシテ紀州家ノ藩士ナリ本名ハ岡山八郞
治云幼年ノ頃ヨリ武術ヲ好拾五オニシテ京都ニ出テ其當時楊心流柔術ノ名人ナ
ッ ッ
ル一 柳公ノ家臣一 柳織部先生ノ門ニ入テ六七年間修業セシ時ニ先生死去セシ
カバ又浪士ニシテ眞ノ神道流柔術ノ逹人本間丈右衞門先生ノ門ニ入リ晝夜心骨
ヲ碎キテ修業セシニ六年ニ過キズシテ其奧儀ヲ極メ諸國ヲ遍歷シテ各藩ノ名家
先生方ト試合シタレトモ一度モ不覺ヲ取リタル事ナシ亦修業中

九十

...Dōshin Honma was at Osaka (city) along with [Sensei] Saemon as well. The founder and his men had
exercised quite a bit of discretion when taking from the cunning tactics of the Yōshin Ryū ("School of the Willow
Heart") as represented by the customs of the school itself. Consequently, they even went to the bother of using
the same names for the techniques and kata patterns in the drafting of [the school]. There had existed as many as
303 techniques including the inner techniques when choosing for and establishing the Shodan Initial Level,
Chūdan Middle level, Jōdan Upper level as well as for proceeding through the lower kyu ranks. Having
bothered to establish 68 techniques. These namely originated with the Shin No Shintō Ryū ("School of the True
Footpath of the Gods"). Also about me and the [school of] the True Willow Tree of the Calamitous Gods
(Y)ōshin shinyō) we as practitioners combined the two previously mentioned schools, namely it was Sensei
Ryūkansai who was the founder.

Daisan Shinyō Ryū Genso No Ryakuden


Item Three Biography of the Founder of the School of the True Willow

Regarding Sensei Ryūkansai Minamoto Masanari he was born in Seshū Matsuzaka into the household of feudal
retainers of Kishū. His real name during childhood was Okayama Hachiji, and by the time he was 15 years old
he had developed a preference for the Bujutsu martial arts. He had proceeded out of Kyoto (city) at the time
seeking the masters of the Yōshin Ryū, in particular a vassal Household of Ryūkō(?), having entered the gates of
a one Yanagi Oribe Sensei and practicing under him for the span of some 26 years until that Sensei had died.
Also, the Ronin masterless samurai whom had been involved in and become masters of the Jujutsu of the Shin
No Shintō Ryū were entering the gate of Sensei Honma Takeshi Sauemon day and night. For some six years they
practiced most excessively so much as to crush body and soul. In various countries where they traveled they had
carried it even to its O(-ku)gi secrets level as teachers of the distinguished families of each clan. Even where they
had made Shiai bouts they never once suffered the embarrassment of defeat. Again, all while in training, which...

19
Translator's Note: Some people will not care for this particular note, I apologise in advance! According to some Japanese sources, the
name (Sensei) Ryūkansai (Minamoto Masanari, or something quite similar to this) is, or is suspected of being, another name for Iso
Mataemon. Some of these sources claim that, originally, it was used in an attempt to create the illusion that Ryūkansai and Iso Mataemon
were two different people. Still other sources insist that Ryūkansai and Iso Matemon were definitely two different peoples associated with
one another (but that Ryūkansai might have been more than one person.) It is commonly claimed that they were never able to ascertain if
Ryūkansai was or was not an actual existing person at all (possibly manufactured as a questionable claim). Even today, on the internet on
finds both names grouped together as "Iso Mataemon Ryūkansai (Minamoto Masanari)" listed as "one person", the "founder of Tenjin
shinyō ryū" SEPERATE NOTE: The text makes an unusual reference to: “...For some six years they practiced most excessively so much
as to crush body and soul...” this odd-ball remark MUST be taken as it was meant: it was said somewhat disparagingly of a group of the
Rōnin masterless samurai whom had take up the practices of the Jujutsu of the Shin no shintō ryū. It was meant to illustrate that (as one
might fear would be the case) the Ronin in question over-did things. SEPERATE NOTE: The text statement makes use of the term 'Kyu'
for lower ranks. This demonstrates that (some form of) the 'kyu' was already in use by the time that the school was founded and indicates
that it might well have been part of the original structure of Yōshin ryū type Jujutsu schools (circa the 1700's). I remind you the date of
the writing is 1893, but the textual statements are adaptations of (the passages from the scrolls) text written anywhere from 1690-1790.
SEPERATE NOTE: The text makes reference to (either or both the Shinyō ryū and theYōshin ryū) under an alternate name (Y)ōshin shinyō
(夭神真楊) “...the [school of] the True Willow Tree of the Calamitous Gods...” This term is less common in Japanese and a little more
common in (older) Chinese. It looks (visually) very similar to the name Tenjin shinyō (天神真楊) , and the meaning of Tenjin (天神) and
(Y)ōshin (夭神) is really very close to identical, and is a reference to the highest ranked of the Gods. But the (Y)ōshin (夭神) form carries
more force, naturally. It's truest meaning would be comparable to “the Fate of fates” (highest ranking spirits who determine fate.)
SEPERATE NOTE: The text (and other writings of the Tenjin shinyō ryū ) sometimes uses the school name Shinyō ryū (真楊流) to refer to
any or all of the Yōshin ryū (any of several schools by that or very similar sounding name), the Shin no shintō ryū and the Tenjin shinyō
ryū itself (especially in early formative generations.) There is a (somewhat separate) school by this same name: Shinyō ryū (真 楊 流 ).
Some forms of it are, and some forms of it are not, implied as being relevant and involved. Similar (liberal) usage of the name Shinyō ryū
(真楊流) is observable in several other schools (whether derived from or not derived from the Tenjin shinyō ryū.) Sometimes one finds
the kanji and syllable pronunciation reversed as Yōshin ryū (楊真流) as any common Internet search will provide multiple examples in
Japanese, and in Chinese. Either way its written, whether as Shinyō ryū (真楊流) or as Yōshin ryū (楊真流), it seems to refer largely to
the same exact thing. It doesn't seem to be restricted in usage to the Akiyama type Yōshin ryū, but to a variety of schools of some order of
Yōshin ryū typing in general.But not so much of Takagi school forms of the Yōshin ryū. One finds idioms like: Yōshin-mon (楊真文) or the
other version Shinyō-mon (真楊文), the term is rather an old one, it is used to refer to any number of fields of study (especially the old
Asiatic type medical fields, and sometimes Shinto style traditions in general). Roughly it translates as “the Studies of the True Willow
Tree” (it's technically about the same thing as the name of a College.) In fact, in old Sino-Japanese.... it's one way of saying “Sino-
Japanese Studies”. Believe it or not, it did have an equivalent of nearly the same name (something about willow trees or the boughs of a
willow tree) in most European language and tradition (it also shows up in an earlier form in some quotes from the Christian New
Testament and is somewhat representative of an old Israeli-Jewish version (including the Talmud) of the “Doctrines of the Willow Tree”).
By the way, that's a good alternate way of translating Yōshin-mon (楊真文) , “Doctrines of the Willow Tree”.
故在テ江州草津ニ兩三年足ヲ止メ柔術ヲ指南セシ時人ノ爲メニ僅ニ門弟西村氏ト
兩人ニテ百余人ノ惡者ヲ相手トシ多年修練ノ秘術ヲ以テ之ヲ追散シ人命ヲ救ヒシ
└在リ此時始メテ當身ノ事ニ附テ大ニ悟リシ處在り尤モ戰塲ニテハ組打ヲ専一ト
シ亦敵ニ依テ當身ヲ以テ修業スル事ハアラザリシニ柳關齋先生ハ人命ヲ救ハンガ
爲メニ處々ニテ眞劒ノ勝負ヲ成シ遂ニ眞ノ當ヲ以テ修業セザレバ勝利ヲ得ル能ハ
ザルヲ悟リ是ヨリ更ニ眞ノ當受ル事ヲ工夫シ專ラ當身ノ修業ニ心力ヲ用ヰラレテ彼
ノ柔能ク剛ヲ制スルノ意ニ違フ處モ多年心ヲ碎キテ終ニ其眞意ヲ得テ柔術ノ奧妙
ヲ極メ乃チ楊心流ト眞ノ神道流トヲ合一シテ別ニ一泒ヲ立テ手數百二拾四手ト定
メ天神眞楊流ト号シ諸國ヲ巡歷修業ノ后東都ニ出柔道ヲ師範ス然ルニ故在テ一度
栗山又右工門ト云后亦磯氏ニ由緒在テ其家ヲ繼

二十

...consequently was in Kusatsu at Gōshū for about two or three years. Having taken a pause from the
instruction in Jujutsu at times, one of the men whom had been made a student, Mr. Nishimura and two
others with him, had taken a hundred others [as training partners] and had put in several [more] years
of practice training using the Hijutsu secret arts of [pretending that] the opponent [in the kata drills] is
really a ruffian [with whom one is faced] that one is driving off as a means of defending one's own life
and interests. └When at the time this exists, right from the beginning in the subject of Atemi body
attacks, largely one clings to the understanding that it has come to exist as a circumstance of
condition. Although, what tussles occur on a battlefield are rather exclusive to it. And also it depends
on what enemy and what Atemi body attacks one has made practice for, and yes well, beyond that
there isn't much. Sensei Ryūkansai held it as being an act of solace for one's own life at points along
the course of such episodes being established against the victory and defeat of an actual threat. Finally
concluding in the true success (shin no tō wo motte) for which one has been training and so the victory
taken, of which otherwise one understands that one would not be able to enjoy. Furthermore, from this
act of truly fending off (shin no tō-ukeru → ma no ate-ukeru) the thing and entirely by cunning tactics in
the practices of the Atemi Body attacks. Having made use of mental power and strength having
controlled strength by weakness in accordance with the sentiments that say willow wood is weaker but
is used to bind other woods. It makes a difference in the circumstances of the course of many years of
heart crushing which in the end one has had to acquire the truer sentiments of. In carrying out the
secrets of Jujutsu (jūjutsu no ōmyō), namely in that we have joined as a single standing branch both
the Yōshin ryū and the Shin no shintō ryū, having bothered to form a total of 124 techniques and so
having established it gave it the name Tenjin shinyō ryū. This after having toured several other
countries and also having practiced with the master instructors of Judo in the Eastern Capital [Tokyo].
Still there is what gets said upon occasion about Kuriyama Mataemon and how only afterwards did
Mr. Iso's lineage come into existence as a successful practice, ...

20
Translator's Note: The text passage makes use of the idiom shin no tō ( 眞 の 當 ) in various adaptations (for example, some of them would really be more
appropriately pronounced as ma no ate(-ru/-ri) instead). It is a known “word game” in Japanese language that helps to identify the original source of the statements
as having come from the textual traditions of Shin no shintō ryū. As we said in earlier text notes, most of the passages of this book come from the textual statements
and descriptions found on the scrolls and other legitimate literary works of the Parent schools of the Tenjin shinyō ryū. In this case, and wherever else throughout
the text where one encounters these references to the idiomatic usage of shin no tō (眞の當) , then we know that the original source of the remarks was the Shin no
shintō ryū. That school uses this construct with some frequency in a sort of word game, a pun of sorts on the school name Shin no shintō ryū.

ギ幕府ノ臣トナリ磯又右衞門柳關齋源正足ト稱シ名譽テ天下ニ轟シ諸國ノ藩十
門下ニ集ル者五千余人ノ多キニ及べリ是則チ我ガ天神眞楊流ノ元祖也

第四 藝術進達ニ必要ナル心法

凡ソ武藝ハ何藝ニヨヲズ其奧儀ヲ極メント思ハゞ先ヅ良師ヲ撰テ其門ニ入藝術
ノ進達スルニ隨ヒ内ニハ勇氣ヲ充ツルモ敢テ外面ニ顯ハサズ他事ニ氣テ止メ心
ヲ觸ル事ナク唯其師ノ指敎ニ隨テ修業ノ年月ヲ重子古人ノ奧儀ヲ探ル事ヲ知ラ
バハ則チ上手ノ部類ニ入ルヲ得べシ然ルニ此ニ藝道進達ヲ妨グル三毒者有リ即
チ酒色財ナリ若シ此ノ三毒物ヲ愼マズンバ假令藝道上逹スル共色情ノ爲メニ心
志ヲ奪ハレ金錢ノ爲メニ節儀ヲ誤リ或ハ大酒ニ酖リテ本心ヲ失ヒ前後モ知ラズ
醉伏シテ不意ノ危難ニ陷リ或ハ高慢ノ心ヲ生ジテ諸人ヲ脚下ニ見ナシ彼等ハ何
程ノ事ヲ仕出サンヤナドト侮リ輕シ

二十一

being retainers of the Bakufu shogunate. And so he took the name Iso Mataemon Ryūkansai Minamoto
no Masanari which then went roaring all across the country and several other countries besides. He
gained no less than those whom became practitioners in 10 of the feudal domains, numbering as many
as 5,000 people. And so with all of this happening I became the Founder of the Tenjin shinyō ryū.

Daiyon Geijutsu Shintatsu Ni Hitsuyō Naru Shinpō


Item Four The Advancement of the Arts Through the Indispensable Mental Arts

Generally in regard to the arts, it's all according to which of the arts and the extent of its O(-ku)gi
secrets level as would be given consideration beforehand, and also one would consult the compilations
of the better instructors as one enters the gates to make progression through the artifices. Observing
their contents from within, one grows bolder about it and learns to deliberately apply it in facets
outside the artifice itself. Allowing one to put a stop to what [an opponent] has in mind over several
different kinds of affairs. Nevertheless, depending upon the instruction of the art's instructors, and what
length of months and years one must fumble around to amass the O(-ku)gi secrets, as namely one ought
to enter and acquire the classifications of its more advanced techniques. Still, about this, there are some
hindrances when progressing through and making the accomplishment in the arts, as there are what of
the three kleshas (desire, ill will and ignorance) that a practitioner might have. Namely the want for
wine, women and wealth. And if one supposes such to be the case then there is a need to be discreet
about what of the three kleshas (desire, ill will and ignorance) may occur, meanwhile making progress
and achievements in the arts. Having some sense of using the same colours as [the kleshas] would
otherwise have snatched away and robbed you of the profit as you make those mistakes trying to hold
true to your own values and principles. Or possibly instead, one engages in heavy drinking and loses
sight of one's true motivations because of it, one rather knows the entire context and how one can be
sadly humbled by heavy drinking and how unexpectedly one can fall into peril by it. Or otherwise,
perhaps arrogance has arisen in the heart, one cannot help but seeing various people as if they are lowly
and bowed at your feet. And regarding those people, how far did this go? To what extent were they
scorned and belittled by you?

21

Translator's Note: The text passages here do not have the markers indicative of origin from the textual traditions of the Shin no shintō
ryū, but instead we suspect them to have derived from the original Yōshin ryū textual traditions, from the look of it. We notice that they
made direct usage of the Buddhist terminology “three kleshas” (三毒) whereas there were certainly other ways it could have been worded
to express much the same thing. This clue and a few others besides make us think that it smacks of the Yōshin-mon (楊真文) , “Doctrines
of the Willow Tree”. However, especially at and after Line 10, to us some of the language resembles the language used of the Kitō ryū
instead (such as would generally have fit here rather well.) So we identified much of the text passages as originally coming from the
Yōshin ryū whereas some appears to have come directly from the Yōshin-mon sections of that school. The rest of it seems to have likely
come from the Kitō ryū ?
メ油斷シテ婦女童見ノ如キ手弱キ者ニ謀ラレテ一生ノ不覺ラ取リ後世迄汚名ヲ
殘ス樣ノ事在レバ假令藝道ハ頗ル上逹スルモ眞ノ名人上手トハ云ヒ難シ故ニ眞
ノ名人手利ノ地位ニ至ヲント思ハバ能ク此ノ三毒ヲ戒メ愼デ修業スベキ事ナリ

第五 柔術之大意

柔術ノ大意ト云ハ身ニ全ク武具ヲ着ケズ唯今出生シタル赤裸ノ意味ヲ考究シテ
能ク其精理ニ逹スル事肝要ナリ其上ニテ武具テ着スレバ即チ内外能ク合体シテ
心ハ身ヲ支配シ身ハ武具ヲ支配シテ武具ノ爲ニ身体ヲ支配セラル、ノ戞ナン然
ル時ハ戰塲ニ臨ミ紅打ヲ爲スニモ能ク身体自由ノ働キヲ爲スヲ得べン凡ソ甲冑
ヲ着スレバ起キ伏シノ進退自由ナラザル者ナレバ心ノ用ヒ方ヲ修行シテ心ヲ一
身ノ主君ト定メ手足ヲ以テ其臣僕ト見爲シ能ク一心ト手足トヲ和合セシメテ後
武具ヲ着用シ身体ノ働キヲ自由ニ爲スヲ必要ト

二十二

... Such as when so mistreating women and children. The idea is not to be the person who has the
weaker technique, and so cause a failure in your own life, having been captured and the stigma of what
comes after. The affairs of what will have come to exist and meanwhile very much so while trying to
make progress through the arts, as they say that the advanced techniques of the true masters are rather
difficult. Consequently giving consideration of it would be to approach acquiring the techniques of and
becoming a true master yourself. Frequently one must guard against the three Kleshas even when one
is training.

Daigo Jūjutsu No Tai-i


Item Five A Summary of Jujutsu

Regarding what is to be said of the summary of Jujutsu, when one is armed and wearing full armor that
covers the entire body, upon closer examination it is with some sense of being stripped completely
naked. Quite frequently that is the conclusion of the spirit and principle [of relying upon armor]. This
is a vital point. Yet beyond it, one ought to have worn armor. In that namely the interior and exterior of
the armor [and one's body within it] quite frequently have a certain unison about them. The mind
controls the body, the body controls the arms and armor, making the weapon and armor a single part of
the body itself when so controlled. As one would strike agilely, during those sorts of times when being
confronted on the battlefield, so as to have drawn blood, quite frequently the body can move rather
freely to some advantage. Generally though [when wearing armor] one cannot readily go through the
movements and doings of one's daily life when rising and bedding down at night, as a person must be
able to do. If one uses one's head, then one can find ways to use and practice it. The mind is the
singular master of the body itself, and so the [movements of] the hands and feet are decided by it.
Being a servant, that is how it is viewed. Quite commonly there is a certain strict harmony between the
singular mind and the limbs of the body, beyond that the movements that the body uses when in armor
are likewise rather freely made, and that is a vital point.

22

Translator's Note: The text entry on the opening line of the Jujutsu No Tai-i statement says: mi ni mattaku bugu wo tsukesu (身に全く
武具を着けす) or by way of translation: “...when one is armed and wearing full armor that covers the entire body...”, this is a known
statement famous of the Tenjin shinyō ryū that most frequently gets (grotesquely) mistranslated. The known mistranslation reads
something quite like this: “...The body is equipped with it's own weapons and armor, (this is true even when completely naked)...” THAT
is a grotesque and common mistranslation that one encounters sometimes. There is no mistake here in my translation, as a few lines later
there is another form of the word 'armor', kacchū (甲冑) “helm and armor” occurring in the construct kacchū wo tsukesureba (甲冑を着
すれ は) “one should have worn armor”. I have no idea how the mistranslation occurred? I don't know why it became common? One
finds similar statements (from any number of the ryūha) that are quite similar and about 40% of the time, or greater, one encounters the
same kind of mistranslation. Such mistranslations are ridiculous and utterly change the meaning of the statement, to what was NOT said
by the Japanese masters and their schools. Here, the statement meant that one whom relies too heavily upon armor might as well be
naked, since they cannot defend themselves without it. Even the hand weapons one might use, and the movements used when wielding
them, would be a disadvantage when not wearing armor. So one must know how to move and defend oneself both with and without
wearing armor, was what it was meant to say. The source of the passages here is shared in common, in some form, in the textual
traditions of all three schools: Yōshin ryū, Kitō ryū and the Shin no shintō ryū.
ス故ニ柔術ハ戰塲ニ於テモ最モ要用ノ業ナリトス然ルヲ世人此ノ理ヲ知ラズシ
テ高貴ノ人抔ノ稽古スベキ者ト思ハズ唯亂心酒狂ノ輩ニ出遇タル際ノミ用ベキ
樣ニ心得ルハ大ヒナル誤ナリト云ベシ

第六 形之意味幷ニ力之論

凡ソ柔道ノ形ノ稽古ノ意味ハ活物ナルヤ又死物ナルヤ茲ニ些カ疑シキ處在が如
シ然レ共柔道ノ稽古ノ形ハ死物ニモ非ズ亦活物ナリトモ云ヒ難シ何トナレバ先
ヅ稽古ニ臨デ我ガ相手ハ必ズ敵ナリト思ヒ能ク位ヲ取テ而シテ前心通心殘心ノ
要法ヲ守リ(前心トハ最初懸聲ヲ發シテヨリ形ノ擧動ニ取係ラザル間ノ心得ヲ云
ヒ通心トハ形ノ擧動中ノ心ノ働キヲ云ヒ殘心トハ擧動終テ后我ガ眼ヲ轉ジテ敵
ノ眼目ニ意ヲ注グ際ノ心得ヲ云) 氣ヲ丹田ニ納メテ勇威ヲ外面ニ顯サズ敵ハ死
物ノ如クナリトモ全ク活物ナリト思ヒ精神ヲ疑ラシテ修行スル時ハ則チ活物ノ
稽古ドナリ又之ヲ死物ノ如クニ思

二十三

Consequently, about Jujutsu, there most certainly are techniques for the more important matters of the
battlefield. Yet even then, the peoples of the world also know this principle themselves, as one must
consider that there are practitioners of these practices even among the likes of the Nobility. However,
where one encounters drunkards or mad men, one makes use of the occasion as one understands to do
so, being that largely it's said that they will make certain mistakes, for instance.

Dairoku Kata No Imi Narabini Chikara No Ron


Item Six The Meaning of Kata Patterns in the Theories about Strength

Generally, the meaning of practicing the Judo Kata patterns is that there are things useful to a living
person and also things that are worthless. Here one is left with some doubts about which ones are and
are not. What is worthless is mistaken, but there is what gets said about when some such certain things
might prove useful instead. There is what would be somewhat difficult to handle, and so when
practicing beforehand for the confrontation, there is the consideration that inevitably there will be you
and there will be the enemy. Quite frequently there will be the position of who captures whom. And so
there is the crucial methods of fending for oneself by Zenshin Foreknowledge the recognition
beforehand, Tsūshin recognition of the course of events as it's occurring and Zanshin maintained
awareness immediately after (zenshin-tsūshin-zanshin no yōhō). (About Zenshin foreknowing, it allows
one to snare them from the beginning when one first gives outcry against them. They say that there is
the point when there are no lines of kata pattern capturing techniques in motion. About Tsūshin
recognition of the course of events as it's occurring, they say that there is the movement of what one
had in mind to accomplish within the context of the movements of the kata patterns. About Zanshin
maintained awareness immediately after, as the movements have concluded one sees what has changed
and what has collapsed in it all afterwards. They say that to some extent it betrays what the main
objectives of the enemy were. [SEE NOTES BELOW]) When the spirited gut instinct in all of it has settled, one
will know with what courage the leather helm and face plate straps were bound against the enemy, and
also what was worthless to have done at the time and certainly was thought to be of some use but now
is viewed with distrust. At times when practicing for it, namely one intends to practice what is worthy
and useful. But one thinks that some of this may prove futile. So as one conducts it, what practice there
was of worthless things will manifest,...

23

Translator's Note: The text entry here on the Meaning of Kata Patterns in the Theories about Strength and the subject of Zenshin-
tsūshin-zanshin no yōhō, is talking more about the Paradigm of the Jūjutsu Higakusho (we have offered a translation of that in the
Collection.) The Paradigm in question is described as “thousands appearing unexpectedly on either side of the crest ridges looking down
into the valley position that you occupy”. The Paradigm traditionally gets scaled down in size and number when used to represent a small
group attacker who is confronting you (perhaps as would be robbers?) “...They say that to some extent it betrays what the main objectives
of the enemy were...” Here is a good example of a statement that applies whether or not the Paradigm has gotten scaled down in size as
described. But first and foremost it was said of the grander form of the Paradigm. ABOUT THE MENTION OF KATA PATTERNS IN THIS
AND SIMILAR ENTRIES: Most of the places in this page entry where it spoke of kata patterns is parallel or identical to the idea expressed
about the Paradigm in question (by kata patterns, First it means the patterns of movement and action from both sides of the Paradigm,
yours and the insurgents. Only afterward does it actually refer to kata patterns in the sense of techniques. Even then: First Off, it means
what kata pattern fighting techniques will be seen both on your side of the Paradigm and the insurgent side. Only afterwards does it refer
to actual kata pattern fighting techniques that you would use yourself. In theJūjutsu Higakusho it had quite commonly illustrated this by
using the term “the thousands of kata patterns”, or similarly the “Kata patterns of the 10,000 things manifesting” (which means “the kata
patterns occurring and observable through-out all of the episode and everything that happened in it”) I should point out that the
documents of the Tenjin shinyō ryū we already translated and offered in the collection do contain a number of TSR adaptations of the
passages of the Jūjutsu Higakusho, and even contained a short abbreviation of the Jūjutsu Higakusho itself. There are some obvious
differences in the passages of the text, presumed to be representative of the preference-of-opinion within the TSR itself. They do not
agree with the original passages of the text, the TSR version is rather an independent adaptation. Presumably, the statements in this entry
have originated as an adaptation of the Kitō ryū passages, with what appears to be contribution from the Shin no shintō ryū.
テ行ヘバ死物ノ稽古ナリ譬へバ棒ヲ以テ打タル、時ニハ恐怖ノ心稍薄カルベキ
モ劒戟ヲ以テ斬ラントスル時ニハ直チニ性侖ヲ失フノ思ヒ在レバ恐怖ノ心モ轉
大ナルべシ故ニ常ニ白刄中ニ飛入ル心持ニテ修業スレバ上手名人ノ地位ニ至ル
事モ難キニ非ザルナリ亦稽古中ニ力ヲ强ク入ルヲ忌ム事ハ一向ニ力ラヲ嫌フニ
ハ非ズ元ヨり力在ル者ト力無キ者ト藝術ノ上達同位ナレバ力在ル者ニハ若ク可
カラズ然レドモ業未ダ熟セザルニ力ヲ用ユレバ身体手足ニ至ルマデ凝り固リテ
死ノ如クナり其流儀ノ業ヲ覺ユル事難キ者ナリ故ニ氣ノ扱ヒト力ノ扱ヒトノ差
別ヲ云へバ業ヲ行フニ輕ク柔ラカニシテスラリト滯リ無キヲ氣ノ扱ヒト云テ大
ヰニ好ンデ用ユト雖トモ一圖ニ心氣凝り固リテ擧動ノ重ク硬クナリタルヲ力ノ
扱ヒト云テ甚ダ之ヲ嫌フナリ柔道ニ志ス者ハ良ク考へ可キ者トス

第七 眞ノ位ノ說

二十四

...for example, to have worthlessly practiced staff strikes. At times, fear will offer to weaken your heart
and mind, such as when they offer to perform beheadings. Regarding such times, quite immediately one
begins to lose all hope of surviving. The heart having filled with fear largely turns this way, and
consequently it is usual that the naked blade will enter the picture and [heads] will go flying. The mental
attitude as one would practice for this, one approaches by the advanced techniques of the masters. But it is
not mistaken to think that even that subject is with some difficulty. Also there is the subject of how to
practice for avoiding the strength of a person who is much stronger than you are. In that one would hate
the direction that his strength offers to carry things in, yet from the beginning there is some error in how he
uses that strength and there are artifices for a person whom lacks strength themselves. One can improve to
an identical status as a person who does have strength, but one ought not to try to match them [strength for
strength]. While one is not yet able to make use of the techniques, the particular way that one would use
strength is approached through the entire body and it's limbs. The muscles stiffen and clump up much as if
they were becoming deadened. One needs remember that about the techniques of the school, it would be
rather difficult for a person to make use of them like that. Consequently, they say that one ought to
discriminate between trying to manage one's spirit and manage one's strength. When performing
techniques, one uses light supple movements to manage the conditions without hesitation or delay, that is
largely the preference of usage. Although there is certainly going to be some sense of muscle stiffening
that might impede some movements, through rigidity for example, they say it's caused by any use of force.
There should be a staggering dislike of this, as intended by the ways of Judo. Frequently the practitioner
should be able to discern it.

Dai-shichi Shin No Kurai No Setsu


Item Seven Theories about the True Positions

24

Translator's Note: The text entry right away helps further clarify that, indeed, it's in regard to the Paradigm of the Jūjutsu
Higakusho, since common ruffians do not offer 'beheadings' as capitol punishment, usually. Some would think it odd that the text
(better said: the traditions of theTenjin shinyō ryū) seem to suggest that one ought to practice for when an insurgent has come, occupied
and is now offering to perform beheadings (“public executions”)?? It is a hard thing to imagine for some people, that one ought to kneel
(in practice) and try to dodge the blade of a (wooden) sword, practicing for how one might escape such execution... suffice to say that
there is a lot more involved, to say the least. When the Paradigm is scaled down (for interpersonal defense), I guess one could say that
(one of) the attackers is offering to actually cut or stab you if you do not comply. Practicing this kind of scaled down version would
indeed be part of the plan.

我ガ眞楊流柔術試合ノ手形ハ眞之位ヨリ始ル所以ハ例バ草木ノ果實一粒ヲ蒔テ
萠芽ヲ發生シ長スルニ從ヒ根トナリ幹トナリ枝葉ト別ルゝモ其終ニハ亦花ヲ開
キ實ヲ結ビテ元ノ果實ニ返ルガ如キ意味ノ敎へニシテ此敎タルヤ獨リ之ノ試合
ノミニ限ルニ非ズ萬法皆之ニ由テ辨フべシ實ニ大始大尾ノ試合ナリ先ヅ敵ヲ見
ルニ其利腕並ニ持タル道具ニ心ヲ附べシ一体敵ノ眼目ニ心ヲ附ルハ基ヨリナレ
ドモ眼ニハ動モスレバ虛術ノ在ル者ナレバ之ノミニ依賴ス可カラズ敵動カザル
時ハ之ニ應ズルノ目當ナシ故ニ我ガ身体ヲ正シク守ルべシ亦敵ニ向フニモ必ズ
敵ヲ惡ミ思フべカラズ只我が全身ニ氣ヲ滿シム可シ但シ氣ヲ滿ルト云ニ口ヲ結
ビ額上ニ靑筋ヲ立テ顏色ヲ朱ノ如クニ成スヲ云ニ非ズ之ニテハ手足共硬クナリ
テ意味少シク遠フナリ我ガ肩ガイカラヌ樣全身柔ラカク爲シテ敵ノ變ニ應ズル
事第一ナリ敵テ惡ミ無二無三ニ挫ガントスレバ却テ敵ニ制セ

二十五

I took the the techniques and kata patterns of Shin no kurai True positions from the Shia(h)i fighting
levels of the Shinyō ryū ("School of the true willow”). About the way they are done, right from the
start it could be compared to sowing the seeds of grain, fruit trees or berry bushes. As they begin to
sprout and then grow lengthily as it sprouts roots and a trunk shaft. Then it sprouts leaves and
branches. Finally in its conclusion, it's flowers begin to bloom, and it will bear fruit again and again.
The teachings about its meaning is much like this, it is like this for even one person alone in the
Shia(h)i level. Like the law of the 10,000 things it is unlimited. One ought to be able to discern that
there is a reason in all of this. Really this a greater beginning and a greater ending in the Shia(h)i level.
Beforehand when one sees the opponent, as well as what he is holding in his dominant hand, the mind
generally clings to the thought of the weapon and also clings to the thought of the enemy's intentions.
That is certainly the foundation it begins on. The eye of a practitioner is likely to be looking for gaps
through which to use his artifice. In the face of this, it is not based upon what it should have been. The
enemy is unmoving at the time, one is answering to this despite that he has no true objectives.
Consequently, one would be most correctly defending oneself bodily, and even when confronted by an
enemy invariably one ought not to think about how much one hates the enemy. However one's would
have become quite agitated (ki wo mishimu → ki wo michiru) physically and when over-excited (ki wo
michiru) they say that one cannot speak properly [lit: ""the mouth becomes bound up"] and the muscles of the
upper forehead all stand up stiff. From the likes of this the face will turn red but they say it's not an
error made by you for this to occur since the likes of this is happening. But it means that the hands,
arms and legs will have stiffened and may feel somewhat disjointed from the body. One's shoulders
may feel as if tightly bound. One must make the body relaxed and supple (yawaraka 柔 ). When
responding to an opponent, that is the single most important thing and it's absolute, because it's easier
for the opponent to approach and wrench [the joints and limbs of your body]. The practitioner must
control the opponent [and not be controlled by him].

25

Translator's Note (SPECIAL ATTENTION): The text entry would seem to indicate that the original source of the text passages is {one or
more forms of] the Shinyō ryū. Some people may want to know this, since the next few pages (all of which are the continuation of the
sub-section itemShin no kurai no setsu here) has a few instances of usage of the idiom AIKI. The examples occur most commonly in
either a Simple or Compound Construct, some of which are Verbal Constructs. They will be duly noted and the construct discussed in the
blue translator's notes on that page. Since some people would find these occurrences of the idiom AIKI to be noteworthy, the seeming
identification of these text passages for the next several pages to originally come from Shinyō ryū could be as well?

SEPARATE NOTE (SPECIAL ATTENTION): The text entry contains usage of the Idiomatic Verbal Construct ki wo michiru (氣ヲ滿ル →
気を満る) and also an unusual rarer adaptation of the same idiom: ki wo mishimu (氣ヲ滿シム → 気を満しむ) . There is some slight
confusion about the meaning of this Verbal construct, in part due to the fact that it's meaning is sometimes dictated by context. The basic
meaning of ki wo michiru (気を満 る) is “to be Agitated; Over-excited” as can be deduced from the rest of the text passage after the
double occurrence of the Construct: it describes the effects of agitation and over-excitement on the body.
Straight from the text: waga zenshin ni ki wo mishimu-beshi tadashi ki wo michiru (...我が全身ニ氣ヲ滿シム可シ但シ氣ヲ滿
ル ...) “...one's would have become quite agitated physically and when over-excited...”, this doubled example includes a lesser
known, less common form of the ki wo michiru idiomatic verbal construct, it uses the older form of the verb 'michiru' in the form
of 'mishimu'... but the main form of the idiom occurs immediately afterwards, this is is called “doubling” or “paralleling” as
reinforcemnt. It's a commonLiterary Device
The confusion about the meaning and usage of this idiom seems to be caused by the fact that it has other (but related)
meanings which are derived by context and line content. When it has the other meanings, it can sometimes be rendered
as ki wo michiru(気を満る) “Bristling with spirit” or one could use the translation “Brimming with spirit”. One example
of this definition would be when a text reads: “Having seen the opponent's error, and seeing your own opportunity, then
your movements will be vigorous against him since you are brimming with (renewed) spirit...” even here, we see a
possible sub-inflection of the meaning. Really in a case like this ki wo michiru ( 気 を 満 る ) should be understood as
having the definition“to be Renewed of spirit; to have Renewed hope”. That helps one to understand that sub-inflectons
of it's definition do exist (technically, I think these are called Tertiary definitions, but some sources indicate that it should
be considered Secondary definitions. )
ラルゝ者ナリ故ニ能ク心氣ヲ愼メテ体ヲ正シク守リ敵ノ詐リ設ケシ虛ニ乘ラヌ
事肝要ナリ亦心ノ全ク滯リテ活動セザルハ居付共氣住共云テ甚ダ之ヲ忌ム或ハ
我ト敵ト一体一氣ニナルヲ合氣ト云テ之モ宜シカヲズ敵ノ變動ノ氣ニ付入ルヲ
合氣ノ先ト云フ我モ敵モ動カザル先キニ拳法ヲ行フヲ不意ノ先ト云フ彼我共ニ
適當ノ塲處へ行キテ而シテ勝負ヲ決スルハ常ナリ其一足前ヨリ業ヲ行フヲ業ノ
先ト云ナリ彼ノ身搆ヘヲナシ形樣ヲ膳フナドハ形チノ先ト云テ即チ氣住ナリ人
ヲ制スルニモ投ルニモ我ガ掌中ニ持タル石ヲ大地へ打込ガ如キ心持ニ成スベシ
總テ敵ニ向フニハ歩行ニモ止マルニモ全身柔ラカニシテ肩ヲイカラヌ樣ニ心氣
ヲ納ムレバ自カラ臍下充實スル者ナリ亦トウ〱ト懸聲ヲ發スルハ宜キガ其トウ
〱タル聲ヲ腹ノ内ニテ渭フ心ヲ持ベシ然レバ口ヲ開キ物ヲ云フテモ臍下ノ氣拔
ケヌナリ亦人ヲ搦メ捕へ或ハ投ルニモ良ク身体ヲ守リ先

二十六

Consequently, there is a definite sense of precaution when one is bodily defending oneself to be sure,
having made preparation against the lies of the enemy so as to not be caught off guard by them, this is a
crucial point. Also if the heart and mind all are hindered [as by fear or over concern], one cannot take
action. The conditions now settled [either way] and the resultant spirit [whatever it is] goes along with
[whatever things] had gotten said [through its course and at the time]. One ought very much to avoid this.
Or possibly, there will have come a stalling in it all that is sudden and uniform (ittai ikki ni naru wo
a(h)iki) between oneself and the opponent as if both of you were of one spirit and body forestalled. They
say that despite [what one would think] about this that it's not very good. They say that the opponent will
take advantage of the point of the stall out (ni tsuke-iru wo a(h)iki no saki) by changing his spirit and
intentions. When neither you nor the enemy can take action at that point, you should perform Kenpō fist
method at a time when it's not expected. Both Oneself and the opponent would have been moving towards
a more suitable grounds of circumstance, upon which to decide victory and defeat. That usually has one
single accompaniment and they say that it is the next technique that comes after the first technique. There
are suggested kata patterns for when he is lacking in his bodily posture (mi-kama(h)e), and they say that the
initial kata pattern is namely the one that determines the resultant spirit, even when controlling a man, even
when throwing him, just as one can be readily controlled oneself, much like a gem-stone to be plucked up
from the ground. That is the sense it will have occurred with, and in its conclusion when confronted by an
enemy, even when one was walking about on foot, and having come to a halt, the entire body is to be kept
flexible and supple (yawaraka 柔) one's shoulders not constricted, so that one ought to be able to carry out
one's own intentions and fully so according to one's own gut instincts. Being a practitioner also, what
sustaining outcries one will have given truly they come from the same gut reactions that have fixed your
attention. They say that one would tend to open the mouth against what is happening since one did not
become dispirited by it. And also when becoming entangled with people, sometimes even when throwing
them, commonly one defends oneself with the left hand [or, "passive capacities"] …

26
Translator's Note: The text entry here has two (2) occurrences of the idiom AIKI in it. Before I say anything about either, I would like
to remind you that they exist in a congruous and unbroken commentary about Shin no kurai and the concepts found in it. In order to
understand the real meanings one would have to keep them most strictly in context. Similarly the two occurrences of the word 'aiki'
appear within a Language Construct composed of integral elements and are not at all separate distinct occurrences of a word. That fact of
'context' can be equally, or more, important here. WORD DEFINITON(S): Since the text has some few more example specimen usages of the
word 'Aiki' in the pages, perhaps we'd better look at it's actual definition(s) (when as a word in a sentence). When encountering the word
'aiki' (in the old form of the language 'ahiki' instead), if it is occurring in a sentence, it should be first and foremost assumed to have a
definition based off of “to Forestall”, unless other elements in the passage indicate that “Stalling out” is more correct. Forestalling occurs
before a thing could take place. Stalling is when a thing was already in motion. This would be the more prominent of the Primary
Definitions of 'aiki'. Secondary and Tertiary definitions of the word 'aiki' have a meaning like “to Anticipate (the course of something)”,
“to Deter or Prevent”, “to Impede or Hinder”, “to Thwart” and sometimes even “to Monopolise” You might ask us, why didn't you
denote any such definitions in the translation of the Budō Hiketsu Aiki No Jutsu and similar texts when you translated them?? There
were practically no uses of the word 'aiki' used as a word in a sentence within any of the passage lines of the other texts. Now let's get
one with discussing the two instances that did occur in this one:

• The first instance that occurs here is in a form of an Adverbial Compound Construct (basically it's a non-verbal construct)
ittai ikki ni naru wo a(h)iki (一体一氣ニナルヲ合氣) or in Mod Jap. (一体一気になるを合気) when I translated this one I had
to double up on the translation by re-wording to obvious meaning within it's elements or risk the line of translation not being
fully complete. So the translation I used was: “...there will have come a stalling in it all that is sudden and uniform between
oneself and the opponent as if both of you were of one spirit and body forestalled...” really a little too lengthily, but there was no
other way to convey the fuller meaning of the characters. The problem I resolved by doubling up on the translation line is in the
context of the first part of the Construct, namely:ittai ikki ( 一 体 一 氣 ) when in immediate conjunction with a(h)iki ( 合 氣 )
changes somewhat the meaning, sort of expands it sometimes. I would explain but that would be even lengthier. Interestingly
enough, in this example here, the word 'aiki' is a secondary or even tertiary element and is not a Primary element of the
Compound Construct. That's linguistics for you, though. One might have expected or even wanted the word 'aiki' to be a
Principle word in the construct, but it''s not, it's occupying at least a secondary position. What could I tell you, based off this fact,
that might be interesting or useful?? That is an easy one to answer: It demonstrates that the word 'aiki', as a word in the language
(and certainly when being used in Martial arts historical descriptors), is a fully ACTIVE living word. It can have Principle (or,
'Primary') importance and definition whether it occurs as a singular word alone, or within any form of a Language Construct.
When a word is indeed an active and living word, as it did in these two examples, it may or may not occupy a principle position
within a construct: it could have a secondary or even a tertiary element valuation. And would certainly have Secondary and
Tertiary Definitions (which can be governed by its position in a language construct)

• The second instance occurs in a Compound Verbal Construct tsuke-iru wo a(h)iki no saki (ニ付入ルヲ合氣ノ先) or
in Mod Jap. (に付入るを合気の先) by way of translation: “Take advantage of the point of the stall out”. It occurred in
the full statement form as: teki no hendō no ki ni tsuke-iru wo a(h)iki no saki to i(f)u ( 敵ノ變動ノ氣ニ付入ルヲ合氣
ノ先ト云フ) which translates fairly simple as: “...They say that the opponent will take advantage of the point of the
stall out by changing his spirit and intentions...”

To remind all of you again, in the beginning of this sub-section it seems to have identified the Shinyō ryū as being the original source of
these text passages, but we don't know how heavily they got adapted? Even if rather heavily adapted, they would most likely be a
synthesis of compatible historical statements from various of the writings of that school. We should also mention that they could have
been synthesised from more than one branch of schools that gets called Shinyō ryū (not necessarily the exact same school.)
ヅ左手ニテ捕ラへルニハ右ノ手足ニ心付亦右ノ足ニテ投ルニハ左リヲ良ク守ル
べシ尚敵ニ向テ進ムニハ眞直ニ進デ敵ノ身隅ニ掛カルべシ人ノ形ハ角ナル者ナ
レバ其角々へ投ル事ヲ專ラ修業スベシ且ツ氣息荒クシテハ勝利ヲ得ル事難シ敵
ト我ト身体接近シタル際ハ敵突カバ我ガ体ノ身隅ニ突レ敵引カバ我亦其身隅ニ
掛リ頭ヨリ腰ニ至ル迄能ク柔ラカニ合氣ヲ離レテ敵ノ欲スル處ニ從ヒ例バ水上
ニ瓢ヲ浮べテ押バ脫ル如クニ敵ノ体ヲ我体ニ引受唯死ノ塲ニ行クヲ要トス之眞
ニ死地ニ陷ルヲ欲スルニ非ズシテ死ヲ先ト爲ス時ハ生ノ理却テ其内ニ在ル者ナ
リ能ク心ヲ留メテ修業スペシ

第八 弱能ク强ニ勝ノ理

凡ソ柔道ヲ修業スル者ハ如何ナル剛强ノ人ニ對スル共必ズ危ミ畏ル可カラズ亦
柔弱ノ人ニ向フテモ决ヲノ輕シメ慢ル可カラズ常ニ修練爲ス處ノ藝術ヲ以テ敵
ノ力ニ逆ラハズ例へバ波上ノ浮木ノ如キ

二十七

...which then one can be captured by it. The right hand and foot are earnestly attentive to the
intentions. When throwing someone, it is done by the right foot and the left would be kept frequently
in a defensive position. Furthermore as one is confronted by the opponent, and when advancing there
against, one would be advancing straight in with the intent to bodily corner and snare the opponent.
When considering the shape of the human frame, one ought to consider where [the human frame] has
sharper angles and corners. One should even practice throwing at and according to those angles and
corners. Even further still, when one's breathing pattern is rather rough, it can be difficult to take
victory against him. As the two bodies draw closer, yours and the opponents, when you're not
thrusting at the opponent's body then your body can be thrust through at its angles and corners. Much
the same when not pulling the opponent down yourself, then by snaring you according to the body's
angles having used his head and approached by [alignment of] the hips. Frequently, [it can be
prevented] if one kept oneself flexible and supple (yawaraka) and forestalled him by having
distanced yourself (a(h)iki wo hanarete) which is done in accordance with what the opponent had
been wanting to do against you in the circumstance. An example of this would be when [in the tale of
the Children of the Barbarian bullrushes] the gourds had washed ashore over the waterway, much as
if they had fallen off [the plant into the water]. One would be bodily undertaking whatever one does
as is the enemy bodily undertaking something much the same. However, it is crucial to understand
that this occurs across killing ground. And indeed it is not mistaken to think that there is something of
a death wish in what is happening. There will be those whom die at the time and those who survived,
that is how the principle of life is approached, and for those of us still caught up in the world of the
living, quite frequently we have it in mind to put a stop to things, and that is why one ought to
practice.
Dai-hachi Yowai Yoku Tsuyoi Ni Katsu No Ri
Item Eight The Principle of the Victory of the Weaker over the Stronger

Generally, of those whom practice Judo, it means being confronted with whatever kind of strength
people may have, and invariably also one really ought not to allow themselves to succumb fear of the
danger present. Also, when you yourself face people whom are weaker than you are, you ought to
decide not to belittle or berate them. One ought to conduct oneself correctly according to the arts in
any given circumstance, and one ought not to meet force with force but instead be like driftwood that
is being carried on the waters.

27

Translator's Note (HIGH PRIORITY): The text entry makes use of the word AIKI in a very important example of it's usage. The
Compound Verbal Construct: a(h)iki wo hanarete (合氣ヲ離レテ) or in Mod Jap. (合気を離れて)→ from the base Verbal Infinite:
a(h)iki wo hanareru (合気を離れる). The Verbal Construct a(h)iki wo hanarete (合氣ヲ離レテ) when translated means “...stalled (or
forestalled) by having distanced oneself...” and is spoken in the Past tense voice. This simple verbal construct would most usually be
identified as being the first and foremost meaning of Aiki-no-jutsu itself, and ergo even so of Aiki Jūjutsu. That being the case,
although the Verbal Construct itself does not qualify as being literal terminology and nomenclature, obviously one might expect it to
show up in the historical lines of passage used to describe (Aiki no jutsu) or elements of that and related arts within the tenets of the
various schools of artifice. The text of the Kiaijutsu Sakkatsu Jizai which we translated and placed in the Collection, in Chapter One
gave the definition of AIKI as being: “...AiKi is when one makes the more obscure static facets (seiteki hōmen unmushin) and is said to
be not unlike going up into or coming down out of a mountain ravine in the ground circumstances...”, and the reference to the likes of
mountain ravines is common-place as are 'remote coastlines' and etc. It comes from the traditional teaching tales used by the Japanese
traditions to explain the initial stages and definition of Aiki no jutsu and so help to define what it is and what it entails. The imagery
here is one of an endangered Japanese warrior whom flees a powerful enemy by going up into a mountain ravine (as a way of making
himself unavailable to the pursuant). Refusing to come back down until the timing and circumstance suits him. THAT is what the
Kiaijutsu Sakkatsu Jizai was trying to explain when it gave that definition of the AiKi. The Kiaijutsu Sakkatsu Jizai again in Chapter
One also said on this subject: “...There is [one form of] the Art of Kiai and there are [other forms that are also] the Art of Kiai, and
there is also the AiKi itself. In the broader applications of this, in the end there is no difference between them. In the narrower sense
however, there are some small differences...”

Could one translate a)iki wo hanareru ( 合 気 を 離 れ る ) as “Putting a peaceful or harmonious distance (between you and
something)” Yes, that is somewhat possible as a rendering but (linguistically speaking) it's not a very good translation of it. It
really has more force of attention on the 'distance' being what caused the stall out. One notices that the verb is hanareru and
that 'aiki' is not acting as a verb at all but occupies the position of and has the force of a (passive participle based) noun.

Other conjugations of the Verbal construct that might be encountered include:

the Base or Infinitive Form is of course: aiki wo hanaru ( 合 氣 を 離 る ) from which comes the form aiki wo
hanareru (合氣を離れる) and there is the conjugations aiki wo hanaruru (合気を離るる), aiki wo hanarete (合気
を離れて) and many others besides which can be found in a common internet search engine. Another example of
declination would be Aiki wo hanarero!(合気を離れれろ!) roughly translated would read: “Forestall him now!”
but I have never seen the Japanese use it (they have other ways of saying it.) There is another way (archaic
language) to pronounce the same characters used to write aiki wo hanaru (合氣を離る) and this may be found with
the alternate pronunciation aiki wo sakaru. If it occurs as aiki wo sakaru( 合 氣 を 離 る ) the meaning is most
probably “to Escape (by stalling or forestalling)”, “to Prevent (one's own harm or injury”. But this is not a
conjugation of aiki wo hana(re)ru, it is simply written with the same characters.

Other Verbal Constructs that are encountered having some relationship to aiki wo hanareru (合気を離れる),

aiki wo kakeru (合気を掛ける) “to Snare by Stalling, Forestalling or by Monopolising”, “to Insistently
Stall or Forestall”, “to Capture by Stalling or Forestalling”, others possible (especially depending upon
what conjugation of the verb 'kakeru').
Aiki wo tsukau (合気を使う) "to Make use of Stalling or Forestalling", “to Thwart”, “to Hinder”, others
possible (especially depending upon what conjugation of the verb 'tsukau'). SAME AS Aiki wo mochi'iru
(合気を用いる)
Aiki wo bakuro-suru (合気を暴露する) "to Rub it in; Mock", "to Control or Manipulate (especially by
what one reveals)", others possible (especially depending upon what conjugation of the verb 'suru').
Aiki wo hazusu ( 合 気 を 外 す ) "to Avoid being Stalled or Forestalled", "to Stall or Forestall another",
(especially depending upon what conjugation of the verb 'hazusu').
Aiki jōgedō-kara ( 合 氣 上 下 動 か ら ) [Non verbal based but shows verbal qualities] "Stalling (or
Forestalling) completely", "Monopolise completely" etc etc
Aiki no keiko wo suru (合気の稽古を練磨する) "to Practice the practices of Stalling and Forestalling".
Aiki wo shitte-morau (合気を知って貰う) "to Know how to Stall or Forestall", "to Know that one is
stalled or forestalled oneself".
Aiki wo ki(wa)meru ( 合 気 を 極 め る ) "to Determine the extent of stall out", "to Persistently Stall or
Forestall", (especially depending upon what conjugation of the verb 'ki(wa)meru')
Aiki wo dekiru (合気を出来る) "to be Abe to Stall or Forestall"
Aiki wo taikan-suru ( 合 気 を 体 感 す る ) "to Have the sense or feeling that one has been stalled or
forestalled."

身ヲ以テ之ヲ制スル時ハ如何ナル剛强ノ人ニ對スル共勝利有者ナリ例ヘバ大船
ヲ氷上ニ浮ブレバシ一人ノ力ニテ能ク之ヲ自由ニ進退セシムルガ如キ之レ船ノ
氷上ニ在ルガ故ナり若シ此船ヲ陸上ニ置ク時ハ迚モ一兩人ノ力ヲ以テ動カシ得
ベキ者ナランヤ弱者ノ强者ニ對スルモ此理ニ齋シク通常ノ働ニテハ勝ツ事能ハ
ザル故ニ宜シク其術ヲ以テ我詐り示セシ虛ニ敵ノ乘ジタル處ヲ見スマシテ之ヲ
打テバ必ズ勝利テ得ル者ニヲノ敵ノ變ニ應ジテ業ヲ行フ事肝要ナり

第九 形ヲ敎ルノ要

我ガ眞楊流ニ於テ敎ル形ハ手解ヨリ始リ大尾迄順序ヲ立テ定規ヲ設ケ手合ヲ敎
ユルト雖モ能ク熟練スルニ至レバ順序ノ定規ヲ要セス實際定規ニ泥マス空々寂
々トシテ無我無心ヨリ出ルヲ善トス其敎タルヤ先ツ四角ナル者ヲ而次第ニ丸ク
實ニ珠玉ノ如クニナスノ意ナリ始メ順序ヲ立定規ヲ設ケテ敎フレ共之ヲ學フ者
切瑳琢磨ノ

二十八
At the time one controls this with the body as one is confronted with the whatever kind of strength the
people might have, and so the practitioner takes victory. An example would be when a large boat is
adrift on the waters, the strength of just one man is enough to easily move it forward or backward.
This too is much like when a boat is floating on water, particularly so in such cases where one is
bringing the boat ashore, even though it's a large boat the strength of a single man would be able to
move [and beach] it. Even when a weaker person is confronted by a stronger person, by using the
principles and usual customs of Monomi(?) Ritual abstinence but frequently one would not be able to
take victory itself. Yet it's a good artifice that demonstrates how could deceive and take advantage of
an enemy, by careful observation of the circumstances one would be able to strike like this. Invariably
a person could even take victory, when responding to the changes an enemy is making through the
conduct of technique and this is a crucial point.

Dai-kyu Kata Wo Oshifuru No Kaname


Number Nine The Vital Points of the Teachings About Kata Patterns

About me and the Shinyō ryū and what I teach of its Kata patterns, to start with there are the Te hodoki
Basic Introduction 'Hand releases' and they conclude in the Junjō curriculum structure at the point
where the Main entries begin. Having some knowledge of Hand techniques (teai) not withstanding the
fact that what one does practice of them would be sufficient, they are a necessity of the preparations of
the established Junjōcurriculum structure. The actuality of these measures is such as when a thief has
caught you alone by yourself. One proceeds without thought of oneself and without allowing
distraction (muga mushin), through both the good and evil therein, as one has gained knowledge of it
beforehand about those persons caught in the [lines of] the squares [SEE NOTES] In the sequential order of
it indeed also [caught in] the [lines of] the circles. Much as if caught within the facets of a jewel. That
is the meaning of it, for instance. Straight away the preparations of the main measures of the Junjō
curriculum structure are to have been learned. Together with what else the practitioner studies, in the
progression through it not unlike the efforts of a gem polishing stone...

28

Translator's Note: The reference in the text entry to Monomi Ritual abstinence, I was not sure which Romaji rendering best represented
the intended word? But it is in regard to then common Shinto Buddhist observances and the minor ritual purification performed in them.
It involves washing oneself, gathering up and composing oneself and quieting thoughts that offer to distract away from the proceedings.
These sorts of things being momentarily abstained from as distractions to the (religious) event. In this kind of case, where they suggest
using it (as a pattern of handling an immediate threat) is due to the familiarity of it, most people could resort to it and fare better during a
crisis. Our own customs and traditions have something comparable usually, we could use that in much the same fashion. SEPARATE
NOTE: Again, the text itself makes reference to the Shinyō ryū, and probably is also identifying the original source of the text passages is
(where what part of the text passages are not the immediate remarks of the authors, anyways.) What part of these passages seems are
indicated speaks of the “circles and squares”, apparently in regard to ruffians and thieves. This language description comes from the
teachings of the likes of the Jūjutsu Higakusho that we translated and placed available in the collection. The subject and it's common
language descriptors was also found to be shared in common with the Kitō ryū. Lots of schools of Jujutsu are a representation, of some
kind, of the brand of Jujutsu in the text of the Jūjutsu Higakusho. The doctrine about “circles and squares” is concerned with standard
Mandala-like depictions that have a series of overlapping circles and squares drawn within the matrix of the depiction. These doctrines
say that “those whom exist within the lines of certain of these circles and squares cannot easily act outside of their influences, and may
likewise not be able to exit or escape the (influences) that the lines of the circles and squares represent.” Squares are thought of as being
more rigid and stern, circles are more flexible and flowing. That ruffians and thieves are somewhat described in a dialogue like this as
having been bound in the lines of the squares, this means that, as being criminals, the consequences and punishment for their actions is
predictably going to be harsh. Even our own handling, as the property owner and victim, will see them injured or killed as we protect
ourselves and our property. However it also mentions the lines of the circles that overlap with or exist within these squares. That part
refers to the facts of the flexibility the ruffian thieves will use. If they can carry out the crime and escape undetected, then the flexibility
of the circle-line within the rigidity of the square containing that circle has been (momentarily) circumvented.

Some of these doctrines about the “circles and squares” has this kind of context. Being able to operate within the flexibility of
the Circle-lines that allow one to (momentarily) circumvent the harsh rigidity of the lines of the squares. For paramilitary
purposes, this could, for example, allow one to escape the Paramilitary enemy and his regional occupations, for the sake of
seeking one's own freedom and carrying out resistance movements against the occupying enemy.

In a vaguely similar line of thought on it all: When the social laws have become corrupt and the criminal has more
right to intrude upon you and your property that you have to the right for defending self and property. These
traditions identify that context as being proof of some form of Foreign invasive occupation (one's own people and
their laws certainly could never sustain that kind of misbehavior against themselves!) It is the lines of a Square (harsh
and rigid, potentially dangerous to you.) There are however circle-lines that overlap to these Squares, and circles
within the square, which allow one flexibility of movement and action (you can defend yourself and your property...
there's ways to successfully do so.) Recognition (of the relevant lines, which are the rigid lines of a square and which
are circles.) The adversarial (in the model example of this level of it, whom have caused the laws to favor the
criminal, is trying to act on the flexibility of certain circle-lines by which to victimise you and people like you. Not
the least of which is your own lack of recognition of the processes involved (it's some form of an occupation not
getting proper recognition). The tradition says that this kind of an adversarial is himself bound in the lines of a square
that he might not properly perceive himself: when he gets recognized, he will loose his grip and be sent hurling down
in retaliation. Subject to the harsh rigidity of the lines of the square in which he has bound himself in so doing.
功ヲ積極意ノ處ニ逹スレハ其技藝自ヅカラ心ニ凝滯セズシテ神速ナル故竟ニ團
々タル珠玉ノ如ク始メモナク終リモ無ク廻轉變化シテ極マラス機ニ臨ミ變ニ應
ジテ能ク不思儀ノ働キヲ爲スヲ得べシ尤モ心ハ沈靜ナラザレハ勝利ヲ得べカラ
ス心靜ニシテ淀マス固マラス氣滿チ体烈シク而シテ能ク活動自在ノ妙處ニ逹ス
レハ如何ナル剛强ノ者ト雖モ是ヲ制シ得べカラザル事ナシ此ノ處宜シク工夫セ
ザルべカラス

第拾 氣ト躰トノ說

氣ト体トノ中ニ陰陽アリ則チ躰中ニ存スル氣ノ起リヲ陽ト云亦其靜マルヲ陰ト
曰フ當流ニ於テ專ラ氣ノ扱ヒ方ヲ敎ヘテ業ヲ成サシムルト雖モ之レ無形物ニシ
テ別テ外面ニ露出シタル者ニ非ス唯躰中ニ滿チ存スル處ノ陰陽ナレハ隨テ弛ミ
撓ミテ全カラザル事アリ平常安坐成シタル處ノ心氣ハ漫滿トシテ所謂愼靜無事
ノ姿ナレ共

二十九

...to polish us, one would proceed through it with that sense for the doing. Having oneself such artifice in
mind one proceeds into it without delay and with a swiftness, particularly so by the [lines of] the circle(s)
[and the flexibility they afford] much like the facets of a gem. Even when this is not quite the the case
immediately from the beginning, in the end there is no lack of it, as things will have changed in their
rotations, and without limitation or restriction. By the opportunities it affords, one can frequently respond
to the changes within any confrontation, having acquired the ability to perform marvelous feats. Although
it does afford some peace of mind, and one would be able to rather calmly take victory, having not fallen
into a stagnant lump of a soul through over-exaggerated bodily agitation (ki (wo) michiru). So frequently
one can freely perform marvelous feats, having approached things this way. Regardless of the stronger
person, although perhaps one cannot really control his strength itself this way, nonetheless that's just fine
since he will have no other device of scheming other than shouting hoarsely [his strength made as nothing].

Dai-jū (I)Ki To Karada Tono Setsu


Number Ten The Theories about Spirit and the Body

About the body and the spirit, throughout both there is Yin and Yang [Passive and active elementation] and
namely that what exists of these in the body they say is what causes active (Yang) arisal of the spirit. Also
they said that passive (Yin) inactivity causes the calmness present. In the standard practices of the school,
they are taught how to handle mood and sentiment, there being techniques for that sort of thing. Although
when and if things are unpatterned (mukei) it discloses to a person all the more what mistakes are being
made. Although the body is moved by what has occurred as is caused by the interaction of the Yin and
Yang [passive and active elements] things really don't bend that much according to what slackness might
be evidenced. What normal tranquility usually exists in the circumstances of sentiments about a thing may
come to permeate the whole thing, as if it were turning into a non-event despite what actions occurred in
the beginning.
29

Translator's Note: The text entry at Number Ten and the title of the subject one must look a bit closer at this. The entire text passage is
a rather obvious adaptation of the Kitai no koto, but definitely an adaptation of it (not identical). I rendered the romaji as “(I)ki to
karada” but the other way is “Ki to tai”, and this was meant to convey the same thing as the word 'Kitai' from the Kitai no koto. These
are important points that one needs made clear here about this and what subject the text is actually addressing in these passages. In the
Jūjutsu Higakusho and also found in the Densho of the Kitō ryū, there is a subject entry called Kitai No Koto “the Subject of the Body
of Ki Energy”. Although, really, it should be translated as “the Subject of Evident Spirit and Sentiment (at the time something is
happening)” The documents and scrolls of the Tenjin shinyō ryū, also contain the same entry “Kitai no koto”, but in some of the Tenjin
shinyō ryū scrolls, especially those scrolls that represent the Parent school Shin no shintō ryū, the subject is called by an older variation
of the name “Kigai no koto”, but otherwise it's the same subject and word. The word Kitai ( 氣 體, 氣 体 or 氣 躰 )
actually is a
word that means “gas cloud”, “mass of gas or fog” but in a context like this the meaning is “Prevalent
sentiments and spirit” as if those were a cloud of gas, fog or mist that drifts through an episode. That's
the language for you.
The statements of Kitai No Koto were made strictly about the Paradigm of the Jūjutsu Higakusho and that is described as
being: “Thousands showing up unexpectedly on the crest ridges above looking down into the valley position where you are.”
That was the chief subject of address when the statements of the Kitai no koto were penned out. However else we might
understand this section of the text and it's passages (however we might otherwise understand them, and no doubt that fine to
understand them by as well?) One cannot overlook the fact that it is some kind of an adaptation of the subject of Kitai no koto as
well, even if only some kind of additional commentary on the subject. Also, when the passages, either of this text or any of the
scrolls, makes mention of “the body” it should ALSO be understood as being in direct relationship and reference to “the corpus
of all present (both friend and foe)”.
For comparison purposes, the original Kitai No Koto (in full) says: “As concerns 'Ki' energy [or, spirit and sentiment], it
fills a place not unlike a pot, and it's said that Yang ('Positive' polarity energy [active sentiments and spirit]) occurs with
'Ki' energy, Yin ('Negative' polarity energy [Passive sentiments and Spirit]) is settled in places as much of it as there is.
The adherents of the school are taught to specialise in handling 'Ki', it may be said that there are techniques to compel
['Ki' energy]. And it's said of 'Ki' energy that it can become a visible thing and invade the safety of the body, the legs
being kicked at, 'ki' energy itself also follows such as philosophical principles [describe of it] and is entirely able to do
so. Seated in the usual quiet position is that which causes it, as concerns [the relationship to] Kata techniques they are
brimming with our dispositions being the (physically based) peace of mind of safety itself [ergo charged of 'Ki' energy].
However, to be able to do the workings of the movements, as concerns the moment, in these techniques, possibly in
proportion to being offset on one hand and being offset on the other hand [e.g. one kind of error opposed to another kind
of error]. Losing/having wasted the ordinary 'Ki' energy [e.g. 'Ki' of that which is ordinary], this consequently the
adherents of the school are taught to keep hidden, the position itself [e.g. of keeping the loss hidden] nurturing the
vitality of the one's entire being. To obtain and remain in possession the heart [of the matter], as concerns that itself and
having said what has already been said, the position of sound health is protected by being able to do the techniques.
Furthermore, to think that vitality is the origins, consequently Jujutsu confirmed and recorded the influence factors.
Using the parts of 'Ki' energy with complete mastery, on one hand certainly to have put effort into it, and on the other
hand [to avoid] weeping over vain matters. On the one hand, certainly to do the workings and on the other hand being
vacant to become the thing, both beginning and end being indistinguishable, the movements of sitting and standing [e.g.
all body movements througout] being one movement conjoined by acquiring all calm composure with regularity. In the
Sokuten No Maki (“Book of Heaven's Rule”) it says that management is of immovable wisdom, in the Hyōshō
(“Paramilitary writings”) it says that there is preparation for being undefeatable, one must use strategies of victory, and
also restrain oneself from misusage of sacred words, and it also says what one should do with those [i.e.; the sacred
words]. With oneself victory rests upon (one's) true character, as it concerns with the Senmanjin [e.g. (lit.) “Thousands
of Ten Thousands Man” i.e., 'Perfect human being'] as if they exist, this the principles of victory.”
動作ヲ始メ身体手足ヲ運用爲スニ至レバ其業ニ從テ中心傾キ終ニ平生ノ氣ヲ損
スル者ナリ故ニ昔日當流ニ於テ秘傳爲シタル處必ズ先ツ己ガ方寸ノ元氣ヲ養ヒ
弛ミ怠ラシメス事物ニ心氣ヲ停ムル事ナク宜ク萬業ノ基本タル處ヲ堅固ニ保チ
守ラシムルヲ要トス基本既ニ定ツテ業ヲ成セハ如何程働キ動クトモ元氣能ク决
シテ缺損スル┐ナク左リニ力ヲ用ルモ右ノ空シキ事ナリ亦右ヲ働スモ左弛マス
前后上下ニ隙ナクシテ起居動靜共ニ其氣ヲ損スル無キニ至レバ眞ニ大丈夫ト言
フ可キナリ

第十一 志ト氣ト力トノ區別

志氣力ノ此ノ三ツハ區別シテ論スル┐甚ダ難シ然レトモ今試ニ之ヲ分ケテ云ヘ
バ眼前ニ或一物在リ此ヲ取ラントスル志ノ起ルニ從フテ手ノ前へ出ツルハ何ゾ
ヤ是レ志ニ從テ氣ノ手ニ通フガ故ニシテ其ノ物ヲ取り扱フハ即チ氣ニ從フテ力
ノ手ニ集ルニ由ルナリ亦力

三十

As one would be about to make use of the body and its limbs, one will do so according to what
techniques best represent the inclinations of what one had in mind to do. Usually one will have become
somewhat dis-hearted [by what is happening] and so consequently one conducts according to the
Secret traditions (hiden) of the more classical schools. Invariably that means that you must have
fostered good health and the needed flexibility and limberness as there will be a certain amount of
vivacious action. One must keep tight reigns on self-negligence since one intends to put a halt to the
circumstances, the basic techniques (kihon) and all that transpires in them is suitable for doing just
that. They are firmly held to be a suitable defense and that is a crucial point. The Kihon basics being
what the techniques themselves are actually based upon, to whatever extent, and the movements in
them are certainly quite spirited. They lack no spirit at all┐ Not withstanding what follows [in the
quote] thereafter, even when force is used, what proved futile beforehand, and what movements
occured beforehand, and what will have proven reliable afterwards, all of these become like a
monarch, to which there will be no end of bowing and rising. So in the affairs of one's daily life, as
there is no lack of becoming dis-hearted in that, indeed it is said that one must have some kind of
security!

Dai-jūichi Kokorozashi To (i)Ki To Chikara Tono Kubetsu


Number Eleven The Differences Between The Will, Spirit and Strength

Regarding these three as what determines the force of determination and esprit de corps, in theory
there are differences between them┐ the kind of differences that are quite difficult to define. Now-a-
days they would tell you that a particular effort has been put into doing so. And so right before our
eyes there is an ulterior motive that begins to arise. When one is about to take a-hold of this, when the
Will is mustering itself, so the hand begins to extend. About that act of reaching out towards
something, the hand will travel the route defined by the spirit, and consequently takes hold of and
handles the affair. Namely, that the growing strength of the hand depends upon the spirit itself, and so
strength is produced.

30
Translator's Note: The text entry at Number Eleven likewise looks as if it was adapted from the Kyūkajō No Gokui (“Secrets of the
Nine Items”), found in the Densho of the Kitō ryū and the Jūjutsu Higakusho itself. Depending upon one’s point of view then, these
statements are an adaptation of the textual traditions of the Kitō ryū or the text of the Jūjutsu Higakusho (both, really.) Our efforts to
identify what sources the lines of this text come from has led us to denote the information.
ノ出ヅル處ニハ氣集リ氣ノ通フ處ニハ力集ル事ハ一定ノ理ニシテ氣力不二トナ
ルモノナリ然レトモ此ニ區別シテ論スル者ハ力ヲ先立テ業ヲ爲セバ其害甚ダ多
シ是ヲ以テ力ヲ捨テ唯氣ノ扱ヲ熟練セシメンガ爲ナリトス故ニ業ノ熟達スルニ
至レハ人々固有ノ力ハ其業ニ應ジ働キニ從フテ出ル事ハ固ヨリ敎ヲ待タズシテ
明カナリ是レ志氣力合一不二ノ妙處ナリ

第十二 氣ヲ滿ル事

氣ヲ滿ツルト云フハ前ニモ論ゼシ如ク常ニ氣ノ弛ミ撓ム事無ク張弓ノ如クニシ
テ中心正シク坐スル所ヲ氣ノ滿ツルト云フナリ譬へバ千手觀音ノ如シ觀音ハ蓋
シ心一ナリト雖モ能ク其心ノ千手ニ行キ渡リタルガ故ニ皆一同ニ動キ働クヲ得
ルナルべシ若シ心ガ一方ニ偏倚ル時ハ必ス動ク手ト動カヌ手ト有ニ至ル動カサ
ルニ於テハ幾本在モ用ヲナサス是ニテハ氣ノ滿ツルトハ云可カラス故ニ頭ヨ

三十一

Regarding the circumstances of accruing spirit, what route the spirit will take in a circumstance, it is considered
to be a fixed principle as strength is mustering, the will-power will become unparalleled. Certainly there will be
some differences in any discussions about this, since those person [caught up in the event] show some strength
beforehand upon which their techniques are being based. There are multiple injuries that one would otherwise
suffer which can be avoided by relinquishing the use of force, by merely using skillful dexterity when handling
the circumstances. And so mastery of these kinds of techniques ought to be sought out, which proceed in reply
[to an opponent] using only the strength and mobility that is typical of the average person. Right from the start,
when one has not acquired knowledge of it, then clearly the will is carried out meeting force with force, and
whichever one has the superior strength wins.

Dai--jūni Ki Wo Michiru (No) Koto


Number Twelve The Subject of Becoming Agitated

They say about becoming agitated that, much like when in an argument, beforehand, one was rather relaxed as
one usually would be, things being uneventful. Then as one's focus sharpens, it's much like the tension of a bow
drawing taunt, even despite that one might have been seated at the time. That is what they say about becoming
agitated. An example would be a thousand-handed Kannon spirit, whom even though has a wholeheartedness
about itself, undoubtedly as the heart and mind are what conduct all thousand of its hands, which consequently
would usually move together in one movement of activity. But supposing that even one hand deviates at the
time, then it is inevitable that [this deviation] of a hand will eventually impede, hand by hand by hand, as it uses
them. Until it can no longer move, no matter how many [of its hands] it does or does not make use of. Mis-
actions like this are caused by having become agitated, which they say one should not do, since it is the head
that leads the hand and foot as one approaches to do a thing.

31

Translator's Note: The same source seems obvious? The Kyūkajō No Gokui and the Densho of the Kitō ryū.
リ手足ノ先ニ至ル迄能ク氣ノ行キ渡リテ一點ノ隙間ナク平生充分ニ正シク安坐
スル處ノ有樣テ以テ氣ノ滿ツルト云フナリ

第十三 位ノ意味

位ヒトハ波上ニ漂フ浮木ノ心持チニテ在ル處ヲ云ナリ則ケ浮木ハ卷キ上ル波ニ
ハ之ニ從テウキ上リ亦落チ下ル浪ニモ此レニ從テ沈ミ落チ西ニ流レ東ニ漂フテ
少シモ水ニ逆ラフ事ナシ柔術ノ業モ亦此ノ如ク决シテ敵ノ氣力ノ烈シキ處ニ逆
ラハス之ニ隨ヒ應シテ其氣力ノ衰ヘ屈スルヲ察シ而シテ自然ニ勝利ヲ得ル事ヲ
眞ノ位ヒト云ナリ

第十四 不動心之說

不動心トハ即チ如何ナル事ノ變ニモ心ノ動カザルヲ云フナリ心正明ニメ總身ニ
氣滿チ渡リ眼ニ白刄ヲ見テモ心ニハ見ザルガ如ク亦耳ニ大砲ノ音ヲ聞テモ心ニ
ハ聞カザルガ如ク凡テ物毎ニ驚キ動カ

三十二

To some extent, frequently the prevalent spirit reaches a point where it has no gaps or interruptions,
and usually this would be sufficient but when recklessness has become evident in the state of things,
they say that it will cause agitation (ki wo mitsuru).

Dai-jūsan Kura(h)i No Imi


Number Thirteen The Meaning of the Positions

About the positions, they say that there are the circumstances of having a sense of being driftwood
floating on the waters. There are rulings about acting somewhat in accordance with this sense of being
driftwood carried on the waves, floating up and then dropping in the wave motions. Even the waves
themselves somewhat do so in accordance with this, folding under as they collapse, drifting in the
currents at times somewhat to the East and then to the West, never going against the flow of the water.
Even the techniques in Jujutsu are pretty much like this, never going directly against the intense
willpower of the enemy. Responses are made that follow along with it instead. Sort of considering and
giving into it so as to weaken it, in the end to have most naturally taken the victory and that is said to
be the truth of the subject of the Shin no kurai true positions.

Dai-jūyon Fudōshin No Setsu


Number Fourteen The Theories About Steadfastness

About steadfastness of heart and mind (fudōshin), namely they say that it is in whatever changes do
occur where the heart and mind become unrelenting. There is an absolute clarity of the heart and mind
[expressed] throughout ones entire body, as one becomes excited, brimming with spirit (kimichi → ki wo
michiru)
at the sight of the naked blade as one looks across at it. It becomes rather as if one does not see
the sword itself. Again the same occurs with the ear and the artillery cannon even though one actually
can hear the roar of the cannon, the mind and heart becomes as if one does not hear it. Whereas the
more usual response is to become paralysed with fear from [the sight or sound] of such an object.

30

Translator's Note: The entry at the bottom of this page makes use of a verbal and nounal contraction of ‘ki wo michiru’, that being
kimichi (氣滿チ ) or in Mod Jap (気満ち ) . As we said earlier in the Blue font Translator’s Notes, the verbal idiomatic clause ki wo
michiru has a meaning derived from context. In this kind of example, the definition of “Brimming with spirit” or otherwise worded
“Bristling with spirit” would be more accurate than “Agitated; Over-excited”.
ザル心ヲ大丈夫ノ不動心ト云フ此ノ如キ心膽ヲ以テ我が身躰ヲ働カシ千變萬化
ノ術ヲ行ヒ大敵ニ出遇トモ少シモ驚キ懼ル、事ナキヲ即チ眞ノ不動心ト云フ故
ニ往時ハ生レナがラニヲノ自然大砲ノ響或ハ太刀音ヲ聞キ劒擊ヲ以テ勝負ヲ爭
フ事ノ常ナレバ順ツテ心膽ノ修練モ出來得タルナルペシ最モ其頃ニテモ腹中ノ
修練ノ爲メ野ニ伏シ山二入リ亦ハ人跡絶タル處ル行テ凡テ心中ノ動セザル事ヲ
專一ニ修業爲シタル者故眞ニ不動心ノ位ニモ至リシ成ルべシ併シ當世ノ修業者
ト云ハ多クハ手足ニノミ藝在テ腹中ニハ術ナキガ如シ依テ此ノ處テ能ク熟考シ
不動心ニ至ルノ工夫專一ニ修業スペシ

第十五 無我無心ノ說

凡ソ見ル處ノモノヲ直ニ相手取氣ニ成リ形チヲ造ルハ其處ヘ心ヲ留ルモノニシ
テ此レハ我が心ニ好ミ求ル處有ガ故ナリ亦順ツテ敵アルナリ例ヘバ敵ハ何程取
掛ラントスル勢ヲ顯シ示スト雖トモ我ハ

三十三

They say that the peace of mind afforded by a steadfast heart and mind is much like this [the same as] the mind
itself being what moves one's own body through the outplay of the thousands of changes occurring within all
that transpires around us. Even when meeting up with a great enemy, and one is somewhat surprised and afraid.
Namely wherein things are uneventful, therein lies the core truth of the steadfast heart [vigilant throughout].
Even in ancient times, consequently, it was the natural course of things that the roar of the cannon was born.
Likewise the sound of swords clashing together, as pursuit of victory and defeat had become the usual course of
things. And the order of that day became the tune to which the heart and mind were practiced. Very much so
indeed then, out in the fields they practice with that advantage in mind, and so [their bodies] inclined as they
entered up into the mountains. Again, seeking out where there were no signs of human habitation since it did
not suit the movements of what they had in mind, to exclusively practice the techniques as such persons do.
Particularly so by the steadfastness of heart which drove them to carry it out to its extremes. But they say that
those persons whom engage in the practices now-a-days do not lack in the techniques of working the hand and
foot out in the country side. Consequently then this is much the same circumstance, quite frequently
approaching by steadfastness of heart the unique and cunning tactics to practice them with all due precaution.

Dai-jūgo Muga Mushin No Setsu


Number Fifteen The Theories of the Selflessness and Freedom of Thought

Generally, having seen oneself firsthand the capturing spirit with which an enemy moves about and what
patterns and kata techniques will have been produced thereby, the heart stops at the sight of the circumstances.
And wherein one can claim that [what is transpiring] is very much to one's good liking, and so of use to you, as
a matter of coincidence, yet it follows that there is an enemy afoot. An example would be when an enemy is
willing to go to the lengths to begin it all, and what is demonstrated by his vigourousness. However, about
oneself [at such times] it is much as if we are asleep [not noticing what will happen]!

33
只眠リタルカ如ク敢テ好マズ能ク心ヲ正明ニ成
シ泰然安座シタル處ノ如キヲ以ラ則チ無我無必
トハ云ナリ此ノ無我無心ノ所ヨリ出テ敵ニ應ジ
テ業ヲ行フ事ヲ肝要スルナリ宜シク考ヘテ修業
ス可シ右第一ヨリ第拾五迄ハ先師ノ口傳ヲ其マ、
茲ニ記述ナシタル者ナリ

凡トノ柔術手合ノ形ヲ稽古ナスニハ先ツ体ノ中心
ヲ正シクセザルベカラズ中心崩ル時ハ身体弱ク業
モ自カラ速ナラサルモノナリ故ニ畵ヲ以テ茲ニ体
ノ搆ヘ方ヲ些カ示ス平座ノ形チハ一圖ノ如ク膝ヲ
左右ニ開キテ体ヲ眞直ニ伸シ兩肩ヲ下テ臍下ニ氣
息ヲ滿シムル樣ニ成スペシ

三十四

To have so daringly taken pleasure in [what was transpiring] quite frequently will have made one's
own heart and mind quite transparent to others, whereas it would not be so if one had only sat in calm
composure, namely [seated firmly] with no sense of self concern and without hindrance of thought
(muga mushin) as they say. To have proceeded from this circumstance of having no self concern and
without hindrance of thought (muga mushin) when in response to the enemy and then but to carry out
the techniques, that is a crucial point, for instance. It will have been thought of as correct, and that is
how one ought to practice. The previous items one (1) through ten (10) written to here, they came
from the oral teachings of the former Headmasters. Given here [in this text] as an account by one
whom had received it from them.

About this Jujutsu fighting technique, in general, as a kata pattern of the practice, there might not be
an evident correctness of physical focus and form. There is some tendency at the time for the mind to
be unsettled (chūshin kuzu(-re)ru), yet even when one's own techniques and body are the weaker, and
one cannot muster any speed, nonetheless one can somewhat demonstrate ways to manage [bodily]
posturing. About the forms of being seated flat and level, much as in Illustration One, the knees are
kept spread apart to the left and right sides, the body is held perfectly erect. Both shoulders are held
low, while one maintains one's bodily composure...

34

Translator's Note: The last two lines of this text entry make use of the Idiomatic Verbal Compound Construct: Seika ni kisoku wo
mishimuru( 臍 下 ニ 氣 息 ヲ 滿 シ ム ル ) or in Mod Jap ( 臍 下 に 気 息 を 満 し む る ) . Most other translators would have rendered it “...while
breathing deeply from the abdomen...” but this rendering is (usually) a gross mistranslation based off of the raw elements of the idiom.
This is an Idiomatic Verbal Compound, the raw elements are simply not what indicates the meaning and definition of idioms, clausal or
otherwise. Seika ni kisoku wo mishimuru ( 臍 下 ニ 氣 息 ヲ 滿 シ ム ル ) means instead “… to Maintain one's composure (whether bodily or
otherwise)...” Evidence for this definitionfollows immediately in the line (continuing through to the first line of the next page)
with …yōni nasubeshi chokuritsu wo nashitaru ( 樣ニ成スペシ直立ヲ成シタル ) or in Mod Jap ( 様に成すベし直立を成したる ) which reads:
“...so as to be able to stand up (on ones feet)…” That the translation makes more sense (when using the proper translation for Seika ni
kisoku wo mishimuru) seems obvious, since “maintaining one’s composure (bodily and otherwise)” would facilitate being able to readily
return to one’s feet… whereas “abdominal breathing” will do no such thing.
Also, the Idiomatic Verbal Compound Construct: Seika ni kisoku wo mishimuru (臍下ニ氣息ヲ滿シムル) or in Mod Jap (臍下に
気息を満しむる) is rather obviously a direct relative of the idiom 'Ki wo michiru’ (気を満る) as one can see from its elements. One
can readily deduce from these examples that ‘Ki’ (気) + (満) in any verb form construct has a likely meaning related to emotional
states and conditions.
直立ヲ成シタル際ノ形ハ二圖ノ如ク

少シモ身体ヲ傾クべカラズ中心崩ル

時ハ自カラ臍下ノ氣息拔ケテ倒レヤ

スキモノナリ

三十五

...so as to be able to stand up. Regarding the circumstance of the kata pattern, much like in the
illustration, there is some tendency for the body to be inclined a little, and for the mind itself to be
unsettled (chūshin kuzu(-re)ru) at the time, having become so much disheveled that one could collapse
given the circumstances.

35

Translator's Note: The brief page entry use of a Verbal Idiomatic Compound related to the one that I documented in the
previous page: Seika ni kisoku wo mishimuru ( 臍 下 に 気 息 を 満 し む る ). The two constructs are directly related, and
almost the exact opposite of each other in meaning. The Verbal construct in question here is: Seika no kisoku nukete (臍下
ノ氣息拔ケテ) or by way of translation “...having become so much disheveled...” Whereas the more confused modes of
translation would have rendered it, based off the raw elements of the idiomatic construct, something like “letting the breath
slip from your lower abdomen”, probably trying to work it in as a remark about abdominal breathing again. The actual
meaning was reinforced by the earlier occurrence of: Chūshin kuzu(-re)ru tokiha mizukara (中心崩ル時ハ自カラ) → Mod
Jap ( 中 心 崩 る 時 は 自 か ら ) “...the mind itself to be unsettled at the time. ..” and further reinforced by what followed
immediately after its occurrence, namely: ta(w)oreyasu kimono nari (倒レヤスキモノナリ) → Mod Jap (倒れやすきも
のなり) “...(that) one could collapse given the circumstances...”
一文字ノ形チハ三圖ノ如ク左右へ足ヲ開キテ

爪先ニ力ヲ入テ腰ヲ下ゲ体ヲ眞直ニ成シ腹中

へ充分ニ氣息ヲ滿シムベシ

三十六

About the Straight Line Kata Pattern (ichimonji no kata), much like in Illustration Three, the left and
right foot are held open and apart, the hips lowered and the tips of the toes dug in for strength. The
body held erect, as is sufficient to maintain one's composure and to allow fullness of breath.

36

Translator's Note: The brief page entry makes use of the standard and idiomatic expression: Fukuchū-(h)e jūbun kisoku wo
mishimubeshi (腹中へ充分ニ氣息ヲ滿シムベシ) → Mod Jap (腹中え充分に気息を満しむべし) “...[(The body held erect,)] as is sufficient
to maintain one's composure and to allow fullness of breath...” If one only translated it by the raw elements of the idiom, it produces
something like: “...as is sufficient to allow fullness of breath...”. Similarly, if one does not account for the standard (non-idiomatic)
meaning, then it produces: “...as is sufficient to allow one to maintain one's composure ...”. Both should be combined in an ‘expanded’
translation to convey what the text actually says in the (pre-modern) Japanese. Again, as with the others documented in these Blue font
notes, the verbal construct that we are speaking of in this note is a relative (however direct or indirect may be the case) of the idiom Ki wo
michiru (気を満ちる).
平ノ一文字ハ四圖ノ如

ク片膝ヲツキ片足蹈開

テ爪先へ力ヲ入レ此間

凡ソ三尺余トシ身体眞

直ニ腰ヲ輕ク踵ノ上へ

付ベシ

三十七

About the Level Straight Line (hira no ichimonji), one knee is thrust out in that one has stepped out to
the open with a single foot, the tips of the toes dug in for strength. Of which this is generally about at
about three feet or so [where the foot is planted]. The body is held erect so as to allow mobility, for
which the held is held upraised.

37

Translator's Note: The brief page entry makes use of the idiom Koshi wo karuku ( 腰ヲ 輕ク ) → Mod Jap ( 腰を 軽く ) the meaning of
which is somewhat reliant upon context. Most translators are confused by it and render it something like “keeping the hip joints flexible”.
The proper meanings are instead something like “(allowing or maintaining) Mobility”, “to (keep) Agile”, “to be Nimble”. Jack be nimble,
Jack be quick, Jack jumped over the candlestick. Do what?!
Actually, the statement “...the toes dug in for strength...”, really should be translated more like “digging in the toes so as to be ready” and
is quite comparable to the English language idiom “plant the feet”, or “dig in the feet” both of which means roughly “to Make oneself
ready (especially for something that is troublesome)”.
平ノ搆へ方ハ五圖ノ如ク左右ノ爪先ヲ立揃テ

片膝ハツキ片膝ハ少シ上テ橫ニ開キ合手ノ眼

目ヲ見込テ兩肩ヲサゲ腹中ニ氣息ヲ滿タシム

ベシ總テ身体ハ眞直ニ成テ下腹ノ内が自然ト

張樣ニナルヲヨシトス

三十八

About the ways of managing the Level Postures (hira no kama(h)e), much like in Illustration Five, the
tips of the toes of the left and right feet are planted quite firmly, one knee being thrust out and the
other knee held somewhat upright in the posture. One stares right at the opponent's intentions straight
through the gap [between the spread legs], avoiding to bear the burden [of his obvious intentions] by
maintaining self composure as one should. Generally the body is held erect, with some natural tension
occurring from one's gut reaction, seeing what things have come to.

38
眞 心 流
合流
眞之神道流

天神眞楊流柔術

手 解

一鬼拳 オニコブシ

此手合ノ形ハ先ヅ双方ノ間五六寸計
リ隔テ對座ナシ左右ノ手ヲ膝ノ上ニ
置受身ノ者ハ左右ノ手ニテ捕身ノ左
左ノ手首ヲシカト

三十九
Shinshin Ryū The School of True Heart
A(h)iryū Combined as one school
Shin No Shintō Ryū The School of the True Footpath of the Gods

Tenjin Shinyō Ryū Jūjutsu


The Jujutsu of the School of the True Willow Tree of the High Gods

Te Hodoki
Basic Introductions “Freeing the Hands”

-- Oni Kobushi Demon’s Fist


About this fighting technique, it is done when both parties have reached the point of being separated
by only five or six inches away from each other, not merely remaining seated across from one another,
both hands placed on the knees, the defender having both right and left hands grabbed a hold of at the
wrists by the attacker who used both right and left hand to do so.

39
摑ムナリ(一圖參照)捕身ノ方ハ右手ノ指ヲ延揃ヘ腕ニ强ク力ヲ入レヌ樣ニシテ臂
ヲ受身ノ目先キヘ張出シ乍ラ伸シ居ル指先ヲ我左リノ肩口ノ處ヘ付ケテ平三角形
ヲナセバ捕ヘラレタル手ハ自然ト放レルナリ(二圖參照)(伹シ是ヨリ次ノ振解ノ形
ニツツク)

一振解 フリホドキ

此手合ノ形ハ前ノ鬼拳ト續キテ取ルハ平三角形ヲ爲シタル手ノ平ノ甲端ノ處ニテ
受身ノ兩眼ノ間(即チ烏兎)ヘ打チ掛ルナリ此際受身ノ者ハ左

四十

(In reference to Illustration One) About the way the attacker attacked, the fingers of his right hand had extended
out as he was putting forth the strength to do it through his arm. As the defender, immediately moves the [right]
elbow outwards, while pulling the tips of the fingertips [of the right hand] over to one's own left shoulder, to
cling to it there. About the level triangle pattern (hira sankaku gata) this will have formed, it keeps the hand
from being recaptured. About that hand, it is the natural way to have released it (In reference to Illustration One)
(One can do this slowly and also the next pattern of release.)

-- Furi Hodoki Shake Off Release

About this fighting technique, like Demon's fist that came before it and what follows it afterwards, about the
capture in these, they make some use of the level triangle pattern (hira sankaku gata) the hand being used to
draw out and extend the opponent's arm to its limit. The defender keeps both eyes fixed on things (namely
through the whole time it is occurring) then snaring and striking him, for instance. Upon this occasion, the
thumb of the defender’s left hand is pointed downward…

40
リ手ノ拇指ヲ下ノ方ヘ向ケ余リノ四指ヲ上ノ方ヘ向ケテ開キ掌ノ處ニテ受留メ(一
圖參照)直ニ手首ヲシカト摑ミ又捕身ノ方ハ摑レタル手ノ指先ヲ伸シタルマ、急ニ
下ノ方ヘ切落スベシ(二圖參照)此時手先ノミ下ラヌ樣臂ト手先ト同樣ニ下スベシ

一逆手 ギャクデ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト仝ジ樣ニ膝ノ上ニ手ヲ置テ對座シ受
ノ方ハ我左右ノ手先ヲ逆ニ
甲ヲ我方ヘ向ケ小指ヲ上ニ
成シ拇指ヲ下ヨリ外ノ方ヘ
廻シテ左右ノ手首ヲシ

四十一

...and the remaining fingers being oriented so as to be pointed upwards, palm open and up. (In
reference to Illustration One) One rather directly ignores [the other wrist] which has been grabbed a
hold of. And also, about the way the defender moves, having been grabbed a hold of and extending the
fingertips of that [captured] hand, one rather quickly strikes downwards [across the opponent's right
forearm] as if to cut the limb off. (In reference to Illustration Two) At this point, don't be so foolish as
to turn the fingertips downwards since the fingertips and his elbow are now in the same position and
that can be driven downwards.

-- Gyakute Hand Reversing

Regarding this fighting technique, as with the way things were done in those techniques before this
one, the hands are placed up on the knees, while seated across from one another. As the defender, the
direction of your own right and left fingertips are used to turn his hands to face away from you, back of
his hands to the inside. His pinky finger will be turned upwards, and the thumb downward towards the
outside. Rotate the left and right wrists...

41
カト摑ムナリ(一圖參照)捕身ノ方ハ摑マレ
タル左右ノ手ノ指先ヲ柔ラカニ延揃テ少シ
外ヘ開ク心持ニテ急ニ左右一時ニ手先ヲ充
分ニ突キ出スベシ(二圖參照)

一逆指 ギヤクユビ

此手合ノ形モ前ノ如ク相對座爲シ請身ノ者
右手ニテ捕身ノ左リノ指先ヲ甲ノ方ヨリ摑
ミ内平ノ方ヲ上ニ向ケテ强ク揚ルナリ(圖
參照)此時捕身ハ拇指ヲシカト曲テ掌ニ付手腕ノ關節ヲ下タヘ押シ付腹ト臂ト離レ
ヌ樣ニ成スベシ此形モ左右同樣ナリ

一片胸捕 カタムナドリ

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ者ハ左手ニテ捕身ノ左右

四十二

... that were just grabbed. (In reference to Illustration One) The way that the attacker has grabbed a
hold of you, the fingertips are to be kept relaxed and flexible, and extended out somewhat to the open
outside. With some sense of quickness, with the fingertips of both right and left hand simultaneously
thrust outwards with sufficient force to push away (In reference to Illustration Two).

-- Gyaku Yubi Finger Reversing

Even with this fighting technique it's pretty much like with the ones before, seated confrontational to
one another. The person who initiates it will use their right hand, the attacker will extend his fingertips
to the left, grabbing flatly to the inside and facing upwards. He will raise up with some degree of
force. (In reference to the illustrations) At this point, bend the attacker's thumb back into his hand
while clinging to it. Keep the joint of your arm open and down, pushing [his arm and hand assembly]
in towards his hip. Separating his elbow [away from his body] like this when doing so. About this
Kata technique, the left and right side versions are identical.

-- Kata Muna Dori Single Lapel Capture


About this fighting technique, and the person who initiates in it, with the left hand they gather and
take...

42
ノ前襟ヲ一ッニ摑ミ右手ニテ頭ヲ打タソト
爲スナリ(一圖參照)此際身ノ方ハ右手ヲ押
シ拇指ノ掌ヲ咽喉ノ中ノ少シ凹ミタル

處へ掛ケ右膝ヲッキタルマヽツマ先ヲ立テ左足ヲ後へ大キク踏ミ開キ膝頭ガ前へ
伏サヌ樣ニシテ腰

四十三

... a grip on both the left and right lapels. Doing what he does as he makes the strike against the head
with his right hand (In reference to Illustration One), at this time, about the direction of the body, you
will extend your right hand pushing through against his throat which is somewhat caught in the crook
of the thumb and palm. You are snaring him by having come up on one knee, standing on the tips of
the toes of the left foot which is to the rear. Largely, having steeped out into the opening on the front
kneecap and inclining towards him, hip upraised.

43
ヲ揚ゲ右手ニテ我ガ左リノ前ノ襟
ヲ持チ充分ニ右手ヲ張リ躰ヲ眞ス
グニ押シテ左リノ前ノ臂ヲ張リ乍
ラ襟ヲ肩ノ方へ引キ放ス(二圖參
照)

一兩胸捕 リヤウムナドリ

此手合ノ形ハ前ノ如ク相對座シテ
請身ノ者ヨリ左右ノ手ニテ胸グラ
ヲ取ルナリ捕身ノ方ハ先ヅ右ノ手
ガ上ナル時ハ左手ノ指先ヲ延揃へ
臂ト指先ト平ラカニ爲シ其中程ノ甲端ノ方ヲ尺澤へ掛ケテ(伹シ尺澤トハ手首ノ曲
リメヨリ拇指ノ通リヲ一寸五分程離レタル處ヲ云フ)强押付テ手先ヲ左手ノ下へ入
レ右手ニテ我左リノ指先ヲ下ヨリ摑ミ左ノ臂ヲ下ゲ乍ラ右手ニテ我手

四十四

... a grip on both the left and right lapels. With the right hand, reach across to one's own left and grab to
brace the lapels. Pulling sufficiently with the right hand to straighten [the garments] across your body.
The elbow being thus drawn across the front of your body towards your left, release your [right] lapel
by pulling it towards your [right] shoulder. (In reference to Illustration Two)

-- Ryō Muna Dori Both Lapels Capture

About this fighting technique, much as with the others that came before, seated in confrontation facing
one another, the person who initiates does so by grabbing a hold of the chest with both the left and
right hands. About the way the attacker attacks, right from the start with the right hand rising at the
time, as you extend the fingertips of the left hand keep them level with the elbow and at about the
midway point between you and the opponent snare him at the shakutaku/or/shattaku ("foot deep
swamp") vital point [bottom of the inner elbow]. (They say that one should slowly grind shattaku
("foot deep swamp") vital point while bending his wrist back so that his thumb is bent back at a
distance of about one and a half inches.) Sharply push the fingertips of {his?] left hand down and in,
while with your right hand grab the fingertips and pull down towards your left also pulling down on his
elbow with your right hand...

44
Translator's Note: I should point out that the illustrations appear to have been drawn in “mirror-reverse” as if one was watching
someone do it.

Translator's Note: The first line on this page, at characters 4 &5 indicate the usage
of the right hand ( 右 手 migi-te) whereas there is a hand-written note in the text that
indicates instead the left hand ( 左 手 hidari-te). This is quite similar to the text of
theHayanawa Kappo Kenpō Zukai Zen which we translated and made available.
There were some number of seemingly obvious, or likely, reverse descriptions that
were documented in that text.
先ヲ押シ上ゲルナリ(二圖參照)此際受ハ左手ヲ放スベシ又捕ハ直グニ右手ノ指ヲ
延シ甲端ニナシテ手首ノ曲リメヨリ少シ元ノ處ヲ尺澤へ掛ケ右膝ハ突キタル儘ッ
マヲ立左足ヲ後へ大キク踏ミ開キ左手ニテ我左リ襟ヲ持チ体ヲ眞スグニシテ襟ヲ
引キ上ゲ乍ラ右手ノ指先ノ下ラヌ樣押落スナリ

一小手返 コテガイシ

此手合ノ形ハ前ノ如ク相對坐シ此度ハ捕身ノ方ヨ
リ左手ノ拇指ノ平ヲ受ノ右手ノ甲へ掛ケ四指ヲ拇
指ノ方ヨリ掌ノ方へ掛ケテ柔ヲカニ受ノ手ノ指先
ヲ上ニ向ケテ面ト等分ニ上ゲ又右手モ同樣ニ拇指
ヲ左リノ拇指ト重ネテ四指ヲ掌へ掛ケ

四十五

... but while pushing up with the tips of the fingers. (In reference to Illustration Two) About the
circumstances of the defense, one would free up the left hand and as one makes the capture and you
are immediately extending the fingers of the right hand to about the point when reaching the boundary
edge of the other party, bend his wrist backwards somewhat making a grip handle of it. Snare him at
Shakutaku//Sattaku ("Foot Deep Swamp") vital point [bottom of the inner elbow] About the right knee
it is thrust out as one is standing on the left foot which is to the rear. Largely having steeped out into
the opening, one grabs one's own lapel and pulls it up across one's own body to the left so as to
straighten [one's garments], while using the fingertips of the right hand to push and drop him.

-- Kote Gaishi Wrist Reversing

About this fighting technique, pretty much like the ones before, one is seated confrontational across
from one another. About the circumstance, from the way the attacker attacked, the fingers of the left
hand kept level while used to fend off and snare the right hand of the other party driving his his away
from the four fingers [of his hand] more in the direction alongside his palm. Fending off gently by
directing the fingers of the hand upward coequal to his face. And if so doing to the right hand, it is
important that the thumb be driven to [your?] left [away from his body?] while clinging with your four
fingers to his palm.

45

Translator's Note: I should point out that this page entry and several others when describing the techniques used a language construct
quite like this one (from this page): migi te no yubi wo noshi kōtan ninashite (右手ノ指ヲ延シ甲端ニナシテ) → Mod Jap (右手の指を
延 し 甲 端 に な し て ) translating as “...extending the fingers of the right hand to about the point when reaching the boundary edge of the
other party...” The point we are tryong to explain is in regard to the use of the word kōtan (甲端) “the boundary edge of the other party.”.
NOT EVERY INSTANCE in the text holds th e immediate potential we are about to indicate. But this page and some few others most certainly
do. The word kōtan ( 甲 端 ) when not in reference to armor would be translated as “the boundary edge of the other party.” When in
reference to armor being involved it would be translated “edge-of-the-armor” especially in relationship to the parts of armor about the
head neck and shoulders, as well any jutting edge (such as the jut out of the lip of the gauntlet.) If the language elements sustain it (such
as in this case, where from first word to last word in the clause, it certainly does.) Then this example could (at the same time, if armor
were involved) be instead translated as “...extending the fingers of the right hand out to the edge of his armor...” The technical
descriptions of Kata patterns in this book that include kōtan ( 甲 端 ) or an adaptation of the elements of kōtan which have the two
characters kō ( 甲 ) and tan ( 端 ) within one or two characters of each other: most all of these can be alternatively translated as “...the edge
of his armor...” They appear to have been written with specific characters that allow EITHER understanding.
The lower half of the pages contains a different but similar example, using the construct: uke no migite no otsu-(h)e kake (受ノ右手ノ甲へ
掛ケ ) → Mod Jap (受の右手の甲え掛け), wherein this would have referred to armor being involved the pronunciation instead would
presumably be:uke no migite no kō-(h)e kake (which demonstrates that when in regard to armor there is sometimes a change in the way
the exact same words are going to be pronounced.) When said this way, the translation would be instead: “...to fend off and snare the
right gauntlet...” So we see from this kind of textual adaptation that it was written in such a way as to lend itself to both understandings, a
matter of the form of literary language it was written in.

Since this is the case and it’s an interesting and useful point, we should identify where these language statements came from,
which of the Parent school of the Tenjin shinyō ryū contributed to the very lines of text and their wording. In this case it was
generally known not be be so much the Kitō ryū as it was instead the likes of the Yōshin ryū and the Shinyō ryū (probably what
was meant by having namedShinshin ryū?)
(一圖參照)乍ラ左ノ膝ヲ少シク橫へ開キ右足
ヲ受ノ右脇へ踏ミ出シ受ノ手首ヲ大キク廻ス
心持ニテ我左ノ膝ノ際へ受身ノ掌ヲ押シ付ケ
体ヲ倒スナリ(二圖參照)此形モ左右共同樣ニ
捕ルべシ

一兩手捕 リヤウテドリ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ノ如ク對坐シテ
受身ノ者ハ右ノ手ヲ先キニ左ノ手ヲ次
ニ爲シ捕身ノ右ノ手首ヲシカト捕へ左
ノ腰ノ方へ引キ付ル

四十六

(In reference to Illustration One) While dropping to the left knee somewhat out into the open, one
fends off by taking a step towards the right side with the right foot, largely there is a sense of the
defender turning his wrists. The positioning of one's left knee as the defender pushes away with the
palm of his hand, to bodily drop [the opponent]. (In reference to Illustration Two) Of this Kata
technique, one is controlling to the left and right at the same time when making the capture.

-- Kote Dori Wrist Capture

About this fighting technique and the way the capture is made, much the same as before, you are
seated across from one another. About the defender, the tip of the right hand and next the left hand is
used. The defender ignores the grip on his right wrist and instead pulls [the opponent] across the left
hip.

46
ナリ此時捕身ノ者ハ受身ノ者ノ引ク力ニ先立チテ指先ヲ延シ急ニ突出シ又急ニ引
寄セ小手先ヲ受ノ手首ノ上ニ爲シ(圖參照)又腰ノ邊迄突キ出スべン此形モ左右同
樣ナリ

一氣捕 キドリ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト同ジク
對坐シテ左右ノ手ヲ膝上
ニ置捕身ノ方ハ右足ヲ前
へ立テ乍ラ右手ノ指ヲ柔
カニ押へ甲ノ方ニテ受身
ノ膻中(但シ膻中トハ胸部
ノ中程ヲ去フ)ヲ當ルト同
時ニ左手ニテ右ノ膝頭ヲ
ハネ上テ倒シ直ニ左右ノ
手ニテ我陰嚢ヲ圍フべシ
(圖參照)

四十七

About the attacker at the time, the defender takes the lead and sharply pulls on him. As the fingertips
are extending out, one swiftly gives a pushing thrust, swiftly tricking him to fend off by suddenly
pulling him towards you instead, bringing your wrists up as you do. (In reference to the Illustrations)
Also one makes the pushing thrust out from alongside the hip. This Kata technique controls from the
left and right sides at the same time.

-- Ki Dori Spirit Capture

About this fighting technique, same as before, seated across from one another. Both left and right
hands placed on the knees. About the way that the defender counterattacks, he is standing with his right
foot forward while giving a gentle shove with the fingers of the right hand which is planted in the
middle of the attacker's chest (pushing a little slowly hand planted in the middle of the chest and
pushing all the way through.) At the same time with the left hand being placed in the air just above and
to the right of the kneecap when immediately dropping him. Then [having done so] immediately cup
your testicles with both the right and left hands [because he is in position to kick you there] (In
reference to the Illustrations).

47
一天倒 テントウ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ請身ノ者ハ右手ヲ伸シテ捕
身ノ後へ廻シ左手ヲ前ニ爲シシカト抱へルナリ
捕身ノ方ハ我全身ヲ柔ヲカニ伸上リ右足ヲ後へ
踏ミ開キ乍ラ左手ノ平ヲ請身ノ背ニ掛ケ右腕ノ
肘ヨリ上ノ方へヌキ出シ拳ヲ天倒(天倒トハ小兒
ノヒヨムキト云フ處也)へ當テ圖ノ如シ强ク向へ
ッキ倒スナリ

一扱捕 モギトリ

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ者ハ左手ニ小太刀ヲ携へテ
座シ右手ニテ拔キ頭ヘ切付ルナリ此際捕身ノ方ハ左手ヲ開キテ甲ノ方ヲ頭ヘ付

四十八

-- Tentō Dropped from Heaven

About the way the capture is made in this fighting technique, and the initiator. Extending out the right
hand, from the front one rotates the left hand up behind him but otherwise ignoring the grip he has
taken upon you. The way that the bodily capture is done, one pushes upwards gently, using the whole
body, stepping into the opening with the right foot to the rear. The left hand being held level to and
snaring at the initiators backside, the elbow of the right arm directed upward as the palm is produced
against the tentō ("Dropped from the Heavens") vital point [crown of the head] (Regarding tentō
("Dropped from the Heavens") vital point it is said to be the 'soft spot' on the crown of the head on
very young children) the strike is pretty much as one sees it in the illustration. It is not difficult to drop
him when having thrust in this particular direction.

-- Mogi Tori Handling and Capturing

About this fighting technique, and the initiator. Wielding a short sword (kodachi) which he had drawn
with his right hand from his seated position, he cuts at the head, for instance. The way the capture will
be done on this occasion, open the left hand and cling somewhat to his head...

48
少シ頸ヲ前ヘ出シテ手ノ内平ノ
方ニテ切付ル手首ノ處ヲ受止メ
テシカト握リ(一圖參照)次ニ右
足ヲ前、踏ミ立テ乍ラ右手ノ拇
指ヲ甲ノ方ヘ掛ケ四指ヲ内ノ方
ヘ掛ケテシカト摑ミ右足ヲ後ヘ
大ク踏開キ乍ラ手ヲ下ヘ丸ク船
底ナリニ右足ノ爪先迄引付此際
請ハ前ヘ伏スペシ又捕ハ左手ニ
テシカト手首ヲ下へ押付ケ右手
ノ大指ニテ甲ヲ押シ小太刀ヲ扱
ギ取ルナリ(二圖參照)

四十九

... bringing him forward by his neck, By the way you direct the flat side of the hand, as if cutting at his
wrist with a sword to fend off and halt him, otherwise ignoring to take a grip (In reference to the
Illustration One). Next having the right foot to the front, stepping to stand up, while snaring the other
party's right thumb and also snaring the four fingers from inside but otherwise-pointedly-ignoring-to-
take-a-grip, your right foot to the rear and largely having stepped into the open, while bringing the
hand downwards in a circle, as if one were guiding a boat [along the waterway], pulling him down
alongside the tips of the toes of the right foot. Upon this occasion he is getting what he asked for
having been prostrated before you, and also, about the capture, it's done with the left hand while
otherwise-pointedly-ignoring-to-take-a-grip on his wrist. Pushing down on him [after dropping him]
while the thumb of the right hand is used to push him down, take hold of the short sword (kodachi) and
capture him with it. (In reference to the Illustration Two)

49
一打手 ウチデ

此手合ノ形モ請身ノ方ヨリ右ノ拳ニテ

頭ヲ打ツナリ捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ指ヲ延

揃テ甲ノ方ヲ頭へ付少シ肘ヲ上ゲ頭ヲ

前へ進メテ受留メ(一圖參照)直チニ手

首ヲ握リ右足ヲ受身ノ右脇へ踏ミ出ス

ト同時ニ右手ノ指ヲ伸シ甲端ノ方

五十

-- Uchite Striking the Hand

About this fighting technique, and the way that the initiator strikes with the right fist at your head. The
defender uses their left hand extending the fingers and clinging to the [attacker's] head. The elbow is
rising up, in front of his head as one advances, having fended him off and stopped him. (In reference to
the Illustration One) Immediately one takes grip on his wrist, the defender steps out to the right side
with the right foot, while at the same time with the right hand, one pushes [his arm] to the outer
edge…

50
ヲ腕ノ附根ト肘ノ中程へ掛ケテ(二圖參照)我左ノ方へ大ク廻ス樣ニメ倒シ其マヽ
受ノ手ノ小指ノ方ヲ上ニメシカト押へルナリ是迄ノ手解拾貳手ハ强テ掛聲ヲ要セ
ザリシモ初段眞ノ位ノ形ヨリ後ハ必ズ掛聲ヲ發スベシ尤モ懸聲ハ其流儀ノ掟ニ因
テ種々異ナルト雖モ先本流ニ於テハ常ニ發聲ノ調子ニ順テ業ヲナシ或ハ業ノ調子
ニ順テ聲ヲ發スル事アリ而シテ此發聲ノ度數ニ附テハ別段定規ナシト雖モ之ヲ亂
リニ力ヲ入レ或ハ氣拔ケノ如キ聲ヲ發スル事甚ダ冝シカラズ爲ニ却テ業ニ不熟ヲ
來ス者ナリ故ニ請身ノ方ハ初學者ヲシテ其業ノ調子ヲ速カナラシメンカ爲メニ發
聲ノ度數自然ニ多ク又捕身ノ者ニ在テハ始メ中終リト三度位聲ヲ掛ケルヲ度ト爲
スベシ而シテ此始メテ發スル所ノ聲ハ未ダ何事ニモトリ懸ルノ意少シモ無ク志氣
力共ニ能ク鎭ミタル前心ノ音調ナリ次ニ發スル所ノ聲ハ業ヲ成スノ調子ニ順テ全
身ニ滿タル氣ノ勢ヒ自然ニ發スル

五十一

... and clings to his arm snaring him at the inside of the elbow joint. (In reference to the Illustration Two) It
is largely by means of rotating to one's own left side, dropping [oneself?], that being done by fending him
off alongside the pinky finger of the hand parrying upwards in that direction and pushing sharply against
him. About the previous 12 hand release techniques (te hodoki) up to this point, one had not been required
to voice objection to his attempt at taking you by force. From the Shin no kurai True positions of the Kata
Patterns of the Shodan Initial Level Transmission, and invariably afterwards, one ought to produce spirited
verbal protest. About the outcries given, there are rules in the customs of the school (ryūgi) but there is
some disagreement about various factors, nevertheless, there are of course the primary points made by the
school itself. And as always there are rules about the timing of spirited outcries and when techniques
should be lacking of spirited outcries. Sometimes the rules about the timing with which spirited outcries are
given depends upon what kind of spirited outcry that it is. However, in regard to the over-repeating of
numerous spirited outcries, there are no lack of rules against this particular sort of thing. Notwithstanding
that one might enter forcefully in full disregard of such rules, or possibly become pretty much as if dis-
spirited [failing to utter any]. It is quite fine whatever use of the voice that one makes, depending upon
what the techniques were that got used, and naturally, there could be a greater number of outcries that got
made that way. As that is likely the case when one is proceeding with otherwise immature techniques. And
coincidentally, about the way that an initiator attacks, the Initial grade students are taught early on a
suitable timing within the techniques themselves. Yet there can be some advantage to multiple outcries of
objection, and there are the beginning, middle and ending stages that an attacker uses, and so one will have
made three fold over some number of spirited outcries against them! And so this is how one begins to make
utterance [of the spirited outcries], capturing in whatever way one does by the voiced objection to the
circumstances. Somewhat having intended to snare him by it and having no lack of a sense of this, as the
force of intention to do so frequently comes to bear and to the tune of one's initial perceptions of the affair.
What next might be voiced under these circumstances and with what timing rather depends upon how
vigorously over-excited one gets as can naturally occur given what reasonable tune come out in it all.

51
通心ノ音調ナリ旣ニ擧動ノ終臨テ發スル聲ハ心ヲ靜ニシテ能ク位ヲトリ全身柔
ラカク充分ニ滿渡リタル氣少シモ拔ケル所無キ殘心ノ音調ナリ此ノ知ク前心通
心殘心ト區別シテ聲ヲ發スルニ至テハ業モ自カラ柔ラカニシテ速カナル者ナリ
昔日本流ニ於テ序皮急ヲ三ケノ傳唱へ又是ヲ別テ九ケノ傳トナシタルモ皆前ニ
伸タル調子ノ塲合ト異ナラズ故ニ發音ノ度數調子ニハ尤モ心ヲ用ュベキ者ナリ

五十二

Already the circular ring of conduct is completing its loop, and about the use of voice, when the heart
and mind are calm, quite frequently one can make the capture by use of the voice alone. One having
sufficiently conveyed by it the spirit which permeates the entire body and even so with some
gentleness, as one slips out and away from the circumstance uneventfully, but to the tune of Zanshin
continued awareness when doing so. Knowing this then one makes a distinction between Zenshin
Predisposition, Tsūshin Immediate then-and-there attention and Zanshin Continued awareness. And
about approaching the use of voice according to all of this, one learns techniques suitable for this, even
the more gentle ones, early on. People in the schools from the old days kept the traditions of the
Jōhakyū Three parts of performance and engagement, even the traditional nine parts of this teaching
and never relinquishing it. It extends itself through everything beforehand as the very timing of
circumstance itself, even through the changes that occur. Consequently, such persons even followed
[the tradition] by pronunciation [of the name Jōhakyū] with a rhythm of some frequency [Jōhakyū,
Jōhakyū, Jōhakyū] so as to be able to express the core usage of it.

52

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初段 居捕
一眞之位 シンノクライ

此手合ノ形ハ相方互ニ六尺程離レテ對坐シ禮ヲ成シ捕身ノ方ハ兩足ヲツマ立右膝
ヲツキ左膝ハツマ先ヲ揃へタルマヽニテ少シ上テ開キ搆へルナリ(一圖參照)此時受
身ノ者ヨリ懸聲ヲ爲シ次ニ捕身ノ者モ聲ヲ懸ケルナリ而シテ我躰ノ中心ノ崩レヌ
樣充分

五十二

Shodan Idori Initial Level Seated Captures

-- Shin No Kurai True Positions

About this fighting technique, you and your training partner are seated about six feet away facing each
other, give the bow. About the way that the attacker attacks, he starts knee walking on both legs,
thrusting out the right knee then followed by the left knee, gathering [the garment?] somewhat
upwards about the kneecaps to help keep his posture open enough to move. (In reference to Illustration
One) At this time the defender gives an outcry to protest (kakegoe) which next the attacker gives an
outcry of reply (goe wo kakeru) and then paying particular attention so as to not allow one's own body
to become disheveled (kuzurenu → kuzureru)...

52

Translator's Note: The text uses tsumatachi つ ま 立 for “knee walking”, probably for → 褄 立 ("standing on the skirt of the
hakama").
ニ意ヲ用ヒテ眞直ニ立上リ左ノ
前へ筯違ニ二尺五寸程左足ヲ踏
出シ体ノカガマヌ樣ニシテ少シ
ク膝ヲ張リテ腰ヲ下ゲ請身ノ右
ノ膝先八寸計リ離レタル所へ右
足ヲ踏出シ而シテ右手ノ指先ヲ
揃テ伸シ我右腰ノ邊ヨリ請身ノ
兩眼ヲ目掛指先ニテ我陰嚢ノ邊
迄丸ク大キク拂フべシ是ヲ霞ト
云フ是ニテ少シ請身ノヒルマ處
ヲ見テ左右ノ手ノ指ヲ揃へ伸シ左リ手ノ小指ノ方ヲ請身ノ咽喉へ當テ右手モ之ニ
添テ同時ニ左足ヲ請ノ右ノ後へ踏込ナガラ膝ヲツキ其時ノ我体ノ勢ヒニ

一眞之位

五十三

...stand up rather straight [in the seated position] to the left front, when he has stepped in with his left
foot at about 2 feet distance and he is close enough to use chopsticks. Do not bend the body as you do
all of this! Somewhat extend the knee while keeping the hips lowered, planning to advance upon the
initiator while yet maintaining a distance of 8 inches from his left knee cap. Step with your right foot
and then extend outreaching with the fingers of the right hand, the attacker will watch with both eyes
peeled as you begin to cup and shield your testicles with your fingertips, as you sweep towards him in
an arcing path. They say that this is done just as much to 'enmist' him [e.g. it's a smoke screen deception] This
makes the attacker wonder what you are doing and planning as he watches. Both left and rights hands
are to be extended in outreaching to draw near the pinky finger of his left hand, then strike him in the
throat using the right hand as a propping brace for the blow. At the same time, the attacker's left foot
will be back to his right rear side, which he will thrust out that knee as he takes a step knee walking, at
that point moving one's own body vigorously…

-- Shin No Kurai True Postures

53
テ請ノ体ヲ向フノ隅ノ方へ倒シ左
手ノ小指ヲ下ニ爲シ拇指ヲ上ニシ
請ノ左襟ヲ余リ强ク力ヲ入レヌ樣
指先丈少シ懸テ握リ右手ニテ請身
ノ右ノ臂ノ邊ヲ輕ク指ヲ伸ヲノ持
右足ハ左ノ膝頭ト三尺五六寸計リ
離レタル橫ノ方へ膝ノ前へ伏サヌ
樣ニ開キテ爪先ヲシカト踏シメ面
ハ右ノ爪先ノ方ヲ向左膝ハ右足ノ
爪先ヨリ三尺五六寸離レテ請ノ右
ノ耳ノ際へ突キ体ノ中心ヲ失ハザル樣臍下ノ氣ヲ滿テ充分ニ位ヲトルべン(二圖參
照)此時受身ノアイズニ由テ直ニ左右ノ手ヲ放シ我

五十四

...to bodily drop the attacker in his corner. Keeping the pinky finger of the left hand turned downward
and the the thumb upward, one enters across from the attackers left collar and somewhat snaring him
having gripped the excess alongside [the collar's material fabric] firmly with the fingers. With the right
hand take a light grip on the attacker's right elbow with your fingers extended out. You are positioned
so that the right foot is at a distance of some three and a half feet away from [¿his?] left kneecap, your
other knee is planted flat on the ground to the front. Having stepped [in the squatting seat] out into the
open ignoring the position of the toes. About the face side [of the bodily arrangement], the fingers of
the right hand are just like the left knee. The toes of the right foot are at a distance of about one and a
half feet from the attacker when one thrust in [the hand] alongside the attacker's left ear, but not yet
causing him to physically lose balance by his center-of-gravity. But he is otherwise sufficiently
disturbed enough to be thrown from this positioning. (In reference to Illustration Two) At this point the
defender has not entirely come physically together actually meeting with [the opponent], both left hand
right hands remain utterly free, such as when cupping the testicles.

54

Translator's Note: The text uses chūshin (中心) for the term “center of balance” in the construct karada no chūshin wo ushinaha-zaru
( 体 ノ 中 心 ヲ 失 ハ ザ ル ) → Mod Jap ( 体 の 中 心 を 失 は ざ る ) or “...but not yet causing him to physically lose balance by his center-of-
gravity...”. This is not entirely uncommon a usage for the term chūshin (中心 ) when occurring in the construct karada no chūshin (体ノ中
心 ) or something quite like it. The text makes common usage of the word chūshin ( 中心 ) and, it would seem, under any number of the
definitions and expanded definitions the term may be given. SEPARATE NOTE: Again the text makes use of a declination of the Verbal
Idiomatic Construct ki wo michiru (気を満る) in the declinated Past tense form of ki wo michi(-ri)te (気を満て) In all fairness, it could be a
declination off the form of the Verbal Construct as ki wo mitsu (気を満つ ) which is why I rendered the romaji as ki wo michi(-ri)te, trying
to indicate that the more correct pronunciation might prove to be ki wo michite, instead. Ki wo mitsu (気を満つ) is usually described as the
root-base form of the verbal construct, from which the other familiarforms of it derive. In either event, it is found in the third line from
the bottom of the page in the construct: Seika no ki wo michi(-ri)te jūbun nikurai wo torubeshi ( 臍下ノ氣ヲ滿テ充分ニ位ヲトルべン ) →
Mod Jap ( 臍下の気を満て充分に位をとるべ ) or by way of translation: “...But he is otherwise sufficiently disturbed enough to be thrown
from this positioning...” This comes without the sense of dishevelment indicated by the well known term Kuzushi (from the verb
kuzuru), but shows that, sometimes, the two terms (ki wo michiru) and (kuzushi) have similar usage regarding the set up that allows one
to throw an opponent (both terms can mean “disheveling”, but completely different forms of disheveling.) One knows that this is
interesting, from some perspectives. SEPARATE NOTE: The text spoke again of the “cupping of the testicles” in the very last line and said:
“...both left hand right hands remain utterly free, such as when cupping the testicles...” Further backing up what the text already said
about the covering of the testicles as being a distraction and ‘smoke screen’ trick. What it said here was that such moves can be made to
dissuade an attacker from reaching for our arms (they don’t want to be seen reaching towards our groin. It’s not very manly.) The source
of the lines of the text to this point through the entire section appears to be from the parent schools Yōshin ryū and Shinyō ryū .
陰嚢ヲ圍ヒ請ノ擧動ニ心ヲ付べシ(之レテ殘心ト云フ)此形ノ基本ハ始メヨリ終リ
迄實ニ能ク位ヲ取ルヲ以テ眞ノ位ト名ル者ナリ

一添捕 ソイドリ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ右脇へ七八寸離レテ坐シ受ヨ
リ聲ヲ懸次ニ捕身ノ方モ聲ヲ懸テ右ノ膝ヲ少シ左
リへ寄方右ノ足ヲ爪立右ノ膝ハ突キタルマヽ腰ヲ
上ゲテ請身ノ後へ左足ヲ踏出シ請身ノ右襟ヲ肩ヨ
リ七八寸下リ右手ニテ持輕ク左へ送リ左手ノ拇指
ヲ下ニシ小指ヲ上ニシ受身ノ後ロヨリ左リノ頸ノ
處へ出シ右ヨリ送リタル襟ヲ持右手ハ受身ノ体ヨ
リ離

五十五

One would be giving some attention to the conduct of the initiator (they say that this is Zanshin Continued
alertness). About the basics (kihon) of the Kata technique, from its beginning through to its conclusion,
frequently one can make the capture from this position. That is why practitioners gave it the name Shin no
kurai True positions.

-- Soi Dori Propping Capture

About this fighting technique, toward the defenders right side seated at a distance of some seven or eight
inches away, the defender gives an outcry of protest, and the attacker gives an outcry of reply. Moving the
right knee somewhat to the left so as to draw nearer to him. Standing on the toes of the right foot, having
dropped to the right knee, bringing the hip up higher, as one is moving toward the rear of the attacker.
Stepping with the left foot, one reaches with the right hand over the attacker's shoulder [from behind] and
grabbing his right collar about seven or eight inches down its length. Nimbly send him on his way by
driving the thumb of your left hand downward, with the pinky finger pointed up. The defender proceeds to
drive [the attacker's head] into his own left rear, dispatching him to the right side. About the grip on the
collar with the right hand, it is done in a fashion so that there is not much distance from the defender's own
body.

55
レヌ樣ニシテ右ノ肩先ヨリ手首
迄指ヲ伸シテナデ下ケテ握リ
(一圖參照)同時ニ腰ヲ下ゲ右腕
ヲ充分ニ上へ揚ゲテ受身ノ脇ノ
下へ我頭ヲ付腕ヲ巻付ル樣ニシ
テ我手ト受身ノ手トヲ受身ノ腹
ノ處へ押ツケ其マヽ其へ橫ニ寐
少シ右ノ腕ニテハネル心持ニシ
テ受身ノ体ニ我体ヲ添タルマヽ
一轉スレバ受身ノ体ハ向フへナ
ガル也此時ニ受身ヲ起サヌ樣我体ノミ起キテ頭ヲ揚ゲ左膝ヲ受身ノ右ノ耳脇ノ處
へ突右足ハ左ノ膝頭ヨリ右へ三尺五六寸離レテ橫へ一文字ニ開キ爪先ヲシ

五十六

From overtop his right shoulder next one extends the fingers and takes grip on his wrist and drives him
downwards by it (In reference to Illustration One). While at the same time, driving the hips downward,
pulling sufficiently upward on his right arm, pulling the opponent down by his armpit. One can also do
so by winding the arm around one's own head, with some sense of springing upward when one does so
[turning him out to one side]. One can also do so by taking the opponent's hand alongside one's own
hip using your hand to guide, pulling him across [your hip], flattening him somewhat to the ground. It
is done with some sense of springing upward with his right arm, the defender using his own body to
prop [the arm] against, and then one would make a single turn. About the defender's body, sending him
in a certain direction when faced with him, like this at the time, one does not really rise to one's feet at
all when doing so. Rising only slightly with one's own body, and so raising the head, the defender's left
knee being alongside his ear and armpit, dropping to the right knee, and the left knee cap to the right
side to a distance of some three and a half feet. Ignoring the position of the toes as one steps open like
this into Ichimonji Straight line posture.

56
カト踏付襟ヲ持タル手ハ左後ノ方へ引樣ニシ右手首ハ我右ノ乳ノ邊へ少シ離シテ
持居リ臂ヲ張リ肩ヲ下ゲ面ヲ右ノ爪先へ向ケ氣ヲ臍下ニ納メテ左右共引分シメル
ナリ(二圖參照)此形ハ始メヨリ終迄我体ヲ受身ノ体ニ添タルマヽ捕故即チ添捕ト
云フ又終ニハ請身ノ相圖ヲ聞テ放シ敵ニ眼目ヲ附殘心爲ス事前ト同樣ナ

一御前捕 ゴゼンドリ

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ右脇へ七八寸離レテ坐シ受身ノ者聲ヲ掛次ニ捕身ノ者聲ヲ懸
先右手ノ平ニテ受身ノ右ノ手先ヲ輕クオサへナがヲ右足ヲ受身ノ左ノ膝先八寸程
離レタル處へ踏ミ出シ左手ノ拇指ヲ受身ノ左手ノ甲へ付余ノ四指ヲ内平ノ方へ掛
ケルト同時ニ左足ヲ右足ト揃テ立時右手ヲ放シ左手ノ方ヲ前同樣ニ掛ルナリ此ノ
手ノ持樣ハ始メ左リノ拇指ヲ甲ノ方へ付余ノ四指ヲ

五十七

Having taken a hold of the collar, about that hand, one is pulling him into the left rear by it. About his right
wrist as one does so, it's at some distance from one own right breast, one has also taken an extended grip on
hs elbow using it to pull downward on his shoulder. To it's front face side, the fingertips are facing in on it
[gripping], bringing him to that unsettling end (ki wo seika ni osamete [SEE NOTES]) pulling and controlling
him both right and left during the stand off. (In reference to Illustration Two) About this Kata technique,
from the beginning through to its conclusion, using one's own body to prop him by as the defender, and then
throwing him by it, namely they say that is a Propping capture (soe dori). And about the ending of it, pay
attention to the way that the attacker was illustrated in the illustration, since the main point is to have clung
with Zanshin Continued awareness, much the same as one would beforehand.

-- Gozen Dori Capturing in the Presence of Royalty

About this fighting technique, the attacker's armpit is only a distance of about seven or eight inches away,
while seated together. The defender gives an outcry of protest, next the attacker gives an outcry of reply.
With the fingertips of the right hand being held out level, the defender nimbly plants and pins his right foot
in place. The defender's left knee cap will have been at a distance of about eight inches away, as one takes a
step [knee walking] the thumb of the defender's left hand will be used to grip and cling to the attackers
thumb, the four fingers used to crush it back flat into the palm of his hand and clinging to him this way.
While at the same time, the left and right foot will be placed in a firm stance, at the time the right hand still
free, moves forward towards his left hand, and clings to it. The way that this hand takes grip, one begins to
the left of the attacker's thumb, and then clings with the remaining four fingers, especially to his pinky
finger.

57
Translator's Note: The text uses a very highly idiomatic expression (a real beauty of one, actually): ki wo seika ni osamete (氣ヲ臍下ニ
納メテ ) Mod Jap → ( 気を臍下に納めて ) by way of translation: “...bringing him to that unsettling end...” The literal elements would read
“...having brought the spirit in his lower abdomen to a finish...” It would also be possible to translate this something quite like: “...having
brought his intentions to a halt...”. Or “...having brought his intentions to an end...” Usage of the verb osameru ( 納める ) does include an
implied element of having lain him out flat, such as on the ground or across the top of something. Being that the verb is commonly used
to describe the placement of “offerings”, such as to the Gods or Higher ranked persons. Ergo, it would have been possible to translate ki
wo seika ni osamete (気を臍下に納めて) Mod Jap → (気を臍下に納めて) as: “..having submitted him prostrate upon the ground...”

小指ノ方ヨリ内平へ掛我手首ヲ内ノ方へ曲ゲ
ヲ甲ノ方ヲ下へ向樣ニシテ腕ヲ向へ伸セバ受
身ノ腕ハ逆ニナリ躰ハ自然ト前 へ伏ス樣ニ
ナルナリ此時又右手ヲ同ジ樣ニ掛ケテ兩足ヲ
揃テ躰ヲ眞直ニ爲シ手ハ少シモ引ク心持無ク
前へ伸ス樣ニスレバ受身ノ腕ハ自然ト逆ニナ
ル故体ハ充分ニ前へ伏ルナリ(一圖參照)此
時左足ヲ輕ク柔ラカニナシ受身ノ脇腹ヲ輕ク
爪先ニテ蹴其マヽ下へ蹈立ズニ直ニ左ノ後
ノ方へ斜ニ引テ膝ヲ付左右ノ手ハ少シモ引ク
心持

五十八

Having snared him level to the inside, bending it in to the inside of one's own wrist, bending it down
and back towards the opponent. In much the same fashion the arm has been drawn out extended, used
to guide him. About the defender's arms, when reversing [his hand] for instance, by it his body will be
brought forward and lain out flat. At this time, both hands being used to snare him, both feet will have
been planted, as the movements are being immediately made by the body itself. About the hands, the
way this is done lacks a sense of actually pulling on him, as otherwise it is done by the the extension
[of his arm] towards the front. About the defender's arms, there is the natural reversal being used. And
coincidentally about the body, it is used to bring him sufficiently forward so as to prostrate him (In
reference to Illustration One). At this time, one is rather nimble and flexible with the movements of the
left foot. And with some nimble agility of the sides of the body and the hips one kicks him with the tips
of the toes, but one does not directly step on and tread him down to stand on him. One pulls diagonally
into the left rear, keeping [the arm] adhered to your hip. About the left and right hands, there isn't the
slightest sense of pulling on him.

58
無ク体ト共ニ右足ヲ我在リノ膝頭ヨ
リ二尺余離レタル橫へ一文字ニ開キ
テ膝ノ前へ伏サヌ樣爪先ニ力ヲ入レ
面ヲ右へ向左右ノ手ハ終リ迄少シモ
引ク心持無クシテ拇指ニ力ヲ入レヌ
樣小指ノ方ヲ引クトモナク押ストモ
ナク丸ク自然ト操込ム樣ノ必持ニ爲
スベシ(二圖參照)而シテ受身ノ相圖
ヲ聞カバスグ左右ノ手ヲ放チ陰嚢ヲ
圍ヒ受身ノ方ヲ見殘必ナスベシ此形
ハ君公ノ御前ニ於テ人ヲ捕へルト云
フ心ニテ則チ御前捕ト号クル者ナリ

一袖車 ソデグルマ

五十九

The body together with one's right foot and kneecap remaining at a distance of some two feet, standing
in Ichimonji Straight line posture, he is on his knees being drawn into the front but not yet prostrated.
Digging in one's feet, face to the right front. About both the right and left hands, even through to the
conclusion there is no sense of pulling on him. One does it by digging in with the thumbs, there isn't
even any pulling done from the direction of the pinky fingers. There isn't even exactly any pushing in
much, it is simply the way it is naturally manipulated and that is the sense of it (In reference to
Illustration Two). So then, please pay attention to the way that the defender is illustrated in the
illustration, the left and right hands are free, and so can be used to cup-shield the testicles. The
defender would be maintaining observation in Zanshin Continued awareness. About this Kata
technique, they say that it is to be done in public before Nobility, when capturing someone, bearing
that in mind, it's why practitioners named it Capturing in the Presence of Nobility (gozen dori).

-- Sode Guruma Sleeve Wheel

59
此手合ノ形ハ始メハ眞之位ノ時ト同樣ニ六尺程離レテ
左右ノ足ヲ爪立左膝ヲ少シ上ゲ開テ構へ請身ノ者ヨリ
聲ヲ掛次ニ捕身ノ方聲ヲ掛テ左ヨリ右ト二タ足進ミ爪
先ヲ成丈ケ左右へ開テ踏右手ノ指先ヲ揃廷シ請身ノ右
ノ肩先へ輕ク掛ケ左足ヲ後へ踏込此 右足ト同時ニ左手
ノ甲ノ方ヲ上ニシテ拇指ヲ受身ノ左襟ノ内ノ方ニシ肩
ヨリ七八寸下リテ余リ强ク握リツメヌ樣ニ指先ヲマゲ
テ柔ラカニ持咽喉へ卷付樣ニ右へ寄セ又右手ニテ左リ
ノ肩先即チ衣ノ袖ノ附ギワヲ强ク握リツメヌ樣ニ左手
ト同樣ニ

六十

About this fighting technique, begin at the time with Shin no kurai True positions, while at the same
time you are six feet apart from one another, standing on the toes of the left and right foot, with the left
knee raised somewhat into the open, matching the posture of the opponent. The initiator gives an
outcry and next the defender gives an outcry of reply. From left to right advance on both feet, as much
as one can on tippy toes. Stepping into the opening left and right, firmly plant the fingertips of the
right hand on the top of the opponent's right shoulder, nimbly snaring him having stepped in behind
him with the left foot. This right foot step while raising the opponent's left arm upwards, the defender's
thumb on the inside of [the opponent's] left collar, seven or eight inches down [on the collar, reaching
across his shoulder from behind] and taking a rather firm grip on it. The grip of the fingers has a rather
gentle firmness to it. Wind [the collar] around his throat close to the right side, and with the right hand
being to the left of the shoulder, namely, take firm grip upon and cling to the sleeve of the garment. At
the same time...

60
指先ヲ曲ゲテ柔ラカニ持襟首ノ方へ引寄テ此方
左右ノ手ハ甲ノ方ヲ上ニシテ小指ノ方ヲ首筋へ
付衣ノ襟ト肩先ノ袖ノ附際トヲユルミノ無キ樣
ニシカト首筋へ巻付腕ヲ伸シテ少シモ前へ引キ
寄セル心持無ク我体ヲ眞直ニ立(一圖參照)左足
ノ膝ヲ充分ニ後ノ方へ下リテ突キ右足ヲ橫へ一
文字ニ開キ面ヲ右へ向左右ノ手ハ前へ引付ヌ樣
ニ小指ノ方ヨリ柔ラカニシメルナリ(二圖參照)
之ニテ受身ノ方相圖ヲナサバ手ヲ放シ前ノ形ト
同ジ一樣ニ殘心ナスベシ此形ハ衣ノ袖ニテ車ノ

六十一

...gently let the fingers bend a bit. Having gripped the collar at the neck and pulling him closer by it,
about the way that the right and left hand do this, coming up in the direction of the opponent, the pinky
finger comes alongside the nape of his neck and clings to the collar of the garment, clinging also to the
sleeve at the top of shoulder but without having tipped him backwards. Extending the arm and
somewhat winding it alongside the nape of his neck across your front-side [¿behind him?]. But there is
no sense of pulling him closer. One's own body is standing erect (In reference to Illustration One).
Having the left knee and foot sufficiently to the left rear, the right foot is thrust out in Ichimonji
Straight Line posture, bodily open facing to the right side. About both the left and right hands in front
of you, it's not really done by pulling on him, instead there is a gentle constriction applied from the
direction of the pinky fingers (In reference to Illustration Two). As is illustrated in this section of the
illustrations, the hands are free in the front, and from the beginning of the Kata technique, and just the
same throughout it, one would maintain Zanshin Continued awareness. About this Kata technique, it is
much as if one is wheeling him by the sleeve of his garment...

61
ク左右ヨリ廻シ捕ルト云ノ意ニテ則チ袖車ト号ル者ナリ

一飛違 トビチガヒ

此手合ノ形ハ中三尺程離レテ對座シ受身ノ者ハ小
太刀ヲ左手ニ携へ(小太刀長サ一尺六寸ヲ掟トス)
受身聲ヲ懸次ニ捕身ノ者聲ヲ懸受身ノ者ハ二タ度
聲ヲ發シナガラ腰ヲ揚ゲテ右足ヲ前へ踏出シ右手
ニテ小太刀ヲ拔頭上へ切付ナリ此際捕身ノ者ハ右
手ノ指先ヲ揃へ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立テ拇指ノ方
ヲ我額ニ付腰ヲ上ゲテ右足ヲ受ノ踏出シタル右足

六十二

... they say that it is with the sense of controlling and rotating him with both the left and right [hand],
when making the capture. Namely, that is why the practitioners named it Sode Guruma Sleeve wheel.

-- Tobi Chiga(h)i Flitting About

About this fighting technique, you are about three feet in sitting across from one another. About the
attacker, he is holding a Kodachi short sword in his left hand (as a general rule, the length of a kodachi
short sword would be about One foot six inches long). The attacker gives an outcry and the defender
makes an outcry of reply. About the attacker, he may make outcry two or three times. Having mustered
himself the attacker having his right foot forward, takes a step and draws the kodachi short sword with
his right hand. [The sword] held overhead to cut you down. Upon this occasion, the defender places the
fingertips of his right hand on [the attacker's] elbow. The fingertips are next slid into an upright position
to stand right in front of, and having the thumb towards, your own brow. The defender having mustered
himself, he has advanced a step, the defender steps with his right foot so that the right foot is then
planted to the outside.

62

Translator's Note: The text uses koshi wo agete (腰ヲ 揚ゲ テ ) → Mod Jap ( 腰を 上げ て) it’s an idiomatic expression, the literal
elements of which read: “...the hips having arisen...” and when found in Jujutsu technique descriptions is often taken rather literally (since
it is a seated position that the technique started from). One can translate it that way, but the idiomatic meaning is “to have mustered
oneself”. It’s possible to find (some form of) the idiom used even when standing is clearly indicated… and was not meant to convey a
sense of hip movement at all (but instead the meaning “to have mustered oneself.”) In this text entry some form of it occured twice,
leaving one rather to doubt "rising of the hips" under those circumstances, anyways. I say this because sometimes one would want to
translate it as both, for example:"havig mustered himself and his hips had begun to rise up (as he went into motion)". But if it was a
standing position described, never really "hips having arisen" but instead strictly the idiomatic meaning only.
ノ外側へ踏込切付ル手ヲ受ル心持無
ク只摺違樣ニ成シ臂ト指先ノ中程ニ
テ我体ト共二少シ向フへ押シ(一圖
參照)左手ニテ受ノ手首ヲ握リ左膝
ノ方へ引付右手ノ指ヲ延拇指ノ腹ヲ
右耳ノ下即チ獨鈷ニ當テ少シク押ス
心持ニ爲シ右足ノ爪先ヲシカト踏シ
メ膝ニテ受ノ右膝ヲクジキテ上向ニ
倒シ右足ノ膝ヲ受ノ右腕ノ付根ノ際
へ突キ左手ニテ受ノ手首ヲ下へ押付
左足ヲ立小太刀ヲ摑ミ居ル手ノ平ノ處へ足ノ小指ヲ付腰ヲ下ゲテ我体ヲキメテ右

六十三

Without any sense of fending of with the hand as he is slashing at you, done instead merely by means
of having scraped alongside [his sword arm], your fingertips and the elbow being about midway
between the two of you, tour own body and the two [elbows, his and yours] having about the same
force of direction and pressure (In reference to Illustration One). With the left hand, grab the attacker's
[lower] wrist, in the direction of the elbow, pulling on him with the fingers, keeping the fingers
somewhat outstretched. The thumb that is alongside your hip and [the other] thumb near to your right
ear will be lowered. Namely it is that [the hand near your ear] is somewhat as if [conveying] the
sustaining point of the single pronged vajra (dokko ni ate) [e.g. hand upraised as if to cup the ear and hear what he is saying].
And so one applies pressure [with that upraised hand] from some sense of that. One ignores the toes of
the right foot when taking the step, and the knee one has drawn nearer alongside the opponent's right
knee, to upturn and drop him. The right knee and foot are at about the position of the joint of the
opponent's right arm. Thrust in with the left hand, driving the opponent's wrist down. Standing on the
left foot, gripping the kodachi short sword, with the palm of your hand upon that occasion, planting the
little toe of your foot you will have dis-hearted him driving his hips down and back, as would be
determined between your body and right thumb [the angle they drive him down at].

63

Translator's Note: The text uses an idiomatic expression which is rather the polar opposite of the one documented on the previous
page. Namely, koshi wo sagete (腰を下げて) “having dis-hearted”, probably gets confused for "driving the hips downward" (in some
translations). Much like the polar opposite documented on the previous page (“to muster oneself”) this one sometimes would need to be
given both literal and idiomatic expression when translating it, such as: “having dis-hearted him as you drive his hips downward”. In this
case, given the way that the Kata throws the man down, I used that very mode of translation. Instead of “dis-heart” one could also
translate it as “unnerve”, “dishevel” or something quite like this.
拇指ニテ獨鈷ヲ押シナガラ左足ニテ小太刀ヲ踏切リ(二圖參照)左右ノ手ヲ放シ
前ノ如ク殘心スベシ此形ハ始メ切付タル時鳥ノ飛違フが如クニ成シテ捕ル故則
チ飛違ト号タル也

一拔刀目附 ヌキミメツケ

此手合ノ形ハ相方六尺程離レテ坐シ受身ノ方ハ左手ニ木太刀ヲ携ベシ(木太刀ノ
長サ三尺二寸ヲ掟トス)捕身ノ方ハ小太刀ヲ携へベシ而ヲノ先受ヨリ聲ヲ懸次ニ
捕身聲ヲ懸ケテ右手ニテ小太刀ノ抦ヲ握リ堅ク握リツメヌ樣ニ和ラカニ輕クス
ラリト拔キ肩ヨリ切先迄眞直ニ受身ノ左眼ヲ目差シテ腕ヲ伸シ(一圖參照)靜カ
ニ立上リテ左リ右ト三角ニ二タ足受身ノ右ノ膝先ヨリ七八寸離レタル處迄進ミ
膝ヲ左石ニ開キテ少シ腰ヲ下ゲ体ノコゴマヌ樣ニ下腹ヲ前へ出ス樣ニシテ左右
ノ肩ヲ落シテ搆へルナリ此際受身ノ者ハ木太刀ニテ拔打ニ膝ノ邊テ目掛テ一文
字ニ切付ルナリ

六十四

The [thumb is] like penetrating enlightenment of the Single pronged Vajra, with the left foot step in against
the kodachi short sword (In reference to Illustration Two). The left and right hands are both free, and much
as before one would be maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness. About this Kata technique, from the
start as he is cutting at you, one acts pretty much like a bird flitting about when making the capture. In
particular that is why it was called Tobi chigai Flitting about.

-- Nukemi Metsuke Close Observation of the Drawn Sword

About this fighting technique, you and your training partner are seated at some distance to one another.
About the way that the attacker attacks, he will be carrying a wooden long sword in his left hand (the length
of the wooden long sword is about 3 feet two inches.) About the way the defender does it, he is holding a
kodachi short sword, and then at the point where the attacker gives outcry the defender outcries in reply.
With the right hand the defender takes grip on the hilt, but not gripping it too firmly, in order to make
nimble use of it as he draws and hold the kodachi short sword at shoulder level, aimed at the attacker's left
eye and suppressing his arm (In reference to Illustration One.) Having quietly arisen, it is a triangular
position between the right and left knee and both the feet. There is a distance of about seven or eight inches
between you and the attacker's right knee cap. Next one advances somewhat on both the left and right
knees, across the opening. The hips are kept physically lowered and the body is not bowed. One proceeds
forward with due courage, both left and right shoulders are held lowered in the posturing. Upon this
occasion, with the wooden long sword the attacker makes the movements of drawing and cutting with a
long sword. Having caught sight of it, he tries to cut at the knee in Ichimonji Straight line posture.

64
Translator's Note: The text uses the standard and idiomatic expression Shitahara wo zen-(h)e desu yōnishite ( 下腹ヲ前へ出ス樣ニシテ )
→Mod Jap ( 下 腹 を 前 え 出 す 様 に し て ) “...one proceeds forward with due courage...”, sometimes the idiomatic meaning of “due
courage” is known to get left out in some translations. It gets this force of meaning from the combination of shitahara (下腹) and desu (出
す ) “proceed with guts”, or by other accounts instead, the combination of shitahara ( 下腹 ) and yōnishite ( 様にして ) “do it by means of
guts”. Remember that the Kata technique entails going against a long sword with a short sword, that is why some courage is advised.
捕身ハ此時手首ヲ輕ク小指ガ
上ニ成ル樣ニ内ノ方へ返シテ
小太刀ニテ切付來ル木太刀カ
ハネ返ル樣ニ受テスグニ小手
先ヲ輕ク返シテ木太刀ヲ切落
シ又元ノ如ク左眼へ付ルナリ
此際ハ臂ヲ張テ物ヲ打タタク
必持ニテハ惡シ腕ヲ延シタル
ナ一而シテ小手先ヲ輕ク返シ
テトントント二タキザミニキ
ザムグ如クニナスベシ夫ヨリ
左足ヲノ受身後へ蹈込左手ニテ受身ノ左リノ肩ヨリ七八寸下リシ處ノ前襟ヲ左
手ノ甲ヲ外へ向ケ内平ヲ受身ノ胸ノ方

六十五

About the defender, at this time making agile use of the wrists, doing so with the pinky finger upward,
counter him to the inside with the kodachi short sword, proceeding to cut away at him. Countering him
as he springs forth with the wooden long sword. Parry the wooden long sword agilely with the tip of
your hand [against the flat of the blade] while doing a lopping off drop (kiri (w)otoshi). Also, much for
the same cause, while keeping the left eye peeled on him, extending the elbow with some sense of
striking him [and chiding him] in these circumstances, as you do. What evil would have been wrought
by his [sword] arm, while as you do so, all at once making nimble use of the tip of your hand
obviously countering [his blade]. Doing this about two small times or so, as if one has become rather
unaffected by his attempts to peel back your skin. From there the attacker takes a step in with the left
foot to the rear, with your left hand [reaching over?] the attacker's left shoulder down about seven or
eight inches, take hold of the attacker's front collar [reaching from] the outside of his left arm. Thus
facing to inside and level with chest of opponent...

65
へ向ケテ拇指ヲ襟ノ内方エ掛ケ余ノ四
指ヲ外ヨリ掛ケ喉へ卷付ル如クニ右ノ
方へ廻シナがラ右足ヲ受身ノ眞後ノ我
左足ト揃ヲ眞直ニ立小太刀ヲ腰ノ邊へ
ブラリト提襟ヲ持シ手ハ引カヌ樣ニ右
足ヲ後ロノ方へ充分ニ引テ膝ヲ突次ニ
左足ヲ左ノ橫へ一文字ニ開キ腰ヲ落ス
ト同時ニ受身ノ体ヲ我陰嚢ノ前へ引落
シ(二圖參照)倒レタル受身ノ左ノ耳ノ
際へ左膝ヲ突右足ヲ左足ノ開キテ居タ
ル方へ我が体ヲ向キ替テ

六十六

...snaring the inside of his collar with your thumb. The remaining four fingers being to the outside [of the
collar], snare him by winding it about his throat towards the right side, rotating him by stepping with the
right foot directly behind him planting one's own left foot and standing with the kodachi short sword
weilding it about the vicinities of your hip. About the hand that you're using to bear him along by his
collar, one is not really pulling on him, the right foot being to the backside is sufficient enough to pull
itself, since the knee is thrust out. The left foot towards the left in the open in Ichimonji Straight line
posture. The hips are dropped a bit and at the same time the opponent's body is shielding one's own
testicles from the front. Do Shiki (w)otoshi Pulling drop (In reference to Illustration Two). Being that
you are collapsing him, in the circumstance the opponent's left ear will have been alongside your left
knee which is thrust out, while between your left and right foot it is open there. As for what direction
one's body is facing, one can take open steps to exchange the position back and forth.

66
蹈開キ小太刀ノ先ヲ輕ク肩へカツギ左
手ノ小指ヨリ順ニ握リテ喉ヲシメ面ヲ
右へ向ルナリ是ニテ受身相圖ヲ成サバ
左手ヲ放シ右ノ臂ヲ少シ張テ小手ヨリ
小太刀ノ切先ヲ眞直ニ受身ノ左眼ニ付
前ト同ジク殘心スベシ此形ハ始終刀ヲ
眼ニ附テ捕故拔刀目附ト号タルナリ

一鐺返 コジリがヘシ

此手合ノ形ハ相方ノ間三尺程離レテ座
シ受ハ左手ニ木太刀ヲ携へ聲ヲ懸次ニ捕身モ聲ヲ懸ルナリ受身ハ腰ヲ揚テ左膝
ヲ突キタルマヽ右ヲ一足前へ

六十七

Nimbly tricking him by thrusting out the point of the kodachi short sword towards his shoulder,
grasping [the collar?] with the pinky finger in order to constrict the throat with it, face to the right, as
has been illustrated of this in the illustration. The left hand is free, the right elbow is somewhat
extended out. The forearm all the way to the point of the kodachi short sword is held rather straight.
The left eye of the opponent remains glued towards the front, while at the same time, one would be
maintaining ZanshinContinued awareness. About this kata technique, from the beginning the eye stays
glued to the sword and the opponent, that is the particular reason that they named it Nukemi Metsuke
Close Observation of the Drawn Sword.

-- Kojiri Ga(h)eshi Pommel Counter

About this fighting technique, you and your training partner are seated about three feet apart, the
attacker is holding a wooden long sword in his left hand and gives an outcry. Next the defender gives
an outcry of reply. The opponent musters himself, thrusting out the left knee while taking a single step
out towards the front with his right foot.

67
蹈ミ出シ右手ニテ木太刀ヲ中半拔
キカケルナリ此時捕身ハ腰ヲ揚ケ
テ左足ヲ受身ノ左膝ノ際へ蹈出シ
左手ニテ抦先ヲ上ヨリ下へ押へテ
鐺ノ上へ上リタル處ヲ右手ニテ握
リ (一圖參照)又右足ヲ左足ノ際へ
立時押へタル抦先ヲ放シスグニ受
身ノ左ノ手首ヲ握リ我体ヲ受身ノ
体ト同ジ樣ニ向キ替リ左右ノ手ヲ
伸シ眞直ニ立上リ左ノ前ノ角ノ方
へ左足ヲ蹈出シ(二圖參照)又右膝ヲ
左足

二鐺返

六十八

With his right hand he draws the wooden sword halfway and waits. At this point the defender musters
himself stepping out with the left foot being placed alongside the opponent's right knee. Taking a hold of the
tip of the sword's hilt (tsukazaki) then drives it downwards, the kojiri tip of the scabbard now driven
upwards. Take a hold of it with the right hand (In reference to Illustration One). Then one is standing on the
left and right feet, having pushed the tip of the sword hilt, the hand now free, grab the opponent's left wrist.
One's own body and the opponent's body are now in similar alignment. Exchanging the direction of the left
and right hand while extending them. Standing up erect, at an angle into the left front side. Step in with the
left foot (In reference to Illustration Two). Also the right knee is drawn closer to the left foot under these
circumstances…

Ni Kojiri Ga(h)eshi
Illus. Two Pommel Counter

68
ノ際へ寄テ突キナガヲ左右ノ手ニ力ヲ入ズシテ受身ノ体ヲ自然ト我体ノ行ク方
へ寄セルナリ是ニテ左足ヲ身隅へ開キ鐺ニ當テタル手ニテ余リ强ク押サヌ樣ニ
シ左手ヲ伸シテ受身ノ左手ヲ少シ釣上ル樣ニ爲シ面ヲ左リへ向自然ト受身ノ腕
がシマル樣ニ我肩ヲ落シテ臍下ノ滿ルヨウニ爲スベシ受身シマリシト云フノ相
圖ヲナサバ左右ノ手ヲ放シテ前ノ如クニ殘心ナスナリ此形ハ受身ノ携へタル太
刀ノ鐺ヲ返シテ捕故則チ鐺返ト号タルナリ

一兩手捕 リヤウテドリ

此手合ノ形ハ相方ノ間八寸バカリ離レ向逢テ坐シ受ヨリ捕ト互ニ聲ヲ懸テ受身
ノ者ヨリ捕身ノ左右ノ手首ヲシカト握ルナリ捕身ノ方ハ此際右手ノ指先ヲ揃伸
シ臂ヲ受身ノ烏兎ヲ目懸テ張ナがラ伸シタル指先ヲ我左ノ肩先ノ處へ向ケ(手解
鬼挙ノ如シ)是ト同時ニ腰ヲ上テ右足ヲ受身ノ右膝ノ前へ蹈出シ次ニ又右手ニ

六十九

He makes thrusts, both right and left hand [on the hilt of] the sword. The opponent's body and one's
own body moving and coming closer together under these circumstances. The left foot being in the
open corner, strike the kojiri tip of the scabbard with your hand, using the remaining strength, push
sharply on it. Extending the left hand, hook and drive the opponent's left hand upwards just a bit. One
will be facing naturally to the left, while constricting the opponent's arm. One's own shoulders kept
dropped, as one keeps an evident needful control over oneself [being faced with a long sword], while
one is constricting the opponent, they say it is shown in certain cues in the illustration. The left and
right hands are free, much like before, and one maintains Zanshin Continued awareness. About this
Kata technique, one reverses the kojiritip of the scabbard according to how the opponent is holding the
sword. And that is namely why they called it Kojiri Gae(h)eshi Reversing the Pommel Cap.

-- Ryōte Dori Capturing Both Hands

About this fighting technique, you and your training partner are seated at a distance of about six and a
half feet away [(1 ken 8 sun, about 2.1336 meters)] from each other. Both the attacker and defender make
outcry at the same time, The attacker wastes no time to grab both the defender's right and left wrists.
Upon this occasion the defender extends and plants the fingers of his right hand along the attacker's
elbow at the Uto vital point, having noticed that [the opponent] had his arm extended having reached
out to place his fingertips on one's own left shoulder (much like in Te Hodoki Oni-kobushi Demon fist
Hand release). Do this while mustering oneself stepping in with the right foot in front of the opponent's
right knee. And next, with the right hand...

69
Translator's Note: The text makes use of an Indirect relative of the Verbal construct ki wo michiru, that being namely: seika no
michiru (臍下ノ滿ル) → Mod Jap (臍下の満る). It has a definition determined by context, so we must consult what context it was found in,
that would be: seika no michiru yōni nasubeshi (臍下ノ滿ルヨウニ爲スベシ ) → Mod Jap ( 臍下の満るように為すベし ) "...one keeps an
evident needful control over oneself..." quite obviously because one is faced with a dangerous long sword. The word yōni (ように) is the
word “evident” and is in position to serve as a modifying adjective to the construct seika no michiru ( 臍下 の満 る ). The definition here
would be “self control”. But one could have translated it instead as something quite like “maintain courage” to produce: "...one keeps an
evident courage up…". The idiom seika no michiru(臍下の満る ) is a bit rarer than some of the other idioms that were related to the ki wo
michiru construct that got documented in this text. It doesn’t commonly show up in Internet searches.
テ受ノ衣ノ右肩ノ處ヲ持ツト同時ニ左足ヲ右足ト
揃へテ立左手モ同時ニ内平ヲ上ニ向ケテ拇指ヲ向
へ伸ス樣ニシ受ノ右ノ手首ヲ握リテ眞直ニ立而テ
右足ヲ輕ク上ゲ爪先ニテ受身ノ右ノ脇腹ヲ蹴 (圖
參照)テスグニ我左右ノ踵ノ際へ右膝ヲ突左足ヲ
橫一文字ニ開クト共ニ腰ヲ下ゲ其下ゲル拍子ニ連
テ受身ノ体ヲ下へ押受身ノ右腕ハ小指ヲ上ニシテ
拇指ノ方ヲ疊へ付テ肩ト臂トノ中程へ我右膝ヲ乘
セ面ヲ左リへ向我体ノ前へコゴマヌ樣ニ腹ヲ落ス
ベシ受相圖ヲナサバ放シテ殘心スル事

七十

...take a hold of the opponent's garments at his right shoulder. At the same time one has planted the
right foot in relationship to the left foot as one is standing, the left hand is at the same time to the inside
facing level and held up. There is the direction that one pushes with the thumb, while grasping the
opponent's right wrist one is standing erect. The right foot rises nimbly to kick the opponent in the side
with the toes (In reference to the illustrations). Then immediately [resume?] the positioning of one's
own left and right heels, thrust his right knee with the left foot being open in the Ichimonji Straight line
posture. Having so disheveled him, it is in relationship to the timing of having driven the opponent
down. About the opponent's right arm, the pinky finger going upwards, and the direction of the thumb
being kept pointed down at the tatami mats. The shoulder and the elbow are at midway point and there
is the placement of one's own knee, the face towards the left, the body facing the front but is never bent
over. The hips would be kept dropped. The cues in the illustration of the opponent, one is free and
maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

70
前ノ如シ此形ハ初メ受ヨリ充分ニ兩手ヲ捕へタルヲ此方ハ力ヲモ入レズテシ多
易クトリ受ヲ押へル處ノ形チ故即チ兩手捕ト号ナリ此形ノ内ニハ何々ト同時ト
云フ事別テ多シ此同時ニ爲スト云ハ前ニモ在リ又此後ニモ在レド凡テ同時又何
ヲ爲シナガラト云フハ体ノ前后左右手足共ニ少シモ其間合ノ違ハヌ樣ニ働キテ
業ヲ爲ス事ニテ間合違フ時ハ受モ其術ニ乘ヲズシテ却テ我が中心即チ体ノツリ
合が崩レル者故宣シク意ヲ用ユベキ事ナリ

一壁添 カベゾイ

此手合ノ形ハ先捕身ノ方ハ壁ヲ後ニヲノ坐シ受身ノ者ハ一尺程離レテ左リ膝ヲ
突右足ヲ橫一文字ニ蹈開キ聲ヲ懸次ニ捕方モ聲ヲ掛夫ヨリ受身ノ者左手ニテ捕
身ノ腹帶ヲ下ヨリ握リ又右手ノ指ヲ伸シテ拇指ヲ開キ咽喉へ矢筈ノ如クニ掛ケ
テ押付ルナリ(圖參照)此際捕身ノ方ハ面ヲ左へ向ケテ我右ノ肩ガ受ノ右ノ膝頭

七十一

About this kata technique, much as before, from when the opponent begins, you are going to make
sufficient use of both hands so as to capture him. About the way that this is done, there is not much effort
made in doing it, it's likely to be very easy to pin the opponent down in the circumstances of the kata
technique. That is namely why it is called Ryōte Dori Capturing Both Hands. There is this and that which
occurs inside this kata technique. They say it's all pretty much the same and that there are a number of ways
of doing it, from beginning to end. Again, what occurs afterwards in this, generally it's the same and they
say that there is whatever one actually does. There is the front of the body, and that both right and left hands
and feet are somewhat together. Meanwhile there is not much change of distance while doing the actions of
the Kata technique. As for the differing of distance at the time, the opponent is not really making much
usage of such artifice, unlike one's own intentions. One slides one's own body into union and dishevels him.
Coincidentally that is said to be what one must pay attention to about it.

-- Kabesoi Against the Wall

About this fighting technique and the way that the opponent begins, the opponent is seated with a wall
immediately behind him. At a distance of about one foot, dropping to one knee off to the left, steps into the
open in Ichimonji Straight line posture giving and outcry. Next the defender gives an outcry of reply, with
the left hand the attacker grabs and pushes down on the defender's belt line, while extending the right hand,
fingers and thumb open and apart, driving this like the knock of an arrow against the throat, the attacker
snares the defender like this pushing forcibly (In reference to the illustrations). About the way that the
defender does it on this occasion, facing left one plants one's own right shoulder across from the opponent's
right knee cap...

71
へツク程ニ左リへ斜ニ我体ノ力ニテ押
腰ヲ上テ体ヲ起シナガラ右膝ヲ突キタ
ルマヽ左足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ開キテ面ヲ
受ノ方へ向キ左手ノ指ヲ揃へ延シ糸ヲ
下ケタル樣ニ眞スグニ上テ臂ヲ受ノ右
腕ノ尺澤へ掛ケ我中心ノ崩レヌ樣ニ腰
ヲ下ゲナガラ臂ニテ受ノ右腕ヲ下へ落
シ又左手ノ指ヲ延シタルナリ手首ヲ左
へ曲ゲ内平ノ處ヲ受ノ顎ノ下へ掛ケ右
手ノ平テ頭へ掛ケ指先へ力ヲ入レズニ
右ノ下ノ方へ丸ク玉ヲコロガス樣ニ投左右ノ手ヲ陰嚢ノ

七十二

By the effort of one's own body, in mustering oneself pushing up into a standing position, right knee
thrust out left foot entering into the open to strike Ichimonji Straight line posture. The attacker reaches
out planting the fingers of the left hand on and pulling down on the belt line. Pulling directly in and
upwards on it. Snare the elbow of the opponent's right arm at the Shakutaku/or/Shattaku "Foot Deep
Swamp" vital point [bottom of the inner elbow]. But one is not intending to dishevel and drop him
using this. Having disturbed him by it though, using the elbow point to drop the opponent's right arm
down, also extending the fingers of the left hand bend his wrist to the left, so it's bent to the inside and
level. Snare the opponent's jaw and drive him down with the right hand held level, snaring his head too
but without applying any real force in with the fingers. Driving him in an arcing path down by
torquing his head and tipping him over. Then cup shield your testicles with both right and left hands to
keep him from striking you there.

72
處ヘアテヽ殘必ナスベシ此形ハ始メ終共壁ニ添タル手合故却チ壁添ト云フ

一後捕 ウシロドリ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ捕身ノ者ノ坐シタル後ロへ
左膝ヲ突右 足ヲ立聲ヲ懸次ニ捕身モ聲ヲ掛受身ノ
者ハ捕方ヲ左右ノ腕ノ上ヨリ抱ヘルナリ此時捕ハ体
ヲ柔和ニナシ頭ヲ輕ク後へポント當体ヲ眞直ニ腰ヲ
充分ニ上テ右膝ヲ突キタルマヽ左足ヲ橫一文字ニ踏
開キ (一圖 參照) 夫ヨリ左右ノ臂ヲ開ク 樣ニシテ
上ゲナがラ腰テ下ケ

七十三

One would maintain Zanshin Continued awareness, and about this kata technique from beginning to
end it is about being propped up against a wall as a fighting technique. That is coincidentally why the
called it Kabesoi Against the Wall.

-- Ushiro Dori Rear Capture

About this fighting technique, the attacker and defender are both seated, the [opponent's] left knee will
be thrust out to the rear and the right foot stood up on as he gives outcry. Next the defender gives an
outcry of reply. The attacker grabs and raises both the defender's right and left arms. At this point, the
defender makes his whole body rather flexible and lightly tips his head backward, otherwise keeping
the body rather erect. Mustering sufficient courage, [the defender] juts out his right knee and takes a
step on the left foot into the open in Ichimonji Straight line posture (In reference to Illustration One).
From there, the left and right elbows are opened, as one maintains bodily composure...

73
テ体ヲ下へヌケル時ニ兩方ノ指先ヲ揃延シ甲ノ方ヲ
上ニシテ前ニテ突合スレバ左右ノ臂迄平一文字ノ如
クナルナリ而シテ一タン此左右ノ手ノ力ヲ拔キ前へ
下ケテ又右手ヲ上ケ受ノ衣ノ右襟ヲ持チ左手ニテ左
足ヲハネ上ケ(二圖參照)前へ投殘心ナス事前ノ如シ
凡テ受ヲ投ル時ニハ掌中ノ石ヲ大地へ打付ルカ如キ
心持ニテ投ルト同時ニ手ヲ放スベシ此形ハ後ヨリ捕
懸リタルヲ受ヲ捕テ投ル故後捕へ號クルナリ

七十四

...to avoid becoming disheveled. At the time one is planting the fingertips of both hands on the other
party and pushing, upward and back. Prior to this one had coequally thrust out the left and right
elbows much as one had been striking the Hira Ichimonji Level straight line posture. And now once
more, one releases the tension in both left and right hands by lowering them in the front. Also the right
hand is raised, taking a hold of the opponent's garments at the right collar. With the left hand jerk the
opponent's left leg up (In reference to Illustration Two). Throwing him to the front while maintaining
Zanshin Continued awareness, much as before. Generally, when throwing the opponent at the time, it
would be easy to manipulate and cause him to strike a stone on the ground, and the throw is done with
some sense of this. Meanwhile the hands would, of course, be free. About this kata technique, the
attacker was thrown while trying to throw the defender to the rear. Coincidentally it is only a form of
the Ushiro dori Rear capture.

74
初段 立合
一行違 ユキチガイ

此手合ノ形ハ稽古塲ノ廣サニ由リ二間或ハ三間程離
レテ眞直ニ立受身ノ者聲ヲ掛次ニ捕身ノ方聲ヲ掛兩
方ヨリ歩ミ寄リ中七八寸ノ處ニテ立チ止リ捕身ハ左
手ニテ受ノ右ノ手首ヲ握リ右手ノ指ヲ延揃へ我左ノ
肩ノ邊ヨリ受身ノ陰嚢ヲ目掛ケテ斜ニ物ヲ切拂フ如
クニナシ是ト同時ニ左手ヲ我腰ニ付左足ヲ左ノ後へ
斜ニ爪先ヲ後へ向ケテ開キ腰ヲ落シ膝ヲ 少シク左右
へ張リ次ニ右手ノ平ヲ受身ノ左肩ト胸ノ間

七十五

Shodan Tachia(h)i Initial Level Standing Captures

-- Yuki Chigai Misunderstanding in Passing

About this fighting technique, it is to be practiced on spacious grounds, due to the use of two ken
distance [(about 12 feet or 3.657 meter)] or sometimes instead the distance of some three ken [(about
18 feet or 5.486 meter)]. While standing erect, the attacker gives outcry, next the defender gives an
outcry of reply. The two parties begin walking towards each other drawing closer. At a distance of
about seven (7) or eight (8) inches away, they stop and stand together. With the left hand the defender
grabs the right wrist of the attacker, extending the fingers of his right hand and planting them on your
left shoulder. The attacker notices that your testicles are vulnerable and [tries to kik there] much as if to
cut you down and just sweep you away, but will not be able to. At the same time, plant your left hand
on your hip, with the toes of your left foot in the left rear diagonal position. Facing into the open, drop
the hips by flexing the knees somewhat, spreading them to the left and right a bit. Next the right hand
being level to the opponent's shoulder and chest, cling there a little.

75
へ付些モ我躰ノ動カヌ樣ニ左足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ脇へ爪先ヲ外へ向ケテ進メ又右
足ヲ輕ク揚爪先ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴(一圖參照)スグニ受身ノ右足ヲ外側ヨリ踢タル足
ニテ拔ヒ倒シ夫レヨリ倒レタル受ノ体ノ右腕ノ附際へ右膝ヲ突キ右ノ手掌ヲ開
キ拇指ノ腹ヲ受身ノ右耳ノ下獨鈷ト云フ處へ當テ左足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ開キ左手
ハ受身ノ手首ヲ握リタルマヽ肩ノ上ラヌ樣ニ臂ヲ張テ我左ノ乳ヨリ五寸程離シ
テ少シ引ク心持ニシ面ヲ左リへ向ケ氣ヲ滿チテ臍下ノ前へ出ヅル樣ニナシ相圖
ヲ聞キ左右ノ手ヲ放シ殘心ナスヘシ

一突掛 ツキカケ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト㒰樣ニ向合テ直立シ聲ヲ懸ケ間三尺迄進ミ受身ノ者右ノ拳ニ
テ捕身ノ水月ヲ目掛右足ヲ二尺五寸程蹈出シナがラ突ナリ此時捕身ノ者左ノ臂
ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立我体へ附テ

七十六

It's done so that there isn't much body movement besides having advanced the left foot to be alongside the
opponent's right foot and right side, toes pointed towards the outside. And the right foot rises nimbly to kick
him with the toe tips in the testicles (In reference to Illustration One). Having kicked him immediately from
just outside the opponent's right foot, [kicking] with the foot and so pilfering and dropping him (nu(h)i
ta(w)oshi → nu(h)i ta(w)osu) while snaring the right arm of the opponent's body on the occasion. The right
knee is thrust out, palm of the right hand being open, the belly and the thumb are just under the opponent's
right ear, they say not unlike the occasion of a single pronged vajra (dokko). With the left foot one strikes
Ichimonji Straight line posture out into the open. About the left hand, grasping the opponent's wrist with it,
which is done without a sense of indignance. Extending his elbow, done with the sense of pulling it across
one's own breast, to a distance of about five inches away. Facing the left, but it is not done with any over-
excitement that might have arisen from gut reaction beforehand, as one should observe the cues in the
illustration about it. The left and right hands are both free, one would be maintaining Zanshin Continued
awareness.

-- Tsuki Kake Being Thrust At

About this fighting technique, as is otherwise always to be done when being confronted, standing erect
one gives outcry as [one?both?] advance across the distance of one ken three shaku [(about 9 feet or 2.743
meter)]. The attacker with his right palm, seeing that the defender is vulnerable at the suigetsu "moon
water" vital point [pit of the stomach], steps on his right foot across the distance of two and a half feet,
to thrust him there. At this time, the defender with his left elbow and left fingertips held standing
straight up while clinging close to one's own body, ...

76
Translator's Note: The text uses the idiomatic expression: kata no agaranu yōni (肩ノ上ラヌ樣ニ ) → Mod Jap (肩の上らぬ様に) “...which
is done without a sense of indignance...”, probably this one causes some confusion sometimes and gets translated by it’s raw elements to
say something like: “...not raising the shoulder (when doing so)...” But that is not accurate, this is an idiom and means “without
indignance; without pridefulness; no sense of outrage” English has a vaguely similar usage of the word “shoulder”, in such statements as
“No one else could at the time, so I had to shoulder it myself”. This means to humbly bear, carry out or endure something. In Japanese,
it's got a vaguely similar meaning when uttered in the negative voice (the verb agaru → agaranu). It means that one just nonchalantly
takes a hold of the guy’s wrist, there is no sense of snatching something indignantly. MOST of the time one would not combine the literal
meaning (“having nor raised the shoulders”) but wherein that would be appropriate, one combines the two meanings to produce
something like: “...one grabs the wrist but without raising one’s shoulder and doing so without a sense of indignance...”
SEPARATE NOTE: The text has another, very well developed, Idiomatic Verbal Construct based of the ‘ki wo michiru’ construct. Namely,
being:ki wo michite saika no zen-(h)e idzuru yōni nashi (氣ヲ滿チテ臍下ノ前へ出ヅル樣ニナシ) → Mod Jap (気を満ちて臍下の前え出づ
る 様 に な し ) “...(but) it is not done with any over-excitement that might have arisen from gut reaction beforehand….” This particular
construct is Clausal, more or less, and could very well have held the declination of ‘ki wo michiru’ (here being “ki wo michite”) under the
definition more like “bristling with spirit” but the context and elements of the construct seemed to indicate the definition of “over-excited;
agitated” instead. MAKING THE OCCURRENCE MORE INTERESTING INDEED, it is part of a Dual Parallelism of sorts involving the statement
that came before it, namely: kata no agaranu yōni ( 肩ノ上ラヌ樣ニ ) → Mod Jap ( 肩の上らぬ様に ) “...which is done without a sense of
indignance...”, the very same we documented in the top half of this Translator’s note. They were meant to reinforce another in an
expression of frankness in the activity done in the kata technique and that it should be done without a sense of indignation and lacking
reactionary over-excitement. “Business as usual” performance.
右足ノ爪先ヲ外へ向ケ後ロへ一文字ニ三尺
二三寸蹈開キ体ヲ右へ橫向ニナレバ突掛タ
ル拳ノ自然ニヨカル故 (一圖參照) 直 ニ突
出シタル手ノ甲ノ方へ左手ノ拇指ヲ掛ケ内
平ノ方へ四指ヲ延シテ掛右手モ又左手同樣
ニ成シ指先ヲ左指ト深ク重ネ右足ニテ受身
ノ陰嚢ヲ踢 (二圖參照) テ直ニ其足ヲ受身ノ
左右ノ足ノ中程へ踏出テ我体ヲ右へ一廻シ
テ受身ノ左脇へ並樣ニナシテ直ニ右足

七十七

The toes of the right foot facing to the outside behind you, having openly walked across the distance of
some three and a half feet to strike Ichimonji Straight line posture. The body would be facing to the
right, where you will be thrust at with the fist as he inclines to do (In reference to Illustration One).
Immediately as he is thrusting at you, the opponent's hand you will snare it from the direction its
traveling with the thumb of your left hand, snaring him also with the four fingers extended level
together, to the inside. The left hand and right hand working at the same time, the fingers being
stronger when all grouped together, with the right foot kick the opponent in the testicles (In reference
to Illustration One). That foot will be placed about midway between the opponent's left and right foot,
having stepped forward [after the kick]. Rotate your own body to the right side to be roughly right
alongside the opponent's left side [as you drop to one knee]. Straightaway the tips of the toes of the
right foot...

77
ノ爪先ヨリ三尺四五寸離レテ左膝ヲ突キ腰ヲ下ゲテ橫一文字ニ

七十八

...being at a distance of some three and a half feet [planted on the ground], drop to the left knee while
the hips are held lowered having struck Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture.

78
ナリ此時迄手先ノ動カヌ樣ニシテ我体ノ中必ヲシカト定メ而シテ受身ノ指先ガ
我前ノ地へ付ク位ニ手先ヲ丸ク廻スが加ク又左へネジルガ知ク强ク力ヲ入レズ
シテ受ノ体ヲ投ルナリ夫ヨリ左右ノ手ヲ前ノ方へ眞直ニ伸シ肩ヲ下ゲテ面ヲ右
ノ爪先ノ方へ向ケ左右ノ手ノ小指ニ少シク力ヲ入レルナリ之ニテ受身ノ者相圖
ヲナサバ手ヲ放シテ殘心スへシ

一引落 シキヲトシ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト同ジク中二三間離レテ直立シ兩方共聲ヲ懸テ進ミ寄リ間三尺
ニ至リ止リ受身ノ者右ヲ一足前へ踏込ナガラ右手ヲ上ゲ捕身ノ眞向へ打込ナリ
此際捕身ハ右手ノ外ノ方ヲ額ニ附シ内ノ方ヲ充分ニ向へ向ケテ指ヲ廷揃へ左手
モ同樣ニシテ十文字ニ深ク重ネ左右ノ臂ヲ張リ右足ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴此蹴ト左右ノ
手ニテ受身ノ打込拳ヲ受留ルトハ同時二働クナリ又蹴タル足ハ

七十九

What one does next in this is not really done by moving the fingers, and one is otherwise ignoring what he
intends to do to you bodily. As a general rule also, the opponent's fingers to which one is clinging from
one's position on the ground, rotating the fingers in an arc. Also one knows that one had sprung rather
sharply to the left side, as a means of applying pressure. The opponent's body could be thrown when doing
this, the left and right hands are held in the front, directly extended out with some sense of indignation. The
face and the toes of the right foot are facing forward, and one is applying pressure somewhat with the pinky
fingers of both the left and right hand. As one can see from the curs in the illustration, the hands are both
free and one would be maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Shiki (W)Otoshi Pulling Thrown Down

About this fighting technique, much the same as before, both parties are standing erect at a distance of
about two or three ken [(12-18 feet or 3.657-5.486 meter)]. Advancing, as they draw closer to one another they give
outcry. They stop advancing to face each other having crossed the distance of three ken [(18 feet or 5.486 meter)].
The attacker takes a step in with the right foot to the front, raising his right hand. He strikes at the defender
who is directly across from him. Upon this occasion, the defender clings near his own brow with the right
hand just to the outside, sufficiently positioned to the inside to allow one to extend and plant the fingers. At
the same time the left hand will serve as a cross brace (jumonji) to strengthen oneself by. The left and right
elbows extended one kicks him in the testicles with the right foot. One has used the left and right hands to
stop the opponent's fist from striking you and kicked him besides, both actions occur at the same time as
the foot kicks.

79
PARTS ONE AND TWO OF SHIKI (W)OTOSHI "Pulling Drop"

八十

80
直ニ左足ヨリ一尺余後ノ左へ斜ニ膝ヲ突ト同時ニ右手ニテ受身ノ右ノ手首ヲ握
リ左手ノ指ヲ延シ平ヲ臂へ掛ル是ニテ受身ノ右手ノ甲ノ方下へ向故(圖參照)逆
ニナリ体モ少シ伏ス樣ニナルベシ捕身ハ腰ヲ下ゲルト左足ヲ橫ニ踏開クト同時
ニ我前へ腕ヲ引落シテ受身ノ右ノ肩先ガ我前ノ地へ付タル時右手ノ平ヲ甲ノ處
へ掛ケ左手ハ臂ヲ持タルマヽ面ヲ左リへ向テ腹ニテ少シク押ス心持ニナシ(二圖
參照)相圖セバ放シテ殘心スへシ

一兩胸捕 リヤウムナドリ

此手合ノ形ハ兩者ノ間三間バカリ離テ直立シ掟ノ通リ聲ヲ懸兩方ヨリ進行違タ
ル際受身ノ者左右ノ手ニテ捕身ノ左右ノ襟ヲ持右ヲ一足踏出シテ押スナリ捕身
ノ者ハ左ヲ一足後へ下リ左右ノ手ニテ受ノ腕ノ下ヨリ左右ノ襟ヲ持(圖參照)受
ノ体ノ留ル所迄押行踏止リタル受ノ足ノ際へ右足ヲ踏出シ左足モ右足ノ後へ付

八十一

The left foot stepped out at about one foot at a left diagonal angle, drop to the knee. At the same time
with the right hand, take grip on the opponent's right wrist, the fingers of the left hand extended out
evenly snaring him at the elbow. The opponent's right forearm is being used like this to guide him
downwards (In reference to the illustrations). As one reverses the bodily position somewhat, the
defender having knelt down [on the right knee] and stepped out into the open on the left foot while at
the same time, one performs a pulling drop (s)hiki otoshi) to one's front using the [captured] arm. The
opponent will land on the ground at his point of his right shoulder at the time. Having snared his right
arm and holding it leveled, one guides his face somewhat by the placement of the hips, but there is not
really a sense of pulling on him (In reference to Illustration Two). There are some cues about this in the
illustration, [hands are] free and one would be maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Ryōmuna Dori Capturing by Both Lapels

About this fighting technique, both parties are at a distance of some three ken measures [(18 feet or 5.486
meter)]. As they traverse to meet one another standing erect, both parties give outcries as they reach the
position of disagreement in crossing paths. The attacker takes one step towards his left rear [as if to go
to one knee?]. As he steps back the defender takes grip on his left and right lapels, going under his arms
to do so (In reference to the illustrations). Having stopped the attacker body when doing this, and also
having prevented him from taking the step back and down, take a step with the right foot to the position
where the opponent's foot is and stepping more to advance the left foot so that the right foot is
somewhat to the rear [behind him?]...

81
少シク足先ヲ十文字ノ樣ニナシ左右ノ腕ノ力
ヲ拔キテ我体ヲ受ノ体へ附急当我ガ腰ヲ足ノ
際デ下ケ体ヲ仰向ニシテ左足ハ爪先ニ力テ入
レ爪先迄眞直ニ伸シ受身ヲ投ルト同時ニ手ヲ
放シテ其マヽ左リへ起キ左膝ヲ突キ右足ヲ橫
一文字ニ踏開キテ殘心スへシ

一連拍子 ツレビヨウシ
此手各ノ形ハ兩人竝ビ立テ掟ノ通リ聲ヲ懸テ
歩ミ出受身ノ立留リタル時捕身ノ者体ヲ竝ビ
テ足ヲ受ノ後へ一文字ニ踏開キ

八十二

... This is not done by any crossing (jumonji) of the feet and legs. There is not to be any tension in the
right and left arms, one's own body has been brought unexpectedly into alignment with and clinging
alongside the opponent's body, by the positioning of one's feet the hips have been lowered. One's own
body having been turned to face him, one has dug in the toes of the left foot. Next the toes will be
extended out straight as one throws the opponent. Meanwhile the hands are free, having arisen to the
occasion to the left hand side, drop to the left knee, the right foot has stepped out into the open in
Ichimonji Straight line posture, as one maintains Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Tsure Byōshi Carrying Him Along By The Rhythmic Timing

About this fighting technique, both men having traversed across came to be standing alongside one
another giving outcry. Walking up the opponent comes to a stand still, standing right alongside the
defender. Step out into the open with a foot immediately behind the attacker, in Ichimonji Straight line
posture...

82

The following page(s) were missing in the Library version of the Text.
These page copies came from the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian Flament,
Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku Society, Europe.
膝ヲ左右へ張テ腰ヲ充分ニ下ケ指先ヲ延揃甲ヲ
外ニ向ケ腕ヲ延シ内平ノ方ニテ受身ノ細腰へ前
ヨリ充分ニ卷付(圖參照)臂ニ力ヲ入レヌ樣ニシ
テ氣ヲ滿タシ少シク前へ腹ノ出ル樣ニシテ投殘
心爲スベシ此形ハ元來左右共有ル形ナレトモ近
頃ハ一方ノミヲ捕終ルナリ尤モ右ニテモ亦左ニ
テモ形ニ於テハ少シモ替リ無キ事ナリ伹シ圖ハ
左ヨリ捕シヲ示セシ者ナリ

八十三

...both knees extended outwards to the left and right sides. Having sufficiently lowered the hips and
dis-hearted him, with the fingers extended and planted just to the outside, the arms extended as well,
level to the inside, one crossed over the front, the hands at either side of the opponent's hips
sufficiently enough to wind him around [by the grip on the sides of the hip] (In reference to the
illustrations). There is no real effort being applied by the elbows when doing this, but one will bristle
with spirit somewhat being that you are disheveling him to reach across in front of him at the belly [to
grip at the hip.] One would be maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness as one throws him. About
this kata pattern, essentially it is a pattern of controlling by both left and right sides, besides the rest of
what is done. Now-a-days this is what is one way of concluding the capture, as an example. Despite
the positions [of the hands] on the right and on the left sides, somewhat without changing position,
slowly from where the illustration shows, make the capture from the left side.

83

Translator's Note: The text uses a variation of the Idiomatic expression that we documented earlier in the Blue font Translator’s notes.
In this particular case both the standard literal and idiomatic meaning needed to be applied for proper translation to: “...Having
sufficiently lowered the hips and dis-hearted him...” It is not difficult to understand why the opponent would become dis-hearted, given
the compromising position his body was placed in when one stepped behind him and placed the hands on either hip.
The following page courtesy of Mr. Christian
Flament, Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

一友車 トモグルマ
此手合ノ形ハ受ノ右脇六尺乃至七尺或ハ二間
程ニテモヨシ離テ直立ナシ聲ヲ懸テ兩方ヨリ
進ミヨリ間ダ三尺程ニ至リ受身ノ者右手ノ拳
ヲ揚右足ヲ充分ニ蹴込ナがラ頭ヲ打ナリ此際
捕身ノ方ハ左足ヲ後へ開キ右手ノ内平ヲ外へ
向甲ノ方ヲ額ニ付臂ヲ張リ指先ヲ揃へ延シ膝
モ左右ニ張リ腰ヲ下ケテ体ヲ底クシ打來ル手
ト我腕ト十文字ニ成ル樣ニ受留テス

八十四

-- Tomo Guruma Befriending and Wheeling Out

About this fighting technique, the opponent is about six feet to seven feet off to your right side, or
possibly as much as a distance of two ken measures [(12 feet or 3.657)] away instead. One is not quite
standing erect when the outcries are given. Both parties then advancing the remaining span of some
three feet distance, the attacker raises his right fist sufficiently to allow him to readily kick and strike
the head. Upon this occasion the defender has his left foot in the open to the rear, his right hand held
inside level which he then wraps around [the head] just to the outside of the opponent's brow upon
which the fingers are extended out across. The knees are parted and spread to the left and right, to
lower the hips a bit, making a firmer physical base for yourself. The hand he approached to strike with
and one's own arm are now crossed over each other (jumonji) as one has halted in this way.

84
グニ受ノ手首ヲシカト握リ左手ニテ袴ノ腰板ノ處ヲ持頭ヲ受ノ右ノ乳ノ下へ附
受ノ腕ヲ我首ニ巻付ル如ク受ノ手先ト我手先ヲ臂ト共ニ受ノ腹へ押ツケ(圖參
照)我体ヲ柔カニナレ受ノスグ前ノ處へ橫ニ寐ル如ク一轉シテ手ヲ放シ右足ヲ蹈
開キ左膝ヲ突キ受身ノ投ラレテ行立タル方へ向殘心スベシ又橫ニ寐テ一廻リス
ルト云フハ我体ノ丸クコロガルニ共ナワレテ受ノ体モ共ニ丸クスナヲニ投ル樣
例へバ受ノ体ハ車輸ノ廻ルが如ク又我体ハ心棒ノ如クナク之ニ依テ友車ト云フ

一衣被 キヌカツギ

此手合ノ形ハ兩人ノ間三間バカリ離レテ直立シ聲ヲ懸捕身ノ者受身ノ前迄進行
左右ノ手ニテ受ノ左右ノ襟ヲ一處ニ寄セ右手ニテ持右膝ヲ少シ前へ出シテ突キ
左足ハ後ノ方へ踏立我右臂ヲ受ノ胸へ附ル樣ニヲノ少シ向へ押スベシ(圖參照)
受身ノ者ハ左手ニ
八十五

Rather ignoring the opponent's wrists when taking the grip on the koshi-ita back hip panel of the opponent's
hakama skirt with your own left hand, one has run a grip around the opponent's head pulling him down and
clinging to him along the right side of one's chest. Much as he himself might have wrapped around your
own neck, if he could have. One's own [right] fingers and those of the opponent's, one own elbow and that
of the opponent's are pushed in right alongside the opponent's belly (In reference to the illustrations). One's
own body held limber and flexible (yawarakani 柔) as the opponent is being crowded up into, in front of
your position, you are about to turn and lie your body down. The hands are free, one takes a step into the
open with the right foot, drop to the left knee, as one throws the opponent which is carried out according to
the direction in which one is standing, maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness as one does. Also there is
the single turn of laying your body down as already spoken of. One moves one's body in an arcing path, as
one floats out the opponent's body. But one does not throw the opponent's body in an arcing path, for
example. Instead the opponent's body is being rotated and wheeled out. Also about one's own body, much
as if it were the axle of the wheel, they say that the wheel out in Tomo Guruma Befriending and wheeling
out depends on this.

-- Kinu Katsugi By the Outer Garments

About this fighting technique, both men are at a measured distance of about three ken measures [(18 feet or
5.486 meter)] , standing erect they give outcry. The defender advances to the front of the attacker, using the
right hand to grab both left and right sides of the opponent's collars to pull him in closer by. Drop to the
right knee having advanced forward upon it just a bit. The left foot is stepped back into the rear, one's own
right elbow adheres to the opponent's chest, somewhat in the direction that one will be pushing (In
reference to the illustration). About the opponent, with his left hand he will have grabbed at his own lapel.

85
テ襟テ持チ捕ノ手首ヲ下ヨリ握リ右ノ拳ヲ揚ゲ打
タントスルナリ此際捕身ハ左足ヲ受ノ左右ノ足ノ
間へ充分ニ蹈込ト共ニ我体ヲ廻シテ受ノ体ノ下へ
後向ニ入込左手ノ平ヲ受ノ左足へ掛ケ掌中ノ石ヲ
地中へ打込ガ如キ心持ニテ前へ投殘心スベシ此廻
込タル我体ノ形ハ堅ニ一文字ト心得ベシ

一襟投 エリナゲ

此手合ノ形ハ三間程離レテ直立シテ聲ヲ懸兩方ヨリ進行捕

八十六

Grabbing and pushing the defender's wrist downwards as he raises his right fist to deliver the strike,
upon this occasion, the defender steps in sufficiently with the left foot so that it is in the gap between
the opponent's left and right foot, rotating one's own body as one does so, driving the opponent's body
down and backwards. Enter with the left hand leveled and snare the opponent's left leg, place the open
palm of the right hand on the ground much as if to strike it. There is some sense of doing so as one
throws him, maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness. About the bodily rotation one takes in this kata
technique, one ought to have a firm understanding of Ichimonji Straight line posture in regard to doing
so.

-- Eri Nage Collar Throw

About this fighting technique, Standing at a distance of three ken measures [(18 feet or 5.486 meter)]
both parties give outcry, as the defender advances...

86
身ノ者行逢タル時少シ左へ寄リ右足ヲ受身ノス
グ後へ踏出シ右手ニテ着衣ノ襟ヲ持ナがラ受ノ
後へ廻リ堅ニ左足ヲ一文字ニ踏開キ腕ヲ延シ膝
ヲ左右へ張リ腰ヲ充分ニ下テ受身ノ者ヲ止メル
ナリ(圖參照)此時受ハ留メラレタル際少シ後へ斜
ニ左足ヲ踏開クベシ又捕身ノ方ハ右足ヲ動カサ
ヌ樣ニ我腕ノ下ヲ右へ体ノ中心ヲ崩サヌ樣ニ廻
リ受身ト後合ニナリ左足ノ膝ヲ橫へ一文字ニ突

一襟投

八十七

...there is an altercation in passing at the time (ikia(h)i-taru → yuki chiga(h)i [SEE NOTES]). Drawing closer on
the left side, crowding the opponent's right foot, step in behind him and with the right hand take grip
on the collar of his garment [from behind], rotating the opponent backwards. The left foot has firmly
stepped out into the open into Ichimonji Straight line posture, the arm is extended out, the knees are
spread to the left and right sides sufficiently so as to lower the hips when dis-hearting him. And so
having stopped the attacker like this, for instance (In reference to the illustration). About this point in it
and the attacker, when having stopped him, as one intended to do when having stepped in diagonally
behind him with the left foot. About the way the defender does it, the right foot really doesn't move,
the arm will be simply lowered on the right side but it's not done with the intent to bodily destroy or
dishevel him. It only happens to rotate his body backwards, for instance. Drop to the knee of the left
legand, lowering the hips while striking the Ichimonji Straight line posture oneself.

Ichi Eri Nage


Illus 1 Collar Throw

87

Translator's Note: The text uses the idiom ikia(h)i-taru /or also pronounced/ icha-taru (行逢タル) Mod Jap → (行逢たる) in the construct
statement: shinkō torimi no mono ikia(h)i taru toki (進行捕身ノ者行逢タル時) → Mod Jap ( 進行捕身の者行逢たる時 ) “...as the
defender advances, there is an altercation in passing at the time...” It is inetresting because the construct ikia(h)i-taru ( 行逢たる) is a
form → yuki chiga(h)i, which is the name of a kata technique that addresses "an altercation in passing", many people translate the kata
name "Misunderstanding in passing" or something like it.
キテ腰ヲ下ゲ右足ノ爪先ヲシカト踏付膝頭ニテ
受ノ右足ノ膝裏ヲ少シ當テ右手ニ持シ襟テ少シ
モ引心持無ク只掌中ノ礫ヲ地へ打込ムカ如クニ
シテ投ナリ受身ノ者ハ後へ倒レテ直ニ捕身ノ烏
兎ヲ目掛テ右手ノコバノ方ニテ打ベシ又捕身ノ
者ハ右手ノ指先ヲ上ノ方へ眞直ニ廷シテ臂ヲ少
ツク橫ノ方へ張リ尺澤ノ裏ノ處ニテ當來ル手先
ヲ受留テ (二圖參照) 其マヽ氣ノ拔找ケヌ樣ニ殘
心スベシ

一襟投二惡シ

八十八

Ignoring the tip of the right foot, stepping on the knee caps [knee walking], step on and somewhat
strike the inside of the opponent's right knee. With the right hand grab the lapel, but there isn't the least
sense of pulling in it. However he might have picked up off the ground a tsubute striking stone holding
it in his hand, to strike you with it when he was being thrown. When the attacker was immediately
being thrown down to the backside, he might have caught sight of the Uto "Crow and Rabbit" Vital
point on the defender's body and would be preparing his right hand to deal a blow there. About the
defender, the fingers of the right hand are being held up outstretched straight. The elbow is somewhat
drawn out to the side which would stop the attacker from attacking the Shakutaku/or/Shattaku vital
point on the inside of your elbow (In reference to Illustration Two). That way you can’t be surprised
when doing this, as you are maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

Eri Nage Ni Ashi


The Two Evils Part of the Collar Throw

88
一手髪捕 タムサトリ

此手合ノ形ハ前同樣ニ三間程離レテ直立シテ聲ヲ發
シ兩方ヨリ進行間一尺バカリニ至リシ際受身ノ者右
手ニテ捕身ノ前髪ヲツカミ左足ヲ後ノ左へ斜ニ踏開
クナリ此時捕身ノ者ハ受身ノ手ノ甲ノ上へ右手ノ平
ヲ 掛ケ左足ヲ後ノ左へ斜ニ踏開キ頭ヲ曲ゲヌ樣ニ
シテ腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲ左手ノ平ヲ受ノ右腕ノ臂へ當我
体ノ中心ヲ崩サヌ樣ニナシテ左足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ脇
へ蹈込ナがラ少シ向へ斜

八十九

-- Tamusa Tori Capturing by the Hand Holding the Hair

About this fighting technique, it's done the same way as before, standing at a distance of about three
ken measures [(18 feet or 5.486 meter)], both parties give outcry, then advancing across by a measured
distance of one ken one shaku [(about seven feet or 2.133 meter)] to face each other. Having reached
this position, the attacker takes a grip on the defender's hair at the front of his head, step diagonally
back into the open with your left foot. About the defender at this point in it, the back of the attacker's
hand having been raised upward [to grab the hair of your head], snare it having kept the right hand
level to it. The left foot has stepped diagonally back into the left rear, do not bend the head at all when
doing this. You will be dis-hearted [having had your hair grabbed] but keep your left hand level with
the opponent's right elbow [locking his elbow joint open], but what you will do is not with the
intention of disheveling the opponent bodily, simply step through on your left foot so as to come
alongside the opponent's right foot somewhat since he is...

89
ニ体ニテ押シ右足ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴テ
(一圖參照)直ニ後ノ隅ノ方へ体ト
共ニ踏開キテ受身ノ右脇へ斜ニ並
ビタル樣ニナリ左手ノ指ヲ延揃へ
テ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立テ撓骨ノ
處ニテ受身ノ右臂ノ關節ヨリ二寸
程上ノ處へ掛ケ充分ニ氣ヲ滿チテ
些シク腕ヲ押ヘル樣ニナシ受ノ体
ヲ崩シ左足ノ膝ヲ我右足ノ際へ寄
テ突キナガラ受ノ体ヲ我体ニ隨テ
引寄セ右足ヲ右ノ前ノ隔へ斜ニ踏開キ右手ノ指先ヲ受ノ手ノ内平へ掛テ向へ伸
シ面ヲ右ノ爪先へ向テ

九十

......pulling at a diagonal angle on your body. Kick him in the testicles with your right foot (In reference
to Illustration One). Having retreated to one's own rear corner then stepping out of it into the open to
come diagonally alongside the opponent's right side that is the way one approaches and aligns with him
here. The fingers of your left hand having been set [gripping the hand holding your hair] and fingers of
the other hand being used to keep his elbow locked out straight, the way you are standing the spine is a
bit drooped over. One has snared the opponents right elbow at the position about two inches above the
elbow joint, despite that you had become a little agitated. One is not really pushing up on his arm, but
it does dishevel the opponent's body. One’s own right foot is positioned somewhat closely alongside
his left knee which he has dropped to. Depending upon just how one's own body and the opponent's
body gets pulled closer together, one can alternately step diagonally out into the open, into the right
front with the right foot. The fingers of the right hand being leveled to it can snare the inside of the
opponent's hand pulling on him, the right toes and the face will be in the same direction.

90
自然ト氣ヲ滿テ下腹ノ張ル樣ニナシ手先ニ强ク力ヲ入レズ シテ左手ニテ少シク
押へル樣ニナシ (二圖參照) 之ニヲ受身ノ者相圖ヲナサバ手ヲ放シテ殘心スルナ

一後捕 ウシロトリ
此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ捕身ノ直立ナシタルスグ
後へ立テ懸聲ヲ發シ又捕身ノ者モ聲ヲ 懸受身ノ者
ハ右足ヲ捕身ノ右 脇へ少シ踏出シテ後ロヨリ左右
ノ腕共ニ兩手ニテ抱ヘルナリ捕身ノ者ハ先頭ニテ
後へ當左足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ三尺程

九十一

Naturally one cannot allow agitation to continue as a gut reaction, and so one puts in a firm effort with
the fingers [to counter grab the hand in your hair] but somewhat one is not really pushing with the left
hand [at his elbow joint] (In reference to Illustration Two). There are some cues to this about the
opponent in the illustration, the hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Ushiro Tori Rear Capture

About this fighting technique, about the attacker, the defender is not standing perfectly erect as he is
crowded into from behind, outcry is produced and then the defender gives an outcry of reply. He steps
in from behind somewhat alongside the defender's right side, he wraps both arms around and grips
both his left and right hands together. The defender strikes him [in the face] with a head butt to the
rear, then steps out some three feet into the open on the left foot into Ichimonji Straight line posture.

91

Translator's Note: The text uses a few examples of adaptations of the ‘ki wo michiru’ idiom, even though they are not the same as the
previous examples, I did not document them out and explain them (it seemed less necessary by this point.)
踏開キナガラ左右ノ指先ヲ胸部ノ處へ甲ノ方ヲ上ニ向ケテ延揃へ左右ノ臂ヲ指
先ト平一文字ニナシ腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲルナリ(二圖參照) 此腰ヲ下ゲルモ左足ヲ踏
開モ又左右ノ指先ト臂ヲ廷揃へルモ皆一時ニ成スベシ些ニテモ是ニ前後在レバ
抱へラレタル處ノ体ヲ拔ケ難キ者ナリ右ノ如クニ成シテ一度上ゲタル左右ノ腕
ノ力ヲ拔キテ肩ト共ニ手先ヲ下ケナガラ右足ヲ少シク後へ下ケテ膝ヲ突キ左ノ
爪先ヨリ右膝迄三尺余離レテ一文字ニナツテ腰ヲ下ケテ右手ノ平ヲ後へ向テ受
身ノ右襟ヲシカト捕へ又左手ノ平ヲ受身ノ左足エ掛テハネ上ケナがラ右手ニテ
受ノ体ヲ目前ノ地へ打付ル心持ニテ投放シ殘心スヘシ

初段廿手終

九十二

The fingers of the left and right hands are at the position of the chest and the back of the hand faces up
and out. The right and left elbows are extended completely out as are the fingers of the hand, one is not
striking Hira Ichimonji Level straight line posture, but it is enough to dishevel him as the hips are
lowered too (In reference to Illustration Two). Even this lowering of the hips and disheveling him and
even the step out into the open with the left foot, all while one is performing even the least bit of this,
there being some difficulty as one is struggling front to back over this bear-hug grip on your body as
one slips out of it. Much as when performing the earlier part of the technique, when all at once one
raises the right and left arms but keeping them relaxed, the shoulders and fingertips kept below [the
gripping arms]. The right foot is somewhat to the back, the hips thrusting out and downward, the left
fingers are at a distance of about three feet from the right knee as one strikes Ichimonji Straight line
posture having so disheveled him. The right hand although leveled and in it's direction one ignores the
opponent's right lapel and capturing him instead. The left hand also being held leveled to it, snare the
opponent's left leg with that, and springing upwards with it, there is some sense of striking the
opponent physically with the right hand and knocking him to the ground. Throw him freely and
maintain Zanshin Continued awareness.

The twenty techniques of the Shōdan Initial level concluded here

92
○初段ノ手合ノ形ハ當身蹴込ミハ素ヨリ手足ノ逆ニテモ亦ハ咽喉ノシメニテモ總
テ柔ラカニ捕ルヲ以テヨシトス亦此レヨリノ中段ノ手合ノ形ハ咽喉ノシメハ素ヨ
リ手足ノ逆ニテモ又ハ當身モ蹴込ミモ充分ニコタユル樣ニ成スベシ尤唯力ノミ入
レテ手足ノ凝リ固マルハ宜シカラズ総テ柔ラカニシテ目然トコタユル樣ニ能ク意
ヲ用ヒテトルべシ

九十三

○ About this fighting technique, About kicking at Atemi vital points, from the initial positioning it
would be largely out of the question for either the hand or foot due to being in a position contrary to
being able to do so. Even with the likes of performing a throat strangulation, due to flexibility
(yawarakani 柔 ) it would generally have to be done after having thrown him. Again about this sort of
thing in the fighting kata of the Chūdan Middle level, regarding throat strangulation, in the
initial position the hands and feet are in a position contrary to being able to do so. And so
the same with striking Atemi Vital points, or kicking. This because he has you sufficiently
suppressed at the time. It would take a great deal of exertion indeed and the arms and legs
would become quite stiffened indeed, which is no good at all. Generally there must be a
natural flexibility (yawarakani 柔) bu which to do such things. One would quite often have to pay
attention to this sort of thing when one would throw him.

93

[ The rest of Page 93 appears on the First page of the Next Section ]
中段居捕

一眞之位 シンノクライ

此手合ノ形ハ初段ノ眞之位ト同ジ一樣ニ半身ニ搆へ聲ヲ懸ケ眞直ニ立上リ左リ右
ト二タ足ニ進ミ充分ニ氣合ヲ懸テ左右 ノ手ヲ咽喉へ掛ナガラ額ヲ受身ノ胸部へ押
付テ斜ニ倒シ左膝ヲ右耳ノ脇へ突キ右手ニテ受身ノ右腕ヲ抱へルガ如ク成シテ手
ノ内平ノ方ヲ上ニ向

九十三

Chūdan Idori
Seated Captures of the Middle Level

-- Shin No Kurai
-- True Positions

About this fighting technique, it is quite identical to Shin no kurai True positions from the Shodan
Initial level, but one uses Hanmi Half body posture instead. Outcry is given, standing straight up, he
advances two steps with the left and right foot sufficiently so as to gain some control (kiai wo kakeru)
and snares you wrapping both left and right hands around your throat. The opponent is holding your
forehead pressed against his chest. You will drop him diagonally, your left knee will be thrust out
alongside his right ear, as you have taken grip on the opponent's right collar with your right hand. It's
pretty much done like that. The hand will be on the inside and held level along the top of the
opponent's right shoulder, propping up his arm.

93
テ受ノ右肩先ノ處へ出シ左手ニテ右ノ襟ヲ
右手ノ平ノ處へ寄セテ右手ニテ握リ左手ニ
テ左襟ヲ持右足ヲ右ノ橫へ一文字ニ開クト
共ニ頭ヲ上テ右ノ爪先へ向左手ノ方ハ襟ヲ
余リ强ク摑マヌ樣拇指ヲ柔ラカニナシ小指
ニ力ヲ入平ニナラヌ樣ニコバノ方ニテ咽喉
ヲ押へ追々ニシメルナリ(圖參照)受ハ充分
ニシマレバ相圖ヲ成シ捕身ハ手ヲ放シテ殘
心スべシ

一手巾捕 シキントリ

此手合ノ形ハ受ノ右脇へ竝座シ兩人聲ヲ懸捕身ノ者ハ受ノ右膝ヨリ右ノ

九十四

Extending the left hand out, the right hand held level along his right collar to pull him in closer.
Grabbing with the right hand, while one takes grip with the left hand at his left collar. The right foot is
at the right side, now [having stepped out] into the open and being in Ichimonji Straight line posture
while holding one's head erect. The right toes facing forward, the left hand has taken quite a firm grip
on and taken up the excess of the [opponent's] lapel, due to this the thumb is not very flexible at the
moment. There is some tension from the pinky finger as it is not quite leveled in direction as one is to
some extent pressing against his throat to restrain him (In reference to the illustration). The opponent
being sufficiently restrained as indicated in the illustration, the defender's hands are free and he is
maintain Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Shikin Tori
-- Capturing by a Hand Towel

About this fighting technique, one is seated at the opponent's right side, both men give outcry, the
defender moves diagonally to a distance of one foot from the front of the opponent's right knee.

94
前へ斜ニ一尺程離レテ右ノ膝ヲ突キ左
足ヲ受ノ右膝ノ脇へ蹈出シ腰ヲ上テ体
ヲ眞直ニ伸シ(一圖參照)次ニ左手ノ指
手ヲ輕ク少シク曲ケテ右腕ノ附根へ掛
ケ右手モ指先ヲ輕ク少シ曲テ内ノ方へ
掛ケ右足ヲ斜ニ踏開キナガラ左手ヲ臂
ノ邊迄右手ヲ手首迄ナデル樣ニシテ持
ナガラ中腰ニ体ヲキメテ右足ノ爪先ヲ
返ラシテ脇腹ヲ踢直ニ元ノ處へ開キ左
膝ヲ右足ノ際へ突クト同時ニ腕ヲスナ
ヲニシテ强クユタヘヌ樣ニ船底ナリニ
引ク樣ニ受ノ体ヲ引寄テ右足ヲ右ノ前へ斜ニ踏開キツリガタメニ爲スナリ(二圖
參照)此釣がタメト云フハ

九十五

Drop to your right knee, having stepped alongside the opponent's right knee with the left foot, raising
the hips having become spirited and holding your body outstretched erect (in reference to Illustration
One). Next one would be somewhat lightly bending [back?] the fingers of the hand, snaring him at the
joint of his right arm. Then with the fingers of the right hand somewhat bent snaring it from the inside
as well. Stepping in diagonally with the right foot out into the open, one takes grip on his elbow with
the left hand while next on his wrist with the right hand. Being that one's body is only half arisen and
bent over just a bit, the toes of the right are being held reversed backwards. Kick him directly in the
side, for which you have positioned yourself this way. The left knee and the right foot will be thrust
out and placed into the positions indicated [in the illustration], but not grinding into the arm very
forcefully at all. Much like guiding the bottom of a boat [across the water]. So having thus pulled the
opponent's body closer to you, with the right foot thrust out to the right front side, having taken
advantage of [the act of] pulling and grinding him as one stepped out into the open (In reference to
Illustration Two). They say to have taken advantage of it as if hooking him with a fish hook,

95
先左手ノ方ハ拇指ノ根ノ少シ高キ處ヲ臂ノ
少シ凹ミタル處へ付右手ハ受ノ手首へ我指
ヲ卷付ル如ク充分ニ向へ延シテ持受ノ手ハ
小指ヲ下ニナシ拇指ヲ上ニ向ケル樣ニナシ
少シク右手ニテ釣上ル心持ニテ左手ノ方へ
向へ押シ左右共腕ニ余リ强ク力ヲ入レズニ
臍下ニ氣ヲ滿チテ腹ニテシメルナリ又受ノ
体ハ自然ト前へシマルニツレテ乘出スヲ良
トスベシ是ニテ受が疊ヲ打タル時手ヲ放シ
テ殘心スベシ

一左胸捕 ヒ ダリムナド

九十六

The direction that the tip of the left hand, somewhat with the base of the fingers held just a bit high and
clinging alongside the crook of his elbow. About the right hand, much as if one's fingers are being
wound around the opponent's wrist, extending out in a certain direction sufficiently enough to
constitute having a grip on him. About the opponent's hand, his pinky finger is not being driven
downwards. The fingers facing somewhat upwards when doing it, with the right hand and having a
sense of hooking upwards with it, towards one's left hand pushing it in that direction. Controlling to the
left and right while depleting his ability to employ force or apply pressure. He will have become
agitated (saika ni ki wo michite) and somewhat dis-hearted by this (hara nite shimeru), for instance.
Also, about the opponent's body, naturally, having been inadvertently moved forward by this, and as if
he is being rather well ridden to boot. The opponent strikes the tatami mats like this at the time, the
hands are free and one is maintaining ZanshinContinued awareness.

[ Illustration Two of Shikin dori ]

-- Hidari Muna Tori


-- Left Chest Capture

96
Missing Page Here Is Courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament

此手合ノ形ハ兩人ノ間一尺五六寸離
レ對坐シ聲ヲ懸受身ノ者ハ左右ノ手
ニテ捕ノ左右ノ襟ヲ一處ニ寄セ左手
ニテシボリニ捕ナリ受身ノ者ハ左手
ニテ受ノ手ヨリ少シ下ノ處ノ我襟ヲ
握リ左足ヲ受ノ左膝ノ脇ヘ蹈出シテ
腰ヲ伸シ右ノ臂ヲ張テ我襟ヲ肩ノ方
へ引上ケ左手ノ指ヲ受身ノ左手ノ甲
ノ上ヨリ内平ノ方へ充分ニ掛テ小指
ニ力ヲ入レシカトンメ(二圖參照)右
手ニテ手首ヲ摑ミ右足ヲ立チ乍ラ受
身ノ右ノ脇腹ヲ蹴テ直ニ我ガ左足ノ
際へ立又右足ヲ中心ニシテ左ノ後へ
一廻ナシヅヽ直ニ左

九十七

About this fighting technique, both men are seated facing each other at a distance of about one and a
half feet away from each other, then give outcry. About the attacker, he grabs the left and right collars
of the defender, bundled as one, using them to draw him closer. Going over-top with the left hand, the
defender takes grip on his collar somewhat pulling it down to get it out of the attacker's hand. Stepping
in over the left foot to come alongside the opponent’s left knee, the hips are extended out length-ways
and the right elbow is stretched upwards as you pull your own lapel upwards towards your shoulder
[out of his grip]. The fingers of the left hand are now upraised to the inside and level with the back of
the opponent’s left hand sufficiently so as to snare him by it. One rather ignores the tension this causes
at the pinky finger side of the hand (In reference to Illustration Two). Grabbing his wrist with your
right hand while standing chiefly on the right foot, kick the opponent directly in the side, taking the
opportunity presented by this to stand up also on your left foot. Again, the intention here is to make a
single rotation on the right foot directly into the left rear, …

97
Missing Page Here Is Courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament

足ヲ左ノ前ノ 隅へ斜ニ蹈開(二圖參照)受
身ト並ブ樣ニナリ腰ヲ充分ニ下ケテ右臂ニ
テ受身ノ左腕ヲ狹ミ込ム樣ニナシ右膝ヲ左
足ノ踵ヨリ左ノ外ノ方へ四五寸出ス位ニナ
シナガラ我体ト共ニ受ノ体ヲ引寄セ左足ヲ
些上ゲ此時受身ノ者ハ腕ヲイタメス樣ニ左
膝ノ前ノ處へ体ヲ伏スベシ又捕身ノ者ハ腕
ヲイタメス樣ニ体ト体ト並へテ仰向ニ一度
寐テ右足ノ膝ヲ受ノ腕ノ附根ノ際へ突

九十八

...the left foot will then step diagonally into the open left front corner (In reference to Illustration Two).
While having sufficiently dis-hearted the opponent by this, with the right elbow crowd in the opponent’s left
arm arm. Use the heel of the left foot against his right knee driving it towards the outside left some four or
five inches without changing your own position. Pull your body and the opponent’s body closer together,
raise the left foot a little. At this time, the defender will apply some pain to [the opponent’s] arm, as you
would be laying out his body in relationship to the position of the front of the left knee. Then the defender
causing pain to [the opponent’s] arm much the same way, both bodies his and yours facing together rather
the same direction, extend his arm flat out across the right knee having locked out his joint across it as if
thrusting [the joint with the knee sharply]...

98
Missing Page Here Is Courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament

キナガラ左手ニテ受ノ手首ヲ上
ノ方ヨリ持直シテ右手ノ平ヲ臂
ヘ掛ケ左足ヲ左ノ前ヘ斜ニ蹈開
キ我体ヲ良ク正シクシテ前ノ形
ノ如ク釣ガタメニ爲シ面ヲ左ヘ
向テ追々ニシメルナリ之ニテ受
身ノ相圖ヲ聞テ手ヲ放シ殘心ス
ヘシ

一右胸捕 ミギムナドリ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト同シク中一尺
五六寸離レテ對坐シ聲ヲ懸受身ノ者左右ノ手ニテ襟ヲ一處ノ寄セ右手ニテ絞リ
ニ取ルナリ其際捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ平ヲ上ニ向テ受身ノ手首ヲ下ヨリ握

九十九

...while pulling upwards on the opponent's wrist with your left hand. Having recovered oneself [from
the control of the collar grab], one snares his elbow with the palm of the right hand, the left foot steps
diagonally out into the open in the left front side, and frequently this would be proper positioning for
one's own body, much as in the previous kata patterns. Using the advantage provided by doing so to
hook him [like a fish], one's face would be facing towards the left, as one gradually constricts him, for
instance. As one should pay attention to the cues given about this and the opponent in the illustrations,
one's hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Migi Muna Tori


-- Right Chest Capture

About this fighting technique, just like with the previous examples, you are seated across from one
another by a distance of about one and a half feet. Outcry is given, the attacker takes both left and right
lapels into hand, bundled together and uses them to pull you closer. with your right hand choke him as
you take hold of him. About the way the defender handles the occasion, the left hand is palm up,
gripping the opponent's wrist from underneath.

99
Missing Page Here Is Courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament

リ右手ノ掌ヲ開キ拇指ノ腹ヲ受身ノ
右ノ獨鈷へ押付同時ニ右膝ヲ突キタ
ルマヽ左足ヲ後へ一文字ニ蹈開キ腰
ヲ充分ニ上ゲ右手ニテ獨鈷ヲ向へオ
シ左手ニテ受ノ右手首ヲ引キ(一圖
參照)是ヲ少シモユルメ ヌ樣ニヲノ
左足ヲ受ノ右脇へ蹈出シ右足ヲ立ナ
ガラ右脇腹ヲ蹴テ向フへ倒シ直ニ右
膝ヲ右ノ脇腹ノ邊ヨナシ左足ヲ少シ
前へ踏ミ出シ左ノ臂ヲ上ケナガラ掌
ヲ外へ向ケテ受身ノ左ノ手首ヲ持直
シ(二圖參照)

The right hand is open palmed. The defender pushes in sharply with the thumb [against the arm to hold
his arm] straight along the right side of your belly it is not unlike a single pronged vajra to enlighten
him. While at the same time, thrusting him with the right knee being driven into him, the left foot has
stepped out into the open rear into Ichimonji Straight line posture as one sufficiently maintains one's
composure [in the face of the attack.] Driving the [other] thumb in [to the side of his neck, in contrasting pressure]
like a single pronged vajra, pull him by his wrist with your left hand (In reference to Illustration One).
There is otherwise no particular way of doing this, but that the defender has stepped out into the open
on his left foot and planted the right knee as if to stand on him with after rather having kicked him with
it in his right flank in the direction that he has fallen. The right knee is there on his right flank for no
other evident purpose. The left foot has stepped out somewhat forwards, the left elbow is held high,
palm of that hand facing outwards. The recovery [against the attack] was actually done by the actions
of the defender's left wrist (In reference to Illustration Two).

100
下へ押付テ左ノ膝ヲノセ右手ノ平ヲ 少シ上ゲテ内ノ方ヨリ左手ニテ左襟ヲ持右
手ニテ右襟ヲ持右足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ踏開キ左手ノ平ニナラヌ樣甲端ノ方ニテ追
々ニ咽喉ヲシメ面ヲ右へ向之 ニテ受ノヲナシタルヲシテナスベシ

一御前捕 ゴセントリ

此手合ノ形ハ中六七尺程離レテ受身ノ者ハ左リへ橫向ニ坐シ捕身ノ者モ同シク
受ノ向キタル方即チ我右へ橫ニ向キ右膝ヲ突キ左膝ヲ少シ上テ搆へ聲ヲ懸ケ眞
直ニ立ナガラ受ノ坐シタル方へ向テヅカ〱ト受ノ右脇迄歩ミ寄リ左手ヲ 受ノ右
ノ腕ノ附根ニ掛右手ノ平ヲ腕ノ内ノ方へ掛 ケ右足ヲ後へ一文字ニ蹈開キナガラ
左手ハ臂迄右手ハ手首迄ナデル樣ニシテ送リ左右ノ膝ヲ開テ充分ニ腰ヲ下ケ開
キタル右足爪ノ先返ヲ脇腹ヲ蹴テ(圖參照)直ニ元ノ處へ蹈開キ左ノ膝ヲ右足ノ
際へ寄テ突 キナガラ受ノ腕ヲ丸ク船底ナリ

百一

Pushing him sharply downwards while riding him by [the pressure coming from] the left knee, the palm of
the right hand being turned upwards just a bit and to the inside, with the left hand take grip on his left lapel.
With the right hand, take grip on his right lapel, and with your right foot step openly off to the side into
Ichimonji Straight line posture. One cannot prevent what position this will place the palm of the left hand
in, when doing this. By the direction of the back of your hand, you will be strangling him to some extent.
You will be facing towards the right as you do this, the defender need not do anything else.

-- Gosen Dori
-- Capturing in the Presence of Nobility

About this fighting technique, you are [seated] at a distance of about six or seven feet away from each
other. About the defender, [the opponent is] turned facing to the left side while still seated, the defender
does the same. Being the direction of the defender what it is, namely, one would be facing one's own right
side. Drop to the right knee, the left knee is somewhat upraised to the side, outcry is given. He rises to his
feet standing straight up, turning to face the seated position of the defender, walks up to come alongside the
defender on his right side. He snares and clings to the defender's right arm at the joint with his left hand. He
also snares it with the palm of his right hand to the inside of the arm. [The defender] steps out into the open
rear with his right foot striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. With the left hand reach for the [captured]
elbow of the right arm, seeking to free the wrist of the [captured] right arm. The left and right knees are
spread apart enough to allow some stability [against the grip on your arm] which is further dis-hearting you.
You will have next kicked him in the side with the tip of the right foot (In reference to the illustration).
Stepping directly into the heart of the circumstance, the right foot will be positioned close to his left knee,
as it is being thrust out. The defender moves his [captured] arm in an arc, as if guiding a boat [across the
waters] to perform a pulling throw-down ((s)hiki (w)otoshi).

101
[ HERE, THE LIBRARY VERSION HAD AN ACCIDENTAL REPEAT OF PAGE 101 AND ITS CONTENTS ]

NEXT PAGE

ニ引落シ右足ヲ眞一文字ニ踏
開キテ始メ搆へタル際ノ通リ
ニ向手巾捕ト同樣ニ釣ガタメ
ニ爲シ面ヲ右 へ向テ追々ニシ
メ受身ノ者相圖ヲナサバ手ヲ
放シテ殘心スベシ

一袖車 ソデクルマ

此手合ノ形ハ間六尺程離テ相
對座シ捕身ノ方ハ右膝ヲ突爪
先ヲ立テ揃へタルマヽ少シ左
膝ヲ上ケテ搆へ兩人聲ヲ懸 初段ノ袖車ト同樣ニ左リ右ト二タ足進右手ヲ肩先へ
カケ左手ニテ左襟ヲ持

百二

On the right foot stepping straight out in the open striking Shin Ichimonji True Straight line posture, at first
coming alongside his immediate position, rather facing the same direction he is, very much the same as in
Shikin dori Capturing by a Hand Towel. Taking advantage of it to hook him [like a fish]. You will be facing
to the right front while gradually strangling him. There are cues about the opponent in the illustration, the
hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Sode Kuruma
-- Sleeve Wheel

About this fighting technique, you are seated at a distance of about six feet away from each other. About the
opponent, his right knee thrust out while standing on his tip toes, all somewhat in alignment with each other.
The left knee upraised in the body posturing, both men then give outcry. Much the same as with how Sode
kuruma Sleeve wheel is done in the Shodan Initial level, advancing over both left and right foot, you snare
him at the shoulder with the right hand, and with the left hand having taken grip on his left lapel...

102
乍ラ後へ廻リ右手ニテ左ノ肩先ノ衣ヲ握リテ直立ナ
シ左足ヲ後へ斜ニ踏開キ右足モ又斜ニ路開キテ橫一
文字トナリ面ヲ左リへ向腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲテ左右ノ手
ハ少モ引寄ル必特ナク受ノ体が倒レル事モ出來ズ又
起ル事モ出來ヌ樣ニ途中へ止メテ手ヲ充分ニ延シ指
先ヨリ追々ニシメルナリ (圖參照)是ニテ受身ガ打タ
ル時少シ向へ押ス樣ニシテ放殘心スベシ

一飛違 トピチガイ

比手合ノ形ハ間三尺程離テ對座シ受身ノ者ハ左手ニ
小太刀ヲ携へ

百三

[having taken grip on his left lapel...] rotating oneself backwards, with the left hand take grip on his
garments above the left shoulder. Not quite standing fully erect, having stepped out into the open left
foot to the rear diagonally as one also steps out into the open on the right foot. Then stepping out into
the open diagonally to strike Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture. Facing left at the time,
[positioned] sufficiently to have staved off being dis-hearted [by the attempt against you], there really
isn’t a sense of using the left and right hands to pull him closer at all. But the opponent’s body will
have been dropped to the ground, there are other things you can do here. Arising then, doing what one
could do, putting a stop to him right in the middle of his doings. The fingers of the hand are
sufficiently extended so as to be able to gradually strangle him (In reference to the Illustration). By
this, one strikes the opponent, somewhat in the direction he is facing. Then pressing against him,
[hands] free and maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Tobi Chigai
-- Flitting About

About this fighting technique, you are seated at a distance of about three feet away facing each other.
The opponent is holding a short sword in his left hand...

103
聲ヲ懸右足ヲ前へ踏出シナ
ガラ右手ニテ小太刀ヲ拔キ
頭上へ切付ルナリ此際捕身

ノ者ハ受身ノ踏出シタル足ノ
右脇へ右足ラ踏込ナガラ右手
ノ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立我額

百四

Outcry is given, stepping forward on the right foot, he draws the


short sword (kodachi) with his right hand and cuts upwards at
your head. This is the circumstances for the defender.

The steps having been taken by the attacker, one steps in


placing the right foot alongside his right side. Fingers
extended out straight held at the elbow of his right hand.
Leaping in...

104
テ飛込直ニ受ノ腕ヲ下ノ方へ烈シク手首迄ナテ下シ其手首ヲシカト摑ミ(一圖參
照)左手ノ平ヲ臂へ掛ケ乍ラ左足ヲ上テ脇腹ヲ蹴テ(二圖參照)右足ノ際へ立右足
ヲ右ノ後へ斜ニ踏開キ左ノ膝ヲ右足ノ際へ突ナがラ受身ノ腕ヲ丸ク船底ナリニ
引落シ右足ヲ右ノ前へ斜ニ開キ我体ヲ正シクシテ腕ヲ鈎ガタメニナスベシ伹シ
釣ガタメノ捕樣ハ前ニ述タル故爱ニ畧ス

一拔刀目附 ヌキミメツケ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ左手ニ木太刀ヲ携へ捕身ノ者へ間六尺程離レテ左手ニ
小太刀ヲ携へ右膝ヲ突キ左膝ヲ少シ上テ開キ爪先ヲ揃へ半身ニ搆へ受ヨリ聲ヲ
懸次ニ捕ノ方聲ヲ懸ケ右手ニテ小太刀ヲ拔キ肩ヨリ切先迄眞直ニ受ノ左眼ヲ差
シテ附其マヽ立上リ左リ右ト斜ニ二タ足進ム此際受身ハ木太刀ニテ捕ノ右膝へ
橫ニ切付ルナリ捕身ハ腕ニ力ヲ入レヌ樣小手先ヲ内ノ方へ輕ク返シテハネ返

百五

… straight-away headlong, quite violently drive the opponent’s arm and wrist downwards, while otherwise
ignoring the grip you have taken on that wrist (In reference to Illustration One). Snaring his elbow with the
palm of your left hand, hike the left foot up and kick him in the side [NOTE: the illustration seems to
indicate the right foot instead?] (In reference to Illustration Two). Standing with the right foot in this
position, then step diagonally into the right rear on the right foot. Drop to the left knee and from the
position of the right foot, pull and drop him (hiki (w)otoshi) by guiding the arm in an arcing path like
pulling a boat across the water. The right foot has stepped into the open right front, one’s own body being
held correctly as you use his arm to hook him like a fish. Moreover, the way you are taking advantage to
hook him like a fish is much as described in the previous statements, some of which were deliberately
omitted here in the text.

-- Nukimi Metsuke Close Observation of the Drawn Sword

About this fighting technique, the opponent is holding a kodachi short sword in his left hand, the defender
is [seated] at a distance of about six feet away. He holds the kodachi short sword with his left hand. The
right knee thrust out while the left knee is somewhat upraised, out in the open. The roes are bunched
together, one being in the Hanmi Half body posture. The opponent gives outcry and the defender gives
outcry of reply. He draws the kodachi short sword with his right hand. He cuts directly at the shoulder, with
the tip of the sword. The opponent’s left eye will be impeded when clinging to the doing of this. As you
have stood upright, advancing two paces left and right foot, in this circumstance the attacker is using a
wooden short sword, the defender evades the cut by [rising to] his right knee off to one side. The attacker is
not really using arm strength, as he does this. You will nimbly reverse his wrist to the inside...

105
ス樣ニ受テ直ニ切落シ又元ノ如ク左

眼ニ付左膝ヲ充分ニ大キク受ノ右脇

へ蹈込膝ヲ突キ乍ラ 左ノ指ヲ 延揃へ

小指ノコバノ方ヲ咽 喉へ當小太刀ヲ

左 眼ニ付タルマヽ受ノ体ヲ押倒シ(二

圖參照)左手ニテ左襟ヲ摑ミ小太刀ノ

抦頭ニテ齋

百六

...when fending him of, to have cut him down and dropped him (kiri (w)otoshi), then much as with
others earlier, snaring him [by exploiting] his [vision impaired in] the left eye, extend the left knee
sufficiently so as to take a step in alongside to the right of the opponent [e.g. knee walking]. Knee thrust
outward while the left fingers extend straight out being held tightly together, as you strike him in the
throat at about the base of your pinky finger as you keep your left eye peeled on the short sword. You
will have bodily pushed and dropped the opponent (In reference to Illustration Two). With the left
hand, grab his left lapel. And by the pommel cap of the kodachi short sword...

106

Translator's Note: The text uses a fairly common application of kiri-(w)otoshi but in this application the meaning was dualistic… in
actual combative encounter, one might steal away his sword and use it to drop him. The language in some technical descriptors rather
tends to work that way.
下ヲ當直ニ右ノ方へ小太刀ヲ捨テ
右ノ手首ヲ上ヨリ握リ受ノ体ニ付
向フへ押橫ニナシテ右ノ膝ヲ左膝
ノ際へ突キ又左ノ爪先ヲ受身ノ腰
帶ノ邊迄踏出シ腰ヲ下ケテ受ノ右
臂ヲ左ノ膝頭へ當腰ヲ上ナガラ腹
ヲ前へ出シテ手ヲ少シ前へ引受ノ
体ヲ起スナリ(二圖參照)此際左手
ヲ五六寸下ケテ襟ヲ持同時ニ右手
ヲ少シ前へ出シ膝ヲ少シ下ケテニ
ユルメ左足ヲ橫ニ大キク踏開キ乍ラ右手ヲ左足ノ方へ投付ル樣ニシテ放シ同時
ニ左襟モ共ニ少シ前へ引一度起シタル受ノ体ヲ二タ度我前へ伏サセルナリ夫ヨ
リ右

百七

...you will have struck directly and dis-hearted him. Cast the kodachi short sword aside to the right,
grab and raise his right wrist upwards but do not push off to either side of the opponent’s body [or he
can cut you with it!]. In this position both the left and right knees are thrust outward, and the left toes
are in the general vicinity of the opponent’s waistband where one has stepped to. Further dis-heart him
by driving the opponent’s right elbow towards his left knee-cap and proceeding to advance forward
with definitive confidence. Pulling him somewhat forward with your hand(s) [to prevent] the opponent
from bodily arising (In reference to Illustration Two). At this position the left hand is down about five
or six inches grabbing at the lapel, while the right hand proceeds somewhat forwards. One should not
lower the knee in the slightest. Stepping some length out into the open with the left foot off to the side,
while throwing him with the right hand in the direction of your left foot. Freeing oneself while at the
same time pulling him somewhat forwards by his left lapel in a single action, as you are arising.
Having done so some two times to the opponent’s body, as you laid him flat out, for instance. From
there with the right...

107
手ニテ左ノ衣ノ肩先ヲ摑ミ左膝ヲ頸ノ際へ突キ右足ヲ後へ一文字ニ踏開キ臂ニ
テ左右へ引分ル樣ニナシテ追々ニシメルナリ(三圖參照)是ニテ受身ノ者相圖ヲ
ナサバ手ヲ放シテ殘心スベシ

一奏者捕 ソウシヤトリ

此手合ノ形ハ前ト同ジク受ハ左手ニ木太刀ヲ携へ捕
ハ六尺 計離レテ左手ニ小太刀ヲ携へラ半身ニ搆へ
相方聲ヲ懸テ捕身ノ者ハ眞直ニ立上リ左リ右ト斜ニ
二タ足進ミ受身ノ者ハ拔打ニ膝へ橫ニ切付ルナリ捕
ハ小太刀ヲ右手ニテ拔ナカラ

百八

...hand grabbing the garments above his left shoulder. Thrust the left knee out his throat and neck, the
right foot having stepped out into the open rear in striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. It’s done
while gradually spreading and separating the elbows out to the left and right sides (In reference to
Illustration Three). There are cues about the opponent during this in the illustrations, the hands are free
and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Sōsha Tori
-- Minstrel Capture

About this fighting technique, much the same as with the previous ones, the opponent is holding a
kodachishort sword in his left hand. The defender is at a measured distance of six feet away, as he [the
attacker] is holding the short sword in his hand, positioned in Hanmi Half body posture. Both parties
give outcry. The defender directly stands to his feet, advancing diagonally over both left and right foot.
The opponent draws the sword and strikes at the side of your knee. The defender uses his right hand to
remove the kodachi short sword from him, ...

108
受テ上ヨリ切落シ直ニ左眼ニ附ケ左足ヲ後へ踏込ナカラ左手ニテ前ヨリ左襟ヲ
持後へ廻テ直立ナシ小太刀持タルマヽ手ヲ下ケ次ニ左右ノ足ヲ橫一文字ニ踏開
ト同時ニ右ノ手ヲ横ニ伸シ手ノ甲ノ方ヲ下へ向テ小太刀ヲモ眞直ニナシ(圖參
照)直ニ其切先ヲ下へ提其マヽ受ノ左ノ肩先迄手先ヲ廻シテ小太刀ヲ捨袖車ノ如
ク肩先ノ衣ヲ握リ左足ヲ後へ斜ニ踏開キ又次ニ右足ヲ斜ニ踏開キ面ヲ左リへ向
ケテ小指ヨリ追々ニシメ之ニテ受身ノ方相圖ヲナサバ手ヲ放シ殘心スベン

一抦止 ツカドメ

此手合ノ形ハ中三尺程離レテ捕身ノ者ハ木太刀ヲ左手ニ携へテ對座シ光相方聲
ヲ懸受身ノ者ハ右膝ヲ少シ前へ進ミテ右手ニテ抦ヲ握リ少シ引寄セ次ニ左手ヲ
掛ルナリ捕ハ左手ニテ鍔際ヲ握リ居テ受身ノ者が手ヲ掛ケタル際左ノ拇指ニテ
鍔ヲヲサへ腰ヲ上テ右足

百九

… having fended it off (ukete → ukeru) and upwards, then directly cutting and dropping him [“with it”
implied] keeping the left eye peeled, stepping into the rear with the left foot, left hand being to the front
grab his lapel with it and use it to rotate him around backwards. Not quite standing fully erect, and having
taken grip on his short sword, use that to drive his arm down. Next one steps into the open with both left
and right foot, striking Ichimonji Straight line posture, while extending the right hand off to the side. The
back of the hand is facing down and in a direction where the [blade of] the sword is not directly facing (In
reference to the Illustration). The tip of the point is descending being that it’s cutting straight down, From
there one can rotate the opponent with the fingertips placed on top of his left shoulder. Throw the short
sword away, much as when doing Sode kuruma sleeve wheel, by having taken grip on the garments at the
top of the shoulder. Step diagonally in to the open rear with the left foot. And next, step diagonally into the
open left front where one is facing. One gradually strangles him with the pinky finger side of the hand like
this. There are cues about the opponent in the illustrations, the hands are free and one maintains Zanshin
Continued awareness.

-- Tsuka Dome Hilt Stopper

About this fighting technique, one is at a distance of about three feet away. The opponent is holding a
wooden long sword in his left hand, as you are seated across from him. Both parties give a startling outcry.
The attacker advances with the right knee somewhat forward, take a grip of some sort on the hilt of the
sword, pulling [the hilt] closer to you. Next, snare him with your left hand, for instance. The defender takes
grip on the tsuba hand guard as well, the opponent will snare that hand. By the position of the left thumb
itself, you will use it to clamp down the tsuba hand guard [preventing the sword from being drawn]. You
will become quite bold now. On the right foot...

109
ヲ前へ踏出シ

乍ラ右手ノコ

バニテ烏兎ヲ

當(一圖參照)

直ニ抦頭ヲ下

ヨリ握リ左滕

ヲ突キタルマ

ヽ右足ヲ後へ

大キク一文字

ニ踏開キ乍ラ

腰ヲ下ケ是ト

同時ニ抦先ヲ

右ノ爪先ノ處

百十

...step towards the front, while striking Uto “Bird Rabbit” vital point with the base of the right hand (In
reference to Illustration One). Directly, grab and drive the Tsuka-gashira hilt cap of the sword downward.
The left knee thrust out as the right foot steps broadly out into the open, to the rear, striking Ichimonji
Straight line posture. As you do this he becomes dis-hearted over this. At the same time, reposition
theTsuka-gashira hilt cap towards the right with your fingertips….

110
迄下へ船底ナリニ引來リ我体ヨリ木太刀ノ離
レヌ樣抦先ヲ急ニ肩ノ邊迄上ゲ右足ヲ左膝ノ
際へ寄セテ(二圖參照)膝ヲ左膝ノ際へ寄ト左
足ヲ後へ一文字ニ蹈開クト共ニ右手 ニテ抦光
ヲ下へ伏セル樣ニシテ受身ノ水月ノ邊へ突出
スヘシ此抦先ヲ突出スト左右ノ足ヲ立替テ我
体ヲ向替ルハ寸分ノ違ヒモ無ク速ナラザレバ
氣相拔ケル故能ク々考べシ

一膳起 ゼンゴ シ

此手合ノ形ハ中六尺程離レテ對坐シ捕身ノ者片膝上テ半身ニ搆ヘ兩人共懸聲ヲ
發シ捕身ノ者ハ眞直ニ

百十一

...driving it down and pulling him down like guiding a boat over the water, for instance. One doesn’t
do it so much by means of distance between one’s own body and the short sword, but instead by the
sudden positioning the Tsuka-gashira hilt cap of the sword upwards in proximity to his shoulder and
bringing your right foot in closer to the position of his left knee (In reference to Illustration Two). That
knee coming in closer to his left knee while stepping out into the open rear striking Ichimonji Straight
line posture while driving the Tsukazaki very end of the hilt downward and you lay him out flat. One
would then thrust the opponent in the vicinity of the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit of the
stomach] with [the Tsukazaki ]. This thrust with the Tsukazaki very end of the hilt while standing on
both the left and right feet, sinking into the blow. Sinking into the directional blow with one’s own
body as if to drive it in an inch or so deeper, one does not require speed at all to do this and
furthermore it [as a strike] quite commonly it’s thought to be able to cause him to exude gases
[“farting”.]

-- Zengoshi Arising from a Table

About this fighting technique, you are seated across from each other at a distance of about six feet
away. The attacker raises a single knee assuming the Hanmi Half body posture. Both men make outcry
together, the defender stands straight up...

111
立上リ左リ右ト斜ニ二
タ足進ミ右手ノ指先ヲ
少シ右へ返ラセテコバ
ノ方ニテ烏兎テ打左足
ヲ受身ノ眞後へ踏込左
手ノ拇指ヲ内ニシテ左
襟ヲ持右手ニテ右襟ヲ
持少シ左右へ開テ直ニ
右襟ヲ左リノ方へ少シ
ク寄セ左襟ヲ右襟ノ上
ヨリ首エ巻付ル樣ニナ
シ我左ノ拇指ヲ上ニシ小指ノ方ヲ首ニ附少シク臂ヲ橫へ張テ受ノ体ヲ崩シ右手
ノ平ニテ右膝ヲハネ(一圖參照)テ倒シ乍ラ我右襟ヲ左足ノ方へ充分ニ送テ突キ
左足ヲ堅ニ一文字ニ踏開キ右手ノ

百十二

… then advances on a diagonal path two steps left and right foot. The fingertips of the right hand are
turned somewhat to the right as one strikes with the base of the hand against the Uto “Bird Rabbit”
vital point, the left foot steps directly behind the opponent. Grab his left lapel with the left hand, thumb
to the inside. Grab his right lapel with the right hand, there will be some open space between the right
and left [hands at his lapel]. Pull his right lapel to the left, bringing it somewhat closer to his left lapel
as you then pull both lapels together upwards and wind the collar tightly around his neck by them.
Your left thumb will be up and your pinky finger close alongside his neck. The elbow(s) extended off
to the side, as one disrupts (kuzushi) the opponent bodily with the palm of the right hand while
springing forward with the right knee (In reference to Illustration One). Dropping him while keeping
one’s own right lapel [crossed and covered], the direction moved into sufficient to place him bolting
against your left leg firmly as one stepped out into the open striking Ichimonji Straight line posture.
The fingers of the right hand extended...

112
指先ヲ延テ手左ノ上ヨリコバノ處ニテ受ノ襟首ヲ
少シ押ス心持ニ爲シテ左ノ肩ノ處ヲ握リ我体ノ中
心ヲ正シク右ノ臂ヲ張樣ニシテ我要ノ後ノ方へ引
廻ス樣ニ爲シ乍ラ(二圖參照)左ノ指先ヲ追々ニ摑
テシメルナリ此シメル時ニ橫ニ倒レ居ル受ノ体ガ
起ラレヌ樣ニシメルニ隨テ仰向ニ成迄追々ニシメ
面ヲ左へ向テ受が相圖ヲ爲シタル時手ヲ放シ殘心
スベン

一兩手詰 リヤウテズメ

此手合ノ形ハ間一尺程離レテ對坐シ兩人聲ヲ懸テ受身ノ者ハ捕ノ左右ノ手首ヲ
シカト握ルナリ捕身ノ者ハ手ニ力ヲ入レズニ腰ヲ少シク

百十三

...as the base of the hand is positioned in the upper left. When doing it there is some sense of the
opponent’s lapels pushing on him for you. Having grabbed him at the position of the left shoulder,
fully consistent with one’s own physical intentions, the right elbow extended out while doing this,
which is crucial for what one will do after having pulled him in as one does so (In reference to
Illustration Two). One slowly takes a grip [on the lapels] and strangles him with them, for instance.
Strangling him like this from the side at the time, and then downing him. The opponent cannot
physically return to his feet whilst you are strangling him like this, depending upon just how one has
turned him this way and that while strangling him. You are facing to the left, there are cues about the
opponent in the illustration as one is doing all this at the time, the hands are free and one is maintaining
Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Ryōte Zumi
-- Stuffing In with Both Hands

About this fighting technique, seated across from one another about one foot apart, both men give
outcry. The opponent ignores to take a grip on both the defender’s left and right wrist [but was rather
expected to]. The defender, as he was expecting to apply some force with his hands becomes
somewhat relieved [but confused] by this...

113
上テ体ノ中心ヲ失ハザル樣右足ノ爪先ニテ速ニ受ノ水月ヲ蹴ルト同時ニ左右ノ
手ヲ後ニテ打合セ直ニ兩膝ヲ突テ爪立チ(圖參照)左右ノ手ハ元ノ如ク膝ノ上ニ
置ベシ此水月ヲ蹴ルハ足先ガ受身ノ目ニモ見へヌ位ニ速カニナシテ膝ヲ突べシ
又左右ノ手ハ少シモ上ル心持モナク又開ク心持モナク只速ニ蹴ト同時ニ後ニテ
打合スべシ又受身ノ者ハ一タン放シテ再度左右ノ手ヲ押へ捕ハ此度ハ左足ニテ
前ノ知ク蹴ト同時ニ後ニテ手ヲ打合スナリ此形ハ二度共除リ腰ガ上ラヌ樣意ヲ
月井テ捕ルべシ

一左右之曲 サユウノキヨク

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ左リへ橫向ニ坐シ捕身ノ者ハ受身ノ右脇へ六尺程離レ
テ例ノ如ク半身ニ搆相方聲ヲ懸プ眞直ニ立上リ平常ノ如ク歩ミ行キ受身ノ際へ
立止リ右足ノ爪先ニテ右ノ橫復ヲ蹴テ受ノ際へ立テ右手ノ指先ヲ延シテ掌ヲ顎
へ掛ケ向フへ突ト同時ニ

百十四

...since there was an error in the perceived physical intentions [to be acted upon]. One swiftly kicks the
opponent with the tip of the right foot in the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit of the stomach]. At the same
time, immediately after it, you will both have struck each other with the left and right hands. You will have
dropped to both knees [which you are then standing on] the toes (In reference to the Illustration). Both the left
and right hands , much as if forming a support, are placed up on the knees. About this kick to the
Suigetsu“Moon water” vital point [pit of the stomach], the opponent cannot really see the tip of the toes and
from the position [that you are in] you can quickly drive them in, dropping to the knees as you do. And about
both the left and right hands, there really isn’t a sense of raising them, nor is there a sense of opening them. It’s
just a rather swift kick. And at the same time just after it both parties will have struck each other. Again, about
the opponent, freeing oneself in a single move, and then pushing against him with both hands. At this point the
opponent knows that you will step forward on the left foot, since you kicked him. And that is what led
immediately to both of you striking each other, for instance. In this kata pattern, both moves and what follows
them really do not afford you any sense of advantage, but it is to capture him with some sense of reflection on
the moon (-light) itself. [NOTE: Said in reference to the kick into Suigetsu vital point.]

-- Sayū No Kyoku
-- Bending and Controlling (to the Left and Right)

About this fighting technique, the opponent is seated and facing off to the left side. The defender is at a distance
of some six feet seated on the opponent’s right side, such as is a common seating arrangement. Taking Hanmi
Half body posture, both parties give outcry. Having stood straight up, and being quite leveled, walk over to the
position of the opponent and come to a halt. With the toes of the right foot, kick him in the right side. While
standing over the opponent’s position, extend the fingers of the right hand, and hook his chin in your palm,
thrusting [his head] in a certain direction, while...

114
Translator's Note: The text page makes use of a rarer Compound Kana Construct “(井)” occurring as “(月井て)” , I could not find a
record of this BUT most likely the Romaji would be something quite like getsu wo no nite ( 月 井 て ) “by moonlight” so I think the
language value of “(井)” is a combination of ‘wo’ (を), ‘no’ (の) and ‘ni’ (に) the Compound Kana Construct “(井)” being formed by
overlapping and combining the three Kana characters wo, no and ni. IN ALL HONESTY this could be wrong?? But more than likely it
is correct. The Compound Kana Construct “(井)” occurs a few time in this entire text as well as a handful of texts that we have produced
in the Library Collection. A Compound Kana Construct is one that combines two, or three, elements of Kana script to form a single Kana
character out of them. The most common to encounter is the Compound Kana Construct ‘tomo’.
左足ヲ後へ一文字ニ踏開テ腰ヲ充
分ニ下ケ(一圖參照)又左足ヲ受ノ
左ノ後へ大キク踏込ミ右足ヲ些カ
下ケテ受身ノ後へ一文字ニナリ左
手ノ指ヲ延シテ柔カニ掌ヲ上ニ向
テ顎ノ下へ掛ケ手首ヲ左ノ襟際へ
附右手ニテ受身ノ右ノ肩先ヨリ手
首迄ナデ下ケ甲ノ方へ四指ヲ掛ケ
内ノ曲リ際へ拇指ヲ掛テ掌ヲ上ニ
向ケ我右腰ノ際エ引寄セ左ノ臂が
開カヌ樣ニ背後へ押付指先ヲ左ノ
上ノ方へ斜ニ突出ス心持ニテ腹ヲ
充分

百十五

…stepping out into the open rear into Ichimonji Straight line posture, all this being that one had become
sufficiently dis-hearted (In reference to the Illustration). Then step broadly with the left foot into the
opponent’s left rear, the right foot back just a bit as one has entered in Ichimonji posture into the
opponent’s rear, for instance. Extending the fingers of the left hand, palm up, gently snare his chin from
below. This will place the wrist in the vicinity of his left lapel which is to be clung to with the right hand.
The wrist will be slung over the top of the opponent’s right shoulder, extended downwards. Bending them
to the inside, snare him with all four fingers. Snaring [by gripping] with the thumb, palm facing upwards.
Pull him closer into position against your own right hip. The elbow is not to be opened when doing this,
press his back in [against your hip?]. The fingertips are pointed diagonally upwards towards the left side.
This is done with some sense of thrusting him sufficiently so as to turn the tides against him...

115

Translator's Note: The text page makes use of one of the adaptations of the “koshi wo” + direction = [reactive emotional state]. The
text has a particularly good example of a profound adaptation of this kind of idiomatic construct (nice one, really). Koshi wo jūbun ni
zen-(h)e dashi (腹ヲ充分ニ前へ出シ) → Mod Jap ( 腹を充分に前え出し). Coincidentally the romaji could also be rendered as:
Koshi wo jūbun ni ma(h)e(h)e dashi instead. It is an idiomatic construct, that sometimes has both idiomatic AND literal standard
definition (produced of it’s compositional elements) The literal rendering would be something like: “producing the hips sufficiently
forward” but, by it’s idiomatic meaning, more like “sufficiently advancing beyond an obstruction or impediment”. Here in this case of
it’s usage “…sufficiently so as to turn the tides against him….” Where it should be given it’s literal standard meaning, characteristically
its idiomatic meaning should also be included. Here, in this example, that would not fit very well in the translation. The usage of the
auxilliary verb Dasu 出す in simple (non-construct) form is one give away (it is not used to say something like: "Move(-ing) the Hips")
ニ前へ出シ受ノ体ヲ崩シテ中腰ニナリ(二圖參照)
是ニテ左右ノ手ハ少シモ動ス心持ナク只我体ヲ右
ノ後へ廻リ堅一文字ニナリ手ノ平ニ盛リタル物ヲ
下エ捨ル如ク我目ノ前エ受ノ体ヲ投ルナリ此投ル
處ハ受ノ体ヲ投ル心得ニテ成ス時ハ自然ニ手足カ
固クナル故隨テ業モ速カナラズ只手ノ平ヲ返シテ
見ルト云フカ如クニナスベシ此形ニ限ラズ總テ業
ハ柔ラニシテ速カナルヲ良トスルナリ

百十六

...the opponent’s body disrupted across your hips., for instance (In reference to Illustration Two).
When doing this, there isn’t much sense of moving the left and right hands, it’s done by the turning
and rotating of one’s body as one firmly strikes Ichimonji posture, for instance. Performed with the
palm of the hand, much as if casting away the circumstances against you. One's eyes kept peeled
looking forward as you bodily throw the opponent. The circumstances of this throw are such that there
is a definitive sense of throwing the opponent at the time. Naturally, both the hands and the feet act
quite decisively. And depending upon the speed of the technique as it’s performed, they say that one
can see how it could be done just by reversing him using only the palm of the hand. In this kata
pattern, there really aren’t any restrictions, but the technique is done swiftly and gently being that a
good way to do it.

116
一引立 シキタ

此手合ノ形ハ中六尺隔テ對座シ例ノ如ク捕ハ半
身ニ搆エ兩人聲ヲ懸捕身ノ者ハ眞直ニ立上リ左
リ右ト斜ニ二タ足出左手ノ指先ヲ延揃へ甲ヲ上
ニ向テコバノ方ヲ咽喉へ掛テ充分ニ腕ヲ伸シ斜
ニ押付ルト同時ニ左足ヲ受ノ眞後へ踏込右手ニ
テ右ノ手首ヲ上ヨリ握テ斜ニ引上ケ受ノ体ヲ充
分ニ崩シ(一圖參照)其マヽ引上タル腕ヲ左手ニ
テ内へ卷樣ニナシテ腋下へ狹込我右襟ヲ摑ミ受

百十七

-- Shiki Tate
-- Taking Action

About this fighting technique, seated across from one another separated by a distance of about six feet apart,
such as is common a seating arrangement. The opponent strikes Hanmi Half body posture, both men give
outcry. The attacker stands straight up, advancing two paces left and right foot on a diagonal path. With the
fingers of the left hand outstretched and together, back of the hand facing upwards, snare his throat with the
base of the hand as you sufficiently extend the arm diagonally so as to press in. At the same time, step in
directly behind the opponent with your left foot. With the right hand, grab and raise his right wrist, pulling it
diagonally upwards enough to disrupt the opponent’s body (In reference to Illustration One). Pulling
upwards like that, wind around inside and under his arm [near the elbow joint] constricting and pressing
downward on the underarm. As you do so, take grip on your own right lapel...

117
ノ手ノ内平ヲ上ニ向テ右手ニテ少シ向へ押

ス心持ニシテ下へ押へ左ハ拇指ヲ上ニシ小

指ヲ下ニナシ襟ヲシカト摑左臂ヲ受身ノ右

腕ニ深ク掛テ引立ルナリ(二圖參照)受身ハ

充分ニ引立ラレタル際相圖ヲナスベシ是ニ

テ捕身ノ方ハ手ヲ放シテ殘心スベシ

中段居捕 拾四手終リ

百十八

...the palm of the opponent’s hand facing upwards. There is some sense of pushing on it in a certain
direction with your right hand. Pressing downward on it, the thumb of the left hand is up whilst the
pinky [of the left hand] is facing down. Gripping your own lapel one otherwise ignores it, having
actively hooked under the opponent’s right arm and pulling on it where one stands, for instance (In
reference to Illustration Two). There are cues in the illustration about the position from which the
opponent is to be pulled against where he stands, the defender doing it this way, the hands are free and
one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

Chūdan Jūshi-te Owari


The Conclusion of the 14 Techniques of the Middle Level

118
中段立合
一行違 ユキチがイ

此ノ手合ノ形ハ初段ノ行違ヒト同
樣ニ三間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ聲
ヲ懸テ進ミ行逢タル際捕身ノ方ハ
左手ニテ請身ノ右ノ手首ヲ摑ミ右
手ノ指ヲ伸シテ我ガ左肩ノ邊ヨリ
請身ノ陰囊ノ方へ斜メニ拂イナガ
ラ左足ヲ左リノ後へ斜メニ蹈ミ開
ク時受身ノ右ノ手首ヲ左手ニテ摑
ミタルマヽ我が左リノ腰へ引キ附
ケ亦右手ノ平ヲ請身ノ左リノ肩ノ
處へ當テ

百十九

Chūdan Tachiai
The Standing Techniques of the Middle Level

-- Yuki-chigai Misunderstanding in Passing

About this fighting technique, it’s pretty much the same as Yuki-chigai “Misunderstanding in Passing”
kata technique from the Shōdan Initial level. You are standing about three feet away from one another.
The two give outcry together. You are advancing along into this circumstance of chance encounter.
About the defender and how he does it, with the left hand, grab the right wrist of the attacker, extend
the fingers of the right hand, and place them in the vicinity of your own left shoulder. Make a
diagonally sweeping parry (hara(h)i nagara → hara(h)i nagare) into the testicles of the opponent. Step
diagonally into the open left rear, keeping it open [for yourself] at the time. Having already grabbed
the opponent’s right wrist with your left hand, pulling it across your own left hip. Strike the opponent’s
left shoulder with your right hand...

119
少シクオス心持ニナシ我ガ左足ヲ請身ノ右足ノ脇へ蹈込ミ亦右足ニテ請ノ右足
ノ外側ヨリ拂ツテ倒シ直ニ右膝ヲツキ右ノ掌ヲ開テ拇指ノ平ニテ請ノ右ノ獨鈷
ヲオシ乍ラ左足ヲ橫ニ蹈開キ之レト同時ニ請ノ右ノ手首ヲ左手ニテ摑ミシマヽ
斜メニ引キ揚ゲ亦直ニ其手首ヲ請身ノ頭ノ際へ押シ付テ我左膝ヲ乘セ右手ノ平
ヲ少シ揚テ内ノ方ヨリ左手ニテ左襟ヲ持小指ノ方ヲ咽喉へ押付右手ニテ右襟
ヲ摑ミ(圖ノ如ク)右足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ蹈開キ面ヲ右ノ爪先ノ方エ向テ十分二シ
メ受ガ相圖ヲ爲シタル時手ヲ放シテ殘心スベシ

一向山影 ムコウ ヤマカゲ

此手合ノ形ハ三間程離シテ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進寄行逢ヒタル時ニ先捕身ノ
者ハ右手ニテ左襟ヲ持左足ヲ後へ開キ乍ラ少シ押テ受ノ体ヲ半身ニナシ此際受
身ノ者ハ左足ヲ少シ後へ開クベシ捕身ノ者ハ左手ニテ右袖ノ附根ヲ下ヨリ持左
足ヲ三尺計リ向ヘ蹈込乍

百二十

...there is some slight sense of pushing him, as you step in alongside the opponent’s right foot with your left
foot. Then with the right foot you will sweep the opponent’s right foot from outside it and drop him.
Immediately thrust him with the right knee, and having the palm of your right hand open with the fingers
all held level, push in against the dokko “single pronged vajra” vital point on the opponent’s right side. Do
this while stepping out into the open alongside him with your left foot. At the same time, tightly grab the
opponent’s right wrist with your left hand. Pull him diagonally upwards. Also, immediately shove the wrist
[that you have captured] into a position above the opponent’s head. Place the palm of your right hand on
your left knee [for support] as you rise up and inside. With the left hand, take grip on his left collar, by the
direction of the pinky finger you will be pushing [the collar band] into his throat. With the right hand grab
his right collar (just like in the illustration). Step into the open with the right foot out to your own
sidestriking Ichimonji Straight line posture. Your face and your right toes are facing the same direction,
you’re strangling him with the Jūbun-ni jime “Double Cross Figure” strangle. There are cues about the
opponent when doing this in the illustration. At the time, the hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin
Continued awareness.

-- Mukō Yamakage Front Mountain Shadow

About this fighting technique, you are standing erect about three feet away from one another. The two
make outcry together as they advance into this chance encounter at the time. Initially, the attacker grabs
your left lapel with his right hand, his left foot to the open rear, while he pushes a bit on the defender’s
body who is in Hanmi Half body posture. Upon this occasion, the defender has his left foot somewhat to
the rear as to be open enough to move. The attacker clings to the base of your right sleeve with his left
hand, grabbing it and pulling it down. The left foot steps in by that direction by a measured three feet,
while….

120
ラ左手ニテ少シ押テ臂ヲ張リ体ヲ右向
ニナリ受ノ体ヲ後向ニシテ右手ニ持タ
ル襟ヲ咽喉ノ處へ懸テ充分ニ請身ヲ仰
向ニソラセテ左リノ臂ニテ倒レヌ樣ニ
留メ置キ(一圖參照)右膝ヲ左足ノ踵ノ
際へツキ次ニ左足ヲ橫へ一文字ニ蹈開
キ乍ラ左手ヲ放シ右手ハ襟ヲ持タル儘
ニテ少シモ下へ引ク心持ナク唯柔ラカ
ニ請ノ体ヲ落シテ直ニ左手ニテ左リノ
手首ヲ上ヨリ摑ミ受身ノ腰骨ノ處へ押
シ付テ少シ橫向ニナシ右膝

百二十一

...one pushes somewhat with the left hand so much as to extend the elbow. Your body is facing
towards the right, for instance, while the opponent’s body has been made to be facing the rear. Take a
grip with your right hand on his lapel in the vicinity of his throat, snaring it enough to cause the
opponent to be looking upwards. With your left elbow, having not yet downed him, there is a way to
place it so as to put a stop to him then and there (In reference to Illustration One). The position of the
heel of the left foot as it thrusts is in relationship to the right knee. Next, the left foot stepping out into
the open side striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. This while with the free left hand, and the right
hand, further gripping [the opponent’s] lapel, but there isn’t the least sense of pull downwards on him.
With some gentleness the opponent’s body will drop, immediately with the left hand, take grip on his
left wrist, and shove sideways a bit on the opponent’s hip bone. The right knee-cap...

121
ノ先ヲ少シ上ゲテ脊骨ノ六七椎ノ邊へ當
左足ヲ橫一文字ニ蹈開キ左手ヲ我ガ左リ
ノ乳ノ邊へシキナガラ右手ニテ襟ラ柔ラ
カニ引キシメ亦右ノ膝ノ方ハ强ク押サス
樣ニ追々我ガ下腹ヲ前へ出スベシ此レニ
テ面テ左リへ向キ(二圖參照)充分シマリ
シ時請身ハ相圖ヲナシ捕身ハ左右ノ手ヲ
放シテ前ノ如ク殘心スベシ

一後山影 ウシロ ヤマカゲ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ互ニ掛聲ヲ發シテ進ミ行キ先ヅ捕身ノ
方ハ右手ノ指先ヲ揃へテ伸シ

百二十二

...somewhat upraised and in the vicinity of and striking him at the 6th and 7th vertebra of the spinal
column. Stepping into the open on the left foot into Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture. One’s
left hand held in the vicinity of one’s own left breast, with the right hand gently pull him by his lapel.
Then sharply push against him with the right knee in a certain way, and so one would have turned the
tables on him like this. One is facing left (In reference to Illustration Two). One does so sufficiently to
constrict him at the time. There are cues about the opponent during this in the illustration. About the
defender, the right and left hands are free, and much as before one maintains Zanshin Continued
awareness.

-- Yoko Yamakage Side Mountain Shadow

About this fighting technique, you are standing erect at a measured distance of three feet. Both give
outcry together, as [the two] are advancing along. At the beginning the attacker has the fingers of his
right hand curled together pushing against….

122
掌ヲ請身ノ頤ニ掛ケ左足ヲ後へ二尺余
開キ乍ラ右手ヲ伸シテ頤テ向フへ押べ
シ此際請身ノ者ハ左足ヲ少シ後へ開ク
べシ亦捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ右ノ袖先ヲ
下ヨリ持(一圖參照)次ニ一度開キタル
左足ヲ亦前へ三尺計リ踵込腰ヲ下テ右
向ニナリ乍ラ左臂ヲ少シ張リ受ノ体ヲ
後向ニメ右ノ指先ヲ頤二附タル儘上ノ
方へ手先ヲ廻シテ受身ノ頭ノ上ヲ越シ
体ヲ充分ニ後へ返ラセ受身ノ倒レヌ樣
靜ニ右膝ヲ左足ノ後へ突キテ左足ヲ橫
ニ開キ乍ラ右手ヲ放シ左ノ臂ヲ

百二十三

...and snaring the chin of the defender with the palm of that hand. His left foot to the rear, the remaining two
foot distance stays open while his right hand extends pushing in the direction of your chin. Upon this occasion,
the attacker having his left foot somewhat in the open rear so as to be able to move, the defender grabs the
bottom of the [opponent’s] right sleeve (In reference to Illustration One). Next, in a single move, owing to his
having his left foot where it’s open to move, and there being a measured distance of three feet to the front, one
steps into the front on the heel and lowering the hips, despite having become quite dis-hearted, One will be
facing the front, for instance, while somewhat extending your elbow. The opponent’s body will be facing to
your rear, clinging with the fingers of his right hand to both sides of your chin. Owing to [your head being
driven] upwards, rotate away from his fingers or your head will be driven all the way through. Turn the body
enough towards the rear but not to drop the opponent by doing so. Calmly, thrust his left leg with your right
knee back into the rear. Then step into the open alongside him, with your free right hand wrench his left elbow...

123

Translator's Note: The text page makes another usage example of the idiom we have documented earlier in the text (there are various
forms of the idiom): Koshi wo sagete (腰ヲ下テ) → Mod Jap (腰を下て). As I said in earlier notes, sometimes when encountered, one
would want to use both standard literal definition AND the idiomatic meaning (to be able to convey the fullness of what the text had
actually said. ) That was how I handled the incidental occurrence of it here in the text: ...mata ma(h)e(h)e sanjaku hakari (?)kubishi-
komi(?) koshi wo sagete... (亦前へ三尺計リ踵込腰ヲ下テ) → Mod Jap ( 亦前へ三尺計り踵込腰を下て) ...one steps into the
front on the heel and lowering the hips, despite having become quite dis-hearted,... NOTE: the idiom being discussed, namely: Koshi wo
sagete (腰を下て) in Modern Japanese script, when running an internet search frequently does not produce many hits (the idiom is a bit
obscure, it comes from the older Sino-Japanese language). It should not be confused with koshi wo orosu (腰を下す /or/ 腰を腰を下ろ
す) and any conjugations of it, which means “to Sit down; Sit upon”. BUT yet even then, when it is to be understood as a declination of
koshi wo orosu ( 腰を腰を下ろす), the idiomatic meaning is often “to be Dismayed” as in “to Sit in dismay”, which is fairly well related
to the idiomatic meaning we were discussing of ‘koshi wo sageru’.
ユルメテ受ノ体ヲ下へ落シ右手ノ拇指ヲ右襟ノ内ニ四指ヲ外ニシテ摑ミ左膝ヲ
肩ノ際へ突右足ヲ右ノ後へ蹈開テ始メ我直立ナシタル方へ向キ橫一文字トナリ
左臂ヲ受ノ襟首ノ方へ張テ袖先ヲ引右手ヲ柔ラカニシテ襟カ咽喉へ巻付樣追々
ニシメ面ハ右ノ爪先エ向之ニテ相圖ヲナサバ手ヲ放シテ殘心スへシ此二ツノ形
ハ中段ノ内ニテハ相違爲シ易キ形故体ノ位置ト手先ノ働ヲ能ク考究スベシ

一腰附 コシツキ

此手合ノ形ハ三間程離レテ直立シ互ニ聲ヲ發シ進行中三尺計リニ至リ受身ノ者
右手ノ拳ヲ揚テ右足ヲ前へ蹈込乍ラ打掛ルナリ捕身ノ者ハ此際除ル心持無ク受
身ノ蹈出シタル右足ノ後へ充分ニ左足ヲ蹈込乍ラ唯我体ヲ半身ニナシ腰ヲ充分
ニ下テ受ノ体ニシカト附㒰時ニ左手ヲ柔ラカニ指ヲ延シテ前ヨリ掌方ニテ腰エ
卷付(圖參

百二十四

...drop the opponent’s body, and with the right hand grab his right lapel, your thumb to the inside while the
four fingers are to the outside. Thrust him in the shoulder with your right knee. Step back into the open
right rear with your right foot. One would have begun to stand fully erect by then, facing off to one side
having struck Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture. Extend your left elbow out towards his collar
band. Pull him by the tip of his sleeve gently with the right hand, wind his lapels around his throat to
slowly strangle him. The face and the toes of the right foot are facing the same direction. There are cues in
the illustration. The hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.
About the two forms of this kata pattern, as represented in the Chūdan Middle level, there are some number
of variations. It is a simple Kata pattern. Coincidentally, there is the placement of the body in the positions
to be used, and one ought to give careful consideration to the skillful movements of the fingers.

-- Koshi Tsuki Posturing

About this fighting technique, you are standing erect at a distance of some three feet. Both give outcry
together, as [the two] are advancing and approaching each other across the measured three feet. The
attacker raises his right fist, stepping forward on his right foot, while striking at you, for instance. There is
no sense of other possibilities [such as to avoid conflict] upon this occasion for the defender. The opponent
has already stepped in, with your right foot to the rear and left foot stepping into Hanmi Half body posture,
seeing that you have become dis-hearted enough to act. Rather ignoring the opponent’s body, clinging the
whole time, with the left hand gently place the extended the left fingers forward across his hip palm out and
then wind out his hip (In reference to the illustration).

124
Important Translator's Note: (HIGH ATTENTION!) The text pages starting as of Page 124 and thereafter are all written in a very
different Dialect of the Japanese Language. I am utterly unsure which dialect it is? The dialect of the language is a direct relative of the
dialect that theShinyō ryū based textual tradition of earlier parts of this text were written in, but has some obvious language differences.
Some of the more obvious differences are: Preference for the use of ‘e’ (エ) instead of ‘he’ (ヘ) but with some usage of ‘he’ (ヘ) despite
usage of ‘e’ (エ) in the same line of text or in the same text block. Also there is common usage of ‘e’ (エ) that is rather inconsistent with
the usage of ‘he’ (ヘ) . Makes for a sense of over-usage of ‘e’ (エ) in general. given some examples of text block in the pages it appears.
ALSO there are some noticeable differences in the declination pattern of verbs, other dialects would have considered an atypical verb
declination. I must absolutely point out also that the examples of this dialect in these pages does appear to be written in the proper
Literary Formal of the language suitable to such old scrolls and texts from which they came (as were the previous examples in the former
sections of the text, which are known generally to have originated in the textual traditions of the Shinyō ryū ).

What parent school of the Tenjin shinyō ryū are these examples based upon? I have seen some number of examples of the
language in the scrolls, and some number of complete scrolls sets of, the Main Branches of the Yōshin ryū itself. The dialect
observed in these pages and remaining sections is NOT consistent with that form of Japanese. For example, the Densho of the
Yōshin shintō ryū would be said to represent the Akiyama-Miura Divergent branches… the dialect here in these pages and
sections DOES NOT appear in those writings at all. It does not appear in any of the usual Shin no shintō ryū documents Nor does
it appear in the usual Kitō ryū documents either. My suspicion is that these statements came from the textual traditions of one of
the other “Yōshin ryū” that the school is known to group together and refer to all as “Yōshin ryū” Some of these school names
are generally similar to the pronunciation “Yōshin ryū” but are instead “yoshin ryū” (short ‘o’), “yushin ryū”, “yashin ryū”,
“yuishin ryū” and etc etc. The textual passages demonstrating this unusual dialect of Japanese comes from one of these schools,
undoubtedly… but I have no idea which one?? We have been trying to keep track of and denote what Parent Source the textual
statements in this book came from, so the information was relevant.
照)臂ニ力ヲ入ヌ樣ニ腰ヲ下ゲタル
儘下腹ヲ少シ前エ出シテ 受ノ体ヲ
輕ク後エ落シ左膝ヲ右足ノ際へ突右
足ヲ右ノ後へ蹈開キ左手ニテ左襟ヲ
持右手ニテ手首ヲ摑ミ受ノ腰ニ附少
シ向エ押テ橫向ニナシ我右足ヲ我左
足ノ後エ寄テ膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ受身ノ
腰ニ附テ蹈出シ我腰ヲ受ノ 頭ノ方エ
少シク下ゲ受ノ右臂ヲ我左ノ膝ニ當
右膝ヲ突キタル儘腰ヲ上ゲ乍ラ左膝
ヲ腹ト共ニ向エ押出シテ受ノ体ヲ我
前エ引起シ少シク手ト膝トヲユルメ
左ノ襟ハ肩ヨリ五六寸

百二十五

...the way it’s done there is no force applied by the elbow. Having become dis-hearted, one [enters]
with hips lowered, positioning the lower thigh just a bit forward as you lightly drop the opponent’s
body. Your left knee is positioned in relationship to his right leg, having thrust in and stepping along
his right side behind his right leg. With the left hand take a grip on his left lapel, and with the right
hand grab his right wrist. [SEE NOTES] While somewhat clinging to the opponent’s hip, facing in the
direction that one has pushed into alongside him, the position of one’s right foot and the left foot
behind him one has drawn closer in thrusting in with the [left] knee. Your left foot in relationship to
[your hand] clinging to his hip as you stepped in, and also somewhat the position of your hip in
relationship to the opponent’s head as [he looks’ downward The opponent’s right elbow can be
attacked [by drawing it across] your own left knee, [repositioning yourself and] thrusting it across that
knee. While the tides are turning and you are in motion, the relationship of the left knee and your thigh
together allows you to readily push against him. Then somewhat pulling the opponent’s body
forwards, the hands and knee also [a grip on] the upper collar near the shoulder gripped down along it
by some five or six inches...

125

Translator's Note: There may be an error in the text page, since the statement “...With the left hand take a grip on his left lapel, and with
the right hand grab his right wrist….” has absolutely no place in the description of this particular Kata technique, that we know of. What
occurs just before and just after the line in question is otherwise perfectly congruous to the known technique as well as to the illustration
presented of it in the text. We think we know how the error might have occurred? The lines of textual description that were used in this
book came from an average of three (3) different textual traditions and their version of the description of the Kata technique, two of these
textual traditions were fairly similar in language and content, one was not all that similar in language. One notices that the average Kata
technique description in the book has at least one repeat of material descriptors, in the body of the description. Even though this makes
no sense when unnecessarily repeating a description of the earlier part of the technique already having been described. Similarly, most
have an unnecessary repeating of the final part of the kata technique (the take-down). This was produced by synthesising an average of
three separate descriptions found in the scrolls of the Yōshin ryū, the Shinyō ryū and the Shin no shintō ryū densho. In the Prefaces of this
text, the authors complained that they did not believe that merely quoting and repeating the literary traditions of the schools was
advisable, but complained that diverging wrongfully from them was even worse: Their obvious solution to this understandable dilemma
was to reasonably interweave some three or four of the historical Kata descriptions together as one synthesis. When doing so (going back
and forth between source materials) an error such as we have denoted in this Translator’s Note becomes more likely since one would not
have noticed having accidentally slipped in a single incongruous line of text into the description.

The other option is that this is not a textual error, but that it's actually discussing an alternate way to handle the opponent from
the position struck in the illustration. There is a similar example of that kind of handling later in the same block of text. Again,
produced by the same synthesising of different textual traditions (from the scrolls of the parent schools) describing the smae
technique.
>> A common version of Koshitsuki ("Butressing the Hip" or "Posturing") is to simply body turn from the position shown in
the illustration, rotating on the left foot and only moving the right foot while clinging to the hip with the left hand: dropping the
man backwards over your left knee and thigh This well known henka variation is not mentioned... but is a form very well
known from several of the forms of the Yōshin ryū.
下リテ握リ左足ヲ橫エ開キ乍ラ右手ヲ左手ノ下ノ方エ投込ト共ニ左ノ襟ヲ我前
へ引附テ受ノ体ヲ伏サセ右手ニテ左ノ肩先ヲ捕左膝ヲ首ノ際へ突キ右足ヲ右ノ
後へ蹈開キ左臂ヲ首筯處へ張テ追々ニシメ面ハ右ヲ向キ之ニテ受身ノ者相圖ヲ
ナサバ手ヲ放シテ例ノ如ク殘心ナスベシ

一小手返 コテガ へシ

此手合ノ形ハ初段ノ突掛ト同樣ニシテ三間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ懸聲ヲ發テ進
行中三尺計リニ至リ受身ノ者右ノ拳ニテ右足ヲ前へ蹈出シ乍ラ水月へ突掛ルナ
リ捕身ノ者ハ左ノ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立脇腹へ附右足ヲ後へ開キ体ヲ右向ニナ
リ左ノ拇指ヲ受ノ拳ノ甲ノ方へ付四指ヲ内ノ曲リメノ處へ掛ケ右手モ同ジク拇
指テ甲へ掛ケ四指ヲ内へ掛テ右足ノ爪先ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴直ニ其下へ蹈左足ヲ体ト
共ニ左ノ後ニ廻テ始メ我立タル方へ向膝ヲ突右ハ爪先ヲシカ

百二十六

...with the left foot step to the side out into the open, the left hand and the right hand will be directed
downward while throwing him as you cling to and pull him by his left lapel. As you lay out his body,
with the right hand grab the top of his left shoulder. Your left knee will be thrust out alongside the
position of his neck, as you step into the open right rear on your right foot. The left elbow is extended
as you slowly strangle his neck. You are facing to the right when doing all this, and there are cues
about the opponent in the illustration as well. The hands are free and much as ever before and one is
maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Kote Ga(h)eshi Reversing the Wrist

About this fighting technique, it’s much the same as when being thrust at with the sword in the
ShōdanInitial level form of the technique. You are [both] standing erect and a distance of some three
feet. Both give outcry together. They approach each other crossing the measured distance of three feet.
With the right fist the opponent thrust into Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit of the stomach], for
instance. The defender has his [left] arm straight from the left elbow to the tips of the extended fingers
and clings by these alongside [the opponent], having the right foot in the open rear, Your body will
facing to the right. Pin the back of the opponent’s fist with your left thumb, and wrap the remaining
four fingers around it and cling to him like this, doing much the same with the right hand. Thumb
pinning the back of the opponent’s fist, four fingers wrapped around and clinging to it. Kick him
straight in the testicles with the tip of the right foot. Putting that foot down, step with the left foot
rotating your body in behind him so that you are both facing the same direction. Ignoring to thrust [and
kick] him with the toes into the back of his knee...

126
ト蹈付テ一文字ニナリ(圖
參照)此際迄左右ノ手ハ少
シモ動カサズニ居リ爰ニ
初テ少シ手ヲ上エ伸シ我
手先ヲ左エ充分ニ傾テ受
身ノ手ノ内平ノ方ガ我前
ノ地エ附樣ニ急エネジテ
投左手ニテ手首ヲ摑ミ右
膝ヲ脇下エ突左足ヲ蹈開
キ右手ノ拇指ニテ獨鈷ヲ
押乍ラ左手ヲ斜ニ引直ニ
左ノ手首ヲ頭ノ方エ 曲テ
左膝ヲ乘セ右ノ手先ヲ咽
喉ノ處エ矢筈ノ如クニ掛
タル儘少シ手首ヲ上テ下
ヨリ左手ニテ左襟ヲ摑ミ
小指ノ甲端ノ

百二十七

...instead further stepping out into Ichimonji Straight line posture, for instance (In reference to the
illustration). Upon this occasion the right and left hands are somewhat in motion when doing it. The
opponent was the one whom initiated it, his hand up and somewhat extending out towards you. Your
own fingers will have been slanted to the left enough [to control] the direction of his palms so as to
[throw] him to the ground in front of you. One does this rather unexpectedly to throw him with the left
hand having taken grip on his wrist like this, [as he falls] thrust him under the armpit with your right
knee. Stepping out into the open with your left foot, press in sharply with the thumb of your right hand
not unlike enlightening him with the single pronged vajra. With the left hand pull him diagonally
across and by his left wrist guiding the direction of his head. Ride him [driving in] the left knee, and
catch his throat in the crook of your hand [between the thumb and finger] much like in the Kata
technique Yahazu “Arrow’s Knotch”. Somewhat lift up on his wrist and torque downwards too with
your left hand. Grab his left lapel, your pinky finger along it’s margin...

127
方ヲ咽喉ニ掛ケ右手ニテ右襟ニ摑ミ右足ヲ開キ此時モ初メ我立タル方へ向一文字
ニナリ面ヲ右ノ爪先エ向テシメルナリ例ノ如ク相圖ヲ持テ手ヲ放シ殘心スベシ

一頭捕 ヅドリ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ行キ逢ヒタル際先ツ捕
身ノ方ハ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ掌ヲ受身ノ下頤エ掛ケ左足ヲ後ロヘ二尺余リ蹈開キ
ナカラ体ヲ半身ニ成テ頤ヲ少シ押シ亦請身ノ者モ頤ヲ突レタル際左足ヲ後エ少
シ開クベシ之ニテ捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ指先ヲ下へ向ケテ内平ノ方ヲ受身ノ袴腰ノ
處ヘ當テ左足ヲ右足ノ踵ノ際迄ヨセ右足ヲ前へ三尺計リ蹈込ミナガラ左リノ掌
ニテ袴腰ヲ押シ右手ハ指先ヲ伸シタルマヽ臂ヲ受身ノ臂中へ押シ附ル樣ニ爲シ
テ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立テ左右ノ膝ヲ前后ヘ開キテ我カ腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲ請身ノ
者ノ体ヲ仰向ニ倒レヌ樣(右手ノ臂ニ

百二十八

...and snare his throat with it as well. With the right hand grab his right lapel and [step] out into the open with
the right foot. As it has begun at this point, one is facing the front and standing in Ichimonji Straight line posture.
The face and tip of the right foot are facing the same way. As always there are cues in the illustration about the
grip(s) that are taken. The hands are free and one is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Zudori Capturing the Head

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and separated by a measured distance of three feet.
Both give outcry together. They approach and meet each other. The circumstances begin as the attacker extends
the fingers of his right hand, and snares the defender under the chin [yahazu style?] crotch of the palm [caight
between the thumb and forefinger?]. He had his left foot to the rear and stepped the remaining two paces to
reach you. You are in Hanmi Half body posture and your chin is being pushed back a bit. Then the attacker rears
back a bit to thrust you in the chin. Your left foot is somewhat to the rear where it is open and allows you to
move, as this occurs. The defender’s left hand is facing down, palm to the inside, you strike in the area of the
opponent’s Hakamagoshi [“Back panel of the hakama skirt”]. Step on his left foot with the heel of your right
foot, the right foot is now to the front, having paced across the measured distance of three feet. With the left
palm push away on the Hakamagoshi [“Back panel of the hakama skirt”]. The fingertips of the right hand now
being extended, the defender uses his elbow to push in on [the attacker’s] elbow towards the center and sticks to
it. That’s how it’s done. After doing this with the elbow, one is standing there with the fingers [lightly
extended] , both left and right knees to the front, it is open behind them, having sufficiently lowered the hips
since one had become quite dis-hearted. The opponent’s body is now facing upwards but has not yet been been
dropped and lain out. With the right elbow...

128
テシカト受留メ置キ次ニ左手
ノ平ヲ請身ノ額ノ處へ掛ケ
(圖參照)少シ頭ヲ起ス樣ナシ
右足ヲ左足ノ際迄引キ急ニ手
ヲ放シテ受ノ体ヲ下へ落シ左
足ヲ後へ三尺計リ蹈開キ右手
ハ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立タル
マヽニテ殘心スベシ但シ此形
ハ始メヨリ終リ迄左リ向キニ
一文字ニ成テ充分ニ腰ヲ下ゲ
進ムニモ退クニモ爪足ヲ左右
へ蹈ミ開キテトルベシ

一連拍子 ツレビヨシ

百二十九

...being ignored despite where you could place it and stop him, instead, snaring the opponent’s
forehead with your left hand (In reference to the illustration), you are somewhat raising his head
backwards like this. Your right foot and his left foot are fairly close to each other. You unexpectedly
pull on him with your free hand [to the hair of the back of the head], dropping and laying out the
opponent’s body. With the left foot to the rear, pacing again across the measured distance of three feet,
fingertips of the right hand at the [other] elbow, standing erect and maintaining Zanshin Continued
awareness. However, about this Kata technique, from beginning to end, and all throughout, one is
facing left in Ichimonji Straight line posture. The hips sufficiently lowered in that you had become dis-
hearted and were advancing and retreating As one does the capture, one steps with both the right and
left toes.

-- Tsure Yoshi Leading by Rhythm

129
此手合ノ形ハ捕身ノ方ハ請身ノ右脇へ竝
ビ互ニ直立シテ聲ヲ掛ケテ共ニ五六尺計
リ進行シ先ヅ捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ受身ノ
右ノ手首ヲ握リ乍ラ右足ヲ少シ受身ノ前
へ蹈出シ右手ノ指ヲ延揃へ我左肩ノ邊ヨ
リ陰嚢ヲサシテ斜ニ切拔ヒ乍ラ左足ヲ斜
ニ蹈開キ其時左手ヲ腰ニ附テ引直ニ右手
ノ平ヲ受身ノ左ノ肩ノ際へ當左足ヲ受ノ
右足ノ脇へ蹈出シ左右ノ手ノユルマヌ樣
ニナシ左ノ爪先ヲ充分ニ外へ向テ右足ノ
胵骨ノ裏ニテ受身ノ右足ヲ裏ノ方ヨリ拔
テ倒シ右ノ膝ヲ脇腹ヨリ水月ノ邊へ掛テ乘セ腰ヲ下ケヌ樣ニナシ右手ノ親指ヲ
獨鈷へ掛ケ左手ニテ受ノ右手ヲ少シ引揚直ニ頭ノ際へ曲テ左

百三十

[ Tsure Yoshi Leading by Rhythm ]

About this fighting technique, about the way the defender does it, he is standing to the attacker’s right,
both are standing erect. Both give outcry together. Crossing the measured distance of five or six feet.
To start with, the defender grabs the attacker’s right wrist with his left hand while stepping in on the
right foot into the opponent’s front side. Extending the fingers of the right hand but keeping them
pressed together, placing them in the vicinity of one’s own left shoulder, strike him in the testicles
using a diagonal path in and swiftly withdrawing [the hand after the strike.] Step into the open with the
left foot diagonally. At that time cling to his hip with the left hand, and pull him straight across by it.
With your right palm strike the opponent’s left shoulder, step in alongside the opponent’s right foot
with your left foot. One really doesn’t make use of the right and left hands when doing this, the left
toes have been placed facing just enough to the outside, the metacarpal of your right foot is to the
inside [pressing against?] his liver. The opponent’s right foot is being suppressed to the inside where
he has been dropped. Your right knee lain across his flank stuck into the vicinity of the Suigetsu
“Moon-water” vital point [put of the stomach] as you are riding him. You are not the one who is being
dis-hearted having done this, the hips are not lowered when doing so. Your right thumb sticking into
him not unlike a single pronged vajra [NECC ALT TRANS: “...Your right thumb sticking into the Dokko “Single pronged vajra” vital point...”] You are
somewhat pulling upwards on the opponent’s right hand with your left hand. You are bent over the
area where his head is...

130
足ノ爪先ニテ臂ノ曲リ際ヲ蹈ミ左手ニテ右手ノ下ヨリ受ノ左襟ヲ拇指ヲ内ニシ
テ持べシ此時受ハ左手ノ指ヲ延シ小指ノ附元ノ方ニテ捕身ノ烏兎へ打掛べシ捕
ハ右手ノ指ヲ延シテ親指ヲ開キ内平ヲ上ニ向テ曲際ヲ額ニ付テ受留メ則坐ニ摑
ミ(一圖參照)内へネジテ受ノ右腰ニ附右足ヲ充分ニ後へ引キ少シ左へ寄テ膝ヲ
突キ左足ヲ橫ニ蹈開キ乍ラ襟ハ我前へ引附手ハ右ノ脇ノ後へ充分ニ引付テ受ノ
体ヲ手前ノ方へウツブセニ爲シ左手ニテ襟ヲ下へシカト押付右手ニテ腕ヲ

百三十一

...with the toes of the left foot, keep his [right] elbow bent by stepping on it. With your left hand keep
his right hand lowered, then run your thumb inside his left lapel and take grip on it. At this time, the
attacker clings to your pinky finger near the base, with the extended fingers of his left hand, then
strikes and clings to the Uko “crow-rabbit” vital point. The defender extending the fingers of his right
hand, opening the thumb, palm facing in and upwards. He stops the opponent by using this to cling to
the brow, grabbing him like this while seated alongside him (In reference to Illustration One). Being to
the inside, cling to the opponent’s right hip, having the righ foot to the rear enough to allow you to pull
on him a little. Get in closer on the left side, thrust him with your knee. Step off to the side with your
left foot, while pulling him forward by his lapel. The other hand pulling him from behind along his
right side. The front hand helps to keep the opponent’s body lain out. Ignore the opportunity to grab
grab and pull down his lapel with your left hand. Instead, with the right hand...

131
腰ノ際へ寄右足ヲ立テ爪先ノ小指
ノ方ヲ臂ノ曲リ際へ掛受ノ手ノ平
ヲ上ニ向体ニ付テ背ノ上ノ方へ充
分ニ曲ケ右足ノ爪先が地ヲ離レヌ
樣ニシテ膝ヲ尺澤ノ邊へ乘セ腰ヲ
下ケスニ左手ノ指ヲ伸シコバノ方
ニテ獨鈷ヲ押シ乍ラ右手ノ平ニテ
受ノ右臂ヲ押へ(二圖參照)曲リ際
ヲ左手ニテ摑ミ右手ノ臂ヲ押へシ
ヲ摺ル樣ニシテ手首迄下ケ其手ノ
指先ヲ左へ向テ受ノ手首ヲ握下ヲ
摺ル樣ニ引寄左ノ手首ト深ク重ネ(三圖參照)是ニテ臂ニ掛ケシ處ノ足ヲヌキ右
膝ラ肩際へ突 キ左足ヲ堅一文字ニ踏開キ右手

百三十二

...push his arm closer his own hip and standing with the pinky toe of the right foot facing the same
direction, snaring and bending his elbow. The palm of the opponent’s hand being up and kept sticking
in the same direction as his body, Your spine being held erect but yet bent over enough to do it. One
does not have much distance between oneself and the ground when doing all this. The knee is used to
ride him, driving into himin the vicinity of the Shakutaku//Shattaku “Foot deep swamp” vital point,
which is dis-hearting him. The fingers of the left hand are extended their base held in a certain
direction, pushing in not unlike a single pronged vajra [NECC ALT TRANS: “... pushing into the Dokko “Single
pronged vajra” vital point...” both really], while pushing away the opponent’s right elbow with the palm of your
right hand (In reference to Illustration Two). Grab and bend it with your left hand, pushing and folding
in [behind him across his back?] the elbow of his right arm as you do so. Keep his wrist down, the
fingertips of that hand facing to the left. Grab and lower the opponent’s wrist folding it over [behind
him across his back?], pull his left wrist closer and cross them (In reference to Illustration Three).
Snaring his elbows and slipping them into position like this, your right knee thrust into the area of his
shoulder, while the left foot has stepped out into the open firmly striking Ichimonji Straight line
posture. With the right hand...

132
ヲ向ヨリ顎ニ掛ケ左手ヲ前ヨリ顎ノ下へ差込ミ右手ニテ右ノ臂ノ上ヲ持チ受ノ
体ヲ右へ廻シテ起シ其儘殘心スベシ

一廻込 マワリコミ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間程離レテ直立
ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ捕身ノ者行
逢ヒタル時左手ニテ受身ノ右ノ手
首ヲ摑ミ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ我左肩
ノ邊ヨリ受身ノ陰嚢ヲ目掛テ切拂
ヒ乍ラ左手ニテ受身ノ腕ヲ高ク揚

百三十三

...from the direction it’s facing, snare his chin [hand somewhat over the mouth?], and slide his chin
downward. With your right hand take a hold of his right elbow and raise it. Rotate the opponent’s
body to the right, maintaing Zanshin Continued awareness as you arise when doing this.

-- Mawarikomi Rotating In

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect at a distance of about three feet apart.
Both give outcry together. While advancing the defender encounters a happenstance occurrence at the
time. Grab the opponent’s right wrist with your left hand, extending the fingers of the right hand,
place them in the vicinity of your left shoulder and keep your eye on him as you perform a sweeping
chop [with that hand] into his testicles. With the left hand drive the opponent’s arm up higher in a
certain direction at the time...

133
時ニ左足ヲ左ノ後へ斜ニ踏開テ腰ヲ
充分ニ下ケ右手ノ内平ヲ上ニ向テ受
ノ右ノ手首へ下ヨリ掛左手ヲ臂へ掛
又左足ヲ受ノ右足ノ脇へ踏出シテ爪
先ヲ充分ニ外へ向(一圖參照)受ノ眼
ヲ能ク見込乍ラ我体ノ中 心ヲ崩サ
ヌ樣ニ意ヲ用ヒテ右足ヲ先キ逹テ受
身ノ腕ノ下ヲ廻リ直ニ右ノ爪先ニテ
右ノ股ヲ蹴テ(二圖參照)右前へ斜ニ
踏開キ左膝ヲ右足ノ際へ送リ乍ラ我
体ト共ニ受ノ体ヲ引落シ右前へ斜ニ
踏開キテ腕ヲ鈎固ニシテ面ヲ右ノ爪
先へ向受身ノ者充分ニ

百三十四

...as you step openly and diagonally into the left rear with your left foot, being that you have become
sufficiently dis-hearted to take action. With the palm of the right hand to the inside, facing upward,
snare and drive the opponent’s right wrist downward. With your left hand snare his [other?] elbow.
Then step in with the left foot alongside the opponent’s right foot, the toes facing just to the outside (In
reference to Illustration One). Frequently the opponent will be watching you quite closely, despite this,
he is not able to dishevel your physical intentions against him the way that you are doing this. Making
use of his perceptions, point the toes of your right foot in a directions so as to mislead him, and then
directly move the opponent’s arm downward so as to rotate him a bit. With the toe tips of the right foot
kick him in the thigh (In reference to Illustration Two). Stepping openly and diagonally into the right
front, send his left knee off and away with your right foot, while using both your own body and the
opponent’s body to do a pulling drop ((s)hiki (w)otoshi). Stepping openly and diagonally into the right
front and firmly hooking him like a fish by his arm, your face and the toes of your right foot are facing
the same direction. Enough so as to be...

134
利キタル時相圖ヲ爲左手ニテ疊ヲ打へシ捕ハ此時殘心ナス事例ノ如シ

一抦碎 ツカクダ キ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間程離レテ捕身ノ方ハ腰ニ木太
刀ヲ帶相方直立シテ聲テ懸互ニ進デ間三尺計リニ
至リ先受身ノ者ハ右足ヲ少シ前へ踏出シテ木太刀
ノ抦ニ左右ノ手ヲ懸ルナリ捕身ハ此際左手ニテ鯉
囗ヲ握リ拇指ヲ鍔へ掛テ止メ受ハ直ニ左足ヲ後へ
開クト共ニ木太刀ヲ引べシ又捕身ハ受ガ引ニ

百三十五

...taking good advantage of the opponent at the time. There are cues about doing it in the illustrations,
as one does one strikes the Tatami mats with the left hand. The defender is to this point maintaining
Zanshin Continued awareness, much as in the previous cases.

-- Tsuka Kudaki Hilt Crusher

About this fighting technique, you are at a distance of about three feet apart. Both give outcry together.
Regarding how the defender does it, you are wearing a wooden long-sword slung through your belt.
You are [both] standing erect and both give outcry together. Cross the measured three feet distance to
meet one another, the opponent starts by stepping a bit forward on his right foot. He then grips the hilt
of the wooden long-sword clinging to it with both left and right hands, for instance. Upon this
occasion, the defender grabs the Koikuchi area of the Mouth of the Scabbard, using his thumb to clamp
down on the Tsuba hand-guard of the sword to stop it [from being drawn]. Immediately, the opponent
steps back to the rear on his left foot, pulling the wooden long-sword with him [trying to free it from
your grip]. Then the defender counter-pulls [on the sword]...

135
續テ右足ヲ前へ踏込乍ラ右手ノ臂ヲ少シ張 リ指ヲ伸シテコバノ方ニテ烏兎ヲ當
直ニ下ヨリ抦頭ニ懸右足ヲ後へ一文字ニ踏開クト共ニ抦先ヲ右膝ノ處迄丸ク船
底ナリニ引付(圖參照)腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲ受身ノ者ハ抦ヲ握リタル儘左足ヲ前へ踏
出シ捕身ノ者ハ右臂ヲ体へ付テ抦先ヲ我右ノ肩迄揚ケ腰ハ下ケタル儘右足ヲ左
足ノ際迄寄セ受ハ此時ニ左足ヲ右足ノ際迄引又捕身ノ者ハ左足ヲ後へ一文字ニ
蹈開キ乍ラ受ノ手ヲ抦ニテ卷落ス樣ニシテ水月ノ邊へ突出スベシ受身ハ手ヲ放
ス際右足ヲ後へ一文字ニ開クベシ捕ハ抦ニ手ヲ掛タル儘ニテ殘心スベシ

一歸投 カヘリナゲ

此手合ノ形ハ三間程離レテ直立シ互ニ聲ヲ發シテ進行捕身ノ者ハ受ト行逢タル
時少シ左へ寄右足ヲ受身ノ後へ蹈出シ右手ニテ後襟ヲ摑乍ラ後へ廻テ左足ヲ後
へ開キ手ニテ引カヌ樣ニ唯腰ヲ少シ下

百三十六

...having stepped forward on your right foot to do so, while extending your right elbow a bit and extending the
fingers too. With the base of the palm of the hand strike the Uto “Crow-Rabbit” vital point. Immediately snare
and drive down the Tsukagashira Tip of the sword hilt. Step into the open rear, striking Ichimonji Straight line
posture, while also making a circle with the Tsuka-zaki Tip of the sword hilt, to bring it into the vicinity of your
right knee. Pulling on it [not as if to pull I from it’s scabbard] rather like guiding a boat across the water (In reference to
the Illustration). Being sufficiently dis-hearting to him, the opponent will have tried to re-grip the hilt of the
sword as you have done this, so you step into the front with your left foot. The defender then raises the
Tsukagashira Tip of the sword hilt to the level of your own right shoulder, keeping right elbow clinging close
into your own body to be easier able to do so. This is further dis-hearting to him that you have done this. Bring
your left foot closer in position to your right foot, at this time the opponent will step with his right foot closer
into position to your left foot, pulling on [the sword]. Then the defender steps out into the open rear with your
left foot, striking Ichimonji posture, while performing a winding drop (maki (w)otshi) due to the opponent’s
hand being locked on the hilt. One then thrusts him in the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit of the
stomach]. The opponent’s hands are free, in this circumstance, so one ought to step openly into the rear with the
right foot, striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. The defender’s hand still clings to the Tsuka hilt of the sword
while doing all this, maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Ka(h)eri Nage Throwing to the Rear

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a distance of about three feet apart. Both give
outcry together as advancing across the distance. The defender encounters a happenstance committed by the
attacker at the time. Draw somewhat closer on the left side, step in on your right foot behind the opponent, and
grab the back of his collar while then rotating him to the rear with it, placing your left foot into the open rear as
you do. One is not really pulling him with the hand when doing this. But it will dis-heart him just a bit...

136
ケテ止メ受ハ留メラレル際 左足ヲ後へ五六寸斜ニ
踏下リ又捕ハ左足ヲ右足ト竝テ右足ノ爪先ニテ左ノ
草靡ヲ蹴テ(圖參照)直ニ膝ヲ右足ノ後へ 付テ突キ
左足ヲ橫ニ一文字ニ開クト共ニ腰ヲ下ゲ乍ラ右手ニ
テ襟ヲ下へ眞直ニ引落シ直ニ放シテ臂ヨリ指先迄眞
直ニ立テ其儘殘心ナスベシ此形ハ務メテ指ヲ立ルニ
ハ非ズ唯掌中ノ石ヲ地へ打付タル其力ノ勢ガ餘テ自
然ニハネ返ル樣ニ心得ペシ

一壁添拒 カベゾイフセギ

百三十七

...as well as halt him. Being that you have stopped the opponent in the circumstances, step down
diagonally some five or six inches to the rear with the left foot, the defender then standing with right
foot aligned to left foot, with the toes of the right foot kick him the left-side Sōbi/or/Kusanabiki
“Waving grass” vital point [base of calf muscle, usually] (In reference to the illustration).
Immediately, with the right foot sticking to the rear, jut that knee out as you step out into the open side
with the left foot, striking Ichimonji Straight line posture as you further dis-heart him. [Grabbing] his
lapel in your right hand perform a pulling drop (s)hiki (w)otoshi) immediately freeing oneself [from
him]. From the elbow to the fingertips is held perfectly straight as one stands there doing it. One is
also maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness. About this Kata pattern, there is what role the fingers
play in the standing position, and what is disadvantageous. But the palm of the right hand strikes the
ground and clings to it. And one ought to understand that it rather adds somewhat to the force of
power when doing it.

-- Kabesoi Fuseki
Obstructing while Against a Wall

137
此手合ノ形ハ捕身ノ者ハ壁ヲ後ニシテ立受身ノ者
ハ中三尺程離テ前へ立チ先互ニ掛聲ヲ發シ受身ハ
右足ヲ前へ二尺五六寸蹈出シ左手ニテ下ヨリ腹帶
ヲ持右手ノ指ヲ延シ拇指ヲ開キ咽喉ノ處へ矢筈ニ
掛テ押べシ捕身ノ者ハ咽喉ヲ押シ來ル手首ノ曲リ
際ヲ左ノ臂ヲ少シ上テ上ヨリシカト摑ミ右手ノ臂
ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ立甲端ノ方ヲ臂ヨリ少上へ掛テ
右足ヲ一尺程開キ腹ヲ出シテ腰ヲ

百三十八

[ Kabesoi Fuseki Obstructing while Against a Wall ]

About this fighting technique, the defender is standing with a wall behind him. The opponent is
standing in front of you at a distance of about three feet. From the start, both give outcry together. The
opponent paces across some two and a half feet, with his right foot forward and with his left hand
down, grabs your belt-line. Extending the fingers of his right hand with the thumb open snares and is
pushing on you at the throat with Yahazu “arrow knotch” [crotch of the hand formed between the open
fingers and thumb]. The defender proceeds against being pushed at the throat both by bending [the
opponent’s] wrist and raising his left elbow a bit, but ignores to actually grab the elbow when raising
it. The right elbow to the fingertips is held straight as one stands there, one snares and somewhat raises
his elbow along the rear edge [rather behind him?]. You have taken a step on the right foot about one
foot out into the open to help further disturb and dis-heart him given the compromising position he’s
in...

138

Translator's Note: By now the text has made it fairly clear that the hand formation itself and the usage of the Crotch of the hand
[formed between the open fingers and the open thumb] is called Yahazu (矢筈) “Knock of the Arrow” in the Tenjin shinyō ryū. It tends
to get called this in several different branches of the Yōshin ryū, the Shinyō ryū, sometimes in schools descended of Sekiguchi ryū and
several others besides. One might find usage of it in such terms as Yahazu ate ( 矢 筈当 て ) “Striking with the Knock of the Arrow”,
Yahazu uke ( 矢 筈 受 け ) “Parrying with the Knock of the Arrow” or “Blocking with the Knock of the Arrow” which also provides
Yahazu harai uke (矢筈払い受け) “Sweeping and parrying with the Knock of the Arrow” or “Sweeping Block with the Knock of the
Arrow” and in fact a form of this nomenclature occurred a time or two in the text as both Yahazu harai (uke) and Yahazu harai (uke)
mari (矢筈払い( 受け)丸り) “Arcing sweeping parry with the knock of the arrow” and an instance or two of a strike to the groin called
Yahazu harai mari ate ( 矢 筈 払 い 丸 り 当 て ) “Arcing sweeping strike with the knock of the arrow”. This is all most legitimate
terminology to the Tenjin shinyō ryū (the Yōshin ryū, the Shinyō ryū and several others besides),and due to the influences of Kano
Jujutsu and its Early Kodokan Judo, it fully applies in most forms of Karate-do and also in the Korean adaptations of these (spoken
instead in Korean language, of course.)
下ゲ乍ラ体ヲ左へ向足ハ体ト
共ニ踵ヲ少シ上テ左右ノ爪先
ヲ左へ向尚又是ト同時ニ左手
ニテ受身ノ手ヲ左へ逆ニ返シ
右手ハ下へ押ヘル樣ニナシテ
受ノ体ヲ充分ニ崩シ右足ニテ
受身ノ右足ヲ外より拂ヒ(一
圖參照)倒シ右膝ヲ腕ノ附際
へ突キ左足ヲ一文字ニ踏開キ
左手ノ拇指ニ少シ力ヲ入テ受
身ナ左ノ手首ヲ向へ返ス樣ニ
シテ充分ニ延シ右手ハコバノ方ニテ少シ向ペ摺ル樣ニシテ

百三十九

...while the body of facing to the left side, the heel of the foot is being held a bit of the ground, the
fingertips of both left and right hands are facing to the left. Further still, then at the same time you will
reverse the opponent’s hand back to the left, and with your right hand push down on it while doing so,
sufficiently as to disrupt the opponent’s body. With the right foot, sweep the opponent’s right foot to
the outside (In reference to Illustration One). Dropping him, thrust out his arm stuck out across your
right knee, having stepped out into the open with the left foot to strike the Ichimonji Straight line
posture. Applying some pressure with the thumb of the left hand as you reverse the direction of the
opponent’s left wrist as you do so. Extending [his arm] out enough for it. The base of the right hand
grinding and pushing in a certain direction...

139
押へ(二圖參照)面ハ左へ向テ追々ニシムルナリ

一腕挫 ウ デシキ

此手合ノ形ハ中ニ間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ
發シテ進行中三尺計リノ處ニ至リ受身ノ者右足
ヲ一尺五寸計リ踏出シ左右ノ手ニテ捕身ノ左右
ノ前襟ヲ一處ニ寄セ右手ニテ摑ミ左足ヲ一尺五
六寸計リ後ノ左へ斜ニ踏開キ乍ラ右手ニテ襟ヲ
突出スナリ此時捕身ノ者ハ受ノ手ノ直下ノ處ノ
我襟ヲ左手ニテ摑ミ左足ヲ左ノ後へ斜

百四十

... while you do it (In reference to Illustration Two). One is facing to the left, and slowly constricting
[his arm].

-- Ude Shiki
Wrenching the Arm

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at some distance away from each
other. Both give outcry together as advancing across the measured distance of some three feet as you
approach one another. The opponent steps in on the right foot a measured length of about a foot and a
half. He grabs both the defender’s right and left lapels from the front, drawing [the defender] closer to
himself as he gathers [the lapels] together with his right hand. The defender steps diagonally into the
open left rear by a measured foot and a half, with the left foot, while with the right hand thrusting
overtop [the arm holding you by] your lapels. At this time, the defender drives the opponent’s hands
straight down, as you grab your own lapels with the left hand [to stabilise it]. Stepping diagonally into
the left rear with the left foot...

140

Translator's Note: The entry Ude Shiki is often times (and sometimes in other schools) pronounced ‘Ude Kujiki’.
メニ踏開キ乍ラ左手ニテ襟ヲ引上右
手ニテ受ノ手ノ甲ノ上ヨリ内平ノ方
へ四指ヲ掛テ小指ニ力ヲ入テ我胸ノ
方へシカト押付左手ニテ上ヨリ手首
ヲ摑ミ左足ヲ受ノ右足ノ際へ蹈込右
足ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴上ケ(一圖參照)直ニ
左足ノ開キ居タル方へ斜ニ蹈開キテ
爪先ヲ充分ニ外へ向ケ乍ラ受ノ手ノ
内平ヲ上ニ向テ腕ヲ逆ニ我左リ臂ニ
テ脇腹ノ間へ狹ミ込左ノ膝ヲ右足ノ
際へ寄テ突キ乍ラ

百四十一

...while pulling up on the lapels with the left hand, having the right hand up over top the back of the
opponent’s hands, palm facing in, snare it with the four fingers, applying pressure with the pinky
finger. Ignoring one’s own chest, pull up with the left hand, grab his wrist. With the left foot step into
the vicinity of the opponent’s right foot and with your right foot kick up into his testicles (In reference
to Illustration One). Immediately stepping diagonally into the open with the left foot, the toes are
pointed enough to the outside while the opponent’s palm is facing up. Reverse his arm, keeping his
arm stuffed in along your side under your left elbow. Bring your left knee closer to your right foot,
while...

141
受ノ体ヲ柔ラカニ引寄セテ受ノ体ト我体ト竝フ樣ニ一度仰向ニナリ(二圖參照)
夫ヨリ靜カニ起キ乍ラ右手ヲ受ノ右ノ手首ノ向へ 上ヨリ掛左膝ヲ腕ノ附根ノ際
へ突左手ノ拇指ノ元ノ少シ高キ處ヲ臂ノ少シ凹ミタル處へ掛ケ右足ヲ前へ斜ニ
蹈開キ面ヲ右ノ爪先ノ方へ向釣固ニナシテ追々ニシメテ受身ガ相圖ヲ爲シタル
時手ヲ放シテ殘心スへシ

一諸別 シヨベツ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ離テ直立シ互ニ聲テ懸テ進行キ間一尺五六寸計リノ處
ニテ兩人共左ノ後へ斜ニ蹈開キ捕身ノ者ハ左足ヲ受ノ眞後ニ蹈込乍ラ左ノ前襟
ヲ左手ノ親指ヲ内ニシテ摑ミ又右足ヲ後へ踏込乍ラ右手ノ拇指ヲ上ニシテ受ノ
右臂ノ骨ヨリ些カ上ノ細キ處ヲ持右足ヲ右前へ蹈出シ乍ラ腕ヲ右ノ向へ斜ニ充
分突キ延シテ(一圖參照)又右足ヲ左足ノ際へ寄セ此際一度突延シ タル腕ヲ受

百四十二

...rather gently pulling the opponent bodily closer, doing this will align the opponent’s body to your body,
facing together in one move, for instance (In reference to Illustration Two). From there one calmly arises, while
snaring and lifting the opponent’s right wrist with your right hand, drawing and thrusting the joint of his arm
across your left knee. Keep the base of the thumb of your left hand high along the nook of his inner elbow,
snaring him there. Step diagonally into the front with your right foot, your face and the fingers of your right
hand will be facing the same direction, as you have quite firmly hooked him like a fish as you slowly constrict
him. There are cues in the illustrations about the opponent as you do this at the time. The hands are free and one
is maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Shobetsu
Dividing between Both (Arms?)

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three feet away
from each other. Both give outcry together as advancing across the measured distance of a foot and a half. Both
men step diagonally into the open left rear. The defender steps in directly behind the opponent on the left foot,
while grabbing the front of [the opponent’s] left lapel, with the left hand, thumb to the inside of it. Then step
into the rear with your right foot, while taking a hold of the opponent’s sleeve just above the bones of his right
elbow, the thumb of your right hand will be pointed upward as you do so. Step into the right front on your right
foot, while thrusting his arm out diagonally enough that he is extended out and facing the right side (In
reference to Illustration One). Then bring the left foot closer to the right foot, and upon this instance thrust the
opponent’s arm up over...

142

Translator's Note: The context of the term "Shobetsu" as it's getting used here would suggest that it's being used to mean: "Dividing
one arm from the other" or something quite like that. The problem (with giving the technique name a translation) is that the term
'shobetsu' can be applied lots of different ways... so which translation should it be given?
百四十三

143
ノ頭ノ方へ曲ケ(二圖參照)左ノ方へ輕ク指先迄ナデ行乍ラ 左ノ肩先ノ衣ヲ指先
ニテ輕ク持左右ノ小指ノ方ヲ襟首ニシカヽ付左 足ヲ後へ斜ニ一踏開キ次ニ右足
ヲ橫へ一文字ニ踏開キ乍ラ腰ヲ下ルト共ニ受ノ体ヲ追々ニ下ヘ落ス樣ニナシ我
左右ノ腕ヲ充分ニ伸シテ受ノ体が下へ附迄ニ充分ニ咽喉ノシマル樣ニナシ面ヲ
左へ向受身ガ相圖ヲナシタル際手ヲ放シテ殘心ナスベシ

一大小捕 ダイショウトリ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ大小ノ刀ヲ帶タル處ノ形ニシテ中三間計リ離レテ直立
ナシ互ニ聲ヲ發シテ進行体ノ接近シタル時捕身ノ者ハ右手ハ大刀ノ抦左ハ小刀
ノ抦ニ手ヲ掛ル心持ニテ左右共指先ヲ延拇指ヲ開キ右ハ胸骨ノ中程ニ付左ハ少
シ脇へ掛左足ヲ左ノ後へ斜ニ踏開キ(一圖參照)腰ヲ下ル此際受身ノ者ハ我刀ノ
鍔ニテ水 月ヲ押ス者ト見傚シ左足ヲ少シ後へ開キ体ヲ崩ルヽナリ捕身ノ方ハ

百四十四

... his head bending it all in one single move (In reference to Illustration Two). The fingers moving nimbly
towards the left side, while gently grabbing the garments at the top of his left shoulder, the pinky finger [side of
the hand] adhering at and controlling the left and right sides of the collar at the nape of the neck. With the left
foot step into the open rear at a diagonal angle, next the right foot stepping into the open to strike Ichimonji
Straight line posture while further dis-hearting him by rather slowly dropping the opponent's body to the
ground in a certain fashion. Your own left and right arms will have extended sufficiently so as to do this, and
are helping to keep the opponent's body pinned down and to constrict him across his throat. You are facing
towards the left, there are cues about the opponent in the illustration, the hands are free upon this occasion and
you are maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness.

-- Taishō Dori
Capturing the Twin Swords

About this fighting technique, in the Kata technique the opponent is wearing a Daisho twin sword set in his
belt-line. You are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three feet away from each other.
Both give outcry together as advancing across until reaching the point where you meet at the time. The
defender uses his right hand to move the hilt of the long-sword to the left. There is some sense of clinging with
your hand to the hilt of the Shotō short sword, the fingers extended, thumbs open with both right and left
hands, with the right hand cling in at his breast bone and with the left hand somewhat clinging to his side. Step
diagonally into the open left rear with your left foot (In reference to Illustration One). Having dis-hearted him
upon this occasion, give due consideration to sharply pushing the Tsuba sword hand-guard of the sword into
Suigetsu ‘Moon-water’ vital point in the pit of his stomach. Having stepped unto the open rear with the left foot
allows one to bodily disrupt him, for instance. The defender…

144
腰ヲ下ケタル儘手ニテ押サヌ樣
ニ左足ノ爪先ヲ充分ニ外へ向テ
受ノ右足ノ脇へ踏出シテ受ノ右
足ヲ外ノ方ヨリ右足ニテ拂ヒ倒
シ直ニ右膝ヲ橫腹ノ際へ突キ左
足ヲ橫へ斜ニ踏開キ受ノ眼ヲ見
込充分ニ氣相ヲ懸テ押ス心持ニ
ナスベシ(二圖參照)受身ノ者ハ
此氣相ヲ懸ル時鍔ニテ水月ヲ充
分ニ押當テラレル者ト見成シテ
相圖ヲナスベシ此圖ハ木太刀ヲ
帶タル處ナレ

百四十五

… having dis-hearted him by doing this, the way it’s done you are not really pushing [the sword hilt]
with your hand. The toes of the left foot are pointed enough to the outside [to apply inadvertent
pressure]. Step in with your right foot alongside the opponent’s right foot just to the outside,
sweeping it away and dropping him (hara(h)i (w)otoshi). Immediately thrust him in the side of his
thigh with your right knee, step diagonally into the open to the side but staying enough in the
opponent’s line of sight so as to maintain his attention, there would be some sense of pulling on him
(In reference to Illustration Two). The attacker being rather absorbed with you during this state of
fluctuation at the time, as you strike and push in with the Tsuba sword hand-guard against the
Suigetsu ‘Moon-water’ vital point in the pit of his stomach, there are cues about doing this in the
illustration.
The illustration of this is actually being done with a [set of] wooden swords…

145
トモ平常稽古ヲ爲ス際ニハ受惡シキ故無腰ニテ形チノミヲ捕ルベシ

中段立合拾四手終
百四十六

...that is usually what is done during practice, which as in the circumstance itself, one is otherwise
unarmed against what wickedness the opponent intends, and so one makes the capture like that.

Chūdan Tachia(h)I Jūshi-te Owari


The 14 Middle Level Standing Techniques Ended Here

146
投捨 ナゲス テ

一鐘木 シモク

此手合ノ形ハ三間程離レ
テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ
進ミ行中三尺計ニ至テ互
ニ立止リ面ヲ見込充分ニ
氣合ヲカケ受身ノ者右ノ
拳ヲ揚ゲテ右足ヲ前ノ方
へ二尺五六寸踏出シ乍ラ
捕身ノ頭上へ打掛ルナリ
此際捕身ノ者ハ右足ヲ後
へ三尺計リ一文字ニ踏開
キ乍ラ左手ノ指ヲ延シ甲
ノ方ヲ我額ノ上ニ附臂テ
橫へ張リ腰ヲ充分ニ下テ

百四十七

-- Nagesute The Sacrificing Throws

-- Shimoku Bell Hammer

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a distance of some three feet away
from each other. Both give outcry together as advancing across the three feet distance until reaching
the point where both of you come to a stand-still facing each other, looking each other in the eyes [as
both attempt] to gain control (kia(h)i wo kake) [of the other]. The opponent raises his right fist and
has his right foot forward having stepped in across the remaining two and a half feet, as he strikes at
the defender’s head. Upon this occasion, the defender steps to the rear with the right foot a measured
three feet and strikes Ichimonji Straight line posture. Extending the fingers of the left hand you guard
your own forehead with the back of this hand, the elbow will be extended out to the side, as you have
become sufficiently dis-hearted to take action…

147
膝ヲ左右へ開キ頭ヨリ腰迄柔ラカク眞直
ニシテ打來ル手先ヲ我手ト十文字ニ受留
メ(一圖參照)直ニ其手首ヲ摑ミ左右ノ爪
先ト共ニ体ヲ少シク左へ向乍ラ右手ニテ
右袖ノ附根ヲ下ヨリ摑ミテ(二圖參照)左
手ノ方ハ些カ押心持ニナシ右手ノ方ハ些
カ引ク心持ニ成シテ受ノ体ヲ少シク崩シ
右足ニテ受ノ右足ヲ外ヨリ拂テ投左足ヲ
橫へ一文字ニ踏開キ乍ラ受ノ手首ヲ少シ
引ク心持ニナスベシ

百四十八

...the knees are parted to the left and right, there is a flexible alignment from the head to the hips in
the way that you’re standing, a cross is formed between his arm and your hand in the way that you
stopped the opponent’s strike (In reference to Illustration One). Immediately grab that wrist,
controlling him by the fingers of the right hand, as your body itself is somewhat facing left, grabbing
and clinging to the bottom of his right sleeve with the right hand (In reference to Illustration Two).
The direction and placement of the left hand has a sense of pulling on him just a bit, and the direction
and placement of the right hand likewise has a sense of pulling on him some. This will somewhat
disrupt (kuzusu) as from the outside you sweep the opponent’s right foot away with your right foot,
throwing him as you step out to the open side and strike Ichimonji Straight line posture. There is
some sense of pulling a bit on the opponent’s wrist as you are doing this.

148
一刈捨 カリステ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ離テ直
立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ中三尺
ニ至リ受身ノ者ハ前ト同樣ニ右
手ニテ打掛ルベシ捕身ノ者ハ左
足ヲ後へ三尺余一文字ニ踏開キ
乍ラ腰ヲ下テ右手ノ指ヲ延甲ノ
方ヲ頭ニ付臂ヲ上テ打來ル手ヲ
受留(一圖參照)直ニ手首ヲ摑ミ
腰ヲ下ケ

百四十九

-- Karisute Cutting Down and Casting Away

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three
feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across the three feet distance
until approaching the point where both of you meet. The attacker attacks the same way as in the
previous example, striking at you with his right hand. The defender steps into the open some three
feet striking Ichimonji Straight line posture, having become dis-hearted. Guarding the head with the
back of your right hand, fingers extended. The elbow is upraised as you stop the hand that the
opponent struck with (In reference to Illustration One). Immediately grab his wrist as you dis-heart
him by…

149
タルマヽ左足ヲ右足ノ際へ寄セ右足ヲ後

へ一文字ニ蹈開キ乍ラ手首ヲ右ノ腰ノ際

へ引付受身ノ者ハ此際右足ヲ捕ノ前へ蹈

出スベシ捕身ハ引寄タル受ノ体ヲ股ノ上

ニ受ル樣ニナシテ左手ノ平ヲ受身ノ左肩

ノ上ヨリ前へ掛(二圖參照)へ体ヲ落ス樣

ニ投ルナリ

百五十

...bringing your left foot closer to the position of his left foot and with your right foot step out into the
open behind him, striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. While doing so, bring his wrist down
alongside your right hip pulling it across it. The attacker’s right leg upon this occasion is in front of
the defender being that’s how [the defender] has stepped in. The defender pulling him closer, the
opponent’s body is on [the top of] your [left] thigh, being that you have fended him off the way that
you did. The palm of the left hand is draped over the opponent’s left shoulder and clinging to its front
(In reference to Illustration Two). One may now drop and throw him in this fashion, for instance.

150
一朽木倒 クチキタヲシ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間程離レテ直立シ互
ニ聲ヲ發シテ進ミ受身ハ三尺計ノ處ニ
テ前同樣ニシテ打掛ルナリ此時捕身ノ
者ハ右足ヲ受身ノ蹈出シタル爪先へ蹈
込乍ラ腰ヲ下テ右手ノ平ニテ受身ノ右
ノ乳ノ下ヲ左へ斜ニ突キ乍ラ左手ニテ
右膝ノ曲リ際ヲ拂テ(圖參照)倒スナリ
此ノ投ハ我体ヲ飛込ムカ如クニナシテ
其ノ体ノ勢ニテ倒スナリ

百五十一

-- Kuchiki Ta(w)oshi
Dead Tree Throw-down

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a distance of some three feet away
from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. The attacker while at a measured
distance of three feet, much like before, strikes at you. At this time, the defender steps in so that your
toes are on [the position of] the attacker’s right foot, where he has stepped to, the hips being lowered
[by the broad step across with the knees jutted out]. With the palm of your right hand having been
thrust out towards your left, held at the opponent’s right lower breast, with the left hand [grab the
edge of his trouser] and sweep his right knee up until it’s bent (In reference to the Illustration). You
will drop him [by this], for instance. Throwing him like this, it’s like you are bodily leaping out
when doing it. The force of the body [in motion] is what does the throw-down.

151
一腰車 コシグルマ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ
掛ラ進ミ受身ノ者ハ行逢タル時捕身ヲ見込デ左
足ヲ捕身ノ右脇へ蹈込橫ニ 腕共ニ 体ヲ抱へル
ナリ(圖參照)捕身ノ者ハ右足ヲ受身ノ後へ充分
ニ蹈開キ腰ヲ下テ右手ノ指ヲ延シテ一度左ノ肩
先ノ方へ充分ニ上ケ臂ニテ受身ノ水月ヲ當テ後
へ倒シ其儘殘心ナスベシ

百五十二

-- Koshi Guruma Hip Wheel

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a distance of some three feet away
from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. Having happened upon you by
chance at the time, the attacker seeing the defender steps in alongside to the right with the left foot
near [the defender’s] arm and takes you in a bear hug [wrapping both arms around you] (In reference
to the illustration). As the defender, being dis-hearted, step into the open with your right foot enough
to get behind the attacker, hips lowered [over slightly bent knees]. With the fingers of the right hand
outstretched, in a single move going over-top his left shoulder and with the [right] elbow strike him
in the Suigetsu ‘Moon-water’ vital point, pit of his stomach. Driving him backwards and dropping
him as you continue to maintain Zanshin awareness.

152
一橫車 ヨコグルマ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ離テ直立ナシ互ニ聲
ヲ懸テ進ミ中三尺ニ至テ立止リ兩人共左足ヲ
左ノ後へ斜ニ蹈開キ受身ノ者ハ左足ヲ捕ノ右
脇へ蹈込ミ左手ニテ後ロノ帶ヲ取右手ニテ前
帶ヲ取リ少シ腰ヲ下ル(一圖參照)捕身ノ者ハ
右手ノ拇指ヲ下ニシテ受身ノ右襟ヲ

百五十三

-- Yoko Guruma Side Wheel

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some
three feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across the three feet
distance to approach one another having come to a stand still. Both men at the same time openly step
diagonally on the left foot into the left rear. The attacker steps in with the left foot to the defender’s
right side, and with his left hand takes hold of your belt-line at the rear. With the right hand he takes
a hold of the front of your belt. You become somewhat dis-hearted and slightly lower your hips [by
spreading the feet] (In reference to Illustration One). As the defender, with the thumb of your right
hand down, grab the opponent’s right collar [near the rear, almost behind his head].

153
掴ミ右足ノ踵テ蹈付爪先ヲ右へ向左ハ爪先

ヲ蹈付踵ヲ揚ゲ体ヲ充分ニ右へ向乍ラ受ノ

体崩シ此際受ハ右足ヲ少シ後ノ左へ寄べシ

又捕ハ受ノ体ヲ充分ニ右ノ方へ崩シテ左足

ニテ受身ノ左足ヲ外ヨリ拂ヒ(二圖參照)右

足ヲ後へ開キテ橫一文字ニナルヘシ

百五十四

Dart your right foot in and plant the heel [behind him] with the toes pointed towards the right. The
left foot is planted on the toes with the heel upraised. The body is facing the right side enough to do
this as you disrupt the opponent’s body. Upon this occasion, the attacker will have moved his right
foot to the left and moved a bit closer to you. Then the defender disrupts and unbalances the
opponent bodily to the right by sweeping the opponent’s left foot using your left foot from the
outside (In reference to Illustration Two). This is done as you step out into the open rear with your
right foot, striking Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture.

154
一片胸捕 カタムナトリ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ
互ニ聲ヲ掛テ進ミ捕身ノ者ハ行逢ヒタル
時左右ノ襟ヲ左右ノ手ニテ一處ニヨセ右
手ニテ摑ミ左足ヲ左後へ斜メニ二尺七八
寸計リ蹈開キ乍ラ右手ニテ少シク向フへ
押スへシ請身ノ者ハオサレタル際左足ヲ
斜メニ開キ左手ニテ捕身ノ右ノ手首ヲ下
ヨリ摑ミ右ノ拳ヲ上ゲテ頭ヲ打べシ(一
圖參照)此際捕身ノ方ハ腰

百五十五

-- Kata Muna Dori


Single Lapel Capture

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three
feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. The defender
happening upon this chance encounter at the time, with the right hand [the attacker] grabs both the
right and left lapels bunched together. Stepping diagonally back into the open with the left foot into
the left rear a measured distance of two feet seven inches, being that his right hand was somewhat
pushing you in that direction anyways. The defender having been seized and put upon, stepped
diagonally back into the open with the left foot and grabbed the attacker’s right wrist from
underneath with your left hand. You raise your right fist as if to strike him in the head (In reference to
Illustration One). Upon this occasion as the defender had become dis-hearted…

155
ヲ下ゲテ左足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ脇へ蹈込乍

ラ左手ノ指ヲ延シ甲ノ方ヲ我が額ノ上ニ

付テ打來レ手ヲ十文字ノ如クニ受留メ直

ニ手首ヲシカト摑ミ左足ノ爪先ヲ少シ外

へ向テ右足ニテ請身ノ右足ヲ外ノ方ヨリ

拂ヒ(二圖參照)投テ直ニ左足ヲ後ロヘ一

文字ニ開キ乍ラ請身ノ右ノ手首ヲ少シ左

リノ腰ノ方へ引クへシ

百五十六

...step in alongside the opponent’s right foot while extending the fingers of the left hand in the
direction of the other party [the attacker], [your right fist] held over your forehead as if to strike, and
in this position rather forms a cross [in relationship to the opponent’s extended right arm] as one has
immediately put a stop to the opponent while otherwise ignoring the grip that you have on his wrist.
The toes of the left foot are pointed just a bit to the outside. Having your right foot just to the outside
of his right foot, sweep it away (In reference to Illustration Two). Immediately throwing him stepping
out into the open rear with the left foot striking Ichimonji Straight line posture while drawing the
opponent’s right wrist across your left hip just a bit.

156

Translator's Note: The entry descriptor makes use of the term Jūmonji (十文字) “Cross shaped”, but with some obvious innuendo to a
similar Japanese language term that is pronounced the same way Jumonji (呪文字) and means instead”letters of oath or promise; spell
casting; magical charm”. It was meant to indicate the threat of hitting him in the head with the upraised fist (which is only a ruse, one
does not actually strike him). That is the real reason it was mentioned in the descriptor (which otherwise would seem spurious and
unnecessary to have pointed out so directly, since iy has no functional purpose beyond deception.) The term Jumonji (呪文字) can be
written with other kanji for ‘ji’ have various meanings that would lend itself well to this definition of trickery (meaning such as “Being
held as if in a magic spell”). Common Internet word searches for the various candidates (e.g. 呪文 + “ji” ) I should admit that when
Jumonji (呪文 + “ji”) is written to mean (“Being held as if in a magic spell”) and written as Jūmonji (十文字) “Cross shaped” are quite
directly related: the character Jū ( 十) “Cross; Number Ten” is rather like two (2) strands of binding rope crossing one another (as if
binding the person with a rope).
一手髮捕 タムサドリ

此手合ノ形ハ三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ互
ニ掛聲テ發シテ進ミ請身ノ者ハ行逢タル
際右手ニテ捕身ノ髪ヲ摑ミ乍ラ左足ヲ後
へ斜メニ開クへシ此際捕身ノ者ハ左リノ
足ヲ請身ノ右足ノ脇迄蹈込ミ乍ラ左手ノ
指ヲ伸シ甲ヲ上ニ向ケ請身ノ右ノ脇腹ヲ
臂ニテ當ルナリ(一圖參照)直ニ左足ノ爪
先ヲ外ノ方へ向テ左手ニテ受身ノ右袖ノ
附根ヲ摑ミ右手ノ平ヲ左

百五十七

-- Tamusa Dori Capturing by the Hand Holding the Hair

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three
feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. The attacker happened
upon in a chance encounter at the time, he grabs the defender by the hair of the head, while stepping
diagonally into the open rear with his left foot. Upon this occasion, the defender steps in with your left
foot alongside the attacker’s right foot while extending the fingers of the left hand, back of the hand
up, and [the hand] pointed at your right side as if about to strike him with your elbow, for instance (In
reference to Illustration One). The toes of your left foot are immediately pointed to the outside, with
your left hand grab and cling to the bottom of his right sleeve. The palm of your right hand…

157
リノ乳ノ邊へ當右足ニテ請身ノ右ノ外ノ方ヨ
リ右足ヲ拂ヒ(二圖參照)投テ直ニ左足ヲ橫ニ
一文字ニ蹈開キテ少シ袖ヲ引ク心持ニナスへ
シ但シ此ノ形ノ投ル處ハ始メ腰ヲ下テ臂ニテ
脇腹ヲ當ルト左足ヲ踏込ムト間合ノ違ハヌ樣
ニナスベシ次ニ左右ノ手ヲ掛ケルト右足ヲ拂
フトノ間合モ違ハヌ樣ニ心ヲ用井テ一時ニナ
サザレバ投難キモノト知ルへシ

百五十八

…will be in the vicinity of your left breast, your right foot being to the outside and to the right of the
attacker’s right foot, sweep his foot away (In reference to Illustration Two). Throwing him
immediately, step openly with the left foot out to the side, striking Ichimonji Straight line posture,
there is some sense of pulling a bit on his sleeve as you do. However about the circumstances of the
throw in this Kata pattern, from the start having been rather dis-hearted one brings the elbow
alongside as if to strike him with it, then stepping with the left foot but one is not really doing so to
change the distance and angles. Next you snare him with both the right and left right hands [grabbing
the sleeve of his capturing hand] and sweeping his right foot away [by this anchor]. Even though not
to change the distance and angles by doing so, it is rather as if you have had this in mind to use since
it will have done so all at once. One knows that otherwise it would be difficult to throw him [since he
has a grip on your hair].

158
一小具足 コグソク

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ者ハ左リニ
小太刀ヲ帶シ中三間計リ離レテ
直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ掛テ進ミ間ダ
三尺計リノ處ニ至リ請身ノ者右
手ヲ小太刀ノ抦ニ掛右足ヲ前へ
蹈込ミ乍ラ拔キ打ニ捕身ノ頭上
へ切付ルナリ此際捕身ノ方ハ右
手ノ指ヲ延シ臂ヨリ眞直ニ立テ
右足ヲ請身ノ右足ノ脇へ踏込ミ
乍ラ切付ル刀ヲ除ル心持ナク腕
ト腕トスリ違フ樣ニナスベシ(一圖

百五十九

-- Kogusoku With a Dagger

About this fighting technique, the attacker has a kodachi Short sword slung through his belt, you are
[both] standing erect and at a measured distance of some three feet away from each other. Both give
outcry together while advancing across the measured distance of three feet to the position where you
meet up. The attacker is clinging to the Tsuka hilt of the kodachi Short sword with his right hand. His
right foot has stepped forward, while he draws and strikes at the top of the head of the defender. Upon
this occasion, as the defender extend the fingers of your right hand so that [your arm is] straight from
the elbow up, you are standing erect having stepped in and placed your right foot alongside the
attacker’s right foot. There really is no sense of further warding off the cut of his sword, only that you
are buttressed up arm against arm, having changed into this position by doing so (In reference to
Illustration One).

159
參照)而シテ少シク腰
ヲ下ゲタルマヽ左足ヲ
靜ニ右足ノ際へヨセテ
次ニ右足ヲ後へ一文字
ニ蹈開キ乍ラ右手ニテ
請身ノ右腕ヲスル樣ニ
我ガ右ノ腰ノ方へ引キ
手首ヲシカト摑ミ亦此
レト同時ニ左手ニテ腕
ヲ上ヨリ抱ク樣ニシテ
手首ヲ摑ミ(二圖參照)
腕ヲ左リノ臂ニテシカ
ト狹ミ右手ニテ小太刀
ノ抦先ヲ持右ノ膝ヲ突
テ左右へ引キ分ル樣ニ
シテ請ノ体ヲ左リノ後
へ倒スナリ此時右手

百六十

But in that you had become somewhat dis-hearted, yet you will calmly be placing the left foot in
relationship to the right foot and then next to have stepped openly into the rear with the right foot,
striking Ichimonji Straight line posture. With your right hand using the attacker’s right arm while
doing so, grabbing but ignoring to draw his wrist across one’s own right hip. Also at the same time
when doing this, with the left hand wrapping over-top his arm from above, grabbing him at the wrist
while doing so (In reference to Illustration Two). Ignoring what one could otherwise do with your left
elbow being cramped in so close to him, grabbing the Tsukazaki tip of the kodachi Short sword hilt
with your right hand instead, drop to your right knee, as he realises that you are pulling [the sword out
of his hand] as you do so. The attacker’s body is thrown into your left rear, for instance.At this time,
about your right hand…

160
ハ小太刀ヲサカニ持左手バ直ニ我陰嚢ノ處へ當べシ

一腰刈捨 コシカ リステ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ
直立ナシ互ニ懸聲ヲ發シテ進
ミ請身ノ者ハ行逢タル時右手
ニテ推身ノ右ノ手首ヲ摑ミ左
手ヲ添テ右足ヲ後へ充分ニ開
キ乍ラ手首ヲ引クナリ(一圖參
照)此際捕身ノ方ハ請身ノ者が
我ガ手ヲ引ク力ラニ順テ手先
ヲ伸シ乍ラ右足ヲ請身ノ

百六十一

...as you are reversing the kodachi Short sword [out of his grip], your left hand is kept in the vicinity
of your own testicles lest he should strike you there.

-- Koshi Karisute
Hip Reaping Sacrifice

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and separated by a measured distance of
some three feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. The
attacker being encountered on a happenstance occurrence. With your right hand grabbing and
propelling him bodily by his right wrist, propping him up with your left hand, having your right foot
enough to the open rear so as to be able to pull him by his wrist (In reference to Illustration One).
Upon this occasion, as the defender you use what force needed to pull the attacker with your hand,
the fingertips are extended while stepping in behind the opponent’s right foot...

161
後へ充分ニ蹈込ミ腰ヲサゲテ我体ヲ請ノ体へ柔ラカテ附右手ノ平ノ方ヲ後へ向
テ請身ノ腰へ卷付ル樣ニナシ我が中心ノ崩レヌ樣ニ腹ヲ少シ前へ出シナがラ請
身ヲ後へ投ルナリ此時腕ニ張ク力ヲ入ヌ樣ニナスへシ

一獨鈷 トツコ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立ナシ互ニ掛聲ヲ發シテ進ミヨリ捕身ノ者ハ左
足ヲ請身ノ右足ノ後へ踏込ミ乍ラ左手ノ平ニテ請身ノ左リ耳ヲ輕ク打乍ラ直後
へ廻リ亦右ノ手ニテ右耳ヲ打其マヽ左右ノ手ノ指先ヲ頤ノ下へ掛テ足ヲ左右へ
踏開テ腰ヲ下乍ラ左右ノ臂ヲ請身ノ背骨ノ處へ急ニ押シ付ル樣ニナシテ指先ヲ
シかト上へ向請ノ体ヲ充分ニ崩シ右手ニテ少シク頸ヲ左リへ向左手ノ平ヲ頤

百六十二

...so having dis-hearted him, clinging rather gently buttressed your own body to his. The palm of your
right hand facing towards the rear which allows you to wind the opponent bodily over your hip. It is
not being done with a personal intention of disheveling him (kuzure). Your belly is somewhat sticking
out towards the front, as you throw the opponent to the rear. At this time, the arm will be extended
out but is not applying any force while you do it.

Tokko The Single Pronged Vajra

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and separated by a measured distance of
some three feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. As the
defender you step in with your left foot behind the attacker’s right foot, as you lightly strike the
opponent’s left ear with the palm of your left hand. Rotate to a position directly behind him, and with
the right hand also strike his right ear. Then with the fingers of the left hand clinging to him under his
jawline [under his left ear], openly stepping with both the left and right foot so as to dis-heart him
further, as you dig in both the right and left elbows unexpectedly into his backbone, pushing him as
you do so. Ignoring what you could otherwise do with the fingertips, arch the opponent’s body
upward enough to dishevel him (kuzushi). With the right hand, turn his head so that he is somewhat
facing to the left side. With the left hand clinging under his jawline,…

162

Translator's Note: The statement in the entry descriptor that says: Hara Wo Sukoshi Mae-(h)e Deshinagara (腹を少し前え出しなが
ら)”…Your belly is somewhat sticking out towards the front,…” this also has an Idiomatic force of meaning, which probably should
have been used in the translation instead. That would have caused a rendering of: ”…Your gut reaction [to his failed attack] will be
somewhat obvious,…”
ノ下へ掛右ノ掌ニテ肩ノ邊ヨリ手首

迄ナデサゲテ手首ヲシカト摑ミ請身

ノ掌が後へ向樣ニナシ(圖參照)右足

ヲ後ノ左ノ方充分ニ踏開キテ投ルナ

リ此投ル處ハ少シモ手ニ力ヲ入ヌ樣

ニシテ我体ヲ後へ廻リ乍ラ只手ノ内

ノ物ヲ下へ落ス心持ニテ輕ク柔ラカ

ニ掌ヲ返シテ投へシ

百六十三

...with your right palm being in the vicinity of his shoulder, ward him off between that and the [grip
on] his wrist, but otherwise ignoring his wrist despite that you have grabbed it. The opponent’s palm
[of the captured hand] is facing to the rear while you do all this (In reference to illustration). Having
openly stepped with the right foot enough to the rear, throw him. About the conditions of this throw,
one is somewhat applying pressure with the hand as you do it. Your own body rotates into the rear
while and by merely taking the object in your palm downward you will have dropped him, there is a
sense of gentleness and lightness as you throw him by reversing his palm.

163
一小手返 コテガへシ

此手合ノ形ハ三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ

互ニ聲ヲ掛テ進ミ請身ノ者カ我前へ捕

身ノ者ガ近付タル際右足ヲ少シ前へ進

テ捕身ノ左右ノ手首ヲ左右ノ手ニテ摑

ムナリ(圖參照)此時捕身ノ方ハ左足ヲ

少シ斜ニ開キ乍ラ右手ノ指先ヲ我左リ

手ノ肩ノ邊へ向ルト同時ニ臂ヲ請身ノ

顏ノ方へ張レバ自然ト手

百六十四

-- Kote Ga(h)eshi Wrist Reversal

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect at a measured distance of some three feet
away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. The attacker is right in
front of you, being that as the defender you and he are of some acquaintance. He advances his right
foot forward a bit, then grabs both the defender’s right and left wrists in both his right and left hands
(In reference to Illustration Two). At this time, as the defender you step diagonally out into the open
with your left foot, while the fingertips of your right hand are held in the vicinity of your left side, the
hand facing the shoulder. While at the same time, you extend your elbow in the direction of his face.
Naturally the hands are quite free…

164
ガ放レル故直ニ指ヲ伸シタルマヽ掌

ノ甲端ノ方ニテ烏兎ヲ當ルト同時ニ

左リノ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直ニ掌ヲ我方

へ向テ上(二圖參照)右手ニテ左リノ

手首ニ掛居ル受ノ右手ノ掌ヲ持次ニ

左手モ右手ト同樣ニ掌へ掛其マヽ左

リノ後へ充分ニ廻リ請身ノ左リ脇へ

並ブ樣ニ踏開キテ請身ノ掌ノ左リへ

逆ニ返シテ投直ニ手ヲ放スナリ

百六十五

...and in particular so much so that the fingers are extended, palm at the outside edge and placed so as
to be able to strike the Uto “Crow rabbit” vital point. At the same time, from the left elbow to the
finger tips is being held quite straight, palm facing in and upward towards oneself (In reference to
Illustration Two). With your right hand snare and hold his left wrist, take a hold of the opponent’s
right palm and next, with your left hand snare the palm of his right hand, turning palm to palm.
Rotating and openly stepping in enough into the left rear to align yourself to his left side like this.
You are reversing the opponent’s left palm to throw him, otherwise your hands are immediately free.

165
一引落 シキヲ トシ

此手合ノ形ハ三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ互ニ
聲ヲ懸テ進寄請身ノ者近附タル時左右ノ手
ニテ捕身ノ左右ノ襟ヲ一ニナシ右手ニテ絞
ニ取リ左足ヲ斜メニ開キナガラ右手ニテ少
シヲスへシ此際捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ受身ノ
右ノ手首ヲ下ヨリシカト摑ミ左足ヲ左リノ
後へ斜メニ三尺計リ蹈開キナがラ右手ヲ延
揃へ甲端ノ方ニテ受身ノ烏兎ヲ當テ(一圖
參照)直ニ

百六十六

-- Shiki (W)Otoshi Pulling Drop

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect at a measured distance of some three feet
away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across and coming closer. The
attacker having drawn quite close at the time, takes a hold on the defender’s right and left lapels,
bundling them together, using both his right and left hands. With his right hand, he has taken a
stranglehold, you step diagonally with the left foot out into the open, as he keeps the grip with his
right hand. Upon this occasion, as the defender, with your left hand grab the opponent’s right wrist
from underneath. Step openly and diagonally with your left foot into the left rear to a measured
distance of three feet. Extend your right hand up along the inside edge [of his trapped arm]. Strike the
opponent in the Uto “Crow rabbit” vital point [(either between the eyes or at the bridge of the nose)] (In reference to
Illustration One). Then immediately…

166
甲端ヲ右ノ尺澤へ掛テ少シ腰ヲ下ナガラ尺澤ヲ
シカト押付此時受身ノ者ハ右膝ヲ前へツクへシ
(二圖參照)捕身ノ方ハ其マヽ右足ヲ左足ノ踵ノ
際へヨセテ次ニ左足ヲ左リ方へ斜メニ蹈開キナ
ガラ左手ニテ我襟ヲ持右手ノ甲端ニテ尺澤ヲ押
テ落スへシ此時受身ノ者ハ手ヲ引ルヽニ順テ仰
向ニ倒レル者トス

百六十七

...hook him at the right side Shakutaku//Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point [inner elbow] from
along the inner edge [of his trapped arm], forcing his hips down just a bit. Otherwise ignoring
Shakutaku//Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point, keep him pushed down. At this time, the
opponent drops to his right knee in front of you (In reference to Illustration Two). As the defender,
step in closer with your right foot to the heel of the opponent’s left foot, next openly step with the left
foot diagonally to the left and with your left hand take a grip on your own lapel [to stabilise it]. With
the inside edge of the right hand, push in and drop him [by pressure against] the Shakutaku /or/
Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point. At this point, the opponent will in turn be pulling on your
hand(s) as you drop and turn him face up.

167
一手操 タグリ

此手合ノ形ハ中 三間計リ
離テ直立ナシ互ニ掛聲ヲ發
シテ進行受身ノ者ハ行逢タ
ル際左右ノ手ニテ捕身ノ左
右ノ前襟ヲ一處ニ寄セ左手
ニテ摑ミ右足ヲ後へ開キ右
手ヲ延ス捕身ノ者ハ左足ヲ
橫ニ踏開キ右手ノ指先ヲ延
シ臂ヲ受身ノ左手ノ尺澤ノ
邊ニ深ク懸(圖參照)右膝ヲ
突乍ラ急ニ臂ニテ腕ヲ下へ
押付腰ヲ下テ橫一文字ニナ
リ受身ノ方ハ腕ヲ下へ押シ

百六十八

-- Taguri Reeling In

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect at a measured distance of some three feet
away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. Having a chance encounter
with the opponent, he takes the front of the defender’s right and left lapels in hand and uses them to
pull you closer to him. He grabbed with the left hand as he was stepping openly with his right foot
into the rear. Extending the right hand, as the defender, you openly step off to the side with your left
foot. The fingers of the right hand outstretched, drive deeply that elbow into the Shakutaku//Shattaku
“Foot Deep Swamp” vital point of his left arm hooking him there (In reference to the illustration).
Unexpectedly thrust him with the right knee while, while dis-hearting him as you force his hips down
by pushing [near the Shakutaku//Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point], further dis-hearting him
and forcing his hips down as you strike Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture. Pushing the
opponent’s arm downward at the time…

168
タル時右足ヲ少シ後ノ左ノ方へ寄セ
テ蹈ベシ捕身ノ方ハ臂ヲ掛タル儘手
先ヲ受ノ腰ト脇腹トノ間ヨリ後へ廻
シア背ノ絞處ヲ摑左手ノ平ニテ膝ノ
裏ノ方ヲ拔ヒ乍ラ右手ニテ下へ引落
シ倒スベシ

一捨身 ステミ

此手合ノ形ハ中二三間隔テ直立成シ
互ニ聲ヲ懸捕身ノ方ハ受身ノ前迄進
行左右ノ手受身ノ左右ノ前襟ヲ一處
ニ寄

百六十九

…while stepping into the left rear and drawing him closer to you. As the defender you have snared
him with the elbow whilst your fingers are kept in the vicinity between his hip and side, grabbing and
rotating him to the rear, his spine rather knotted up. With the palm of your left hand slipped in to the
inside of his knee, with your right hand drive downward pulling and throwing him down.

-- Sutemi Sacrificing

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect and separated by a distance of some two
or three Ken [12 to 15 feet or 3.636 - 5.454 meter] away from each other. Both give outcry together. As the
defender, the opponent continues advancing across, use both your right and left hands to grab the
front of both his right and left lapels, bundled together and draw him closer with them.

169
テ右手ニテ摑ミ左手ニテ前帶ヲ下ヨリ握リ右膝ヲ前へ 突キ乍ラ左手ハ少ン引右
手ハ少シ押テ受ノ体ヲ崩シ(圖參照)左足ヲ受身ノ左右ノ足ノ間へ深ク蹈込次ニ
右足ヲ踏込乍ラ急ニ上向ニ寐テ右手ハ頭ノ方へ引左手ニテ突揚ル樣ニナシテ投
ル此際早ク手ヲ放シテ右足ヲ延シタルマヽ左へ起テ左膝ヲ突キ右足ヲ橫ニ踏開
キ受身ノ投ラレテ行万ヲ見テ殘心スへシ

一下リ藤 サガリフ ヂ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ右脇三尺計リ離レテ受身ノ方へ向又受身ノ者ハ堅ニ向互ニ
聲ヲ懸テ受身ノ方ハ左足ヲ左へ一文字ニ踏開キ捕身ノ方ハ右足ヲ後へ一文字ニ
踏開キ次ニ右足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ少シ後ノ處へ蹈込乍ラ右手ヲ受身ノ右腕ト脇腹
ノ間へ差込後ノ紋處ヲ摑

百七十

Grab him with the right hand and with the left hand grab and push down on the front of his belt. Drop
to the right knee, towards the front, pull on him a bit with the left hand while pushing against him
with the right hand, thus disrupting (kuzushi) the opponent’s body (In reference to the illustration).
Stepping in deeply with the left foot so as to step through in between the opponent’s left and right
foot. Next, stepping in over the right foot , while unexpectedly laying him backwards [over your
right(?) thigh) so that he is facing upward. Your right hand is pulling on him [at the lapel?] helping to
control the direction of his head. With your left hand sharply pushing upwards on him as you do this
to throw him. Upon this occasion, the hands are swiftly freed, the right foot outstretched as you stand
fully up to the left side, then drop to the left knee. Right foot has stepped off to the side. It will have
thrown the opponent. You are maintaining Zanshin continued awareness as you watch the entire
outplay.

-- Sagari Fuchi Under the Wisteria Tree

About this fighting technique, the opponent is off to the right side at a measured distance of some
three feet away, the opponent is facing the same direction you are, adamantly facing this direction.
Both give outcry together. The attacker openly steps with the left foot to the left striking Ichimonji
Straight line posture. As the defender, you openly step back on the right foot into the rear striking
Ichimonji Straight line posture. Next you step in with the right foot just a bit behind the opponent’s
right foot, while you slide your right hand in between the opponent’s right arm and the right side of
his body, grabbing and constricting him...

170
This page was missing in the Library version of the Text. This page copy
came from the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo,
Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

ミ左手ニテ左ノ前襟ヲ小指ヲ上ニシテ握リ我体ノ
中心ヲ崩サヌ樣ニシテ受身ヲ少シ返ラセル樣ニ前
ノ方へ引付受ノ体ガ充分ニ崩レタル處ニテ( 圖參
照)柔ラカニ又元ノ如ク起シ乍ラ額ヲ受身ノ胸部ニ
附其儘上向ニ寐テ左右ノ手ヲ延シテ投ル時手ヲ早
ク放シ受身ノ投リテ行タル方へ眼目ヲ附乍ラ左足
ヲ少シ縮メ右足ヲ延シテ踏立橫一文字ニ起ルナリ

百七十一

...as with the left hand grabbing his front lapel, your little finger up, but when doing this one does not
have any real intention of using it itself to disrupt (kuzushi) him, you are doing it to turn the
opponent’s body around a bit. Pulling him bodily forwards enough to have disrupted him (kuzure) in
the circumstance (In reference to the illustration). Gently doing so, and also much as with the
previous examples, standing fully up while clinging to him, keeping your forehead just above the
opponent’s chest. While doing so, he is [bent backwards] facing upwards your left and right hands are
outstretched as you throw him at the time. Your hands are quickly freed as you go about throwing the
opponent in that direction, keeping your eyes peeled while withdrawing the left foot just a bit as you
extend the right foot stepping out and up as you strike Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture.

171
This page was missing in the Library version of the Text. This page copy came
from the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku
Society, Europe.

一腕緘 ウデガラミ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸
テ進中三尺ニ至リ受身ノ者ハ右ノ拳ヲ揚テ右足ヲ
前へ蹈出シ乍ラ捕身ノ頭へ打掛ル捕身ノ方ハ右足
ヲ後へ蹈開キ乍ラ左手ノ指ヲ延シ親指ヲ開キ頭へ
付テ平ノ方ニテ受留直ニ手首ヲ向へ少シ押シテ石
手ノ指先ヲ延シ揃へト握リ右足ヲ受身ノ右脇へ蹈
込乍ラ左手ニテ手首ヲ向へ少シ押シテ石手ノ指先
ヲ延揃へ受身ノ腕ノ下ヨリ向へ廻シテ

百七十二

-- Ude Garami Arm Entangling

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect separated by a measured distance of some
three feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across the three feet to
approach each other. The opponent raises his right fist, stepping forward on his right foot while
striking at the defender’s head. As the defender, you openly step into the rear with your right foot
while extending the fingers of your left hand, opening the thumb and flatly palming his head directly
stopping the opponent. Pushing somewhat in the direction of his wrist(s) as you extend the fingertips
of the right hand and outstretching it to grab [his left wrist]. You step in with the right foot alongside
the opponent’s right side while with the left hand push [his head] a bit in the direction of his [left]
wrist. The fingertips of the right hand extended, [use them to] rotate his [upper] arm down proceeding
to rotate it in the direction…

172
耳ノ脇ヘ出シ手首ノ上ヘコバノ方ヲ掛テ手先ニ力ヲ入レヌ樣ニナシ腰ヲ下ケテ
自然ト受身ノ中心ヲ崩スべシ(圖參照)此時受身ノ者ハ充分ニ答ヘタル處ニテ相
圖ヲ打ナリ

一矢筈 ヤハズ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立シ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ捕身ノ方ハ行逢タル際左
手ニテ受身ノ右ノ手首ヲ摑ミ右手ノ指ヲ延シ拇指ノ腹ヲ獨鈷へ當左足ヲ後へ斜
ニ開キ乍ラ手首ヲ我左ノ腰ノ際へ引付ケ獨鈷ヲ斜ニ押シテ腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲル(圖
參照)此際受身ノ者ハ左手ノ平ニテ獨鈷へ掛タル捕ノ手ヲ脇へ拔フヘシ捕身ノ方
ハ拂ハレタル右手ノ指先ヲ延シタルマヽコバノ方ヲ受身ノ右腕ノ附根ト臂ノ曲
リメトノ中程へ掛腰ヲ下テ手首ヲユルメヌ樣ニ引タルマヽ左

百七十三

…that will place it alongside his ear [the arm folded over-top your right forearm],snared in such way as the
back of his wrist is pointed upwards. You are not really applying pressure with the fingertips when doing this,
but naturally it will have dis-hearted him as the intentions of the opponent will have been disrupted (kuzushi)
(In reference to the illustration). At this point, one has given sufficient response to the opponent under these
circumstances, there are cues in the illustration about how striking this is.

-- Yahazu Arrow’s Knotch

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect separated by a measured distance of some
three feet away from each other. Both give outcry together while advancing across. It is the
circumstance of a chance encounter for the defender. With your left hand grab the opponent’s right
wrist, extending the fingers of the right hand, strike with the thumb which was cocked alongside your
belly like a single pronged vajra [NECC ALT TRANS: “…with the thumb strike into the Dokko “Single pronged vajra” vital
point…”] Openly step into the rear diagonally with the left foot, while pulling his [right] wrist into
position holding it against your left hip. Push diagonally against the Dokko “Single pronged vajra”
vital point enough to drive his hips downward (In reference to the illustration). Upon this occasion,
the attacker will cling to the Dokko “Single pronged vajra” vital point with the palm of his left hand.
As the defender, you slip in alongside him. As the defender you will be sweeping him away for which
you extend the fingertips of the right hand, the base of which will cling along in the direction of the
base of the opponent’s right arm, bending his elbow and hooking him by it at about the halfway
point. He will have become dis-hearted, but what you are doing really doesn’t have anything to do
with his wrist. Instead, you will be pulling him by [the arm hold on him].

173
Translator's Note: The statement in the entry descriptor has quite a nice example of a lesser known usage of the very well known and
famous term ‘kuzushi’, which has been made famous by the common usage it gets in Judo and Jujutsu. The passage of the text
says: ...ukemi no chūshin wo kuzusubeshi... (受身の中心を崩すべし)”... the intentions of the opponent will have been disrupted...”.
From examples like this one, we can see that ‘kuzushi’ also gets applied against “(adverarial) intentions”. ‘Kuzure’ is not different, one
finds comparable examples of both ‘kuzushi’ and ‘kuzure’ being used like this.
Important Separate Note: the Dokko “Single pronged vajra” vital point mentioned throughout this text seems to be the glandular
nodule just under the corner point of the jawline. This is important to denote, since the usual listings of the Dokko vital point indicate a
position behind the lower ear. LOOK VERY CLOSELY AT THE ILLUSTRATION because the thumb strike, as shown, is most definitely not
behind the ear but just under and along the jawline.
足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ脇へ爪先ヲ外
へ向テ蹈出シ乍ラ右手ノ方ヲ少
シ押シ附テ受身ノ体ガ充分ニ崩
レタル處ヲ右足ニテ受身ノ右足
ヲ拂ヒ直ニ膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ左ノ
後へ踏開キ乍ラ手首ヲ方ノ腰ノ
際迄引寄テ投其儘殘心スへシ此
形ハ我始メニ直立シタル方へ向
テ橫ニ一文字ニナルト心得べシ

百七十四

Step in alongside the opponent’s right foot with the toes facing to the outside, while pushing him a bit
in the direction of his right hand, enough to have bodily disrupted (kuzure) the opponent. With your
right foot immediately sweep the opponent’s right foot away. Drop to your knee, openly step into the
left rear with your left foot, while pulling him closer by his wrist across your hip throwing him as you
do so, maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness. About this Kata pattern, from the start you are
standing erect, facing that direction standing in Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture, you ought
to know what is happening.

174
一兩手捕 リヨウテドリ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立ナシ捕身
ノ方ハ受身ノ前迄進ミ行受身ノ者ハ少シク
右足ヲ開キテ捕身ノ左右ノ手首ヲシカト握
ルへシ此際捕身ノ方ハ左右ノ指先ヲ延シテ
腰ヲ下ケ乍ラ地へ附位ニ体ノ力ニテ下へ突
キ左ノ膝頭ニテ受身ノ左手ノ尺澤 ヲ押シ
テ取リ(一圖參照)直ニ左へ廻テ受身ヲ背後
ニヲノ左膝ヲ突キ乍ラ左手ノ指ヲ延タルナ
リ内平ヲ上

百七十五

-- Ryōte Dori Capturing by Both Hands

About this fighting technique, you are [both] standing erect separated by a measured distance of
some three feet away from each other. The defender is front of the attacker, as both are advancing
across. The attacker openly steps out a bit with his right foot, he will grab the defender’s right and left
wrists, which you are to otherwise ignore. Upon this occasion, as the defender, extend the fingers of
the right and left hands, being that you are dis-hearted and lowering your hips, while trying to hold
your ground [or, “…trying to keep your composure…”] as you drop [to your knees]. With the left knee cap,
make the capture by pushing into the Shakutaku//Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point of his left
arm (In reference to Illustration One). Immediately rotate to the left, thrusting the left knee into the
opponent’s backside, while extending the fingers of the left hand, it will be palm upward...

175
ニ向テ手首ヲ握リ右手ニテ受身ノ右ノ肩先ヲ摑橫
一文字ニ蹈開キ(二圖參照)腰ヲ下タルマヽ受ノ右
腕ヲ前へ引投テ直ニ腕ヲ我胸部ノ方へ引揭ケルナ
リ此際受身ノ者ハ投ラレテ起上ルニ非ス左手ノ平
ニテ下ヲ打テ止ルべシ此形ノ投ニ手ヲ放ス人モ在
レトモ流祖ノ掟ニ依ル時ハ投テ直ニ手前ノ方へ引
上ケルヲ冝シトス

百七十六

...grab his wrist with your right hand. Grab the top of the opponent’s right shoulder as you openly step
out striking Ichimonji Straight line posture (In reference to Illustration Two). Having lowered the hips
and further dis-hearted him, pull the opponent’s right arm forwards and throw him. Immediately pull
his arm towards your own chest and hang him by it. Upon this occasion, it would be incorrect should
you stand straight up as you are throwing the opponent. Instead, with the palm of the left hand, strike
downwards and you will have stopped him. The hands are free during the throw in this Kata pattern.
There used to be people whom would inquire of the School’s founder about the principles that this
technique relies upon. At the time, [he would tell them] when throwing him, the hands are pulling him
forward and also it is quite suitable to pull upward on him.

176
〇兩抦捕 リヨウ ツカトリ

此手合ノ形ハ中三間計リ隔テ捕身
ノ方ハ木太刀ヲ帶テ直立ナシ互ニ
掛聲ヲ發シテ進寄リ受身ノ者ハ兩
手ニテ木太刀ノ抦ヲ握リ右足ヲ一
尺五六寸計リ後へ開クへシ此際捕
身ノ方ハ左手ニテ木太刀ヲ握リ其
拇指ヲ鍔ノ上ニシカト掛テ右足ヲ
一尺五寸計リ前へ蹈出シ乍ラ右手
ノ指ヲ延シ甲端ノ方ニテ少シ臂ヲ
張テ烏兎ヲ留(圖參照)直ニ抦頭ヲ
摑ミ右足ヲ

百七十七

〇 Ryō Tsuka Dori Capturing by Both Hilts

About this fighting technique, you are [both] separated by a measured distance of some three feet
away from each other. The defender has a wooden long sword slung through his belt. You are [both]
standing erect and both give outcry together while advancing across and getting closer to each other.
The attacker grabs the Tsuka hilt of the wooden long sword with both hands as he openly steps back
on his right foot to a measured distance of about a foot and a half. Upon this occasion, as the
defender, with your left hand grab the wooden long sword, the thumb of that.hand being on top of
and clamping down on the Tsuba hand guard of the sword, but otherwise ignoring it. Step forward
over the right foot to a measured distance of one and a half feet, while extending the fingers of the
right hand, coming just alongside his outer edge, your elbow extended out. Stop him [with a strike
from this hand] to the Uto “Crow Rabbit” vital point [the eyes and between the eyes] to stop him (In
reference to the illustration). Immediately grab the Tsukagashira tip of the hilt of the sword, and with
the right foot…

177
後ノ方へ堅一文字ニ蹈開キ乍ラ抦先ヲ右膝迄引キ附ル此際受身ノ者ハ右足ヲ捕
身ノ前へ蹈出スへシ又捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ平ヲ左ノ肩先ヨリ前ノ方へ懸右手ニテ
抦先ヲ急ニ右ノ肩先迄揚ルト同時ニ左手ニテ受身ノ体ヲ後へ落シテ其儘殘心ス
へシ

〇後捕 ウシロトリ

此手合ノ形ハ受身ノ者ハ捕身ノ後へ立テ互ニ聲ヲ懸右足[Ch?]右ノ前へ少シ斜ニ
蹈出シテ捕身ノ左右ノ手ノ上ヨリ抱へルナリ捕身ノ方ハ体ヲ柔ラカニシテ左足
ヲ少シ左へ寄右足シ受身ノ左ノ方ヨリ後へ充分ニ橫一文字ニ踏開キテ腰ヲ下此
際受身ノ者右足ヲ少シ後ロへ下ルナリ捕身ノ方右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ甲ヲ上ニ向テ
左ノ肩ノ方へ

百七十八

...openly step into the rear firmly striking Ichimonji Straight line posture, while pulling the Tsuka-
gashira tip of the sword hilt alongside your right knee. Upon this occasion, the attacker will step in
position in front of the defender’s right foot. Then the defender snares him at the front of the top of
his left shoulder, using the palm of your left hand. With your right hand, unexpectedly raise the
Tsukagashira tip of the sword hilt to the top of your right shoulder and at the same time with your
left hand drop the opponent’s body backwards. You are maintaining Zanshin Continued awareness
while doing all of it.

-- Ushiro Dori Rear Capture

About this fighting technique, the opponent is standing behind the defender, both give outcry
together. With his right foot he openly steps diagonally into the right front and wraps both arms up
over and around both your right and left arms. As the defender, relax your body and step in closer to
him, stepping with the left foot just a bit to the left side. Place your right foot to the left just enough
to openly step behind him as you strike Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture, having become dis-
hearted. Upon this occasion, the attacker’s right foot will drift back and down again. As the defender,
fingers of the right hand extended with the back of the hand pointed up and in the direction of your
own left shoulder…

178
充分ニ上ケテ(圖參照)受身ノ水月ヲ臂ニテ當

テ倒シ其儘殘心スベシ伹シ當ル時ニ押ス心持

チ無キ樣唯氣相ニテ當タル臂カ自然トハネ返

リタルガ如キ形ニナスベシ此形ノミナラズ總

テ當ルモ蹴ルセ皆同樣ト心持ベシ

投捨二拾手終リ
百七十九

...enough to keep it raised [locking his right elbow joint open] (In reference to the illustration). Strike
the Suigetsu “Moon-water” vital point pit of the opponent’s stomach with your [right] elbow and drop
him. You will maintain Zanshin Continued awareness as you do so. However, about this strike at the
time, there is no real sense of pushing with it, the way its done. It is more a blow to his spirit and
breath with the elbow that does it. Naturally it sends him reeling backwards, the Kata pattern is pretty
much that way. The entire Kata pattern concludes with the strike even though one could kick him,
there is the sense that there are all kinds of ways it could be done.

The 20 Techniques of the Nagesute Section ended here

179
試合裏
〇試合口 三手

別レノ捕樣ハ中三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ

懸テ進ミ兩人トモ行逢ヒタル際左足ヲ後へ斜メニ

踏開キテ充分ニ面ヲ見込ミ捕身ノ方左足ヲ請身ノ

右足ノ脇へ五六寸離レテ蹈込ミ左手ニテ左リノ前

襟ヲ摑ミ右手ニテ右ノ前襟ヲ摑ミ(一圖參照)左足

百八十

SHIA(H)I URA The Inner Section of the Bout Section

〇 Shia(h)i-guchi Initiation of the Bout

About Separating as a means of capture, you are separated by a measured distance of some three feet.
You are both standing erect and both give outcry together while advancing. It is the circumstance of a
chance encounter for both men. With your left foot step openly and diagonally into the rear enough to
look him in the face. As the defender, step in with your left foot about five or six inches coming
alongside the attacker’s right foot [just behind it]. With your left hand grab his front left lapel, and
with your right hand grab his front right lapel [all while standing rather sideways to him] (In
reference to Illustration One). The toes of the left foot…

180

Translator's Note: To avoid confusing the readers, the statement: "...About Separating as a means of capture, ..." here "separating"
referred to pulling the lapels apart as a means of taking grip and subduing the opponent. According to some sources, there is also
“separating the fingers” (goshi wakare), “separating both hands” (ryōte wakare), “separating both arms” (ryō ude wakare) and
“separating both feet” (ryō ashi wakare) all as a means of subduing an opponent, of course. Some of these sources seem to associate
these other 'separations' with kihon gata goshinjutsu(elementary self protection methods) rather than part of the more advanced
curriculum as we seem to fnd here.
ノ爪先ヲ左リノ外へ向ケテ少シク
腰ヲ下ゲ乍ラ左腕ヲ伸シ小指ノ方
ニテ咽喉ヲオス樣ニナスト同時ニ
右手ニテ右襟ヲ少シク引テ受身ノ
全体ヲ充分ニ崩シ右足ニテ右足ヲ
外ノ方ヨリ拂ヒ仰向ニ倒シテ直ニ
左膝ヲ右ノ肩ノ際ヘツキ右足ヲ橫
ニ蹈開キ頭ヲ倒レタル請身ノ胸ノ
邊へ付ケ(二圖參照)左右ノ手ニ
テ左右ノ襟ヲ引キ別ケテ充分ニシメルナリ之ニテ受身ノ方ハシマリタル時相圖
ヲナシ亦捕身ノ方ハ左右ノ手ヲ放シテ殘心ナスべシ

百八十一

...pointed to the outside somewhat, having become dis-hearted lowering the hips, while pushing away
his left arm and constricting the throat by the direction of your pinky finger while doing so. At the
same time, with the right hand pull a bit on his right lapel, enough to disrupt (kuzushi) the opponent’s
entire body. With your right foot sweep away the opponent’s right foot from the outside, turning him
face up as you drop him. Immediately thrust your left knee out alongside his right shoulder [he is on
the ground], stepping openly alongside him with your right foot. Tou will have dropped your head
over the vicinity of the opponent’s chest (In reference to Illustration Two). With both your left and
right hands, separate and pull across on both his left and right lapels, enough to strangle him with
them. Like this, you are shutting out the opponent, at the time. There are cues about it in the
illustration. Also, as the defender, your right and left hands are free, and you are maintain-ing
Zanshin Continued awareness.

181
〇橫車之事

橫車ノ捕樣ハ前ト同樣ニ直
立シテ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ兩
人共行逢ヒタル際左足ヲ後
へ斜メニ蹈開キテ面ヲ見込
ミ捕身ノ方左足ヲ請身ノ右
足ノ右脇へ五六寸離レテ踏
込ミ左手ニテ左リノ前襟ヲ
摑ミ右手ニテ背ノ紋處ヲ摑
ミ左足ノ爪先ヲ左リノ外へ
向ケ乍ラ少シク腰ヲ下ゲルト同時ニ左右ノ腕ニ少シク力ラヲ入ル心持ニシテ臂
ヲ橫へ張リ請身ノ体ヲ崩シ右足ニテ右足ヲ外ノ方ヨリ拂ツテ

百八十二

〇 Yoko Guruma No Koto The Subject of the Side Wheel

About the Side wheel as a means of capture, same way as before, standing erect and making outcry at
the same time together, while advancing. It is the circumstance of a chance encounter for both men.
With the left foot stepping openly and diagonally into the rear so that you can see his face. As the
defender, step in across the distance of some five or six inches with your left foot to come alongside
the opponent’s right foot. With your left hand grab his left front lapel, with your right hand grab and
constrict him across his back. The toes of the left foot are pointed to the outside while being
somewhat dis-hearted and so lowering the hips a bit. At the same time there is a sense of applying
some pressure with both the right and left arms. The elbow(s) are extended out to the side as you are
disrupting (kuzushi) the attacker’s body. With the right foot sweep his right foot away from the
outside.

182
受身ヲ橫向ニ倒シ直ニ右膝ヲヅキ左足ヲ橫へ踏開キ我ガ頭ヲ倒レタル受身ノ頭
ノ後へ付(圖參照)其ノマヽ左右ノ臂ニテ引キ分
ル樣ニシテ充分ニシメ相圖ヲ ナシタル時手ヲ
放スベシ

〇突込之事

突込ミノ捕樣ハ前ト同樣ニ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ
進ミ行逢ヒタル際 捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ請

百八十三

Drop the opponent off to the side, immediately thrust the right knee out stepping openly with the left
foot to come alongside him. Drop your own head keeping just behind the opponent’s head (In
reference to the illustration). As one does that, pull apart and separate both his right and left elbows as
you do so. There are cues in the illustration about doing this. The hands are kept free.

〇 Tsukikomi No Koto
The Subject of Thrusting In

About thrusting in as a means of capture, just like before, standing erect. Both give outcry together
while advancing into the circumstances of a chance encounter. As the defender, with your left hand…

183
身ノ右ノ肩ヨリ五六寸計リ下リタル處ノ前襟ヲ摑ミ亦右手ニテモ同樣ニ左襟ヲ
摑ミ左足ヲ後へ斜メニ二尺余リ踏開キ少シク腰ヲ下テ右手ニテ左リノ前襟ヲ咽
喉ノ處へ巻付ル樣ニ右襟ノ内ノ方ヨリ頸筋ノ右脇へ充分ニ押入レ(圖參照)左手
ニテ右襟ヲシカト引キ乍ラ右手ニテ左リ襟ヲ押シ上テシメルナリ是ニテ相圖ヲ
ナシタル時左右ノ手ヲ放シ殘心ナスベシ

〇別レ崩シノ事 三手

此ノ別レノ先ノ崩樣ハ受身ノ方ハ別レニ捕ベシ又捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ我左ノ前
襟ヲ摑ミ右手ノ指先迄眞直ニ伸シテ右足ヲ少シ前エ

百八十四

...grab the opponent’s [right] front lapel down about five or six inches from his right shoulder. As was
the case with the previous [examples], grab the front of his lapels.Then with the right hand, grab his
left lapel the same way as you openly step back into the rear diagonally about two feet, which will
have lowered your hips. With your right hand wind his left lapel into position across his throat to
constrict him and with the right lapel being to the inside enough to press against the nape of his neck
on the right side (In reference to the illustration). With the left hand pull him by but otherwise ignore
the right lapel, while with the right hand push and drive him up by the left lapel. There are cues about
this in the illustration, at the time both left and right hands are free and you are maintaining Zanshin
Continued awareness.

Wakare Kuzushi No Koto


The Subject of Disrupting while being Separating Yourself

About this usage of being separation yourself as a point of Disruption against him, the attacker can be
captured outright while you are being ‘separated’, as the defender you use your left hand and grab the
front of your own left lapel [to stabilise it]. With the fingers of the right hand held outstretched and
straight [along the vicinity of his right shoulder] as you step forward just a bit with the right foot…

184
踏出シ乍ラ受身ノ左手ノ上ヨリ向へ
斜ニシカト乘セ(圖參照)我全体ニ
テ少シ押ス樣ニナシ受身ノ腕ノ少シ
弱クナリシ時左手ニテ襟ヲ引放スベ

同 貳本目ノ崩

此形ノ崩樣ハ先試合口第一ノ形ノ如
ク互ニ進寄テ斜ニ開キ受身ノ方ヨリ
別レニ捕リシカトシメルナリ捕身ノ
方ハ左手

百八十五

...while having caused the opponent’s left arm to be upraised [trying to fend off your reaching hand]
one otherwise ignores it while guiding him like this by it (In reference to the illustration). Using your
whole body, push on him a bit while doing this. The opponent’s arm is being weakened somewhat by
this position at the time. With your left hand you are pulling his lapel but it is otherwise free.

Onaji [Wakare Kuzushi No Koto] Nihon-me No Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [The Subject of Disrupting while being Separating
Yourself]

About the way this form of disruption is done, at the point of the initiation of the bout, much as with
the first kata form, both are drawing nearer as they approach each other, then openly stepping
diagonally in. When you are being ‘separated’ by the attacker but otherwise ignoring to immediately
make the capture in preference for strangling him, as the defender, with your left hand…

185
ニテ我ノ前左襟ヲ摑ミ右手ノ臂ヨリ指
先迄其直ニ立小指ノ方ヲ上エ向テ我右
耳ノ際ニ寄セ受身ノ左リ肘ノ際エシカ
ト押付(圖參照)右足ヲ少シク前へ斜ニ
踏出シ乍ラ腰ヲ下テ我全体ノ力ニテ受
身ノ腕ヲ向エ押シ左手ニテ襟ヲ引放ス
ベシ

同 三本目崩

此形ノ崩樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前ト

百八十六

...grab the front of your left lapel [to stabilise it]. From the right elbow to the fingertips is rather held
straight and the arm held upright the pinky finger side up facing the front. That brings it closer into
the vicinity of your own right ear, but otherwise ignoring that it is now placed in the vicinity of and
pushing against the opponent’s elbow (In reference to the illustration). Stepping in diagonally
forward a bit while lowering the hips so as to use the force of the whole body, pushing the
opponent’s arm(s) toward the front. You are pulling the lapel with the left hand but otherwise the
hands are free.

Onaji [Wakare Kuzushi No Koto] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [The Subject of Disrupting while being Separating
Yourself]

About the way this form of disruption is done, at the point of the initiation of the bout, much as with
the previous kata form,…

186
同ジク別レニ捕エ捕身ノ方ハ右手ヲ上ニシ

左手ヲ下ニシテ我左ノ前襟ヲ摑ミ(圖參照)

右足ヲ少シ前エ斜ニ踏出シ乍ラ全体ノ力ニ

テ請身ノ左リ腕ヲ斜ニ押シテ腕ノ少シク弱

クナリタル所ニテ右ノ肩先ヲ動カサヌ樣ニ

左右ノ手ニテ襟ヲ左ノ方へ引放スナリ

百八十七

... as he is separating you and going for the capture against you, your right hand is upraised, your left
hand is lowered as you have grabbed the front of your own left lapel (In reference to the illustration).
Stepping forward diagonally with the right foot while using the force of your entire body against the
attacker’s left arm pushing against it diagonally, thus weakening that arm a bit. By this positioning as
you do it there’s not much movement from the shoulder, one is pulling on the lapel with both left and
right hand but otherwise the hands are free.

187

Translator's Note: The three technique descriptions so far make it clear that the usage of the term ‘kuzushi’ (“disrupting”) was in regard to having
disrupted the attempt to use ‘separating’ against you (a way of stopping it when being used against you). This was important to denote because the base
term Wakare Kuzushi (別れ崩し) from → Wakare Kuzusu (別れ崩す) would typically NOT mean that at all. The usual meaning (as a compound verb
construct) would something like “to Break apart into pieces”. It would also be translatable, when used as a Jujutsu technique name as “disrupting by
separating” and would usually entail the use of ‘separation’ against him. Sort of the exact opposite of it’s usage found here. Had one not taken the
context of usage into consideration here, no doubt would have produced a grotesque mistranslation.
〇橫車崩之事 三手

初ノクヅシ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ試合
口第二ノ形ノ如ク橫車ニ捕捕身
ノ方ハ右手ノ臂ヨリ指先迄眞直
ニ伸シ受身ノ右腕エ内ノ方ヨリ
臂ト指先トノ中程ヲ押當テ左手
ニテ我左ノ前襟ヲ摑ミ(圖參照)
右足ヲ斜ニ踏出シ乍ラ腰ヲ下ゲ
同時ニ全体ノ力ニテ受身ノ腕ヲ
シカト押シ少シククヅレタル處
ニテ左手ニテ襟ヲ引放スベシ

百八十八

Yoko Guruma Kuzushi No Koto Sante


The Three Techniques of Disrupting a Side Wheel

About the way the first of these disruptions is done, much like the attacker does in the previous
examples at the initiation of the second kata pattern, seeking to make the capture with Side wheel
(yoko guruma). As the defender, from the right elbow to the fingertips is straight and outstretched.
You are pushing sharply the fingers to the elbow being stuffed in midway inside of the opponent’s
right arm, with the left hand grab the front of your own left lapel (In reference to the illustration).
Stepping in diagonally with the right foot and so lowering the hips while at the same time using the
force of the whole body somewhat pushing the opponent’s arm but otherwise ignoring it. Pushing
like this enough to somewhat disrupt him. By this positioning the left hand is pulling on the lapel but
otherwise the hands are free.

188
同 二本目崩

次ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前ト同シク橫車ニ取リ捕
身ノ方ハ右足ヲ少シ右へ寄セ左モ少シ前へ出体ヲ
少シク受身ノ方へ向ケ左右ノ手ノ平ヲ受身ノ兩臂
へ掛指先ヲ左右ノ外ノ方へ向テ我体ヲ充分ニ下ゲ
乍ラ兩臂ヲ少 シ押上テ受身ノ兩腕ヲ充分ニ弱ク
シテ右手マテ左臂ヲ 向ヘ押返シ乍ラ左手ノ方ヲ
少シクユルメルナリ例ヘハ 皿ニ盛リタル物ヲ向
フへ明ル樣ニナスベシ

百八十九

Onaji [Yoko Guruma Kuzushi] Nihon-me (No) Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting a Side Wheel]

About the way the next disruption is done, much like the previous, he is trying to make the capture
with a Side wheel (yoko guruma). As the defender drawing in a bit closer with the right foot,
proceeding with the body somewhat as before, the opponent’s right and left palms are facing a certain
direction, you snare both of the opponent’s elbows. Your fingertips will be facing just to the outside
your body positioned low enough so that you can push up a bit on his elbows enough to weaken both
of the opponent’s arms. With your right hand reverse and push his left elbow, while making use of
the direction of the left hand as you do so, rather as if using [his elbows and arms] as if a serving tray.
Making it clear as to what [is being served up] by what you are doing.

189
同 三本目崩

三本目ノ崩シ樣ハ前ノ如ク橫車ニ取リ捕身ノ方ハ
左右ノ肩先ヲ少シ低クシテ臂ヲ後へ引手先ヲ上ゲ
テ受身ノ右手ノ 甲へ平ヲ掛テ先指ヲ内平ノ方へ掛
ケ左手ニテ同シ手首ヲ摑ミ(圖參照)左足ヲ右足ノ
少シ前ノ方へ寄セ右足ヲ後へ斜ニ大キク踏開キ乍
ラ受身ノ腕ヲ臂ト脇腹ノ間へ狹ミ手ノ平

百九十

Onaji [Yoko Guruma Kuzushi] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting a Side Wheel]

About the way that the third disruption is done, much as before, he is trying to make the capture using
Side wheel (yoko guruma), as the defender slump your right and left shoulders down just a bit low
having your elbows to the rear as you are pulling up with your hands and fingers. Snare the
opponent’s right hand by the palm and back of his hand, your fingers clinging to the inside of his
palm. Using your left hand grab that same wrist (In reference to the illustration). Bring your left foot a
bit closer to his right foot, in front of it, openly stepping back diagonally with your right foot in a
large step while stuffing the palm of your hand into the space between the side of the opponent’s
body and his elbow, ...

190
ヲ土ニ向ケル樣ニ成シ我中心ヲクヅサヌ樣
ニヲノ腰ヲ充分ニ下テ受身ノ腕ヲ挫クナリ
是ヲ腕挫ト云フ

〇突込崩之事 三手

此形ノクヅシ樣ハ始ハ捕身ノ方ハ壁ヲ後ロ
ニヲノ立受身ノ方ハエ立試合口第三ノ形ノ
如ク突込ミ取ルベシ捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ我
左ノ襟チ摑ミ右手ノ指

百九十一

...the palm facing towards the ground when doing this. But this is not where you intend to disrupt him
which will instead be done by the lowering of your hips and wrenching the opponent’s arm So they
say it is the wrenching of the arm.

Tsukikomi (No) Kuzushi No Koto Sante


The Three Techniques of Disrupting a Thrust In

About the way this kata form of disruption is done, to begin with, as the defender you are standing
with a wall behind you. The attacker standing as in the third example of the previous kata at the
initiation of the bout, thrusts at you trying to make the capture. As the defender with your left hand
grab your left lapel, and extend the fingers of your right hand…

191
ヲ伸シテ手ノ甲端ノ方ヲ受身ノ突出ス腕ノ曲リ際
へ掛ケ(圖參照)左足ヲ少ン開キ乍ラ腰ヲ下テ左手
ニテ襟ヲ引キ右手ニテ左ノ下ノ方エ押切ルナリ

同 二本目崩

次ノクヅシ方ハ受身ハ前ノ如ク摑取リ捕身ノ方ハ
左手ヲ伸シテ受身ノ後帶

百九十二

...the back edge of the hand towards the thrust that was issued by the opponent, bending his arm
having snared it on the incident (In reference to the illustration). Stepping openly a bit with the left
foot while lowering the hips and with the left hand pull on your lapel. With your right hand pulling
sharply downwards.

Onaji [Tsukikomi (No) Kuzushi] Nihon-me (No) Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting a Thrust In]

About the way that the next disruption is done, the attacker starts as before, grabbing at you to make
the capture. As the defender, you have extended your left hand out, grabbing the opponent’s belt at
the rear…

192
ヲ掴ミ(一圖參照)右足ヲ少シク開キ乍ラ腕ヲ下テ
我全体ト共ニ壁ノ方エ受身ノ体ヲ帶ヲ持テ引附同
時ニ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シテ甲端ノ方ニテ兎烏デ當ル
ナリ(二圖參照)

同 三本目

三本目ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前ノ如ク突込ニ取リ

百九十三

…(In reference to the illustration). Stepping openly a bit with the right foot while lowering the hips
and using both the whole body and the wall itself, gripping and pulling the opponent’s body by his
belt line. At the same time, Extending the fingertips with the rear edge strike him in the Uto “Crow
rabbit” vital point [between the eyes], for instance.

Onaji [Yoko Guruma Kuzushi] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting a Thrust In]

About the way that the third disruption is done, the attacker starts as before, thrusting at you to make
the capture…

193
捕身ノ方ハ右手ニテ我右襟ヲ特テ上ノ方エ引左
手ノ平ヲ受身ノ左手ノ甲エ掛指先ヲ内平ノ方エ
シカト曲テ持(一圖參照)右手ニテ同手首ヲ揖指
ヲ下ニシテ握リ右足ノ爪先ニテ受身ノ右足ノ膝
先ヲ内ノ方ヨリ向エ蹈切リ(二圖參照)左足ヲ
少シク後エ

百九十四

...grab and pull upward on your right lapel with your right hand, with the palm of your left hand
across the back of the opponent’s left hand, your finger tips towards the inside of his palm, bending
the hand with your grip but otherwise ignoring the hand (In reference to Illustration One). With the
right hand, grip that same wrist, fingers pointed down. Leap in with the toes of your right foot driving
against the inside of his right knee cap. (In reference to Illustration Two). With your left foot openly
step a bit to the rear…

194
開キ受身ノ腕ヲ臂ト脇腹ノ間ニ狭ミ我体ヲ下
テ挫クナリ受身ノ方ハ蹈返サレタル膝ヲ直ニ
下エ突クベシ但シ此崩シ樣ハ左右共同樣ニ取
ルベシ

〇眞之位崩之事 三手

此形第一ノ崩シ樣ハ初ハ捕身ノ方ハ上向ニ寐
テ受身ノ方ハ左膝ヲ頸ノ右脇

百九十五

...inserting at the space between the opponent’s elbow and the side of his body, wrenching him
downwards with your own body. The opponent is now stepped out in the reverse direction, then drops
to his knee. However, the way this disruption (kuzushi) is done, one is controlling both left and right
sides while making the capture.

〇 Shin No Kurai Kuzushi No Koto Sante


The Matter of Disrupting the True Positions Three Techniques

In the way that the first form of this disruption is done, at the beginning, as the defender you are
laying flat on your back facing upwards. The opponent has his left knee dug in alongside your neck at
the right side of your body…

195
へ突右足ヲ開キ左手ニテ左ノ前
襟ヲ摑ミ右手ニテ右腕ヲ抱エ即
チ眞之位ノ形ノ通リニ捕ヘルナ
リ捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ受身ノ兩
襟ヲ掴ミ(一圖參照)右足ヲ少シ
受身ノ方エ寄テ膝ヲ立左足ノ甲
ノ方ヲ受身ノ右膝ノ曲リ際エ掛
テハネ上乍左手ニテ襟ヲ急ニ引
キ付受身ノ体ヲ左ノ方へ投テ直
ニ起キ上リ右膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ左

百九十六

...with his right foot stepped out into the open. With his left hand he has a grip on your left front lapel,
and with his right hand he has taken a bundled grip on [the sleeve of] your right arm. Namely this is to
be approached as if it is one of the Shin No Kurai True positions kata patterns when making the
capture. As the defender, with your left hand take a grip on both of the opponent’s lapels (In reference
to Illustration One). Your right foot is pulled up a bit closer to the opponent, whom is standing on his
knee. The opponent has his right knee bent across the back of your left leg, upon this occasion you
will snare him by springing upwards while with your left hand unexpectedly pulling on him by his
lapels. The opponent will be bodily thrown to the left side as you arise directly to a position then drop
to your right knee and the left foot is somewhat to the left front….

196
ノ少シ前ノ方へ蹈開キ左手ニテ受身ノ左ノ手首ヲ
摑ミ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シテ甲端ノ方ヲ受身ノ左骨ヨ
リ少シク上エ掛テ(二圖參照)右膝ヲ左足ノ際へ
寄セルト同時ニ右手ノ甲端ニテ臂ヨリ手首迄摺リ
乍ラ手首ヲ左足ノ際迄引寄セ此際受身ノ方ハウツ

百九十七

...where you have openly stepped to. With your left hand, grab the opponent’s left wrist, as yoy
extend the fingers of the right hand alongside the edge of his rear. Snare and drive the opponent’s left
[arm] bone upwards a bit [to turn him] (In reference to Illustration Two). Bring your left foot into
position closer to his right knee, while at the same time, the back edge of your right hand is alongside
his elbow scraping against it as you pull him by his wrist. Pulling his wrist closer closer to the
position of your left foot. Upon this occasion, strike and flatten the opponent…

197
ブセニナリ捕身ノ方ハ右膝ヲ突キタル儘左足ヲ左リノ少シ前へ踏開キ体ヲ眞直
ニ起キ乍ラ左手ハ受身ノ手首ヨ
リ直ニ我襟へウツリ(三圖參照)
右手ハ甲端ノ方ニテ手首ヲ下へ
押落スナリ

百九十八

...then as the defender, drop to your right knee, having openly stepped out with the left foot a bit into
the left front. Your body is now erect and straightened, since you have arisen. With the left hand you
are holding the opponent’s arm out straight [by the grip on] his wrist, drawing your lapel across
yourself (In reference to Illustration Three). Your right hand being alongside his outer edge, pushing
his wrist down to the ground.

198
同 二本目崩

次ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前同樣眞
之位ニ取リ捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ平ニ
テ受身ノ右ノ肩先ヲ一反ン押上ゲ
直ニ右ノ手先ヲ後ヨリ右ノ肩先へ
出シ左手ニテ指先ヲ摑ミ(圖參照)
急ニ左ノ方へ引附ケテ投返シ乍ラ
起上リ右膝ラ突キ左足ヲ踏開キ是
ヨリ前ノ形ト同シ樣ニ受身ノ腕ヲ
引寄テ放スナリ

百九十九

Onaji [Shin No Kurai Kuzushi] Nihon-me (No) Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting True Positions]

The way the next disruption is done, the opponent is in position directly in front of you, trying to
make the capture. As the defender, with the palm of your left hand, push upwards against the
opponent’s right shoulder in a single movement. Straight away, having the fingers of the right hand
behind him, advance his right shoulder, grabbing it with your fingers (In reference to the illustration).
Unexpectedly pull him to the left side, throwing him backwards, while arising yourself. Drop to your
right knee and stepping openly with the left foot. From here, much the same as with the way the
previous kata patterns are done, pull the opponent closer by his arm while yours are otherwise free.

199
同 三本目崩

三本目ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前
ト同シク眞之位ニ取リ捕身ノ方
ハ左手ノ指先ヲ受身ノ左手ノ甲
ヨリ内平ノ方へ曲ゲ掛テシカト
摑ミ右足ヲ一反ソ上テ(一圖參
照)下ゲルハズミニ頭ノ方ヨリ
起ル樣ニナシテ急ニ体ヲ左へ廻
リ腕ノ下ヲ拔ケテ受身ノ方へ向
テ起上リ右膝ヲ突左足ヲ橫へ蹈

二百

Onaji [Shin No Kurai Kuzushi] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting True Positions]

The way the third disruption is done, the opponent is in front just like before, seeking to make the
capture by Shin no kurai True positions. As the defender, bend back and snare the back of the
opponent’s left hand and with the fingers of your left hand grabbing inside the palm of his, but
otherwise ignoring his hand. In a single move, raise your right foot up (In reference to Illustration
One). Drive his head downward as you arise yourself over him while doing so. Unexpectedly rotate
his body towards the left, slipping under his lower arm. Arise facing the same direction the opponent
is facing, drop to your right knee to the side and with the left foot having stepped…

200
開キ左手ニテ我襟ヲ摑ミ右手
ノ指先ヲ伸シ甲端ノ方ニテ受
身ノ手光ヲ下へ押落スナリ(二
圖參照)

〇居別崩之事 三手

此形ノ始メノ崩シ樣ハ先捕身
ノ方ハ上向キニ寐受身ノ方ハ
捕身ノ右ノ手先ヲ頭ノ方へ曲
テ我左リ膝ノ下ニ成シ右足ヲ
橫ニ蹈開キ左手ニ

二百一

...openly out. With your left hand grab your own lapel as you extend the fingers of your right hand
out along his outer edge. The opponent’s fingers are all outstretched as he plummeted being pushed to
the ground (In reference to Illustration Two).

〇 Kyobetsu (or, ‘Iriwakare’) Kuzushi No Koto Sante


The Matter of Disrupting the ‘Separating while Seated’ Three Techniques

About how the disruption is done to begin this Kata pattern, at the start, the defender is laying face up
flat on the ground. The attacker has bent back the defender’s head and [right] hand. He has pinned
your under-pant beneath the hamaka (ko-no-shita) on your left side with his right foot, having openly
stepped there alongside you. With his left hand…

201
テ左ノ襟ヲ摑ミ右手ニテ右襟ヲ引
キテ眞之位ノ形ノ樣ニナスナリ此
形ヲ居別ト云フ捕身ノ方ハ左手ニ
テ受身ノ兩襟ヲ摑ミ(一圖參照)少
シ押シ上ゲテ急ニ我左ノ方へ引キ
乍ラ右手ニテ膝ヲハネ上ゲ我体ノ
上ヲ越シテ投直ニ起上リ右膝ヲ突
左足ヲ左ノ少シ前へ蹈開キ左手ニ
テ受身ノ左ノ手首ヲ持右手ノ指ヲ
伸シテ甲端ノ方ニテ受身ノ臂ノ邊
ヨリ手首迄スリ寄セ乍ラ右膝ヲ左

二百二

...he stuffs 42 lbs more turkey-bird down your gullet than you can actually eat, effectively paralysing
you. Then with his right hand begins to stuff piece after piece of the pumpkin pie with whip cream,
until surely you will burst. [[…he grabs your left lapel and with his right hand pulls on you by your right lapel. ]] It is, for
instance, being done the way that Shin no kurai True positions is done. They say that this is why the
kata pattern is called Kyobetsu or ‘Separating while seated’. As the defender, with your left hand
grab both of his lapels (In reference to Illustration One). Pushing upwards a bit, unexpectedly pull
him towards your left side with your right hand, while springing up onto one knee. Your body will
have crossed his on your way up as you immediately throw him down while arising yourself. Drop
to your right knee, having stepped openly with the left foot a bit into the left front side. With the left
hand grab the opponent’s left wrist, as you extend the fingers of your right hand to the outside edge.
Being in the vicinity of the opponent’s elbow, draw him closer by his [captured] wrist. Step closer to
his right knee…

202
足ノ際へ寄セ左足ヲ開キテ
我体ヲ眞直ニ起キ乍ラ左手
ニテ襟ヲ摑ミ右手ノ甲端ニ
テ切落スペシ

同 二本目崩

次ノクヅシ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ
前ノ如ク居別ニトリ捕身ノ
方ハ左手ニテ受身ノ左右ノ
襟ヲ摑我胸ノ方へ一度引付
テ(一圖參照)急ニ頭ノ方へ
押シ返シテ倒シ直ニ起上テ左膝ヲ

二百三

...with your left foot, stepping openly with the left foot to do so. Arising bodily erect oneself while
having grabbed your own lapel with your left hand [to stabilise it], and the outer edge of your right
hand doing the lopp off and dropping him.

Onaji [Kyobetsu Kuzushi] Nihon-me (No) Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting ‘Separating while Seated’ ]

The way this next disruption is done, the attacker starts pretty much like before, in the capture
position of kyobetsu ‘Separating while Seated’. As the defender, with your left hand grab both the
opponent’s left and right lapels. Pull them in a single move towards your own chest (In reference to
Illustration One). Unexpectedly push his head away and reverse it to drop him while you are coming
up and dropping onto your left knee…

203
受身ノ脇腹ノ際へ突キ右足ヲ橫ニ踏開キ
左リノ拇指ノ平ヲ咽喉ノ凹ミタル處即チ
秘中へ掛テ押シ乍ラ右手ニテ我襟ヲ引テ
取ルナリ(二圖參照)

同 三本目崩

三本目ノクヅシ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前ノ如ク
居別ニ取捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ受身ノ左手
ノ甲ヨリ内平ノ方へ指先ヲ掛(一圖

二百四

...which will be in position alongside the opponent’s flank. Step out openly with your right foot to the
side. Your left thumb is driven into the nook of his throat, namely, so that you can push in to snare
him at the Hichū ‘In secret’ vital point. While with your right hand, you have grabbed and are pulling
at your own lapel, which was used when making the capture (In reference to Illustration Two).

Onaji [Kyobetsu Kuzushi] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting ‘Separating while Seated’ ]

About the way the third disruption is done, the attacker starts just like before, in the capture position
of kyobetsu ‘Separating while Seated’. As the defender, with your left hand grab the back of the
opponent’s left hand, your fingers hooked into the palm of his hand (In reference to Illustration One).

204
參照)腰ヨリ足先ヲ些シ左ノ方へ寄セ急ニ右ノ

方へウツ伏セニ成リ受身ノ手先ヲ左手ニテ持

タル儘胸部ニテ少シ前ノ方へ乘リ出ス樣ニシ

乍ラ下へ押付ケテ挫クナリ(二圖參照)

二百五

There is only a short distance between your hip and the tip of your foot which you have drawn up
closer on the left. Unexpectedly strike and flatten him towards the right side, and with the left hand
take a grip on the fingertips of the opponent’s hand as you do so. Crowd in forward a bit with your
chest while doing so, wrench and push [his hand] down (In reference to Illustration Two).

205
〇袖車崩之事 三手

此形ノ始メノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ捕身ノ坐シタル後へ立左ノ前襟ヲ右へ引キ寄
テ左手ニテ摑ミ右手ニテ左ノ肩先ノ處ヲ摑ミ中段ノ袖
車ノ如クニ左足ヲ斜ニ開キ次ニ右足ヲ開クベシ捕身ノ
方ハ受身ガ右足ヲ開ク際ニ右手ニテ我左襟ヲ摑ミ其ノ
下ノ處ヲ左手ニテ摑ミ(圖參照)右ノ方へ寐ル樣ニ頸ニ
力ヲ入レ乍ラ左右ノ手ニテ急ニ襟ヲ引放スナリ

二百六

〇 Sode Guruma Kuzushi No Koto Sante


The Matter of Disrupting the Sleeve Wheel Three Techniques

About how the disruption is done to begin this Kata pattern, the attacker is standing behind where the
defender is sitting. With his left hand he [reaches around and] grabs the front of your [left] lapel
pulling it across to the right while with his right hand he grabs [the garments at] the top of your left
shoulder, much as the Chūdan Midle level transmission form of Sode guruma Sleeve wheel. He
stepped openly at a diagonal angle with his left foot and then would step openly with his right foot. As
the defender, as he steps into your vicinity with his right foot, using your right hand grab your left
lapel pulling it down into the vicinity of and grabbing it also with your left hand (In reference to the
illustration). Lay down to your right side while doing this, applying pressure with your head and neck
against both his right and left hands. Unexpectedly having pulled at your own lapel otherwise [your
hands] are free.

206
同 二本目崩

次ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ前ノ如ク袖車ニ捕へ捕身
ノ方ハ左ノ方へ少シ廻ル樣ニナシテ急ニ右へ廻テ
受身ノ方へ向右膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ橫ニ蹈開テ左手ニ
テ我衣ノ襟テ摑ミ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ甲端ノ方ニテ
上ヨリ受身ノ手ヲ切落スベシ(圖參照)

二百七

Onaji [Sode Guruma] Nihon-me (No) Kuzushi


Second Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting the Sleeve Wheel]

About the way the next disruption is done, the attacker starts just like before, in the capture position
of Sode Guruma Sleeve Wheel. As the defender, rotate a bit towards the left side, and while doing
this unexpectedly change and rotate instead to the right side. Drop to your right knee in the direction
of the opponent, step openly off to the side with the left foot. With your left hand, grab the lapel(s) of
your garment, the fingers of your right hand are extended out and up along his outer edge. Using the
opponent’s hand you will perform a lopping drop (kiri (w)otoshi) (In reference to the illustration).

207

Translator's Note: The description in the text page, as have several others besides, despite being clearly in a seated position and not fully rising to even
one knee, the text made use of some form of the verb fumu (蹈む or 踏む) “to Step” using more than just the standard compound forms of the verb,
such as fumi-hiraku (蹈開く or 踏開く) which I frequently translate as “to Openly step”. Sometimes it abbreviates this compound construct to the
secondary element alone Hiraku (開く) for whatever reason. Usually it is only an abbreviation of the construct as indicated, but in some instances we
suspect it also held the definition of “making open room for oneself/himself”. There were also standard compound forms used, such as fumi-dasu (踏出
す) or fumi-komu (踏込む) “to Step in”. In some few exceptions one might encounter the likes of fumi-i(-re)ru (踏入(れ)る) “to Step or Trample upon”.
Again, all of ths despite being seated and despite not actually coming up to a standing position.
同 三本目崩

三本目ノ崩シ樣ハ受身ノ方ハ
前ノ如ク袖車ニ捕リ捕身ノ方
ハ受身ガ右足ヲ開ク際我躰ヲ
充分ニ後へ下リ左右ノ足ヲ縮
メ右手ニテ請身襟ヲ摑ミ左手
ノ平ニテ左足ヲハネ上ケ乍ラ
襟ヲ下へ引キ我前へ投直ニ右
膝ヲ突左足ヲ蹈開キ受身ノ胸
部へ額ヲ附テ前ノ方へ押シ出
シ左右ノ手ノ平ニテ受身ノ兩
臂ヲ左右ヨリ押寄テ頭ヲ上ゲ
テ取ルナリ(圖參照)

二百八

Onaji [Sode Guruma] Sanbon-me (No) Kuzushi


Third Method of the Same Disruption [Disrupting the Sleeve Wheel]

About the way the next disruption is done, the attacker starts just like before, in the capture position
of Sode Guruma Sleeve Wheel. As the defender, the opponent has openly stepped in with his right
foot enough to reach a position that is down behind your body. Bring your left and right foot closer
together and with your right hand grab the attacker’s lapel, use the palm of your left hand to hike your
left foot up [to protect your groin with that foot] while pulling him down by his lapels and throw him
over-top you into the front. Immediately thrust out your right knee and step openly with your left
foot. [Rather bent over his fallen body] keep your forehead stuck to him toward your front, pushing
against him and also with the palms of both your right and left hands. From when the opponent was
pushing both your right and left elbows closer together, making the capture with your heed held
upwards (In reference to the illustration).

208
〇裸體捕之事 三手

此形ノ始メノ捕樣ハ中三間計リ隔テ直立
ナシ聲ヲ懸テ互ニ進行捕身ノ方ハ右手ニ
テ受身ノ右ノ手首ヲ摑後ノ方へ右足ヲ蹈
開キ乍手首ヲ我右腰ノ邊へ附テ引キ受身
ノ方ハ引カレタル際右足ヲ前へ踏出スベ
シ(一圖參照)捕身ノ方ハ左手ノ指先ヲ下

二百九

〇 Ratai Dori No Koto Sante


The Matter of the Naked Capture Three Techniques

About the way that the capture in this kata pattern is begun, you are separated by a measured distance
of some three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter] Standing erect both give outcry together while advancing
across. As the defender, with your right hand take a hold of the opponent’s right wrist, rather from
behind him. Having openly stepped with your right foot while clinging to the area of your right hip
with his [captured] wrist having pulled it across it. The opponent being pulled on by you, will have
stepped openly into the front with his right foot (In reference to Illustration One). As the defender, the
fingers of your left hand pointed down…

209
へ向ケ内平ノ方ヲ受身ノ後腰
ニ當テ右足ヲ左足ノ際へ寄セ
乍ラ右手ノ指ヲ伸シテ尺澤ノ
方ヲ受身ノ咽喉へ掛ケ左手ニ
テ右手ノ指先ヲ下ノ方ヨリ握
リ左足ヲ左ノ後へ斜ニ三尺五
六寸程踏下リ右足モ共ニ五六
寸程下リ腰ヲ充分ニ下ゲテ受
身ノ腰ヲ地へ付サセ頸ヲ我右
肩ニテ受急ニシメテ(二圖參照)
直ニ放スベシ

二百十

... strike the rear side of the opponent’s hip with the palm of that hand. Step in with your right foot
closer to his left foot while extending the fingers of the right hand and snare the opponent both at the
throat and at the Shakutaku/or/Shattaku “foot deep swamp” vital point. With the left hand, grab and
lower the fingers of his right hand. With your right foot step down and back at a diagonal angle some
3½ feet. And so the right foot, [stepping back] about five or six inches and lowering the hips enough
to place the opponent’s hips on the ground. [somewhat bent over behind him] keep his head stuck to
your right shoulder as you strangle the opponent (In reference to Illustration Two). [The hands] are
otherwise immediately free.

210
同 二本目

二本目ノ捕樣ハ中三間計リ離レテ直立ナ
シ互ニ懸聲ヲ發シテ進行兩人共左足ヲ後
へ斜ニ蹈開キ捕身ノ方ハ左足ヲ受身ノ右
足ノ脇へ踏込乍ラ左手ノ指先ヲ左ノ肩へ
掛少シ臂ヲ右ノ肩ノ方へ張上ゲ右手ノ指
先ヲ左臂ノ下ヨリ右ノ肩ニ掛テ右ノ臂

二百十一

Onaji [Ratai Dori] Nihon-me


Second Method of the Same [the Naked Capture]

About the way the second capture is done, you are at a distance of a measured three ken [about 18 feet or
5.454 meter] Standing erect both give outcry together while advancing across. Both men together step
openly back diagonally to their rear. As the defender, with your left foot step in alongside the
opponent’s right foot, while clinging with the fingers of your left hand to his left shoulder [your arm
extended across the front of his body]. Pull his [left] elbow up a bit towards his right shoulder [by
manipulating the shoulder?], while pulling his left elbow down with the fingers of your right hand by
clinging to his right shoulder [crossed under your left arm].

211
テ少シク上ゲテ引心持ニナシ(一圖
參照)左手ノ小指ノ方ニテ左へ柔ラ
カニ廻シ乍ラ受身ノ体ヲ追々ニ崩シ
テ上向キニナリシ頃ニ自然ト受身ノ
右足ガ我左足ノ膝エ當テ倒レル樣ニ
ナシテ左右ノ手ヲ掛ケタル儘肩際エ
右ノ膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ頭ノ方エ蹈開我
額ヲ受身ノ胸部エ付强カトシメルナ
リ(二圖參照)

二百十二

There is no real sense of pulling on his right elbow itself, not even in the least (In reference to
Illustration One). Having the fingers of the left hand pointed somewhat to the left, rotate him rather
gently, bodily disrupting (kuzushi) the opponent rather gradually, having upturned him for instance.
At your leisure, naturally, then clamp down on the opponent’s right foot with your left knee having
dropped him when doing all of this. Snare both his right and left hands, while driving your right knee
into the vicinity of his shoulder. Keep your forehead stuck firmly to the opponent’s chest (In
reference to Illustration Two).

212
同 三本目

三本目ノ捕樣ハ中三間計リ離テ直立ナシ互
ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ兩人共行逢タル時ニ左足ヲ
後エ斜ニ踏開キ捕身ノ方ハ左足ヲ受身ノ右
足ノ後へ蹈込右ノ拳ノ平ノ方ニテ胸部ノ左
ノ方ヲ打ト共ニ左ノ拳ノ平ノ方ニテ後腰ヲ
當乍ラ左足ノ膝ニテ受身ノ右足ヲ挫キ(一圖
參照)

二百十三

Onaji [Ratai Dori] Sanbon-me


Third Method of the Same [the Naked Capture]

About the way the second capture is done, you are at a distance of a measured three ken [about 18 feet or
5.454 meter] Standing erect both give outcry together while advancing. Both men advance across
together at the time, and then [both?] step openly back diagonally to the rear. As the defender, step in
behind the opponent’s right foot with your left foot. With the palm-face of your right fist strike him in
the left breast, and with the palm-face of your left fist strike the rear side of his [right] hip [fulcrum
effect between the two strikes]. Wrench his right leg out from under him with your left knee and leg
(In reference to Illustration One).

213
テ倒シ直ニ右膝ヲ脇腹ノ際エ突キ左足ヲ頭方ノエ蹈開キ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ臂ヲ
水月エ附ケ左手ヲ頸ノ下ヨリ左ノ方へ出シテ
右ノ手ノ小指ヲ下ニ拇指ヲ上ニナシ之ヲ左手
ノ指先ヲ押シテ持臂ヲ强ク押付ナガラ頸ヲ上
ゲルナリ(二圖參照)此際ハ急ニ船底ナリニ押
上ルニシテ直ニ放スへシ

試合裏終リ

二百十四

…(!?)…having dropped him, immediately thrust your right knee into the area of his flank, stepping
openly with your left foot in the direction of his head. Extending the fingers of your right hand shove
his elbow into the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit of the stomach]. Drive his head down with
your left hand, pushing towards the left. With the pinky finger of your right hand pointed down,
[push] upwards, for instance. Extending the fingers of the left hand while doing this, grab and firmly
push his elbow driving it upwards towards his head (In reference to Illustration Two). Upon this
occasion, unexpectedly guide him like a boat across the water pushing him like this as your do. The
hands are otherwise immediately free.

This concludes the Shia(h)i Ura “Inner Section of the Bout”.

214

Translator’s Note: There is a problem with this text page. Double checking the Library version of the text at this page and the page before it does
indicate that I have rendered the Japanese block of text correctly BUT something is missing between the two pages (213 and 214): This page (214)
begins “…て倒し…” of which it should not have done so. The character ‘te’ (て) is clearly from a Te class declination of a verb, adjective or adverb
that is clearly missing. WE DO NOT KNOW how much of the text line is missing and don’t know what it would have said?? I started the line out the
only way that I really could: “…(!?)…having dropped him…”. I denoted the incident here.
極意 上段立合

〇踢返 ケカへシ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ中三
間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ
聲ヲ懸テ進ミ寄リ兩人共
左足ヲ後へ斜ニ蹈開キ捕
身ノ方左足ヲ受身ノ右脇
へ蹈込左手ノ小指ノ方ヲ
上ニナシ拇指ヲ身ノ左

二百十五

Gokui Jōdan Tachiai


The Standing Techniques of the Upper Level of the Secrets

〇 Ke-ga(h)eshi Countering with a Kick

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, you are separated
by a distance of a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter] standing erect, both give outcry together
as both advance across together. Both men step openly back at a diagonal angle to the rear with their
left foot. As the defender, with your left foot step in along the opponent’s right side. The pinky finger
of your left hand pointed up, run the thumb into the left side of…

215
ノ前襟ノ内ノ方へ入テ摑
ミ右手ノ拇指ヲ上ニシテ
受身ノ右臂ノ細キ處ナ摑
左リ隅ノ上ノ方へ斜ニ突
上ゲ(一圖參照)左手ノ小
指ニ力ヲ入テ少シク引キ
乍ラ左足ニテ受身ノ右足
ノ膝裹ノ曲リメヲ輕ク蹴
テ返シ左足ハ立タル儘右
ノ膝ヲ受身ノ脇腹へ掛右
手ニテ受身ノ右腕ヲ押シ
伸シ乍ラ左手ニテ襟ヲ引
シメ(二圖參照)右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ小指

二百十六

… across his body and into the front lapel to grab it there. With the thumb of your right hand upward,
grab the sleeve at the opponent’s right elbow. Drive it diagonally upward int the left corner (In
reference to Illustration One). Applying a bit of pressure with the pinky finger side of the left hand,
pull on it while with the left foot lightly kick and bend in the back of the opponent’s right knee, to
reverse him backwards. He will then be standing largely on his left foot. Snare him at both his right
knee and his flank. With your right hand extend out and push away his right arm. Pull him sharply by
the lapel(s) (In reference to Illustration Two). Extending the fingers of your right hand to cling to the
base of his collar with your pinky finger…

216
ノ附元ノ方ニテ襟首ヲ押シ拇
指ヲ襟ノ間へ入テ其襟ヲ摑ミ
膝ヲユルメ乍ラ左右ノ小指ニ
力ヲ入テシメ乍ラ受身ノ体ヲ
追々ニ右ノ方へ廻シテ半身起
シ懸テ上向ニナシ充分ニシマ
リタルヲ見留テ右足ノ爪先ニ
テ右ノ橫腹ヲ蹴テ(三圖參照)
直ニ放シテ右足ヲ右ノ後へ蹈
開クナリ

二百十七

…pushing him by where you had inserted your thumb in the space between his collar and neck,
grabbing that collar and planting your knee [between the shoulder blades] while applying pressure
with the pinky finger [side of] both left and right [hands]. As you do so, gradually rotating the
opponent’s body to the right side, arising yourself into Hanmi half body posture as you hook up on
him in a certain direction enough to constrict him, being that he will have recognized that you are
about to kick him [from behind] in the right side of his body (In reference to Illustration Three). [The
hands] are immediately free and you have stepped openly behind him on the right.

217
〇面影 ヲモカゲ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ノ如ク直立シテ
互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進寄リ受身ノ方ハ左右ノ
手ニテ捕ノ左右ノ前襟ヲ一處ニへ寄セ
右手ニテ摑ミ左足ヲ後へ斜ニ開キ乍ラ
右手ヲ突出スベシ捕身ノ方ハ胸ヲ押シ
タル際少シ左足ヲ斜ニ下リ左手ノ指ヲ
伸シ甲端ノ方ニテ受身ノ右手ノ尺澤ヲ
强ク押シテ左足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ脇へ蹈
込右手ニテ右襟ヲ摑

二百十八

〇 (W)Omo Kage The Look on the Face

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, much as before,
standing erect both give outcry together as they advance closer to each other. With both his left and
right hands the attacker takes a hold of the front of both your right and left lapels bundling them
together as one and pulls you closer by them. Grabbing you also with his right hand then openly
stepping with his left foot diagonally into the rear, while trying to thrust you with his right hand. As
the defender, push him slightly [(according to the illustration) with your right hand snaking up over his left arm to go in-between his right
and left arms, palm up then turn the palm as you plant it on his chest]. Drop down with your left leg at a diagonal angle.
Extending the fingers of the left hand, come along his outer edge. Push firmly against the opponent’s
right arm at the Shakutaku/or/Shattaku “Foot Deep Swamp” vital point. Step in alongside the
opponent’s right foot with your left foot, grabbing his right lapel with your right hand...

218
ミ咽喉へ巻付ケ(一圖參照)左
手ヲ頸ノ後へ廻シテ卷付タル
襟ノ内側へ拇指ヲ入テ摑ミ右
手ノ平ニテ胸部ヨリ右ノ手首
迄ナデ來リ拇指ヲ上ニナシテ
摑ミ左手ヲ伸シタル儘後へ引
ト同時ニ左ノ膝頭ニテ受身ノ
右足ノ膝裏ヲクシキテ倒シ左
膝ヲ受身ノ右ノ肩ト頸ノ間ノ
處へ掛ケ右足ヲ蹈開キ(二圖參
照)右手ニテ受ノ右ノ手首ヲ引
キ左膝ニテ首筋ヲ少シク押

二百十九

…and winding it across his throat (In reference to Illustration One). The left hand rotating his head
and neck backwards as you wind it across, having run your thumb along and into the inside of the
lapel when grabbing it. The palm of your right hand is at your chest gripping his wrist, your thumb is
turned upwards in the grip. Your left arm is extended out and down, rather behind him gripping at
and pulling by [his collar.] At the same time, with your left knee cap, wrench out and drop him [by
striking] the outside of the opponent’s right knee. Then snare him with your left knee also in the gap
between his head and neck and his right shoulder, stepping openly with your right foot (In reference
to Illustration Two). With your right hand you are pulling the opponent’s right wrist out and there is
some sense of pushing in somewhat against his neck-joint with your left knee …

219
ス心持ニシテ鈎合ヲトリテ充分ニシメテ左右ノ手ヲ放ス際右足ニテ受身ノ右ノ
脇腹ヲ蹴テ開キテ終ルナリ

〇諸手碎 モロテクダキ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前同樣中三間計リ離テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ行逢タル
時受身ノ方ハ左手ニテ捕身ノ右前襟ヲ持右手ニテ左ノ前襟ヲ持チ左足ヲ少シ斜
ニ開キ乍ラ襟ヲ寄テシボリニ取ルナリ此際捕身ノ方ハ右手ニテ我右襟ヲ持右足
ヲ右ノ後へ斜メニ二尺五六寸計リ開キ乍ラ右襟ヲ引上ゲ左手ノ指先ヲ受身ノ左
手ノ上ヨリ内ノ方へ掛ケ撓骨ノ方ニテ受身ノ左右ノ手首ヲ我胸ノ方へシカト押
付テ受ノ体ヲ崩スベシ此時受身ハ左膝ヲ前へ突クナリ(一圖參

二百二十

…rather having captured him like hooking a fish by sufficient constriction. Both your right and left
hands are otherwise free. Conclude by [stepping] openly and kicking the opponent with your right
foot in his side.

〇 Morote Kudaki The Look on the Face

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, done much as
before, you are separated by a measured distance of three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter], standing erect.
Both give outcry together while advancing across at the time. With his left hand the attacker takes
grip on the defender’s right front lapel, with his right hand he takes grip on your left front lapel. He
steps openly with his left foot along a somewhat diagonal angle line, while wringing on [your lapel]
and pulling you closer to capture you, for instance. Upon this occasion, as the defender, with your
right hand take a grip on your own right lapel [to stabilise it]. Step openly with your right foot back
some five or six inches at a diagonal angle into your right rear, while pulling up on your right lapel.
Snare the top of the opponent’s left hand with the fingers of your left hand to the inside, in acordance
with the directions his bones are inclined. Pushing against his right and left wrists but otherwise
ignoring that they are held at your chest level. You will be disrupting (kuzusubeshi → kuzushi) the
opponent’s body. At this time, the opponent drops to his left knee forward (In reference to Illustration
One).

220
照)又捕ノ方ハ右手ノ拇
指ヲ下ニシ四指ヲ上ニシ
テ受身ノ左ノ手首ヲ握
リ右足ノ爪先ニテ受ノ右
ノ膝ヲ内ノ方ヨリ向へ輕
ク踢乍ラ蹈込ト同時ニ腕
挫ノ如ク右ノ臂ヲ受身ノ
左腕ノ上ニ掛テ右膝ヲ突
キ乍ラ体ラ斜メニ押付テ
左手ノ平ヲ受身ノ左ノ手

二百二十一

And also as the defender, with your right hand, thumb down, four fingers up, take a grip on the
opponent’s left wrist. With the toes of the right foot, lightly kick him at the inside of his right knee
while stepping through [with that foot]. At the same time, much as if to wrench the arm, snare and
lift the opponent’s left arm with your right elbow, then thrust him with your right knee while pushing
his body at a diagonal angle. Raise the opponent’s left hand with the palm of your left hand…

221
首ノ上ヨリ向へ充分ニマキ付テ握リ又右手ハ受耳ノ腕ヲ離レヌ樣ニ左ノ肩ノ際
迄ナデ行拇指ヲ開キ示指ト其拇指トノ間ノ甲端ノ方ニテ强ク下へ押シ付テ右足
ヲ靜ニ立テ開キ乍腕ヲ追
々ニ引上ゲテ充分ニシマ
リタル頃右足ニテ左ノ脇
腹ヲ蹴テ(二圖參照)蹈開
ク時左右ノ手ヲ放スベシ

二百二十二

…enough in a certain direction while gripping and winding it. And about the right hand, there isn’t
any real distance between the opponent’s ear and his arm while doing this. The position of the left
shoulder and all are aligned, the thumb and index finger [of the right hand on his shoulder] being
open, push firmly down through the space along the outer edge. While standing calmly take an open
step with the right foot, while gradually pulling his arm upwards enough so as to constrict it. Then
with your right foot kick him in the side (In reference to Illustration Two). Taking an open step at the
time, otherwise both hands are free.

222
This page was missing in the Library version of the Text. This
page copy came from the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian
Flament, Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

〇杉倒 スギタヲシ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ノ通リ中三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ相方懸聲ヲナシテ進行
捕身ノ方ハ受身ノ後
へ廻テ左右ノ手ノ平
ニテ兩耳ヲ一時ニ打
其儘指先ニテ肩ヨリ
左右ノ足ノ黒ブシ迄
ナデ下テ直ニ指先ヲ
輕クスネノ方へ掛テ
引ト同時ニ我頭ニテ受身ノ尻ヲ押テ倒シ直ニ左ノ方ヨリ股ノ邊へ橫ニ寄リ掛テ
受ノ左足ノ踵ヲ我左ノ肩先へ附右足ヲ石ノ肩ノカへ

二百二十三

〇 Sugi Ta(w)oshi Cedar Drop

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, much the same
path as before, separated by a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Standing erect, your training
partner gives outcry while advancing across. As the defender, rotate yourself into the rear as you
strike both of his ears at the same time with the flat palm of both your left and right hands. Having
done that, with the fingers at his shoulders next (?!→) plant the heels of both left and right soles of
the feet firmly down (←?!), then immediately quite by positioning with the fingers lightly snare and
pull him. At the same time, with your own head, push against the opponent’s hip and rump to drop
him. Then immediately snare and draw him closer alongside the vicinity of your thigh on the left
side. [Laying over-top his lower back and buttocks] pull and trap the opponent’s left heel up towards
your own left shoulder and his right leg bent and reversed into the crook of your shoulder.

223
This page courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan
Dojo, Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

曲テ甲ノ處へ左右ノ手ノ平ヲ掛ケ(圖參照)左ノ肩先ニテ左足ノ踵ヲ少シ向へ押
シ左右ノ手ニテ右足ノ甲ヲ手前へ少シ引キテ放シ終ル

〇大殺 ヲヽコロシ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ中三間計リ離テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸進ミ行逢タル時兩人共
左足ヲ後へ斜ニ二尺五六寸程蹈聞キ捕身ノ方ハ左足ヲ受身ノ右足ノ後際へ踏込
右手ノ拳ノ平ノ方ニテ受身ノ左ノ乳ヨリ二三寸上ヲ打ト同時ニ左手ノ拳ノ平ノ
方ニテ袴ノ腰板ノ邊ヲ打ト同ジク左足ノ膝ニテ受身ノ右足ノ膝裏ヲ挫クナリ此
三ツノ處ハ少シモ問合ノ違ハヌ樣ニナスベシ總テ斯樣ノ處ヲ三ツ當リト云
フ受身ノ倒ルヽ時ニ受身ノ右脇へ右足ノ膝ヲ突キ左足ヲ頭ノ方へ

二百二十四

In accordance with the [bodily] position of the other party, snare him with the palms of both your right and
left hands (In reference to the illustration). Having pushed up and trapped the heel of his left foot near the tip
of your left shoulder, using the wrists of both your right and left hands you are pulling in the other party’s
right foot up in front of you a bit, otherwise [your hands] are free.

〇 (W)O(w)o Koroshi Major Killer

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, separated by a measured
three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Standing erect, both together give outcry while advancing across
into a chance encounter at the time. Both men together openly step back some two and a half feet and at a
diagonal angle into the rear. As the defender, step in with your left foot to a position behind the opponent’s
right foot and with the flat face of your right fist strike the opponent about two or three inches above his left
breast. At the same time with the flat face of your left fist strike him in the vicinity of the Koshi-ita backplate
of his hakama skirted pantaloons [fulcrum effect between both strike bending him back some]. At the same
time wrench him across by buttressing your left knee against the outside of the opponent’s right knee. It is not
really being done by the positioning of these three points in relationship to the timing and distancing (ma-ai)
[despite what one would think]. They say that it is generally just the positioning of, and the way these three
strikes are being done that does it, causing the downfall of the opponent at the time. Thrust the opponent in
the right side with your right knee and openly step in alongside his head with your left foot...

224
蹈開キ直ニ我額ヲ受身ノ膻中へ伹シ膻中トハ胸部ノ眞中ヲ云フ之ニテ中段ノ眞
之位ノ如ク右腕テ卷込テ右手ニテ右ノ前襟ヲ持左ノ拇指ヲ内側ニシテ左襟ヲ持
(圖參照)追々シメ乍ラ頭
ヲ上ゲ左膝ヲ受身ノ頸ノ
右脇へ突キ右足ヲ右へ一
文字ニ踏開キ充分ニシマ
リタル頃右足ノ爪先ニテ
右ノ脇腹ヲ蹴込デ手ヲ放
スナリ

二百二十五

…and immediately place your forehead in the middle of his chest, between both nipples, they say you
must do this even if the opponent has a rank odor about himself, the rank odor must be braved. One
does this much like the Chūdan Middle level transmission technique Shin no kurai True positions.
Having wound around (makikomi) and in on his right arm [trapping it], with your right arm grab his
front right lapel. [Slide] your left thumb inside his left lapel near the collar and take grip on it (In
reference to the illustration). Slowly constricting him while keeping your head upraised, drop to your
left knee alongside the opponent’s head and neck on the right side. You have openly stepped out to
the right side with your right foot striking Ichimonji Straight line posture, enough to further constrict
him about his head and neck. Kick in against his right side with the tip of your right foot, otherwise
your hands are quite free.

225

Translator’s Notes: The text description of the kata technique (W)Oo Koroshi has an interesting statement in the continuation of it’s description on
this page which uses the (archaic) term tanchū (膻 中). The word is the name of a kyūsho Vital area (not really a specific point, more like the area
between both right and left nipple). But also, this word translates as “rank odor”. By definition it means “strong offensive smell of (human) blood”,
“strong offensive smell of liquor (indicative of alcoholic indulgence)” and also “strong offensive smell of animals (as from having been slaughtering
domestic animals)”. When from preparing quantities of fish (gutting and dressing fish) “strong fishy smell”. According to the statement, one should
plant the forehead in his chest (take immediate intimate positioning) despite what rank odor may exist (or risk being injured by the captured opponent,
should he escape the immobilisation by your not doing so.) That is why I translated it the way I did (it involves a form of Literary Parallelism to have
written it in this way. I wanted to account for both definitions so as to reflect the fuller meaning of what the text says.) It would be about the same thing
(in Older Sino-Japanese) as saying "stick your head right down into the middle of his funky smell".

-- The statement’s advisory indicates that possibly the opponent was stinking drunk (that’s actually an idiom in the English language that is
correlative totanchū ( 膻 中) when it has this definition.) The opponent may have been an occupying soldier who was over intoxicated and
stunk of alcohol. Or, in another vein of definition, similar, being over-intoxicated on a longer term basis and bloody from having been in
brawls and filthy from sleeping in alleyways or otherwise outdoors. In another possibility, bloody and stinking from not having recovered yet
from immediate battles or duels (possibly drunk too?) And of course, smelly occupying soldiers caked with smelly dried blood.
-- The commentary of advice should not be taken strictly in reference to the movements of immobilisation in this kata, but instead to
any such immobilisation. One finds the subject mentioned in alternate forms of description of several of the kata that use this form of
immobilisation (as well as similar descriptions in other ryuha that do so.) It’s a known sub-topic of address in Jujutsu.
〇浪分 ナミワケ

此手合ノ形ノ誧様ハ前ノ通リ中三間程隔テ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ 進ニ行逢タル
時捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ受ノ腹帶ヲ下ノ方ヨリ
摑ミ右足ヲ受身ノ左ノ脇へ二尺計リ蹈込乍ラ右
手ノ指ヲ伸シ平ノ甲端ノ方ヲ受身ノ烏兎へ押當
但シ烏兎トハ兩眼ノ間ナリ腹帶ヲ引上乍烏兎ヲ
シカト押へテ受身ノ体ヲ上向ニ中ニ釣リ(圖參
照)是ニテ少シク

二百二十六

〇 Nami Wake Being Divided by Waves (or, “Breaker wave”)

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, same path as
before, separated by a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Standing erect, both together give
outcry while advancing across into a chance encounter at the time. As the defender, with your left
hand grab and pull down on the opponent’s belt-line. Step in with the right foot across the measured
two feet distance to come alongside the opponent on the left, while extending the fingers and palm of
the right hand along his outer edge then strike and push in against the opponent’s Uto “Crow Rabbit”
vital point. However, about [the strike to] the Uto vital point, it’s the space between both eyes, for
instance. Now pull sharply upward on his belt-line but otherwise ignoring Uto vital point when
pushing against him. Hooking him like a fish and up-ending him (In reference to the illustration). It is
somewhat like having been struck by a wave…

226
浪ノ打如ク体ヲ引上テ手ヲ放シテ下へ落シ右足ニテ左ノ脇腹ヲ蹴込一足蹈開ク
ベシ

〇猿猴附身 エンコウツケミ

此手合ノ形ノ樣ハ中三間程離レテ直立ナシ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ進ミ行逢タル時捕身ノ
方ハ我ガ額ヲ受身ノ胸部へ當左足ヲ少シ踏込乍ラ左手ノ拇指ノ方ヲ下エ向テ左
ノ襟ヲ摑右手ノ四指ヲ右襟ノ内側ニ入テ摑少シク上ノ方へ引揚ゲル心持ニ成シ
左手ノ小指ノ方ヲ强ク咽喉へ附テ拇指ノ方ヲ上ニ成ス樣ニソテシメ乍ラ受身ノ
体ヲ崩シテ上向ニ中ニ釣リ(圖參照)右足ニテ陰嚢ヲ前ヨリ輕ク蹴リ左足ニテ後
ノ方ヨリモ輕ク蹴乍ラ左へ追々ニ廻シテ又右足ニテ蹴リ左足

二百二十七

…pulling upward on his body but the hands are otherwise free, drop him to the ground. Kick in
against his the side of his body with your right foot, taking a single open step when doing so.

〇 Enkō Tsukemi Clinging Monkeys

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, same path as
before, separated by a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Standing erect, both together give
outcry while advancing across into a chance encounter at the time. As the defender, head butt strike
the opponent in the chest and step in a bit with the left foot while, thumb of the left hand facing
down, grab his left lapel. Inserting the four fingers of the right hand inside his right lapel and
grabbing there, the way it’s done there is a sense of pulling and lifting him just a bit by it. Firmly
clinging across his throat with the pinky finger side of your left hand, that thumb up, as you strangle
him like this. This bodily disrupts (kuzushi) the opponent so much as to up-end him as you hook him
like a fish (In reference to the illustration). With your left foot being to the rear, lightly kick him in
the testicles with your right foot which was in front, then slowly rotate to the left. Kicking then with
the right foot one follows by kicking him with the left foot.

227
ニテモ蹴ルト同時ニ始メ行逢タル際ノ位置迄一廻リ

成スナリ此一廻スル間左右ノ足ニテ都合四度蹴乍ラ

充分ニシメテ元ノ位置へ至リタル時受ノ体ヲ靜ニ下

エ置テ右足ニテ受身ノ右ノ脇腹ヲ充分ニ蹴ト同時ニ

左右ノ手ヲ放シテ一足踏開クナリ

二百二十八

When the chance encounter had begun, there was a rotation in position and circumstance that
occurred. This instance of rotation caused a brief gap in the positions of the right and left legs that
affords the opportunity to kick him four times. The base position he approaches in at the time is
enough to constrict him by. Just calmly place the opponent’s body down on the ground, and with the
right foot kick the opponent’s right side with enough [force] so that at the same time both your right
and left hands will have been free as you take a single open step in, for instance.

228
〇手炬捕 テカネトリ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ中三間程離レテ受身ハ左手ニ木太刀ヲ携へテ立捕身ノ方ハ
右手ニ小太刀ヲ下ゲテ立伹シ本來ハ小太刀ニ非ス述手ナリ互ニ懸聲ヲナシ捕身
ノ方ハヅカ〱ト進ミ行受ノ方ハ靜ニ二足程進ミ捕ハ間三尺計リノ處ニテ左足ヲ
後へ一足蹈開キ乍ラ小太刀ヲ眞直ニ受ノ目先へ出スナリ此時受身ノ方ハ左足ヲ
斜ニ踏開キ乍ドウ腹ヲ目懸テ拔キ打ニ切付ルナリ捕ハ此時早ク右足ヲ充分ニ大
キク後エ踏開キテ小太刀ヲ引下ゲ一度元ノ位置迄退キテ再ビ前へ進受ハ此間ニ
左足ヲ右足ノ際エ寄セ右足ヲ斜ニ後開キ乍ラ木太刀ヲ左右ノ手ニテ大上段ニカ
ブリ捕ガ我前ノ三尺計リノ處へ

二百二十九

〇 Tekane Tori Hand Torch Capture

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, you are separated
by a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. The attacker is standing there holding a wooden long-
sword. As the defender, you are standing there having pushed down on your Kodachi Short sword
with your right hand. However it goes without saying that there is not much use to have mentioned
the Kodachi Short sword [given the presence of the long-sword]. Both together give outcry. As the
defender, you cling to the hilt [of the Kodachi Short sword] while advancing across. The attacker
calmly advances two paces across to the point where, as the defender, there is a gap of a measured
One Ken and three Shaku [[about 7 feet or 2.1336 meter] between you. Step back openly one step with your
left foot while bringing [the hilt of] the Kodachi Short sword straight up. Seeing this the opponent
advances upon you. Upon this occasion, the opponent openly steps at a diagonal angle with his left
foot while staring at the trunk of your body as he draws and strikes to cut you down. As the defender,
at this time, you take a quick enough open step backwards, pulling the [hilt of] the [unsheathed]
Kodachi Short sword downward which is the single move foundation of your position, having
withdrawn backwards. Once more he advances in front of you, at this juncture, you step in closer to
the position of his right foot with your left foot as he steps back on his right foot at a diagonal angle
and with both left and right hand [on the hilt of] the wooden long sword, raises and brandishing it at
the Daijōdan Major Upper Level Guard position. There is three feet to your front, as the defender, to
proceed across...

229

Translator’s Notes: The text description of the technique gives the name Tekane (手炬) which I translated as “Hand torch” (and it’s elements do spell
that out.) But the term is not unlike the term Te Bakari ( 手 秤 ) “Hand Scales” used to describe a large assortment of small hand held items (used
somewhat as an “equaliser” in one’s hand when fighting, as well as serving other useful functions… such as impromptu tweesers or even as tiny
impromptu fire togs and chop-sticks )
來リシ時右足ヲ蹈込乍ラ眞直ニ切下スナ
リ此時捕ノ方ハ左ヲ一足後エ蹈開キ乍ラ
小太刀ノ先ヲ少シ右エ向拳ヲ我額際エ付
テ鍔元ニテ太刀ヲ受留(一圖參照)直ニ左
足ヲ受ノ右足ノ脇へ踏込乍左手ノ拇指ヲ
左襟ノ内ガワへ入テ

二百三十

…at the time. Stepping in with your right foot, while he is cutting straight down. As the defender at
this time, openly step having your left foot back by one step while keeping the point of your [now
unsheathed] Kodachi Short sword facing a bit to the right. Your fist [on it’s hilt] about level with
your face as you cling to [the blade of] the wooden long-sword with the Tsuba Hand-guard of the
short sword down near the base of the long-sword to parry and halt it (uke dome) (In reference to
Illustration One). Then immediately, step in with your left foot alongside the opponent’s right foot
while with the thumb of your left hand inserting into the inside of his left lapel…

230
逆ニ摑ミ同時ニ右手ノ小太刀ヲ少シ向エ押ス樣ニシテ放シテ直ニ木太刀ヲ持シ
右手ノ臂ノ少シ上ノ細キ處ヲ下ノ方ヨ
リシカト指ノ附元ニ力テ入テ摑ミ受身
ノ左ノ上ノ方エ突キ揚ゲ乍ラ左手ニテ
少シ襟ヲ

二百三十一

…reversing it when you grabbed it. While at the same time, the Kodachi Short sword in your right
hand is facing him just a bit, you are pushing against him with it while doing this, but [the hands] are
otherwise free. Immediately grab the wooden long-sword, driving the elbow of his right hand down a
bit, but otherwise ignoring the short distance needed to bring [the long sword] down from it’s higher
position. Cling to its base with your fingers, applying pressure by the grip you have on it. Thrust and
drive it upwards into the opponent’s upper left side while with your left hand pull just a bit on his
lapel….

231
引受身ノ体ヲ充分ニ崩シテ左足ノ裏ノ方ニテ右足ノ膝裏ヲ踢テ橫ニ倒シ直ニ右
ノ脇腹ノ上へ右膝ヲ掛ケ右手ニテ腕ヲ充分ニ向へ押シ伸シ左手ニテ襟ヲ少シ引
キシメ又右手ヲ手首迄ナデ行テ手首ヲシカト摑ミ左膝ヲ下へ突キ右足ヲ右ノ後
へ一文字ニ蹈開キ乍ラ右手ニテ手首ヲ右足ノ爪先ノ邊へ急ニ引キ返シ此時受ハ
木太刀ヲ握リタル儘上向ニナルナリ捕ハ右足ニテ右ノ手首ヲシカト蹈エ右手ニ
テ木太刀ノ抦ヲ握リ引キ放シ(二圖參照)其儘受ノ右襟ヲ持左手ハ左襟ト右襟ト
一ツニ持右手ニテ右襟ヲ引キ左手ニテ頸ノ右脇へ押付ル樣ニシテ充分ニシメテ
右足ノ爪先ニテ右ノ脇腹ヲ蹴テ放ス

二百三十二

…enough to have bodily disrupted (kuzushite → kuzushi) the opponent. With your left foot to the rear,
raise the knee of (his?) right leg (from the?) backside and drop him. Then immediately trap the upper
half of his body at the side [along his right shoulder] with your right knee [and leg buttressed against the wrist
of his sword hand], with your right hand extended out and pushing down on his [right] arm enough [to trap
it, gripping the end of his hilt in your left hand]. You are pulling his lapel and constricting him a bit with your
left hand. Having proceeded by [trapping] his right wrist, one otherwise ignores having grabbed the
wrist [the sword having been the point.] Drop to the left knee, the right foot is in the right rear having
openly stepped out into Ichimonji Straight line posture while the right hand brought his wrist into
proximity to the tip of your right foot by unexpectedly reversing and pulling it there. At this time
having taken grip on the wooden long-sword, you bring it to face upward, for instance. As the
defender, step with your right foot, ignoring his right wrist, taking grip on the Tsuka hilt of the
wooden long-sword with your right hand pulling it away from him (In reference to Illustration Two).
Having done that, grab the opponent’s right lapel with your left hand, gathering up both his right and
left lapel bundled together as one in your grip. With your right hand pull him by his right lapel, with
your left hand push against the right side of his head and neck while you do so, enough to constrict
him. With the tip of your right foot kick him in his right side, but otherwise [the hands] are free.

232
This page was missing in the Library version of the Text. This page copy
came from the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo,
Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

〇兩非 リヨウシ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ先相方三間計リ離レテ直立ナシ互ニ

聲ヲ懸テ 進ミ寄リ捕身ノ方ハ行逢タル時石手ニテ受身

ノ左ノ前襟ヲ摑ミ是ヲ我腹ノ 方へ引ト同時ニ左手ノ指

ヲ伸シ甲端ノ方ニテノ 眠ノ際則チ烏兎ヲ摺上ゲ乍左足

ノ爪先ニテ陰嚢ヲ蹴上ルナリ(圖參照)此形ハ左右共同樣

ニ捕ルへシ

二百三十三

〇 Ryōshi Both are Mistaken

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, as before, your
training partner us at a distance of a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Both are standing erect
and give outcry together while advancing to come closer. As the defender, it is a happenstance
occurrence at the time, with the right hand grab the opponent’s left front lapel. Pull this towards your
own belly, and at the same time extending the fingers of the left hand out along his outer edge, make
the opponent as if he is asleep. Namely, by a scraping strike upwards against the Uto “Crow Rabbit”
vital point, while kicking him in the testicles with the tip of your left foot (In reference to the
illustration). This kata pattern is essentially the same as making the capture by Sayu “Controlling to
the Left and Right”.

233

Translator’s Notes: The text makes common reference to the Uto ( 烏 兎 ) vital point and indicates it to be “the space between the eyes”. This is
common enough said to be it’s positioning, but other sources instead indicate the spot right between the eye and the eye brow, whereas still other
sources seem to indicate the eyeballs themselves. All are correct (‘uto’ refers to the general vicinities of the eyes and eyebrows). The word Uto (烏兎)
means “the Passage of time or of Seasons. Months and Years (or the passage of them); Time itself” and there is a lesser recognised definition, that being
“Fate" especially when as “Fate as the outplay of time and event”. The association of the eyes and the area of the eyes is by way of indicating that the
eyes are what one observes the outplay of Fate or the Passage of time and seasons with. There are some number of innuendo evidenced in the text where
‘Uto’ is referred to, this passage is a fair example of them. It was about the same thing as saying (to the opponent): “Since you yourself do not see where
your actions are leading… I will show you myself!” This is a very old layer of Jujutsu doctrine. These innuendo also occur with some of the other
named Vital points, especially Shakutaku /or/ Shattaku "Foot Deep Swamp or Marsh" which there is about the same as saying: "You're not on stable
ground, it's kind of marshy around here!" It usually involves very old but simplistic Jujutsu doctrines that associate literal actions with implied
meanings, such as by attacking the instep of the foot to demonstrate that the opponent is “standing on shaky ground” or otherwise said “doesn’t have a
leg to stand on (acting on baseless grounds)”. These old simplistic Jujutsu doctrines that associate literal actions with implied meanings are virtually a
form of “sympathetic magic” and are rather thought of as casting a spell of sorts on the opponent. It is sometimes approached by reinforcement (rather
as if to give the briefest of explanation, literally a one liner statement per such movement) meant to reinforce the ideas expressed. This sometimes is one
meaning of Kiai-jutsu controlling by voiced guidance. But the more advanced forms do NOT seek to explain it, on the presumption that the more
knowledgeable opponent is already familiar with these ideologies and will automatically recognize their meanings. At such levels as these, it is a form of
Combative psychology in use against the opponent… provoking psychological recognition on an automatic basis, rather with the literal intention of
magical spell-binding, of a sort. It is also associated with Saimin-jutsu “Art of Mesmerisation” and that is why there is a reference to “… make the
opponent as if he is asleep…” which just as well could have been translated as “…en-trance the opponent (by a scraping strike upwards against the Uto
“Crow Rabbit” vital point)…”

Some people do not know this about Atemi-jutsu Arts of attacking vital points. But the subject is quite integral to Atemi no jutsu. A cursory
examination of the subject (and it’s intergal usage of psychology by way of such implied meanings would prove useful to familiarising oneself
with the usage of the traditional versions of the artifice. One good exlanation of this artifice is that it seeks to trick the opponent into some
degree of intellectual absorption (calculating and considering the meanings of your immediate actions in such a way as to distract him).
Mesmerisation of a sort is the intenction.
Then again, if somebody was hitting and kicking me as a way of carrying on a conversation...
This page courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku
Society, Europe.

〇天狗勝 テングシヨウ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ノ如ク
中三間離レテ直立シ互ニ聲
ヲ懸テ進ミ寄リ捕身ノ方ハ行
逢タル時右手ニテ受身ノ右ノ
手首ヲシカト握リ右足ヲ後へ
大キク蹈開キ乍ラ充分ニ右手
ヲ引キ此時受身ハ右足ヲ蹈出
ナリ直ニ放シテ指先ヲ伸シ尺
澤ノ邊ヲ咽喉へ掛ケ乍ラ右足
ヲ受身ノ後ニアル我左足ノ際

二百三十四

〇 Tengushō Goblin Victory

About the way that the capture is done in this kata pattern of a fighting technique, much as before,
your training partner us at a distance of a measured three ken [about 18 feet or 5.454 meter]. Both are standing
erect and give outcry together while advancing to come closer. As the defender, it is a happenstance
occurrence at the time, with your right hand grab but otherwise ignore the opponent’s right wrist.
Take a large open step to tour rear with your right foot, while pulling enough with your right hand to
drag him along a bit. At this time, the opponent will advance his right foot. Being that your hands are
immediately free, extend your fingers snaring him across the throat and at Shakutaku /or/ Shattaku
“Foot Deep Swamp” while openly stepping with the right foot behind the opponent. The position of
your left foot now brought closer…

234
This page courtesy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo,
Kishin Juku Society, Europe.

へ寄セ左手ノ指先ヲ下へ向ケ内平ノ方ニテ受身ノ細腰ナ押シ乍ラ左足ヲ後ロへ
一二尺計リ踏ミ開キ腰ヲ充分ニ下テ我右膝ノ上へ受ノ背中ヲ乘セカケ左手ノ指
ヲ伸シテ受身ノ頸筋へ矢筈ノ如クニ掛ケ(圖參照)右手ニテ咽喉ヲシメ左手ニテ
頸テ押シ充分ニシメテ右手ノ指先ヲ伸シ臂ニテ受身ノ水月ヲ突ト同時ニ一足後
へ下ツテ受身ノ体ヲ下へ落スナリ此一ト足後へ下ルト云フハ右足ヲ左足ノ祭へ
引テ早ク左足ヲ後へ下ルナリ

極意上段 立合終リ

二百三十五

… the fingers of the left hand facing down and the palm of the hand to the inside, push against the
more slender part of the opponent’s hip, while openly stepping back to the rear by a measured one or
two feet. Having become sufficiently dis-hearted, lower the hips enough to raise the right knee so
you can ride the opponent with it planted in the middle of the opponent’s back. Extending the fingers
of the left hand, rail the opponent with it at the nape of his neck much like snaring him with Yahazu
Arrow knotch (In reference to the illustration). With your right hand constricting the throat and your
left hand pushing against his head and neck enough to further constrict him. Extending the fingers of
the right hand, thrust him in the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point with your right elbow. At the
same time, planting one foot behind him, drop the opponent bodily. They say that this one [move]
with the foot behind him is what drops him. The position of the left foot to his right foot used to
quickly pull him over it by.

Gokui Jōdan Tachiai ended here.

235
This page was missing in the Library version of the Text. This page copy came from
the Personal Copy of Mr. Christian Flament, Jikan Dojo, Kishin Juku Society, Europe.
This page was particularly important because it is the starter page for the next section
of the text as the beginning of the next section of the curriculum.

上段 居捕

〇後鎻 ウシロカスガイ

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ者ハ稽古塲ノ中
程ニ座シ捕身ノ方ハ請身ノ後ノ右ノ
隅ノ方へ左足ノ瓜先ヲ揃へテ右膝ヲ
ツキ左リ膝ヲ少シ上テ構へ互ニ掛聲
ヲナシテ捕身ノ方ハ眞ツ直グニ立上
リ請身ノ右脇迄進ミ行キ先左手ニテ
請身ノ左リ襟ヲ前ノ方ヨリ拇指ヲ内
へ入テ逆ニ摑ミ右手ニテ右ノ肘ノ少シ細キ處ヲ拇指

二百三十六

Jōdan Idori
The Seated Techniques of the Upper Level

〇 Ushiro Kasugai Clamp from Behind

About the kata pattern fighting technique, the attacker is seated in the middle of the training area. As
the defender, you are facing him from the right rear corner behind him. With the toes of your left foot
having been bunched together, kneel in position alongside him, drop to your right knee and your left
knee upraised a bit. Then both give outcry together. As the defender, standing straight up and
advancing across to come along the opponent’s right side. With the tip of your left hand insert your
fingers into the front of the opponent’s left lapel and take grip on and reverse it. With the thumb of
your right hand pointed up grab and raise his right elbow a bit…

236
Translator’s Notes: The text uses the word (鎻) which most usually would be pronounced kusari and is the word “chain”
that would be found in the martial art weapon the Kusari fundō “counter-weighted chain”. BUT here in this example,
instead, it gave the pronunciation ‘kasugai’. The character (鎻) is not being used for the word ‘kusari’ (“chain link”) this
time: it’s the wordkasugai (“clamp”) The more usual character for the word kasugai is ( 鎹). Furthermore, the word for
‘clamp’ being used here is a noun and not the verb “to Clamp”. That word (the verb form) would be Shimetsuke →from
Shimetsukeru (締付ける) “to Clamp (on, in or down on)”. This is quite important because it would be slightly unusual not
to use the verb “to Clamp” in this context. That would usually have been the case unless (most originally) the technique
used kasugai clamps when making the capture. If that’s the case they would have been sode kasugai (“sleeve clamps”)
Shaped like the character: ( 几 ) made of iron and about two or three inches long, bring both arms together behind the
man’s back, run the point of the clamp through the fabric of one sleeve and then the other, pinching them together and
hooking the straight side into the crook of the other side of the clamp, they then look like the character: (又) A large steel
safety pin could be used for sode kasugai. The ‘sode kasugai’ can be used to join one sleeve to another or one sleeve to a
pant leg or any suitable object around, for instance. One hears about ryuha specific pronunciations and that these can
impede translation and romaji rendering when one does not know the difference? This is one example, surely. Also, most
people don’t seem to know that kasugai (鎹) as various sorts of clamps are used in the martial arts, some are used similar
to a weapon whereas others are used more like a tool (perhaps a quick fix should a piece of your equipment need to be
rejoined, for instance.) Whatever the case, kasugai are actually common in the Japanese martial arts.
ヲ上ニシテ摑ミ腕ヲ少シ押シ上ニテ右足ノ爪先ニテ右ノ脇腹チ輕ク蹴次ニ左足
ヲ少シ左リへヨリ亦右足ヲ左足ノ際へヨセ右手ニテ左リノ肩先ノ衣ヲ袖車ノ樣
ニ摑ミ左足ニテ左リノ橫腹ヲ蹴テ直ニ膝ヲ七八寸後ノ方へツ我ガ右肩ノ處ヲ請
身ノ襟頭へシカト付テ右足ヲ橫一丈字ニ踏開キ(圖參照)左右ノ手ニテ急ニ前へ
引付乍ラ腰下ゲテシメ直ニ手ヲ放スベシ

〇脇鎻 ワキカスガイ

此手合ノ形ハ請身ノ方ハ橫向キニ坐シ捕身ノ方ハ請身ノ右脇ヲ六尺計リ離レテ
前ノ如ク右膝ヲツキ左膝ヲ少シ上テ請身ノ方へ向テ搆へ互ニ聲ヲ掛テ眞直グニ
立上リ請身ノ右脇迄進行先頭ニテ獨鈷

二百三十七

...push his arm up and away. With the toes of the right foot kick him lightly in the right side, then
with the left foot being slightly to the left and your right foot in position near his left foot, with your
right hand perform Sode guruma Sleeve wheel by gripping his garments. Then kick him in the left
side [having already downed him]. Immediately, having moved the knee back some seven or eight
inches to the rear, having turned your own right shoulder toward the opponent [crouching beside him
on the right knee], clinging to him with but otherwise ignoring the grip you have on his lapel. Your
right foot has openly stepped out when striking the Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture (In
reference to the illustration). With the right foot unexpectedly snatch him forward, while then further
dis-hearting by constricting him. The hands are otherwise free.

〇 Waki Kasugai Clamp from the Side

About the kata pattern fighting technique, the attacker is seated facing to the side in the middle of the
training area. As the defender, you are separated by a measured distance of some six feet off to the
opponent’s right side. Much like before, kneel in position alongside him, drop to your right knee and
your left knee upraised a bit. The opponent now facing to the side, both give outcry. Standing erect,
you advance across to the opponent’s right side. Using a head butt strike him in the vicinities of the
Dokko “Single pronged vajra” vital point…

237
ノ邊ヲ當左手ニテ左リ
ノ襟ナ前ノ方ヨリ逆ニ
摑ミ右手ニテ背ノ紋處
ヲ摑ミ右足ノ爪先ニテ
輕ク橫腹ヲ蹴直ニ膝ヲ
六七寸後ノ方へツキ右
ノ肩ヲ請身ノ右ノ首筋
ノ處へ付左足ヲ橫一文
字ニ踏開キ乍急ニ左右
ノ手ニテ前へ引付(圖參
照)直ニ放スべシ此二手
ハ早ク手ヲ放サザレバ
咽喉ヲ痛メル故引付ケタル際直ニ左右ノ手ヲ放スべシ

二百三十八

...and with the left hand grab and reverse the front of his left lapel. With the right hand grab and
constrict him at the vicinity of the back-side. Then kick him lightly with the tip of your right foot into
his side. Then immediately, dropping to your knee out some six or seven inches to the rear, cling to
the opponent’s body with your right shoulder in the vicinity of his neck joint. Step openly with the
left foot striking the Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture while with your right hand
unexpectedly snatch him forward (In reference to the illustration.) The ]hands] would otherwise be
immediately free. During these two moves in the technique the hands would not be free but quickly
will have become free. It causes him pain across the throat and coincidentally also throughout the
circumstances under which you snatched him. The hands would then be immediately freed.

238
〇後捕 ウシロドリ

此手合ノ形ハ先請身ノ方ハ左ニ木太刀ヲ帶
タルマヽ座シ居ルナリ亦捕身ノ方ハ請身ノ
後へ六尺計リ離レテ前ノ如ク右膝ヲツキ左
膝ヲ少シ上テ搆へ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ捕身ノ方ハ
眞スグニ立上リ講身ノ後際迄進ミヨリ左手
ノ掌ヲ開キ

二百三十九

〇 Ushiro Dori Rear Capture

About this fighting pattern, to begin, the opponent is seated and wearing a wooden long sword
through his belt, for instance. As the defender, you are separated by a measured distance of some six
feet standing behind the attacker. Much like before, kneel in position alongside him, drop to your
right knee and your left knee upraised a bit up. Both give outcry together. As the defender, standing
straight up immediately advance across to the rear side of the opponent. With the open palm of your
left hand…

239
矢筈ノ如クニナシテ襟頸ノ處へ
掛ケ右手ニテ抦先ヲ下ヨリ持鍔
ノ處ヲ水月へ當乍ラ左手ニテ首
ヲ少シ押シ(一圖參照)左膝ヲ一
尺七八寸後ノ方へツキ左手ヲ抦
へカケ右足ヲ橫一文字ニ蹈開キ
乍ラ左右ノ手

二百四十

…much as if using Yahazu Arrow knotch hand formation, snare him at the head and neck in the
vicinity of his collar. With your right hand grab and lower the Tsukagashira tip of the hilt of his
sword. Drive the Tsuba sword hand-guard into and strike the Suigetsu “Moon water” vital point [pit
of the stomach] while with your left hand push his neck and head away (In reference to Illustration
One). Dropping to your left knee out to the rear about a foot and a half, cling to the Tsuka hilt of his
sword and step openly out with the right foot striking Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture, while
with both left and right hands…

240
ニテ抦ヲ上ヨリ持ナヲシテシカト押へテ左手ニテ抦先ヲ握リ右手ニテ受ノ右ノ
手首ヲ摑ミ右足ヲ右へ一文字ニ開キ抦ノ方ハシカト押付乍ラ手首ヲ右ノ方へ引
キ(二圖參照)其儘右足ニテ脇腹ヲ蹴テ放スベシ

〇片羽縮 カタハチヾミ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ受身ノ坐シタル所ヨリ六七尺離レテ前ノ如キ形ニ搆へ互ニ
聲ヲ懸捕身ノ方ハ眞直ニ立上リテ受身ノ右脇迄進ミ右手ニテ右ノ前襟ヲ左ノ方
へ寄セ首ノ後ヨリ左手ニテ捕へ右手ノ平ヲ右ノ肩ノ際へ掛(一圖參照)左足ノ膝
ヲ斜ニ一尺五寸程後へ突右足ヲ橫へ踏開キ乍ラ受身ノ首ガ左手ノ上ニナル樣ニ
後へ倒シ次

二百四十一

…grabbing and raise the Tsuka hilt of the sword, but otherwise ignore it other than to push on it. With
your left hand grip the Tsukazaki tip of the hilt, with your right hand grab the opponent’s right wrist.
Openly step with the right foot to the right striking Ichimonji Straight line posture, rather ignoring the
direction that the Tsuka hilt of the sword is now facing. Push against it while pulling his wrist farther
toward the right (In reference to Illustration Two). Having done that, with your right foot, kick him in
the side, [your hands] are free.

〇 Kata-ha Chijimi Paralysing One Wing

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, the opponent is seated in a certain position,
you are separated by about six or seven feet. Much like before, in the kata pattern, [kneel] in position
alongside him, [dropped to your right knee and your left knee upraised a bit.] Both give outcry
together. As the defender, standing erect, advance across to the opponent’s right side. With your right
hand, from behind him, grab his right front lapel and draw him closer to his left side. Capture him
with your left hand, taking a hold of him at his right shoulder also, with the palm of your right hand
(In reference to Illustration One). Dropping out your left knee diagonally at about one and a half feet
to the rear, step openly off to the side with your right foot while slipping your left upper arm around
and over the opponent’s neck while dropping him backwards as you do. Next…

241
ニ右足ヲ受身ノ腰ノ際へ寄
セ右手ニテ右ノ手首ヲ握リ
腰部へ押付橫向ニナシ又右
ノ膝ヲ左膝ノ際へ突左足ヲ
前ノ方へ踏出シ右手ヲ少シ
揚ゲテ受身ノ右上膞骨ノ中
程即チ臂ト肩ノ間ノ處ヲ膝
先へ掛テ右足ヲ靜ニ立乍ラ
左右ノ手ニテ襟ト手首ヲ引
分受身ノ体ヲ中程迄起シテ

二百四十二

…bring your right foot closer to the area of the opponent’s hip. With your right and grab his right
wrist, push it across your own hip [his arm] facing out to the side. Then jut out your right knee
roughly into the position where your left knee was as you openly step out with your left foot towards
the front. His right hand having been upraised just a bit by this, your [right] knee planted in the right
side of his upper back at the backbone. Namely, you will then catch his arm at the space between his
elbow and shoulder, drawing it across your [right] knee cap. Calmly stand up on your right foot [from
the kneeling position] while pulling with your hands on his lapel and [captured] wrist. Then you will
center the opponent’s [seated] body where you have arisen to...

242
我下腹ヲ前へ出シ(二圖參照)
充分ニ咽喉ノシマリタル處ニ
テ右ノ爪先ニテ右ノ脇腹ヲ蹴
テ橫ニ蹈開キ乍ラ左右ノ手ヲ
放スベシ

二百四十三

… as you lower your hips towards the front (In reference to Illustration Two). [Pulling on his lapel]
enough to strangle his throat in that position, kick him in the right side with the tip of your right toes,
stepping openly off to the side while otherwise both your right and left hands are free.

243
〇矢筈 ヤハズ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ先受身ノ
者ハ小太刀ヲ指シテ坐シ捕身
ノ方ハ五六寸離レテ前へ坐シ
互ニ聲ヲ掛テ受身ノ方ハ左手
ニテ捕身ノ胸ヲ捕リ右手ニテ
小太刀ヲ拔キ頭へ切付ルナリ
捕身ノ方ハ左手ニテ我胸ヲ捕
ヘタル手首ヲ下ヨリシカト握
リ右手ノ指ヲ伸シ頭ニ付臂ヲ
張テ少シク体ヲ前へ進ム樣ニ
シテ切付ル手先ヲ受止メテ直
ニ手首ヲ握リ左足ヲ受ノ左リ

二百四十四

〇 Yahazu Arrow’s Knotch

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, at the start, the opponent is seated and
fingering on a Kodachi short sword. As the defender you are seated in front of him, separated by
about five or six inches. Both give outcry together. With his left hand the opponent takes a hold at the
defender’s chest. With his right hand he draws the Kodachi short sword and strikes to cut at your
head. As the defender, with your left hand grab [the garments at] your own chest [to stabilise them]
under his wrist but otherwise ignoring his grip on you there. Extending the fingers of your right hand,
cling to [his wrist] and push the (Tsuka-)gashiratip of the sword hilt away, extending your elbow a
bit as you do. Advance forward upon him bodily. The fingers are stopping and fending off the cutting
strike. Then immediately take a grip on his wrist and step in with your left foot…

244
膝ノ脇へ踏出シ(一圖參照)
右手ニテ受ノ左腕ヲ向へ
押シ乍ラ右ノ方へ廻シテ
上向ニ倒シ左足ノ膝ヲ突
右足ニテ右ノ手首ヲ蹈へ
右手ニテ小太刀ノ抦ヲ持
テ扱取リ直ニ右ノ襟ヲ捕
へ右足ノ小指ノ方ノ甲端
ノ處ニテ咽喉ヲ蹈付左ノ
膝ヲ少シ左へ寄セ左ハ手
首ヲ引キ右ハ襟ヲ引右足
ノ甲端ニテ咽喉ヲ充分ニシメル(二圖參照)右足ノ膝ヲ受身ノ左ノ肩ノ際へ突左
足ノ爪先ニテ左ノ脇腹ヲ蹴テ放スベシ

二百四十五

...alongside his left knee (In reference to Illustration One). With your right hand, push the opponent’s
left arm towards himself while rotating (him?) towards the right, dropping him so that he is face up.
Jut out the left knee and step on his right wrist with your right foot. Grab the hilt of the Kodachi short
sword with your right hand, handling and capturing him with it. Immediately then, take a hold of his
right lapel and step with the pinky toe side and inner edge of your right foot positioned alongside his
neck. Bring your left knee a bit closer on the left, pulling on his[captured and extended] wrist as well
as his lapel in your right [hand]. The inner edge of your right foot pressed alongside his neck enough
to constrict him (In reference to Illustration Two). Dropping to your right knee in the vicinity of the
opponent’s left shoulder, kick him with the tip of your left foot in his left side. [Your hands] are
otherwise free.

245
〇突掛 ツキカケ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ先受身ノ
者小太刀ヲサシテ坐シ捕身ノ
方ハ五六寸離レテ前へ坐シ互
ニ聲ヲ發シ受ハ左手ニテ胸グ
ラヲ取へ右手ニテ小太刀ヲ拔
キ水月ノ邊へ突掛ルナリ捕身
ノ方ハ右手ニテ左ノ手首ヲ上
ヨリシカト摑ミ左足ヲ後ノ方
へ一文字ニ蹈開キテ左手ノ指

二百四十六

〇 Tsuki Kake Thrusting with a Sword

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, at the start, the opponent is seated and
fingering on a Kodachi short sword. As the defender, you are seated in front of him separated by
about five or six inches. Both give outcry together, with his left hand the attacker takes a hold of
your chest. With his right hand he draws the Kodachi short sword and thrust at Suigetsu “Moon
water” [pit of the stomach]. As the defender, with your right hand take grip on his left wrist from
underneath, but otherwise ignore it. Openly step with your left foot into the rear, striking Ichimonji
Straight line posture. Extending the fingers of your left hand…

246
ヲ延シ甲端ノ方ニテ突來ル
小太刀ノ先ヲ 内ノ方 ヨリ
拂フ(一圖參照)直ニ左足ヲ
前へ蹈込乍ラ烏兎テ拳ニテ
當又直ニ胸襟ラ捕へ右足ラ
向へ踏出シテ左ノ膝ヲ突キ
乍ラ受身ヲ仰向ニ押シ倒シ
右足ヲ橫一文字ニ蹈開キ右
手ニテ受ノ左手ノ小指ノ方
ヲ上ニシテ左膝ヲ腕ノ上へ
掛べシ(二圖參照)

二百四十七

...going along the inner edge of his thrust. Sweep aside the tip of the Kodachi short sword aside from
the inside (In reference to Illustration One). Then immediately step forward with the left foot while
striking the Uto “Crow Rabbit” vital point with your fist. Then immediately take a hold of the his
front lapel. Step in a certain direction with your right foot dropping to your left knee while pushing
and dropping the opponent so he is laying face up. Openly step with your right foot striking Yoko
Ichimonji Side straight line posture. With your right hand resting on the little finger side of his left
hand and your left knee over-top and pinning down his [left upper] arm (In reference to Illustration
Two).

247
〇無二劒 ムニケン

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ト同
シク受身ハ左ニ小太刀ヲサ
シテ坐シ捕身ノ方ハ前へ坐
シ互ニ聲ヲ懸ケ受ハ左手ニ
テ左右ノ胸襟ヲ捕へ右手ニ
テ小太刀ヲ拔キ頭へ切付ル
ナリ捕身ノ方ハ右手ニテ受
身ノ左右ノ前襟テシカト捕
へ方足ヲ受身ノ右脇へ蹈込

二百四十八

〇 Muni Ken Lacking Both Swords

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, same as before, the opponent is seated and
fingering on a Kodachi short sword. As the defender, you are seated in front of him. Both give outcry
together, with his left hand the attacker takes a hold of both your left and right lapel(s). He draws the
Kodachi short sword with his right hand and cuts at your head. As the defender, with your right hand
grab both the opponent’s left and right lapels, but otherwise ignore them. Step in along the opponent’s
right side with the foot that is on that side…

248
乍ラ左手ノ指ヲ伸シ掌ヲ返シ(一圖
參照)内平ノ方ニテ切付來ル右手ヲ
受留テシカト握リ右足ニテ水月ヲ
踢テ仰向ニ倒シ右ノ膝ヲ腕ノ際へ
突キ左足ヲ橫一文字ニ開キ(二圖參
照)左手ニテ手首ヲ左ノ方へ引伸シ
テ押へルナリ

二百四十九

…while extending the fingers of your left hand, reversing it so the palm is to the outside (In reference
to Illustration One). With the inside of your palm, parry and stop his right hand during the striking
cut, but otherwise ignore his grip on you. Kick him at Suigetsu “Moon Water” vital point [pit of the
stomach] with your right foot. Drop him so he is facing up. Jut out your right knee while stepping
openly with your left foot striking Yoko Ichmonji Side straight line posture (In reference to
Illustration Two).With your left hand pulling and extending out his wrist to the left then pushing
down on it, for instance.

249
〇見刀曲

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ先受身ノ者ハ左手
ニ木太刀ヲ持テ座シ捕身ノ方ハ右手ニ
小太刀ヲ携へ左右ノ足ノ爪先ヲ揃へ右
ノ膝ヲ前へ突左膝ヲ少シク上ゲ開キ互
ニ聲テ掛捕身ノ方ハ眞直ニ立上リ受身
ノ前迄進ミ左足ヲ後へ斜ニ蹈開キ乍ラ
小太刀ヲ受ノ目先へ眞直ニ突出シ

二百五十

〇 Kentō Kyoku (or, Kentō Magare) Bending Him by Watching the Sword Closely

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, as before, the opponent is seated and
holding a wooden long sword in his left hand. As the defender, you are carrying a Kodachi short
sword in your right hand, the toes of both your left and right foot are bunched together seated in front
of him. Both give outcry together, dropping to your right knee to the front, your left knee is a bit
upraised out in the open. Both give outcry together. As the defender, you’re standing erect as you are
advancing towards the attacker’s front side. Openly step back at a diagonal angle with your left foot
into the rear while appearing to thrust the Kodachi short sword straight at the pupil of his eye.

250
受身ハ此時ニ木太刀ニテ拔打ニ足ヲ拂フナリ又捕ノ方ハ右ノ小手先ヲ輕ク返シ
テ小太刀ニテ木太刀ヲ受留メ直ニ又小手先ヲ返シテ木太刀ヲ切落シ元ノ如ク受
ノ目先へ突出スナリ(但シ此切落スト云ハ實ハ尺澤ヲ打事ナレ共眞實ニ打時ハ小
手ヲ痛メルが故ニ稽占ノ際ニハ總テ假ニ木太刀ヲ打ト心得ベシ)是ヨリ捕ハ左足
ヲ受ノ眞後へ蹈込ミ乍ラ小太刀ヲ橫ニ受ノ咽埃へ掛ケ右足ヲ左足ノ際へ寄セ左
手ノ指先ヲ輕ク小太刀ノ先へ上ヨリ掛テ左足ヲ二尺余リ後へ踏開キ右ノ膝頭ヲ
受ノ背後へ押付乍ラ少シ腰ヲ下テ下腹ヲ前へ出ス樣ニシテ左右ノ手ニテ小太刀
ヲ手前へ引付テ受ノ体ヲ充分ニ崩シ(一圖參照)少シク右ノ方へ倒ス樣仕掛テ急
ニ左ノ前へ倒シ其

二百五十一

At the time, the attacker is drawing and striking with the wooden long sword as he takes sweeping
steps, for instance. As the defender, slightly reverse your right forearm so as to fend off and stop the
wooden long sword with your Kodachi short sword. Then immediately reverse your forearm much as
if to lop off and drop the wooden long sword to the ground, striking at the base of the blade. Again,
make it look like you are thrusting into the opponent’s pupil (However, what they say about how one
does this cutting drop (kiri (w)otoshi), it’s done by striking at shakutaku/or/shattaku “Foot Deep
Swamp” vital point, while appearing to strike straight in at the time. This causes pain to his forearm.
Coincidentally when practicing it to it’s conclusion, one ought to know it will do so even if one
strikes at the long sword itself.) After this, as the defender you step straight in behind the attacker
with your left foot while bring your Kodachi short sword from the side and trapping him with it
across the base of his throat. Bring your right foot closer to the position of your left foot and further
trap him by raising the tip of your Kodachi short sword with the fingers of your left hand. Step
openly back through the remaining two feet distance to your rear with your left foot while driving
your right knee cap into the opponent’s spine, somewhat dis-hearting him at the thought of what
surely comes next since you have done this. With both your left and right hands pull rather sharply
on the Kodachi short sword in front of your own body enough to destabilise (kuzushi) the opponent’s
body (In reference to Illustration One). Drop him to the right a bit as you have snared him by doing
this. Then unexpectedly dump him into the left front.

251
儘頸筋ヲ打ナリ(二圖參照)又之モ小太刀ヲ用ユレトモ術手ト心得ベシ

二百五十二

Having done that, strike the nape of his neck (In reference to Illustration Two). Then there are the
techniques of using the Kodachi short sword whichever of these may come, and one ought to know
that they will.

252
〇龍虎 リヨウコ

此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ前ト同ジク受ハ木太刀ヲ携へテ座シ捕モ小太刀ヲ左ニサシ
前ノ如ク片膝ヲ突テ半身ニ搆へ互ニ聲ヲ懸テ捕身ノ方ハ右手ニテ小太刀ヲ拔キ
受ノ左眼ヲ指テ眞直ニ出シ立上ツテ左リ右ト二タ足斜ニ進ミ少シ腰ヲ下テ腹ヲ
前へ出スベシ此際受バ右手ニテ木太刀ヲ持拔打ニ膝ノ邊へ切付ルナリ捕ハ小手
先ヲ返シテ小太刀ニテ木太刀ヲ受ケテ直ニ上ヨリ打落シ体ノ中心ノ崩レヌ樣元
ノ如ク小太刀ヲ眞直ニ出シ次ニ左足ヲ大キク受ノ右ノ後へ充分ニ蹈込ト同時ニ
左膝ヲ突キ乍左手ノ指ヲ延揃へ甲端ノ方ヲ咽喉へ

二百五十三

〇 Ryūko Two Rivals (or, “From Beginning to End”)

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, just like before, the opponent is seated and
holding a wooden long sword in his left hand. As the defender, you are fingering a Kodachi short
sword with your left hand, much like before. Drop to a single knee while you are assuming the Hanmi
Half body posture, both give outcry together. As the defender, with your right hand draw the Kodachi
short sword and point it at the attacker’s left eye. Straight away proceeding to rise to your feet, taking
two paces left then right foot advancing upon him, so as to unsettle him, the hips square on to the
front and lowering your hips a bit. Upon this occasion, the attacker takes grip upon and draws the
wooden long sword then strikes with it, cutting in the vicinity of your knee, for instance. As the
defender, reversing your forearm so as to ward off the wooden long sword with your Kodachi short
sword, then immediately raise it and appear do a lopping off drop (uchi (w)otoshi) much like before.
Next, take a very large step in behind the opponent to the right rear, and at the same time jut out your
left knee while extending and bunching together the fingers of your left hand striking him along the
inner edge of his neck.

253

Translator’s Notes: The title of the entry literally reads: “Dragon Tiger”, this is an idiom that has a definition derived by
context. It can mean “Beginning and End” and ergo “Entire context (at a basic level)”. It also means, quite separately:
“Two (powerful) rivals” and ergo “all that transpired between two powerful rivals”. There are a few other definitions that
may occur but these are the chief ones.
當小太刀ノ切先ヲ目先へ附タル儘突キ倒シテ
又直ニ小太刀ノ抦頭ニテ陰嚢ヲ當ルト同時ニ
右足ノ爪先ニテ脇腹ヲ蹴テ開クナリ(圖參照)

〇暫心目附 ザンシンメツケ
此手合ノ形ノ捕樣ハ先前ト同樣ニ受身ノ者ハ
木太刀ヲ左手ニ持チ

二百五十四

…keep the point of the Kodachi short sword right under his nose, doing so as to perform a thrusting
push down (tsuki-(w)otoshi) against him. Then immediately strike him in the testicles with the
Tsukagashira Tip of the hilt of the short sword. At the same time, kick him in the side with the tip of
your right foot, stepping openly to do so (In reference to the illustration).

〇 Zanshin Metsuke Awareness in Close Observation

About the way the capture is done in this fighting pattern, much the same as before, the opponent [is
seated?] and gripping a wooden long sword in his left hand.

254
捕身ノ方ハ左手ニ小太刀ヲ携へ六尺計リ

二百五十五

As the defender you are holding the Kodachi short sword in your left hand, separated by a measured six
feet…

255
離テ右膝ヲ突左膝ヲ上テ搆へ互ニ聲ヲ懸捕ノ方ハ右手ニテ小太刀ヲ拔キ受ノ目
先へ附テ眞直ニ立上リ左足ヲ斜ニ蹈出シ右足ヲ受ノ右膝ノ六七寸前へ踏出シ腰
ヲ下テ兩膝ヲ左右へ張リ少シク腹ヲ前へ出ベシ此際受ハ右手ニテ拔打ニ木太刀
ニテ膝ノ邊へ切付ルナリ又捕ハ小太刀ニテ受テ直ニ上ヨリ打落ス樣ニ下へシカ
ト押へ(圖參照)又直ニ眞之位ノ如ク左右ノ手ノ指ジ延シ左足ヲ大キク蹈込テ膝
ヲ突キ乍ラ左右ノ手ノ甲端ノ方ノ咽喉へ掛ケ突倒シ左手ニテ左襟ヲ持右手ニテ
右腕ヲ輕ク持右足ヲ橫一文字ニ開キテ左手ニテ咽喉ヲシメ右足ニテ脇腹ヲ蹴テ
左右ノ手ヲ放シテ終ルナリ

上段 居捕終

二百五十六

… dropping to your right knee and your left knee upraised in your body posture. Both give outcry
together. As the defender, draw the Kodachi short sword with your right hand and keep the point
aimed straight at his pupil. You are standing erect, take a diagonal step with the left foot and step to
the front with your right foot about six or seven inches, both knees parted to the left and right sides,
hips lowered a bit and squared to the front. Upon this occasion, the attacker draws the wooden long
sword with his right hand and strikes with it, cutting at the vicinity of your knee. As the defender then,
having parried and driven upwards [the wooden long sword] with the Kodachi short sword,
immediately perform a striking throw-down (uchi (w)otoshi) while driving it down but otherwise
ignoring [the wooden long sword] (In reference to the illustration). Then immediately, extend the
fingers of both your right and left hands, much like in the Shin no kurai True positions technique, take
a very large step in with the left foot, dropping to the knee(s), while snaring him along the inner sides
of his neck with both your left and right hands, sharply pushing and dropping him (tsuki ta(w)oshi).
Grasping his left lapel with your left hand, and taking a light grip on his right arm with your right
hand, as you openly step with your right foot striking Yoko Ichimonji Side straight line posture.
Strangle his throat with your left hand and kick him in the side with your right foot. Your right and left
hands are free through to the conclusion.

Jōdan Idori Upper level seated captures ended here.

256
人工呼吸術

先ヅ咽喉ヲシメ或ハ支
腹等ヲ打氣絶シタル人
ノ在ル時ハ其害者ノ背
ノ大推ヨリ下エ六七推
ノ處テ手ノ平ニテ輕ク
押付ル樣ニ三四度打べ
シ必ズ活生スル者ナリ
其他ノ處ヲ打時ハ却テ
害ヲ爲ス事在リ氣ヲ付
テ打ベシ
第貳ノ術ハ死者ヲ仰向
ニ寐カシ頭ヨリ爪先迄
眞直ニシテ甲ノ一人ハ

二百五十七

Jinkō Kokyū (No) Jutsu


The Techniques of Induced Breathing Patterns

[Used] when first there is constriction in the throat, or possibly a certain disruptive fluttering in the
belly and being so ill-struck as to show some disruption as can effect people at times. The condition
causes a bending of the greater support of the spine of the person so-effected, and [the tension related
arching goes] all the way down to the rest of the six or seven [bodily] supports [such as the shoulders, hips,
knees, ankles and etc]. Leaving one [bent over] and pressing the palms of the hands [against the thighs or
knees in distress]. One should strike oneself [or another so effected] about three or four times [with the
palm of the hand, such in across the chest or back] which will inadvertently revive the person. That is how others
are to be struck as well when under such circumstances at the time, contrary to what has caused the
ill effect. One should be attentive and strike them who are so-effected.
About the second technique, an unconscious person who is near death and laying face up should be
stood up [in a seated position] with one man behind them…

257
頭ノ方エ廻リ左右ノ手ニテ死者ノ左
右ノ手首ヲ握リ又乙ノ一人ハ死者ノ
腹ノ上ヨリ腰ヲ押付ヌ樣ニ兩脇エ膝
ヲ突左右ノ手ノ平ヲ助骨ノ少シ下エ
當テ指先ヲ上エ返ラセ是ニテ甲者ハ
左右ノ手ヲ輕ク柔ラカニ手前エ引ト
同時ニ乙者ハ左右ノ手ノ平ニテ指先
ノ付ヌ樣輕ク柔ラカニ上

二百五十八

…controlling the rotations of their head with both left and right hands and also to have taken a hold
of both the wrists of the person who is near death [when in other body positions]. The other man across from
the first man straddled over-top the thighs of the person near death and pushing in on their hips and
torso. When doing so the one man is straddled over-top him with both knees on either side of the
man’s body and supporting the hip bone somewhat with the palm of both left and right hands.
Pushing as if striking down [on the pelvis and torso], fingertips facing up along the length [of the
person’s body]. While doing this, the first person is lightly and gently pulling towards himself [at the
injured man’s wrists, in time with the movements] all while the other person pushes gently up and in with the
palms of his left and right hands.

258
ノ方エ押上ルナリ斯ノ如ク何度ニテモ死
者ノ息ヲ爲ス迄甲者モ乙者モ手先ノ調子
ヲ違エヌ樣ニ爲スベシ生氣ノ付タルト認

二百五十九

Pretty much that is how it’s done, however many times need be to cause the near dead person to
breathe again. There really is no change in the rhythm of the handwork done by either person number
one or person number two when doing all this. One can recognise when [the ill-effected person] is
returning to normal breathing.

259
メタル時ハ誠心ノ落付ク少樣藥ヲ與フベシ(圖參照)

總テ活生ノ法ハ手術ノ熟練セサル内ハ何程手術ヲ盡ス共活生
セザル者故爰ニハ諸人ノ行ヒ易キ人工呼吸術ヲ一ツ二ツ認メ
置ナリ死者ニ依テ種々ノ取扱法モ在レ共其レ等ハ不日柔術精
理書ナル者ヲ著スヲ以テ就テ見ルベシ

人工呼吸術終

二百六十

It’s done by sincere self-composure at the time, as well as any medicines there are to be made use of
(In reference to the illustration). About the generalities of the methods of resuscitation (kassei no hō),
there is some skill required for the [medical] procedures, about the inner [parts of the edifice] there
are some number of procedures that are to be exhausted [trying to revive a person] together with what
is not exactly of the resuscitation methods themselves. About persons whom are performing the
application of this, it’s easier for everyone involved if you follow the recognized placement pattern
for person one and two when doing the Jinkō Kokyū (No) Jutsu Techniques of induced breathing.
Depending upon the condition of the person near death, there are a variety of suitable handling
methods that exist along with this one. Regarding the ones that are similar, there are those found in
the Funichi Jūjutsu Seirisho the Book of Jujutsu’s Physiology by Funichi as it was written by it’s
author(s) on observations about that subject.

The Jinkō Kokyū (No) Jutsu Techniques of Induced Breathing Patterns ended here.

260
乱捕
〇スクイ足
スクイ足ハ右手ニテ
左ノ袖先ヲ持右手ニ
テ左ノ襟ヲ持左足ニ
テ右足ノ爪先ノ少シ
元ノ處黒節ノ邊エ掛
テ我左ノ腰ノ方へ引
上ゲ乍ラ右手ハ少シ
押左手ハ左ノ下ノ方
へ引テ敵ノ体ヲ倒ス
ナリ(圖參照)

二百六十一

Randori Struggling Contests

〇 Sukui Ashi Scooping Step

About the Scooping step, with your right hand grab the edge of his left sleeve, with your right hand
grab his left lapel. Hooking him with your left foot in the area of the Kossetsu /or/ Kurofushi “Black
Knuckle” vital point [see notes below] on the right leg at the point just above the ankle] then pull him
up across your left hip while pushing a bit with your right hand. The left hand pulls down on him
while you do so, and so drops the opponent’s body (In reference to the illustration).

261

Translator’s Note: There is a small bit of confusion in the lines of the text for this entry. The kossetsu “Black Knuckle” vital point is
correctly identified as being “…at the base of the toes of the right foot…” (quite specifically it is between the first and second
metatarsals, or otherwise the middle between the second and third metatarsal.) Possibly, because of old source texts like this one, one
might find kossetsu being identified as “the ankle bone” BUT the text clearly states it’s position as being: “…in the vicinities of the
base of the toes of the right foot…”.

What is the source of the confusion in this passage of the text? It combined two (2) older descriptions, one of them indicated
that one was to stamp on the kossetsu “Black Knuckle” vital point then slide the foot up into position along the Lower Mid
Fibula. THISdescription skipped the part about sliding the foot up into that position. IN FACT there is some difficulty translating
the passage becauseTHE TWO FORMS OF THE DESCRIPTION were joined incorrectly (only known example we found in the
text so far). The given description is almost unintelligible in that it says literally: “…snare/hook him in the area of the kossetsu
“Black Knuckle” vital point in the vicinities of the base of the toes of the right foot, then pull him up across your left hip…”
this would have your left foot pinning his right foot to the ground as you torque him across your left hip…
…which is what the older version of this technique did, as a fighting technique (instead of a Judo sparring technique).
When Judo started turning into a sport form, the technique was modified due to probable injuries the original form
would inflict (injuring the metatarsals and possibly breaking the ankle.) The floating position on the lower mid fibula
has little chance of doing that. The technique (as a fighting technique) pins his right foot to the ground and torques him
across your left hip. As such it gets called ‘Sukui dori’, ‘Sukui nage’ and ‘Sukui ashi’. As ‘sukui ashi’ (in the fighting
form of the technique) the name refers to his pinned foot being scooped out, whereas (in the Judo sparring technique)
‘Sukui ashi’ instead refers to the scooping action of your left foot itself.
〇足拂

足拂ヒモ手ハ前ト同樣
ニ持右足ノ踵ノ元ノ處
ニテ敵ノ右足ノ膝裹ノ
處ヲ拂ヒ乍ラ右手ニテ
少シ袖ヲ引テ倒スベシ
(圖參照)

二百六十二

〇 Ashi Hara(h)i Leg Sweeping

Even when sweeping the leg, the hands are used for grabbing him the same way as before. Use the
base of the heel of your right foot to sweep away from the outside of the opponent’s right knee, while
pulling at his sleeve with your right hand so as to perform a pulling throw-down (hiki (w)otoshi) (In
reference to the illustration).

262
〇拂ヒ腰

拂ヒ腰モ左右ノ手ハ前同樣
ニ持右足ノ裏ノ方ニテ合手
ノ右ノ太股ノ前ノ方ヨリ右
へ拂上ルナリ(圖參照)

二百六十三

〇 Hara(h)i Goshi Hip Sweeper

Even when sweeping with the hip, both the left and right hands are used to grab him with the same
way as before. Your right foot sweeping him up and out, to the right from the backside of his right
thigh, in conjunction with your hand movements (In reference to the illustration).

263
〇腰投

腰投ハ左手ニテ右ノ袖先ヲ
持右手ヲ輕ク伸シテ合手ノ
左ノ腰ノ方ヨリ後へ廻シ右
腰ノ邊迄指先テ伸シテ我腰
ヲ少シ低クシ

二百六十四

〇 Koshi Nage Hip Throw

About Koshi nage Hip throw, grab the edge of his right sleeve with your left hand and lightly push
him with your right hand, the movements of your hands combined pulling him across towards your
left hip while rotating him backwards in place over your right hip. [while he is airborne] Push him
downward with your fingertips as you lower your hips a bit...

264
テ合手ノ下度へ附ルト同時ニ腰ヲ上ゲテ橫ニ抱へル如クニナスベシ(圖參照)

以下拾貳種ノ圖ハ當時ノ紐打ニハ余リ用ヒザレトモ本流古風ノ乱捕ニハ多ク用
ヒタル者故參考ノ爲爰ニ著ス者サリ

二百六十五

… during the combined movements of your hands adhering to him in the downward movement much as if
you are hoisting him in your arms across your hip (In reference to the illustration).

About these kinds which we have illustrated they make no use of Atemi striking in the grappling (kumiuchi)
whereas surely in the older traditions of Randori Struggling-in-contest of this school there was quite a lot of
usage of it. Coincidentally, they were created by the consideration of third generation practitioners from
whom the author [of this text] had received them as a practitioner himself.

265

Translator’s Note: This is perhaps a somewhat important statement, since according to it, the Randori techniques were not created by Iso
Mataemon, or even his later Shihan. They did not originate with the Tenjin shinyō ryū itself at all, but instead from either the Yōshin ryū or
theShin no shintō ryū parent schools upon which Tenjin shinyō ryū itself was based. BUT it does not offer to tell us how old the techniques were
at the time they had been passed on to him.
二百六十六

266
二百六十七

267
二百六十八

268
二百六十九

269
二百七十

270
[ The pictorial page has one line of text, it is attached to and commentary on “Shimekomi”: ]

此手ハ相方共樂ニテ動カサヌ計リナリ

二百七十一

About this technique, there is an easiness for both you and the training partner and
being that it’s all quite measured out there is not much movement.

271
◎尤モ組打ノ手合ハ種々ノ業在リト雖トモ余リ紙數ノ增加スル
ヲ以テ次ノ篇ニ於テ著ス事トシ爰ニ一先ヅ筆ヲ止ム

柔術極意敎授圖解畢

二百七十二

◎ Of these they are an outstanding kind of technique for grappling (kumiuchi) among various
techniques that exist for it. However, surely, it would require quite a bit more pages in this book to
account for them all. Perhaps we can address that subject in any consequent volumes yet to be
published? But here, for the moment, we have come to a halt.

The End of the Jūjutsu Gokui Kyōju.

272
THE TEXT ENDED HERE