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March 2009 KGI magazine - reader comments by SMS (unedited versions)

+628529012XXXX

Hey, kAng Guru,I’m eva adita.Thank’s!you want to be my friend,Your maGazine helpeD me in engLish much.In the march eDitioN,you told us about life down under-life in Australia,It’s fantastic,I knowing Australia by it.Sure,i’ll go to there,if i’m be.That’s greAts!n d0 you kn0w?y0u have a lot of fans,my cLassmates have interested with ur magazine,n surely,witH you.0h y,in june eDitioN, d0n’t forget write about the “Batik indo”0k!^o^Thanks KG!

forget write about the “Batik indo”0k!^o^Thanks KG! +6281915682254 Dear KGI, thanks a l0t for the March
forget write about the “Batik indo”0k!^o^Thanks KG! +6281915682254 Dear KGI, thanks a l0t for the March

+6281915682254

Dear KGI, thanks a l0t for the March edition magazine. It was s0 nice to read this edition because it pr0vided me with information of things’ cost in australia. I loved that part especially about ‘life down under’ section. I’m sending my best wishes to this magazine.from : Primantara, singaraja-Bali.

wishes to this magazine.from : Primantara, singaraja-Bali. +628524321XXXX Hi,I’m an English teacher from a vocational

+628524321XXXX

Hi,I’m an English teacher from a vocational school in West Seram, Moluccas.I’ve just got my first KGI magazine from an inspiring old sick man, Mr Agustinus. It was amazing how he inspires me about what I can do with KGI. As I found KGI magazine’s a very inspiring magazine,I’ll be glad if u send me one regularly,and it’ll be my pleasure too if I could join with KGI teacher’s database (Elke, PIRU)

Students in Ambon Thanks for your feedback and comments. A fabulous KGI 20th Anniversary t-shirt
Students in Ambon
Thanks for your feedback and comments. A fabulous KGI 20th Anniversary t-shirt will be sent to all these
people and you know what? We love your feedback so send us more SMS, letters and emails!
Don't worry too much about your English - just write, enjoy and practise your English.
Take a look at the small photographs on the cover of this magazine. Why did KGI staff choose those pictures
for the cover? Send an email to KGI and explain just three (3) of the pictures. Ten entries will win a top-level
learners dictionary from KGI, AusAID and the IALF, plus a 20th Anniversary t-shirt.

How much do things cost in Indonesia?

Indonesia has many hundreds of islands. Each island imports and exports goods and products from and across the archipelago. Did you know that Malang, and especially Batu, is famous for apples? You can buy them all over Indonesia, right? Some people say the best durian comes from Sumatra – what do you think? Small green stones used for decoration in up market homes and gardens come from a special beach in Flores. So, what is your island/province/town famous for? Buyers pay for these items but they also have to pay for the transportation of these items between islands. The prices go up the further away from the source that they are sold. Also the prices will vary depending on where you buy the goods. Many people like to use the local, traditional market as they can bargain with the seller for cheaper prices. Others find it more convenient to use supermarkets where they can buy everything they need under one roof – even if they have to pay a bit more. Here are some prices for goods and services here in Bali. How do they compare to where you live?

here in Bali. How do they compare to where you live? roti bakar - toasted sandwich

roti bakar - toasted sandwich

compare to where you live? roti bakar - toasted sandwich cukur rambut - hair cut nasi

cukur rambut - hair cut

roti bakar - toasted sandwich cukur rambut - hair cut nasi campur - mixed rice Indonesian
roti bakar - toasted sandwich cukur rambut - hair cut nasi campur - mixed rice Indonesian
roti bakar - toasted sandwich cukur rambut - hair cut nasi campur - mixed rice Indonesian

nasi campur - mixed rice

Indonesian style kos accommodation per month Rp 300.000 - 700.000

a

burger

-

Rp 7,000

Transport (per week on motorbike/bemo)

Rp 25,000

lunch at a warung -

RP 6,000

Power/electricity per month

Rp 50,000 - 100,000

a can of coke/soft drink - Rp 4,500

telephone

(land line/mobile)

Rp 50,000 - 100,000

a cheap pair of jeans -

Rp 80,000

a local CD (not imported or pirated)

Rp 35,000

a haircut (male)

Rp 6,000 - 10,000

a loaf of bread

Rp 6,000

a haircut

(female)

Rp 30,000

a kilo of rice

Rp 6,000

a cinema ticket -

Rp 20,000

a kilo of apples

Rp 14,500

a litre of petrol -

Rp 4,500

a litre of milk

Rp 12,500

Contents KGI

JUNE 2009

Front Cover: Life in Indonesia

Inside Front Cover: The March 2009 edition

1

Contents and Welcome from KGI

2

Kang Guru Voices

3

Idioms Inggris and Quick Fix

4

Life in Indonesia

5

Life in the cities

6

Life in the village

7

What we love about Indonesia

8-9

The Australia Indonesia Partnership (AIP)

10

Oz-Indo Connections

11

Inclusive Education - Edu for ALL

12-13

The Joeys in Indonesia

14

Kang Guru in the Classroom

15

Entertainment - so much on offer

16

Different Pond Different Fish (DPDF)

17

Kang Guru News Room

Back Cover: Building for the future

Kang Guru's logo represents the most commonly found kangaroos in Australia - the red kangaroo, often called Big Red, and the grey kangaroo.

Kang Guru Indonesia IALF - Bali PO Box 3095, Denpasar 80030, Bali Phone : (0361) 225243 Fax : (0361) 263509 Mobile: 081 2387 0479 (SMS only) Email : kangguru@ialf.edu Website : www.kangguru.org

Kang Guru Indonesia magazines are published in March, June, September and December. Kang Guru magazines are FREE and should not be sold for profit.

If you would like your own personal copy then write an interesting letter,eamil or SMS, of at least 75 words, to KGI to order the KGI magazine. Be sure to tell us about your life, hobbies, family, etc. Don't worry about your English. okay?

The views expressed are not necessarily those of AusAID or the Australian Government. Articles and photographs may be reproduced with permission from Kang Guru Indonesia.

Printed by PT Dian Rakyat Bali.

Welcome to all of our loyal KGI readers, and listeners AND web browsers to this, the June magazine for 2009. I hope this year is going very well for you all. This year is a big year for KGI - it's our 20th Anniversary. Did you know that? It is a great achievement and thanks to you for your support over the past years.

and thanks to you for your support over the past years. Surabaya BRIDGE participants: from left,

Surabaya BRIDGE participants:

from left, back: Ahmad Faiz, Ali Gufron, Kevin, Abdul Latif from left, front: Agung Prasetyo, Tsamrotul Fuadah - May 15th.

Now for this magazine. The theme is sort of the reverse of the March 2009 magazine theme – Life Down Under. This

magazine's theme is Life in Indonesia, and what's great about living here. Do you know that over the past few months, hundreds of people have written to us telling us why they think Indonesia is a great place to live. Many, many friends of KGI have told us why they absolutely love living here and why Indonesian life is so good. Besides reading those thoughts in this magazine, be sure to check the Story Page on the KGI website for more examples of these responses.

I have known KGI since I was in SMP. I study at UPS now. I love

Indonesia because it is my homeland. Indonesia is so comfy and

peaceful and everyone has a good heart. Riya Ekowati, Aceh Besar, NAD

Not only did we ask you to write about life in Indonesia but we also asked you to tell us about your thoughts on Kang Guru Indonesia as we approach our 20th Anniversary edition of this magazine. Rizaldi Sardani from Padang wrote this -

What I like most about Kang Guru? It is a hard question to answer. Frankly speaking, I like everything about Kang Guru, but the first thing is I like the way Kang Guru communicates in the texts in the magazines. Kang Guru makes me feel close to what is described

in the magazine. The way Kang Guru tells the news or story makes me feel I am experiencing the story. Every single word is exciting. Kang Guru also mentions and displays the KGI staff in the news and articles so it makes me feel emotionally bounded even though

I have never meet any of the KGI staff.

The 20 th Anniversary edition in September will be what we call a bumper issue. That means it will be bigger and better than ever before. There will be lots of pictures and reflections on the past 20 years of Kang Guru. More info on page 17. Perhaps you would like to contribute your thoughts to that edition? Feel free to write something about KGI through the years, or perhaps send any old KGI photographs that you may have. Be our guest BUT send them asap, okay?

that you may have. Be our guest BUT send them asap, okay? a special message from
a special message from Australian Foreign Minister, Mr. Stephen Smith Stephen Smith, Minister for Foreign
a special message from
Australian Foreign Minister,
Mr. Stephen Smith
Stephen Smith, Minister for Foreign
Affairs, has asked me to thank you for
the magazines and to commend you on
this initiative which promotes
Australia-Indonesia relations.
Anne Keane
Personal Assistant to the Minister
Kang Guru VOICES Kang Guru VOICES with Ayu Thanks Very Much letter email SMS forum
Kang Guru VOICES Kang Guru VOICES with Ayu Thanks Very Much letter email SMS forum
Kang Guru VOICES
Kang Guru VOICES
with Ayu
Thanks Very Much
letter
email
SMS
forum

I’m a undergraduate student now at the State University of Malang. I study biology. I’ve been a KGI subscriber since I was in second year of senior high school. I know about the magazine from my friend and I started to subscribe to the magazine. I like Idiom Inggris with Sue. From this article I learn much about using idioms correctly. Different Pond, Different Fish is what I like the most. Between Australia and Indonesia there are many different cultural things and it’s so funny when Australians come to Indonesia and find our different cultural things. Being a KGI subscriber gives me many advantages and I can improve my English. Thanks KGI.

Khoridah Sativa Malang, East Java

You are very welcome and I hope you enjoy this magazine too. Did you know that DPDF is one of KGIs most popular segments? It is!

KGI in Papua and Aceh +628134418XXXX My name is Yusuf Pohan .I’m an English teacher
KGI in Papua and Aceh
+628134418XXXX
My name is Yusuf Pohan .I’m an
English teacher of SMP Negeri 1
Merauke, Papua. I know KGI from a
friend when I followed teachers
upgrading recently in Jayapura. He
gave me the December edition. I’ll be
glad if you send me KGI magazine
regularly. I’d like to tell you that I
have sent Rp.150,000 by wesel pos to
order the SMP package both CD and
cassettes just now. I think you can
check it. I hope I can receive it soon.
I’m waiting for your reply.
+628572777XXXX
Hi KGI. I’m Riya Ekowati. I study in
UPS. I knew KGI when I was senior
high school. I’m interested to read it
cz I want my English get to be better.
I’m interested about life and people
in Australia. Please reply OK!
Jurong Peujera, Aceh Besar
During April 2009, KGI received
almost 500 SMS from KGI readers and
listeners. Sorry but we cannot answer
them all. I hope you understand that.
You can read some of them on the KGI
website in June and July - go to the
KGI Story Page and click on KGI SMS.
2

This decorative envelope is from Ida Ayu Cindy Agririsky in Klungkung, Bali.

From KGI Forum I am a new member of this Forum. I expect this Forum
From KGI Forum
I
am a new member of this Forum. I
expect this Forum help me improve
my English. Now, what are these
words in English:
- Sekolah Bertaraf International
- Karya Ilmiah Remaja
- Palang Merah Remaja
Linda, a teacher from Jombang
posted this on April 30th on the
What's the Meaning channel
Can anyone help Linda? Please go to
the KGI Forum and give Linda the
answers, okay?
Highlights I realize how important the earth is. Global Warming has become a ‘devil’ for
Highlights
I
realize how important the earth is.
Global Warming has become a ‘devil’
for us. Disaster always seem to
happen. When I read the Dec. 2008
magazine, I realized how important it
is to save our earth. Because of you
KGI, my song about the environment
became the 1 st winner for acoustic
song in an environment day
competition set up by International
Power PT IPMOMI MITSUI Co. LTD
Paiton Energy, Probolinggo. Through
this song I hope all people realize
that the Earth is very important.
Let’s save our environment. Don’t
wait until our earth breaks down!
Ingga Yonito Martalino
SMAN 1 Gending,
Probolinggo, East Java
Congratulations on your success. Yes,
thank you for the CD you sent. It is
great and we will play it on KGI radio
in July. I hope people will not only
listen to your song but also do
something for the environment. All
KGI staff wish you all the best and
keep up your good work!
LRCS

Check out these symbols in this magazine. They tell you where you can find even more information about the articles they are attached to.

I won scholarships because of Kang Guru

Happy Birthday Kang Guru but unfortunately I am in Perth now doing my P.hD in Curtin University so I can’t join your party. I got a scholar- ship from this university to do research on teacher development programs and their impact on teachers and their teaching. I won two scholarships - CIPRS from Curtin and Beasiswa Unggulan from Depdiknas. Kang Guru inspired me to do this research after you sent three KGI staff to visit Pemalang and meet with our local English teachers. I think all teachers can do what I have done. Teachers must learn and learn. I will soon write and share my experiences with teachers in Indonesia in order to motivate them to study more

Titien Soebari Perth, Western Australia

That's great news Titien and we wish you luck with your studies. And we agree, other Indonesian teachers can do what you have done. It takes a lot of study and hard work so 'Good Luck' from KGI.

Oh My Lovely Quick Fix

Quick Fix gives me new information about diction and which words are the right ones to use in the sentences. I have learned English for eight years but I still am not an expert in using the words. I used to choose them by feeling and which sounded appropriate in the sentences. Kang Guru just gives a little Quick Fix in the magazine but little by little I am learning more.

Armi Sanytasari Slawi - Te gal, Central Java

Heh Armi, don't forget to check out Quick Fix on the KGI website. There are more words and phrases for you to see there. I will ask Kevin to update Quick Fix on the web for you.

June 2009

Idioms Inggris with Sue Do you have a favorite idiom or slang expression? Most of
Idioms Inggris with Sue
Do you have a favorite idiom or slang expression? Most of us do, don’t we? KGI asked around the
IALF Bali office for some favourite home-grown idioms or sayings. I asked a variety of people for
their favorites. You can do the same thing in your school or with your friends - it is fun to do.
Give it a try!

Alana, Maggie, and Barbara, all ‘true blue’ Aussies came up with these three:

He’s a few kangaroos short in the top paddock. (He’s a bit stupid - tidak cerdas)

What a daggy outfit!

I’m chockers after that meal!

(What unfashionable clothes - bajunya kuno)

(I’m really full after that meal - kenyang)

bajunya kuno) (I’m really full after that meal - kenyang) Gayatri, a member of the KGI

Gayatri, a member of the KGI Consultative Group told us her favourite Indonesian idioms with their English translations. Here are two of them:

Lepas dari mulut buaya, masuk mulut harimau:

released from the crocodile’s mouth, enter the tiger’s mouth. In English we would say out of the frying pan into the fire. The meaning is quite clear – from one bad situa- tion to one which is even worse.

Kuman di seberang lautan tampak, gajah di pelupuk mata tak tampak: a germ across the sea can be seen, an elephant in front of the eyelid can’t.

In English we would say it’s easy to spot the mistakes of others, but not your own.

Chris is from the USA and he chose a saying he dislikes. Why does he dislike it? - Over exposure - he says he’s fed up of reading and hearing it in the news almost every day. Look at this definition: at the end of the day: something that you say before you say what you believe to be the most important fact of a situation.

Here are some examples:

Sure our best player was sent off but at the end of the day, Johan, we just didn’t play well enough to win the game.’ At the end of the day, what matters is that you’re safe.’

'Quick Fix'with Ayu
'Quick Fix'with Ayu

Indonesia and Australia are different countries with different cultures and languages. To be able to speak a second language like a native speaker it is important for us to learn something about the culture of that country. It definitely helps! However blending the two cultures sometimes isn't enough. If we translate what we usually say in our own language directly into English it may sound ‘funny’ to the native speaker. So be careful when you translate because direct translations are not always correct, or meaningful. It may sound unnatural and cause confusion, and sometimes laughter.

Look at these examples -

'Kasian deh lo' ------------- 'pity you' (with a smile)

For native speakers of English this doesn’t make sense. Perhaps try 'what a shame', 'poor you' or 'that's a pity'.

' poor you ' or ' that's a pity '. 'Seperti yang kita ketahui In English

'Seperti yang kita ketahui

In English 'as we all know' is not often used. It can be used when the speaker really does know (or is pretty sure) that the people he/she is addressing actually DO know that

information they are about to be told.

'

------'As we all know

'

are about to be told. ' ------ 'As we all know ' The same problem exists

The same problem exists in Indonesian language. Look at the examples below, they are from students who have studied Bahasa Indonesia:

'I like basketball' ---- 'Saya seperti bola basket'

'Saya suka bola basket'.

seperti bola basket' 'Saya suka bola basket'. 'Please write back' ---- 'Tolong menulis

'Please write back' ----'Tolong menulis punggung'.

'Tolong dibalas'.

'Tolong menulis punggung'. 'Tolong dibalas'. Good Luck! ---- Selamat beruntung. 'Semoga berhasil /

Good Luck! ---- Selamat beruntung.

'Semoga berhasil / Semoga beruntung'.

beruntung. 'Semoga berhasil / Semoga beruntung'. 'Tolong buka(lepas) sepatunya' ----'Please open

'Tolong buka(lepas) sepatunya' ----'Please open your shoes'

'Please take off your shoes'

open your shoes' 'Please take off your shoes' So be careful, direct translation doesn’t always work.

open your shoes' 'Please take off your shoes' So be careful, direct translation doesn’t always work.

So be careful, direct translation doesn’t always work. It may be a good idea to consult teachers/friends/ native speakers if you are translating something directly.

3
3

'Saya suka warna biru' ----'I like blue colour'

'I like blue'.

Polisi tidur ---------- sleeping policemen

'Speed bumps'.

like blue colour' 'I like blue'. Polisi tidur ---------- sleeping policemen 'Speed bumps'. June 2009

June 2009

Life In Indonesia LRCS We are very proud of our country for several reasons. Firstly
Life In Indonesia
Life In Indonesia

Life In Indonesia

Life In Indonesia
Life In Indonesia
Life In Indonesia
LRCS
LRCS

We are very proud of our country for several reasons. Firstly the culture and people. Our motto ‘BHINNEKA TUNGGAL IKA’ - Unity in Diversity - reflects the union of the many different cultures in Indonesia. The range of cultures simply makes life here more interesting. People can enjoy arts from different parts of Indonesia, varieties of food, local traditions, religious ceremonies. It is enriching when people travel to different parts of the country. In general, Indonesian people are so friendly and enjoy life, so visitors often go away with very positive impressions. Secondly, Indonesia is blessed with a wonderful tropical climate so fruits in particular grow very well. The range of fruit, and food in general, is quite outstanding. Like so many Indonesians we love to eat at all times of the day. The availability of such a wide range of delicious food is one of the real highlights of life here in our marvelous country.

KGI Champions

Street Vendors

When Indonesians are overseas and they are asked what they miss most about Indonesia they often say the street vendors! Street vendors sell a wide variety of things including fruit and vegetables, meat and poultry, cigarettes and telephone cards, clothes, kitchen utensils, electronics and even furniture. Food vendors are very popular as ‘tempat nongkrong’ for people of all ages. The food is cheap and not too formal although we cannot always be sure of the standard of hygiene.

we cannot always be sure of the standard of hygiene. The unique thing about food vendors

The unique thing about food vendors across Indonesia is they create new names for dishes all the time. Customers are generally very keen to try out these new items.

es Jerman/es jeruk manis - sweet orange juice STMJ (susu telur madu jahe) - milk, egg, honey, ginger INTERNET (Indomie, telur, kornet) - instant noodles with egg and corned beef batagor (bakso tahu goreng) - deep fried meatball and tofu sigobing (nasi goreng kambing) - fried rice with goat meat ganas (gado-gado nasi) - gado-gado with rice galon (gado-gado lontong) - gado-gado with rice cake burnas (bubur panas) - hot porridge piscok (pisang coklat) - banana and chocolate

What about the food sold from street vendors near your house? Do they sell any
What about the food sold from street vendors
near your house? Do they sell any things with
unusual names or acronyms such as these
examples above? SMS your entry to 08123870479

Traditional markets - beraneka ragam

Going to the daily market is part of Indonesian life. People go to the market not only to shop but also to socialise. Items sold in the traditional markets are cheaper than in the supermarkets. Of course being good at bargaining is very important. There are many different types of market in Indonesia - pasar burung, pasar pagi, pasar senen pasar malam etc. More unique ones include pasar senggol, pasar terapung (floating markets) and pasar kaget.

pasar terapung (floating markets) and pasar kaget. One famous market in Surabaya is called pasar maling

One famous market in Surabaya is called pasar maling (thieves market). This market is where thieves sell their stolen items. You can find things from kitchen utensils, second hand shoes and bags, to motorbikes. People often try their luck to find their own stolen items in the market.

Another unique market is the fa- mous Tomohon Market near Manado. Here you can find unusual animals ready to cook and eat such as mice, squirrels, bats, snakes and lizards. While Pasar Triwindu in Solo sells antiques. And Pasar Sungai Barito in Kalimantan sells everthing BUT on the water.

Markets that use the Javanese tra- ditional calendar are quite unusual too, for example pasar wage and pasar kliwon. These markets only open on very special days. Pasar kaget spring up just about anywhere and then disappear just as quickly.

up just about anywhere and then disappear just as quickly. Australia has markets but what are
up just about anywhere and then disappear just as quickly. Australia has markets but what are
Australia has markets but what are they like? Are there any common characteristics? Can anyone
Australia has markets but what are they like?
Are there any common characteristics? Can
anyone tell us? Email KGI with your
observations and win a KGI Gift Pack.

And a special note from the Kang Guru Champions

For us Champions, life in Indonesia is really interesting now because KGI gives us opportunities to get involved in various educational activities and we play a significant role in those activities. We feel our involvement with KGI has made us love living in Indonesia even more because we can do something to help others to learn English and it’s fun. Being a Kang Guru Champion is great voluntary work. It’s a great way for us to be actively involved in English language activities by visiting schools, English clubs and pesantren for English activities. We also get to attend and conduct teacher workshops and English training for students, plus attend and organize English events and competitions. It’s lovely because we can meet and share with many different teachers and students and work together. KGI has made us agents of change. Thank a lot, KGI.

many different teachers and students and work together. KGI has made us agents of change. Thank
4
4

June 2009

with KGI at Mamuju

LRCS
LRCS
with KGI a t M a m u j u LRCS Life in the cities Take
Life in the cities
Life in the cities

Life in the cities

Life in the cities
Life in the cities
Life in the cities

Take way not give way

When I first arrived in Bali, like many Westerners, I was completely baffled by how the road rules worked. I was still thinking ‘give way’ like I’d been used to in Australia. When I wanted to cross the road I waited politely at the kerb, smiling at the motorists, hoping someone would notice me and slow down so I could cross the road. After spending many long minutes waiting at the side of road and watching how the locals did it I realized that there was a different system operating. I called it the ‘take way’ system’. As a pedestrian you have to get your courage up and just step out into the oncoming traffic with your hand assertively raised to the motorists demanding that they slow down and let you cross.

The same thing if you are driving a car except in this case you use a flapping hand motion to signal to motorists that you are preparing to ‘take way’ and then you slowly ease yourself into the traffic. In both cases it’s your responsibility to ‘take away’ not the motorists responsibility to ‘give way’. It’s important not to show any hesitation otherwise motorists get confused about whether you are moving forward or not and they might try to squeeze in around you. If you are firm and assertive most motorists can see that you mean business and will stop for you. In the beginning it was really hard for me to ‘take way’ because it felt like I was throwing myself to certain death by launching myself into the traffic with only my open hand between that on- coming vehicle and me. This approach would certainly never work in Australia.

me. This approach would certainly never work in Australia. Sonja from Darwin Jam karet - rubber

Sonja from Darwin

Jam karet - rubber time

Many people say that jam karet - time rubber/elastic - is part of Indonesian culture. Do you agree? It seems that jam karet is an accepted part of Indonesian life. Indonesians have become accustomed to the flexibility of time. For special occasions like weddings and conferences, people do not mind waiting to show respect or to be polite. They often regard it as a chance to socialise. People do not mind if the event starts late. If people are late for an appointment they often claim jam karet. There are always a zillion reasons for being late of course - flat tyres, floods, traffic jams, being tired, travel delays and motorbikes breaking down.

Jam karet is NOT a part of Australian culture!

I'm already Not long. Only another 20 minutes. 20 minutes late. How much longer?
I'm already
Not long. Only
another 20 minutes.
20 minutes
late. How
much longer?

Warm up that engine

My Aussie student expressed surprise at the length of time that her host family would warm up the engine of their motorbikes or car. Sometimes they would keep the engine idling for 20 minutes or more. I explained that maybe they still followed the traditional idea that engines needed to be warmed up a very long time because in the old days that’s what was needed. Similarly in Indonesia, a lot of people follow the traditional practice of changing the oil every month regardless how many kilometers the car or bike has done. However, those people who read the manual for their bike or car understand about modern engines. It seems that Western people may have a better concept of mechanics, or they read the manuals more often perhaps.

Subagia from IALF Bali

Motorbikes everywhere!

Look around you. How many people own a motorbike in your village? Motorbikes certainly are VERY important in Indonesia. The number of motorbike users in Indonesia is increasing every year. It is estimated that motorbikes make up 75% of all vehicles on Indonesian roads. This statistic is very high compared to other ASEAN countries. Honda sold almost 1.5 million motorbikes in 2002 - the figure would be much higher now, don't you think? The Indonesian government and local authorities are concerned as the number of motorbikes is now causing more traffic jams and more accidents. Trucks and cars definitely add to the levels of air pollution and so do motor- bikes. So many vehicles giving off exhaust fumes is not good for our environment.

giving off exhaust fumes is not good for our environment. How can people and the authorities
How can people and the authorities cut down the levels of air pollution from vehicle
How can people and the authorities cut down the levels of air pollution
from vehicle exhausts, especially from older vehicles, in your city or
town? Is this possible or not? What do you think?

Here's a common question - why do some people in Indonesia like to wear motorbike helmets even when they are not on a motorbike?

It is not unusual to see people wearing bike helmets at the beach, inside the malls, while using the ATM machine, in buildings BUT so often not when riding on their motorbikes!

June 2009

5
5
Life in the village What is it ? People were thought to be growing it
Life in the village
Life in the village

Life in the village

Life in the village
Life in the village
Life in the village
Life in the village What is it ? People were thought to be growing it around

What is it?

People were thought to be growing it around 5000 years ago. It needs a lot of water to grow. In many countries it is the main or staple food. In Asia about 25 million small farms grow it. 5,000 liters of water are needed to produce 1 kg of it. There are more than 140,000 varieties of it. It is good for you as it is a good source of thiamin, iron, phosphorus, potassium and folic acid. Indonesians love it, averaging more than 200 kg per head each year compared to the average European who eats 5 kg. Hundreds of millions of the poor spend half to three fourths of their incomes on it. Malaysia is ready to import it from Indonesia if the Indonesian government decides to export the staple. There are an average of 36,590 grains of it in a kilogram and 1,829,500 grains in a 50 kg bag. And did you know that it was first grown commercially in Australia in the Murrumbidgee area of New South Wales in 1924.

Every part of the rice plant is used!

The straw (jerami) is used as fuel, as bedding for animals, can be made into rope, handicrafts, shoes, toys, paper and even bricks.

The grain (bulir) is cooked and eaten every day. It is also made into crackers, cereals, flour, milk, processed into feed for animals, cosmetics and fermented into wine, beer and vinegar.

The bran (dedak) is boiled for oil to make soap and cosmetics and added to foods for fibre and nutrition. It is also fed to chickens.

The hulls (kulit gabah) are used as packing material to protect delicate cargo, packed around ice as insulation and burned in simple stoves.

Ash (abu) from the hulls is sometimes used to clean teeth, and turned into cellulose products such as rayon and rice fuel.

turned into cellulose products such as rayon and rice fuel. Everyone eats bubur when they are

Everyone eats bubur when they are sick but did you know it is used for other illnesses too? Drinking the water of boiled rice is often used to treat patient with diarrhea. Cooled boiled rice is mashed into a paste and applied to swellings and skin blemishes. And did you know RICE stands for Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation – the best method to recover from most sports injuries. What would we do without RICE?

Twenty Years ++ in Indonesia - started in the village and moved to the city

Indonesia - started in the village and moved to the city I’ve been very fortunate in

I’ve been very fortunate in my life in Indonesia, having been lucky enough to experience life in remote villages first hand, and life in the megalopolis, Jakarta, which some say is really just like living in a giant cluster of villages. True in a way; people tend to gravitate to an area, and that is where you belong. Mine is South Jakarta. When you are in Cempaka Putih for example, you are in Cempaka Putih, and it is about as different from Kemang as it is possible to be. And in either place you are there without really a sense of being in Jakarta.

I first lived in a pesantren in South Sulawesi – no electricity, running water, twice-weekly

markets, seven kilometers to the nearest daily market. I was the poorest paid volunteer in Indonesia apparently. It taught me a lot about being in Indonesia, and introduced me to the very unique world of the Islamic Education community, where I’ve worked for most of my time

in Indonesia. By a set of circumstances I’ll never really understand, I met Molly Bondan, originally

a New Zealander, who had married an ‘independence hero’, taken Indonesian citizenship, and

lived here since 1947. She was able to interpret Indonesia for me, and give me unique insights and an understanding of how Indonesia had developed, and the set of values which I suppose get defined as national culture.

Molly taught me about Jakarta. She said that Jakartans love two things most – political speculation, and eating in street stalls; and that they are at their happiest when they can do the two things together. True, the very best conspiracy theories emerge in a warung kopi usually late at night. Jakarta has a wry sense of humour and is very proud of itself. We who live here follow the development of every scandal, pothole, every new construction, and greet them all with pride and sometimes rage.

Robert Kingham - LAPIS

pothole, every new construction, and greet them all with pride and sometimes rage. Robert Kingham -
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June 2009

What we love about Indonesia Kang Guru Indonesia recently had the chance to speak with
What we love about Indonesia
What we love about Indonesia

What we love about Indonesia

What we love about Indonesia
What we love about Indonesia
What we love about Indonesia

Kang Guru Indonesia recently had the chance to speak with Australian Ambassador, Mr. Bill Farmer and his wife Elaine about some of their experiences in Indonesia over the past three and a half years. What has impressed them most strongly as they have traveled the length and breadth of the country?

They both agree about the diversity that they have seen in Indonesia recalling the opportunities they have had to visit communities in places as distinct as Banda Aceh and Nias, Yogyakarta, Balikpapan, Komodo and Kupang. “The richness of different cultures, plus the binding presence of Bahasa Indonesia and a common Indonesian identity have been striking as we have travelled around”, the Ambassador said. Mrs Farmer commented on the many signs of religious observance and diversity she has seen throughout the archipelago.

As for highlights, the Ambassador told KGI that heading Australia’s largest Embassy, working with Indonesian Government, business and community leaders, have all been high points in his career. “It has been a privilege, “he said, “to work with Australians and Indonesians in areas of mutual interest – education, health, development, tourism, security, many others”. There has been real satisfaction at the success of the Kemitraan Australia-Indonesia through programs such as building 2000 schools around Indonesia, improving the health of mothers and babies in poor communities in Eastern Indonesia, and in working with Indonesia as it responded to the global financial crisis.

Mrs Farmer expressed her admiration for the many gifted Indonesians she has met, in fields as diverse as batik design, fashion, architecture, cooking and handicrafts. Mrs Farmer drew particular attention to their highly talented housekeeper, Ibu Sumi, at their official residence in Jakarta. Sumi’s expertise in many areas, and not just in the kitchen, has been commented upon by many visiting officials to the residence.

commented upon by many visiting officials to the residence. Ambassador Mr. Bill Farmer (yellow shirt) together

Ambassador Mr. Bill Farmer (yellow shirt) together with his wife, Elaine and a few friends in a local market in Bima

his wife, Elaine and a few friends in a local market in Bima Discovering Jakarta (and

Discovering Jakarta (and fitness) in the early morning on bicycles

Virtually every morning for three years, Louise Hand and her Indonesian friend/fitness trainer rode their bicycles around the streets of Jakarta. Setting off at 5.30am each morning, they discovered Jakarta as they combined exercise and adventure. Here’s a part of Louise’s report for KGI.

Kang Guru, a great friend while I worked as Deputy Head of Mission at the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, has asked me to describe for you one of the things I most enjoyed about my life in Indonesia. At 5.30 am, just before the sun comes up, Jakarta has a charm all of its own – you can forget the megacity - it comes alive as a series of small, humming, interconnected early morning communities. As I did almost everyday, if you have the chance to head off into the streets of Jakarta (or perhaps a city just like it) you will find a very friendly world. You will see squirrels climbing back to bed via the power lines, dads walking wide-awake babies, children getting ready for school and the noodle-stands setting up for business.

In Jakarta you can cycle past Monas with a nod to the great and glamorous mahogany trees, acknowledge the elegant spotted deer in the park, get up some speed on the road to Glodok and travel toward the harbour. You can ride down the full length of the dockyard to see the sun rise over the sea, and take a long look at those huge, spec- tacular, wooden ships. I loved their fading maritime blue and turquoise paint. The sailors’ washing is hung out to dry over carved railings and stairs. Once docked, down the plank comes all the cement, all the logs, anything you ever imagined carried on the shoulders of the day-work- ers. Back on the bike and on through the fish markets is just another part of my cycling adventures.

June 2009

We often stopped under a shady and generous tamarind tree where a man squatted on a mound of coconuts. This is his shop. He may or may not put his cigarette down while he chooses you a coconut, but watch the cold-blooded moment when he beheads the coconuts with his machete. One deadly swipe and you’ll have your drink, with a day- glo pink straw. At that moment – exhausted, hot, resting on chucked husks, with my Indonesian biking friend and a coconut drink in hand - I always felt completely happy.

On my desk in Canberra now I have a small photo of that very moment – the bikes stacked against a rickety fence, the mound of coconuts, and we are drinking from our bright straws.

of coconuts, and we are drinking from our bright straws. Louise Hand, former DHOM Jakarta (far

Louise Hand, former DHOM Jakarta (far right) is now Australia’s Ambassador for Climate Change NB The language in this article is quite challenging!

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Australia and Indonesia have been development partners for many years, with a strong and active relationship going back to the 1950s. The Australian Government will provide an estimated A$452.5 million (3.7 trillion Rupiah) in development assistance to Indonesia in 2009-10. Indonesia is the largest recipient of Australian development assistance in 2009-10. But it isn't just the development activities that makes the Australia Indonesia Partnership strong. It is also the people to people contacts that develop as a result of the associated activities, and as Kang Guru has always said, "Good Neighbours (do) Make Good Friends."

Barefoot Engineers in Papua

(do) Make Good Friends. " Barefoot Engineers in Papua More than 100 Indonesian technical facilitators, who
(do) Make Good Friends. " Barefoot Engineers in Papua More than 100 Indonesian technical facilitators, who

More than 100 Indonesian technical facilitators, who recently graduated from a basic infrastructure course funded by Australia, will be sent to rural villages to help build basic infrastructure such as roads, bridges and wells in Papua and West Papua. The six-month course is part of the Australian Government’s $2.7 million contribution to the special Papua province component of the Indonesian Government’s National Program for People’s Empowerment (PNPM – RESPEK). Known as ‘Barefoot-Engineers’, the participants were selected high school graduates who were taught technical skills in community development and construction. The training program responds to the lack of qualified engineers in Papua and West Papua, and increases the number of skilled technical facilitators available for deployment to rural villages.

A local university, Universitas Cenderawasih, helped prepare training modules and assisted in recruitment. About 30 per cent of the new technical facilitator graduates are women. Australia will also provide a gender specialist to improve gender sensitivity among facilitators and assess women’s participation in the program’s activities. By improving roads, bridges and wells these communities will be able to better access basic services and improve their livelihoods.

Difabled in Yogyakarta with the Central Java Community Assistance Program (YCAP)

*difabled - new terminology for people having different abilities to others

In November 2006, the Australian Ambassador, Mr. Bill Farmer, visited some of YCAP's activities in Yogyakarta. He saw communities working together with YCAP. They were busy planning their community responses to the devastating earthquake which had happened a few months earlier. KGI was there too - check KGI website link below for more information and photographs.

YCAP has continued working hard with other affected communities. In late April 2009, KGI visited two activities in Pundong, 45 minutes south of Yogyakarta. This area was badly affected by the earthquake. YCAP staff, Rachma Safitri and Damayanti Sari Rohmaningtyas took Kevin to a new project's socialization meeting. Community members were planning and discussing a new assistance program for difabled members of their community. The interest shown by the community, and especially the women, was quite surprising for organizers. Local NGO, Dria Manunggal, have been asked by YCAP to set up this program for the difabled victims (and their families) of the Yogyakarta earthquake.

Paramastu Titis Anggita is Project Manager for this program - Increasing Difable Family Income Inclusively. The program will focus on people’s livelihoods and their economic development in Bantul district. The project will train and strengthen businesses in the local sub sector such as food processing - producing local food such as tempe and crackers, and retailers - selling basic daily needs items, and livestock - fowl and fishery

KGI visited the home of Ibu Atun, a very happy mother of new one week old baby. It was an amaz- ing experience to see how YCAP, through local NGO Pusat Rehabilitasi YAKKUM, is helping Atun and her family to get on with their lives. Atun is difabled and uses a spe- cially designed wheel- chair. It was provided by YCAP and PR YAKKUM through program Livelihood Program for People with Disability, Victims of Java Earthquake program. Assisted by her husband, she has started a home based business of raising catfish in a pool in the family yard. The family just had their first har- vest of catfish. The business has begun!

their first har- vest of catfish. The business has begun! Check out all of these AusAID
their first har- vest of catfish. The business has begun! Check out all of these AusAID

Check out all of these AusAID activities (and more) on KGI's website - www.kangguru.org/ausaidprojects/

www.kangguru.org/travel/kgitravel2009yogyakarta.htm

www.kangguru.org/travel kgretravel2006yogyajakarta.htm#ycap

www.kangguru.org/travel kgretravel2006yogyajakarta.htm#ycap 8 June 2009
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June 2009

Smallholder Agribusiness Development Initiative (SADI)

LRCS
LRCS

Being a farmer is not easy – not just in Indonesia but all over the world. To be successful they must overcome many elements which they can’t control such as the weather, pests, natural disasters and market prices. However help is on its way! Groups of cattle farmers in Lombok and South Sulawesi are getting assistance from an ACIAR (Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research) - SADI (The Smallholder Agribusiness Development Initiative) research team. Cattle- farming is one of the best ways smallholder farmers can increase their income as cattle are more profitable than grain.

their income as cattle are more profitable than grain. KGI visited two farmers groups in Lombok

KGI visited two farmers groups in Lombok recently ac- companied by Rini Indrayanti from SADI, Makassar, Pak Giri, Mr. Dahlanuddin, from the University of Mataram and project team members from Dinas Peternakan Kabupaten and Propinsi and BPTP. Working in collaboration with other agencies SADI has developed programs to support the farmers. One of the main problems farmers face is quantity, quality and continuity of good food for the cattle. SADI has introduced new types of fodder - rumput untuk ternak - which farmers can grow easily and feed to their cattle. Farmers can now sell fatter animals more often - typically one to two extra animals per year, therefore increasing their income.

The ACIAR–SADI research team has also introduced simple management practices to enhance stock survival and productivity. Groups of farmers are now keeping their cattle in collective kandangs (barns) which they have built themselves with assistance from SADI and the local Dinas Peternakan Kabupaten. By using these simple feeding and management technologies, smallholder farmers can more quickly become owners and producers of a valuable product in high demand, and in a growing market. It was a fascinating day for Kang Guru and we learned a lot.

On March 13th, BRIDGE participants attended the official launch of BRIDGE at the Sidney Myer Asia Centre in Melbourne. The Indonesian participants were thrilled to be able to sit down and chat with the Indonesian Ambassador to Australia, Mr Primo Alui Joelianto. The Ambassador spoke to KGI at the dinner and had this to say about BRIDGE.

"My name is Primo Alui Joelianto. I’m Ambassador of Indonesia to Australia. I’ve been three weeks in Australia and I was invited by the BRIDGE Project to attend. And I see this project is fantastic as this is one of the reflection of the spirit of solidarity between Australia and Indone- sia. And also one of the follow up action of the conference that we held some days ago in Sydney. So this is actually what we we meant as a comprehensive partnership. So the friendship is not only between the government but also even more importantly is between people of Indonesia and Australia. And we see that this is the first step, a very important step that BRIDGE has taken in strengthening the relation, the people- to-people links between Indonesia and Australia.

the people- to-people links between Indonesia and Australia. While in Melbourne, Indonesian participants traveled to
the people- to-people links between Indonesia and Australia. While in Melbourne, Indonesian participants traveled to
the people- to-people links between Indonesia and Australia. While in Melbourne, Indonesian participants traveled to

While in Melbourne, Indonesian participants traveled to Pascoe Vale South Primary School, about 20 minutes from the Asia Centre. Participants were given tours of the school led by young students who described their school in great detail. These students were so helpful and kind. They answered questions and had a lot of fun with the BRIDGE participants. BRIDGE participants spent several hours talking with their guides before meeting with teachers over morning tea.

their guides before meeting with teachers over morning tea. Era Surya Adnyani (SMAN 4 Denpasar) talking

Era Surya Adnyani (SMAN 4 Denpasar) talking to Duncan about his school and school- work at Pascoe Vale South Primary School.

Much of the success of BRIDGE depends on the sister-schools, and the Australian/Indonesian par- ticipant pairs, setting up internet-based wikispaces, project-based learning and people-to- people communications. Wikispaces will connect them across the oceans - a BRIDGE in fact! The computer training days were intense with participants setting up their wikispaces not just for themselves, but for their students too, during 2009 and onwards!

What is the Australia-Indonesia BRIDGE? It is an Australia- Indonesia project for Building Relationships through Intercultural Dialogue and Growing Engagement managed by the Asia Education Foundation (AEF) in Melbourne. Use the SEARCH function on KGI's website to find out more. www.kanguru.org (SEARCH)

June 2009

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Australian Development Scholarships Oz- Indo Connections Australian Development Scholarships, a AUD$40 million (Rp
Australian Development Scholarships Oz- Indo Connections

Australian Development Scholarships

Oz-Indo Connections

Australian Development Scholarships Oz- Indo Connections

Australian Development Scholarships, a AUD$40 million (Rp 300 trillion) program offers Indonesians the opportunity to study at Masters or Doctorate levels at an Australian University. Fields of study include those important to economic, social and community development in Indonesia. Australia provides 300 postgraduate scholarships every year for Indonesians to not only obtain postgraduate qualifications but also experience the Australian way of life and share Indonesian culture heritage with Australia. Applications for the 2010 intake open on 15 June 2009. Further information can be found at www.australianscholarships.gov.au

Muslim Exchange Program 2009

Samsul Ma’arif Mujiharto is from Yogyakarta. He has a Master Degree from Center for Religious and Cross Cultural Studies (CRCS) from Gadjah Mada University and is currently as lecturer at Faculty of Philosophy of UGM. He

is a participant in the 2009 Muslim Exchange program from

the Australia Indonesia Institute (AII). On May 1st, KGI asked Samsul what he wanted to find out about Muslim life in Australia. Samsul actually left for Australia the very next day. He returned on May 17th and KGI caught up with him. Did he find the answer to his question? Check the KGI website to see what he found out in Australia.

How does the Australian government manage the very wide diversity of religions, cultures and languages in Australia?

diversity of religions, cultures and languages in Australia? Australian Consortium of In Country Indonesian Studies

Australian Consortium of In Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS)

On Friday April 17 th , Kevin traveled to Gajah Mada University in Yogyakarta to meet Ms Elena Williams, Yogyakarta Program Officer for ACICIS. Every Friday morning local Indonesian students are invited to enjoy a conversation session event with UGM ACICIS students. The discussions with students from Purharjo on 17/4 were terrific and as expected there were lots of questions about Australia, schools there and the Aussie lifestyle. Benita, one of the ACICIS students, brought along some Vegemite for the visitors to taste – it was a mixed reaction to say the least! Vegemite is very popular in Australia but somehow judging by student reactions, Kevin is pretty sure it will never become a household treat in Indonesia.

ACICIS is involved with many programs in Indonesia including the Journalism Professional Practicum or JPP (see KGI March 2009 magazine), an immersion semester (language and cultural subjects) and Islamic Studies Immersion semester option both based in Yogyakarta, and a field research immersion semester based at in Malang. Be sure to check out the ACICIS website - learn more about this marvelous people to people Australia- Indonesia activity. You will be surprised at the amazing range of interesting information on their website -

amazing range of interesting information on their website - www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au 'Good Neighbours Make Good

www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au

'Good Neighbours Make Good Friends'

From left: Dede Syarif is from Bandung, , Sanchi and Wati from Cultural Affairs, Lalu Ahmad Zaenuri is from Mataram and Samsul. Check KGI's special Muslim Exchange website page in June 2009.

Good Neighbours Make Good Friends has been KGI’s logo for twenty years. This assistance does not only happen between governments and provinces and states BUT also between people. Through extensive people-to-people activities, a lot is

happening everyday between people in Australia and in Indonesia. Thousands of visitors come to Indonesia every year and

it is understandable that many of them want to give back - balas budi. By helping young people, orphanages, local NGOs

and hospitals the visitors are able to give back.

A good example is a Perth businesswoman, while celebrating 20 years in business,

wanted to do something for the people of her second home. She asked a group of friends in Perth to travel to Bali as part of her birthday celebrations and, rather than give her a gift, donate money for wheelchairs for the disabled in Bali. She raised enough money for ten wheelchairs and in fact, much of the work to make the wheelchairs was also voluntary. More wheelchairs are on their way soon. Local authorities provided invaluable assistance in ensuring the wheelchairs passed through customs and into Indonesia safely. Many Australians are donating clothing including a group of volunteer workers at 'Caring Heart' where ladies sew clothes for many needy children overseas, including Hope Children’s Home in Dalung.

The children from Hope Children’s Home have been involved in a successful Pen Pal Program exchanging cultural experiences with a school Geelong, Victoria. This type of exchange activity culturally enriches, not only the children here, but those in Australia as well. There are over 100 sponsors from Australia currently sponsoring school fees for students at Hope. There are even two Australians sponsoring a young women who is now studying medicine at Udayana University.

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women who is now studying medicine at Udayana University. 10 Staff and students at YPAC in

Staff and students at YPAC in Bali with Aussie helper, Gai Davis.

June 2009

Inclusive Education - Education for ALL
Inclusive Education - Education for ALL

Inclusive Education - Education for ALL

Inclusive Education - Education for ALL
Inclusive Education - Education for ALL
Inclusive Education - Education for ALL

Children, no matter who they are or where they are from, are entitled to a good education. This is a basic human right. It is a fact that many children across the world, and across Indonesia, are being denied this basic right. Whether the children are poor, female, disabled, suffer from Downs Syndrome or HIV AIDS, or students in combatant areas for example, basic education IS their right and therefore that education must be provided. KGI is pretty sure that everyone agrees with this, right?

Over recent years, KGI has introduced readers of this magazine to quite a few disabled, sometimes referred to as difabled people. In 2001 we met Chandra Gallih from Bandung. He started The Space Club in Bandung in 2001 and it was one of the first Kang Guru Connection Clubs. In the December 2005 KGI magazine Chandra talked about being an hemophiliac (orang yang mengalami masalah dengan pembekuan darah) in Indonesia. September 2007 featured the importance of accessible environments for the disabled with Australian Volunteer International, Paulien Long and YAKKUM in Bali. In the December 2007 magazine KGI talked about craniofacial surgery for Indonesian children afflicted with cleft palates and facial deformities. In June 2008 it was news about disabled athletes (weightlifting and tennis).

While opening SMPN 5 Gerung in Lombok (see right), Australia’s Parliamentary Secretary, Mr Bob McMullan, told the local community that Australia is committed to making basic education accessible to all students, including the disabled. This process has already started. All schools being built through AIBEP will be built in a manner that enables access for people with physical disabilities. This policy is fully supported by the Indonesian government.

Photo by Josh Estey
Photo by Josh Estey
supported by the Indonesian government. Photo by Josh Estey At the very same time that Mr

At the very same time that Mr McMullan

was opening SMPN 5 Gerung, Ibu Mia from HWPCI (Himpunan Wanita Penyandang Cacat Indonesia) or the Indonesian Women with Disabilities of South Sulawesi based in Makassar and her team, was presenting a 2 day workshop on Inclusive Education at the Grand Hotel Legi in nearby Mataram. With support from PGMI - Pendidikan Guru Madrasah Ibtidayah/Teacher Education for MI Teachers - a LAPIS sub-activity based at IAIN Sunan Ampel in Surabaya, HWPCI also presented their Inclusive Education Road Show in Malang, Surabaya, Makassar and Ponorogo. These two-day workshops for local education authorities and teachers were conducted to inform participants of the necessity for inclusive education. The physically disabled and those students with HIV AIDS were highlighted for special attention. Workshop participants discussed how to develop ideas on approaches to inclusive education and how to make communities aware that inclusive education is

possible, and it is necessary!

With support from the Australia Indonesia Institute (AII), Ibu Mia and Ibu Hetty from HWPCI went to Australia in March 2009 to see how inclusive education works in Queensland. They were accompanied by Dr. Izul Zulaiha who is the National Module Development Specialist at LAPIS and has helped prepare modules covering reproductive health, HIV AIDS, gender and reforestation. LAPIS is very keen to assist schools and teachers in Islamic schools to cater for disabled students in their madrasah classrooms. With support from MAPENDA South Sulawesi, this process has already begun in SulSel. MAPENDA is keen to hear what further recommendations HWPCI has for them. Renovating schools to accept wheelchairs is one of the first things to do. Five madrasah are already working towards the goal of having inclusive education as a part of their institution.

having inclusive education as a part of their institution. KGI spoke with Ibu Mia at the

KGI spoke with Ibu Mia at the HWPCI Inclusive Education Roadshow in Mataram. Mia said some very interesting things -

she feels very fortunate to be a disabled person helping other disabled people to get a proper education and full opportunities like every one else

HWPCI began as a national organization over 10 years ago in 1997

many parents keep their disabled children at home

once disabled people hear about the opportunities that ARE available, they usually become very brave and join organizations such as HWPCI

inclusive education is happening in Indonesia

in SULSEL 5 madrasah are beginning to work with HWPCI and one will be a model for other schools in Indonesia to follow

children with disabilities are reluctant to enter regular schools because of the lack of training of the teachers to look after them

there are 25 teachers in SulSel training right now to become specialist teachers of the disabled (using specially designed LAPIS training modules)

• • • • • • •

June 2009

Melanie Simpson was successful in her application to the Australian Youth Ambassador for Development (AYAD) program to volunteer with HWPCI as an Inclusive Development Programs officer based in Makassar. Read more about Melanie and her work on the KGI website in July 2009.

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June 2009 12
June 2009
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June 2009

In March the JOEYS went to Australia, this time the JOEYS traveled to Sumatra. They visited six different provinces in Sumatra. At the end of their trip they got a special surprise from Kang Guru. You can find the surprise somewhere on the map. Can you help the JOEYS to find the surprise? Follow the instructions and find the surprise for the JOEYS! You will need a map to help you.

If you are an SMP student then please send your answers by letter/email to the JOEYS at Kang Guru before July 31 st . The JOEYS’ email address : joeys@ialf.edu

S2: Go south 2 squares TASK 2 The JOEYS can’t take the surprise home with them. It's too big! So they have to enjoy the surprise there. What is actually the KGI surprise for the JOEYS then? Can you guess?

E5: Go east 5 squares.

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TASK 3 Here is a terrific postcard from the JOEYS. Now imagine that you are
TASK 3
Here is a terrific postcard from the JOEYS.
Now imagine that you are a member of the JOEYS. Please write a
postcard about your trip to one of the places in Sumatra.
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CamTESOL, Phnom Penh I presented a workshop at the CamTESOL conference in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
CamTESOL, Phnom Penh I presented a workshop at the CamTESOL conference in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

CamTESOL, Phnom Penh

I presented a workshop at the CamTESOL conference in Phnom Penh, Cambodia in February 2009. The theme of the conference was ‘The Globalisation of ELT: Emerging Directions.’ Over 1,300 people attended and over 50% of the participants were Cambodian teachers, many from the rural areas of Cambodia. The opening plenary speaker, Professor Jun Liu, from the Department of English, University of Arizona talked of the challenges, difficulties, advantages and disadvantages of using NNEST (non-native English speaker teachers) and how NNEST and NEST (native English speaker teachers) can mutually benefit from working together. I think this is very relevant to Indonesia. During the conference I talked to some of the Cambodian teachers and it seems they have similar problems as teachers in rural areas of Indonesia – lack of materials, old school buildings and little chance for extra training. About 25 people, mostly Cambodians, attended my teacher workshop on using newspapers and magazine articles and photographs in the classroom, including some articles from Kang Guru magazines and Joey’s cartoons.

Kang Guru and ELTIS working together to assist MGMP in East Java

In April, Sue from Kang Guru conducted three workshops in three days in three towns in East Java - Bondowoso, Situbondo and Probolinggo. Imam Mulyadi, a Master Trainer for ELTIS had

worked with the ELTIS district coordinators, to establish MGMP for Madrasah Tsanawiyah teachers in these areas. About 75 of the participants were teachers at MTs and the remaining teachers from SMP, SMA and SMK schools nearby. Drs. H. Amin Said Husni the Bupati of Bondowoso opened the first workshop

. which was held at Aula Yayasan At Taqwa. In Situbondo the

workshop was held at MTs Nurul Huda, also the home of Pak Imron Zarkasyi, the ELTIS district coordinator. In Probolinggo Pak Siradj, the head of the Religious Affairs office formally opened the workshop. Well done to the committees at each location who worked very hard to make each one special and

meaningful for the participants.

make each one special and meaningful for the participants. ELTIS – English Language Training For Islamic

ELTIS – English Language Training For Islamic Schools http://www.lapis-eltis.org/

KGI often has SMS Competitions for students BUT this time we have a Special SMS
KGI often has SMS
Competitions for
students BUT this time
we have a Special SMS
Competition for English
language teachers ONLY!
Teachers should send
their SMS to KGI as soon as possible
and answer the question below. Five
winners will receive a full KGI
Teacher Gift Pack including SMP and
SMA teaching materials, a t-shirt and
lots of other goodies to use to
motivate students.
What is the best activity you have
done in your classroom that has taught
your students about the Indonesia
Australia Partnership?

Storytelling Competitions - so popular and such a

GOOD way to study and enjoy English!

Story telling competitions are popular in many areas and Dinna Wahyuningsih from Madiun asked KG for some tips to help her students become good storytellers. Here is some advice:

Choose a short, simple story that you like. If you are choosing a story from a book, read it aloud before deciding whether to adapt it for telling. Practice in front of a mirror (or ask someone to film you) and pay attention to the way you stand and the gestures you use. Record yourself and listen carefully to your voice for clear speech, correct stress and intonation. Try telling the story to friends. Ask them for feedback. Time the story and see which parts need to be told faster and where you need to slow down. Which parts should be louder and which parts quieter. Interact with your audience – look them in the eye.

Try this website for more complete ideas: http://www.aaronshep.com/ storytelling/Tips.html

As soon as each new magazine is printed KGI receives many letters and emails, and
As soon as each new magazine is printed KGI receives many
letters and emails, and even SMS from teachers asking “Where
are our KGI magazines?” or “Where is the LRCS?” It’s nice to
feel wanted but we ask you to please be patient. We send out
more than 30,000 magazines each edition. Each one has to be
labeled individually. They can’t all be done in one day! The
postman is a daily visitor to the KGI office and he is especially
busy at magazine time! Anton S. from SMAN 1 Salaman, Magelang
wrote and said it would be better if we published the magazine
every month! That's a great suggestion, but just not possible!
June 2009
A Special KGI Announcement for teachers: Both SMP and SMA packages are currently being revised.
A Special KGI Announcement for teachers:
Both SMP and SMA packages are currently
being revised. These new packages will be
ready and available in July for SMP and
later in the year for the SMA package.
Please contact KGI after June (for SMP) and
after September (for SMA) to order your
new packages.
14

Entertainment in Indonesia

from

the traditional to the modern

Entertainment in Indonesia from the traditional to the modern Indonesia is a country which is very

Indonesia is a country which is very rich in arts and culture, therefore Indonesians and their visitors have a wide selection of local entertainment for people to enjoy. They range from the traditional to the very modern. Wayang, sendratari, gamelan, keroncong, tarian, layar tancep are all part of traditional entertainment. Apart from those there are traditional ceremonies like weddings, house- warming celebrations, cremation ceremonies in Bali and Tana Toraja and rice-harvest ceremonies.

Every area has its own set of traditional performances and ceremonies. In Bali, for example, every full moon and new moon there are traditional dances and gamelan performances by school children at Puputan Park in Denpasar. Most provinces also have annual festivals which are held at different times of the year like sekaten in Jogjakarta and Solo, layang- layang festivals across the country and the Bau Nyale Festival in South Lombok.

Apart from traditional entertainment, there are some more modern activities that Indonesian people enjoy such as going to the movies, art exhibitions, nightclubs and parties. But the most popular are music concerts. Enjoying either indoor/outdoor music concerts is very popular and there are different kind of concerts. Dangdut, pop, rock and jazz are some of the most popular. Many big companies sponsor these concerts as one way to sell their products. That's great for audiences.

We feel lucky living in Indonesia because we don’t have to search for entertainment. Just look around you - the entertainment is everywhere! What is your favourite entertainment, traditional or modern, in your area?

June 2009
June 2009
15
15
DIFFERENT POND DIFFERENT FISH LAIN LUBUK LAIN IKAN LRCS
DIFFERENT
POND
DIFFERENT FISH
LAIN
LUBUK
LAIN IKAN
LRCS

Ah, a bule in Lombok

I moved to Indonesia seventeen years ago. I spent the

first seven years in Jakarta and was just another expatriate in a busy city. No one gave me a second glance. Then I

moved to Bali – the tourist center of Indonesia. Even though I only live 30 minutes away from the capital Denpasar and the main tourist area, Kuta I am still surprised at the reaction from some of the residents of the village where

I live - especially the older ones. They still call me ‘tamu’

– even though I have lived there for ten years! They think

I am mad traveling to Denpasar every day – they might only go there once a year. Some of the younger children cry or run away when they see me. I wonder what stories have they been told?

Recently I visited a SADI cattle fattening project in a small village in the hills outside Praya, Lombok. As we were talking to the farmers a group of children began to watch from behind the fence. The older ones were quite brave and tried to speak some English. However the smaller ones were very wary – one small boy in particular. His older sister told me it was the first time he had seen a ‘bule’ and someone

with white skin. They never go to the tour- ist areas in Lombok and no foreigners have ever visited their village. I am sure this must be true for many areas of Indonesia. What did you think the first time you saw a ‘bule’?

Sue from KGI

More new words - always interesting, don't you think!

People seem to enjoy creating new words from old ones. The creation of new words is often done by joining two other words together. However for westerners who are learning Bahasa Indonesia, it is often quite difficult to follow regular conversations because of these newly created words. People who use standard Indonesian often sound unnatural and too formal, and for young people this is often thought of as not cool. You may know these some of these words below but for others you probably won't find the English translation in any dictionary.

Living in a 'kos' in Jogja

Well, here I am again in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and it’s absolutely wonderful! To answer the question most of you seemed to be asking - yes, I have found a place to live, and no, it’s not exactly what you’d call ‘good’! But it’s quite luxurious by Indonesian standards. Although I had read all the pre-departure info we were given, I don’t think I was quite prepared for the standard of accommodation available. I am staying in a ‘kos’ (boarding house) in a rather luxurious suburb called Pogung Baru, about 30 mins walk from Uni. Before I came here I had a list of criteria for my kos room - it had to have a western toilet, own bathroom, air con, fridge inside room, desk, plenty of cupboard space… ha! What a joke! As I cruised

around kos-hunting they sort of went down the drain and in the end I got none of those things (except my own bathroom)! But I do admit it’s not that bad, once you get used to it. I have a bed with a mattress that is too big for the frame, a very small cupboard, and a desk. That’s it. My bathroom is similarly sparse, with a non-Western toilet (am still trying to work it out) and a tap (Yes, that’s it!!!!). No sink, just a drain in the ground, and no shower head! It’s okay, though, because I do have a makeshift ‘bak’ (bath)

- a plastic container filled with water, and

a small plastic bucket to throw (cold) water

over myself. It’s quite refreshing after the first throw!

over myself. It’s quite refreshing after the first throw! Wah boleh juga, ada peternak sapi bule
Wah boleh juga, ada peternak sapi bule - lumayan buat cuci mata Siapa nama shapi
Wah boleh juga, ada
peternak sapi bule -
lumayan buat cuci mata
Siapa nama
shapi Anda?

Zahra Matthews,19, University of Sydney

For more stories go to the ACICIS website and click Student Perspectives http://www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au

The Grand Winner of the 2009 KGI Writing Competition is Dwi Wahyu Hari Basuki from
The Grand Winner of the 2009 KGI
Writing Competition is Dwi Wahyu
Hari Basuki from SMP Bustanul Makmur
in Genteng, Banyuwangi. The second
winner is Aini from Palangkaraya in
Central Kalimantan. The third winner
is Rizki Kurniawan from Purbalingga in
Central Java. All of these winners will
visit Bali in July 2009 as guests of KGI,
together with Helmi Watimury from
Sorong, a winner from 2008 who was
unable to visit Bali last year. These
winning entries, plus others, can be
seen on the KGI website - Story Pages.

June 2009

curhat (curahan hati) : to share feelings/thoughts with somebody camer (calon mertua) : future in laws gaptek (gagap teknologi) : techno-phobe jaim (jaga imej) : safeguard someone's social image kuper (kurang pergaulan) : not well-socialised lemot (lemah otak): slow brain/slow thought narsis : someone who loves her/himself more than anything suntuk : feeling bored and not in a good mood bengong : do nothing / give a blank look gacoan : love interest heboh : boisterous tebar pesona : spreading charm bete : in a bad mood tajir : rich

cuci mata (picture right)

16
16
heboh : boisterous tebar pesona : spreading charm bete : in a bad mood tajir :

Kang Guru News Room

September's KGI 20th Anniversary Magazine

This special magazine will be bigger and better than any before it AND a pure celebration of 20 years in Indonesia. That's 20 years of telling people all about the Australia-Indonesia relationship, the wide variety of development activities from AusAID, and the myriad of people to people links that are so very strong these days. It will also celebrate KGI assisting people to learn and enjoy English.

celebrate KGI assisting people to learn and enjoy English. Kang Guru Podcasts on the internet KGI

Kang Guru Podcasts on the internet

KGI has finally included podcasts onto the Kang Guru website. You can now hear, and download sound from the site. Check out March and June 2009 magazine pages for podcasts in both English and Bahasa Indonesia. You can listen to selected articles from these magazines AND in both languages. There's a lot more to come as well and special thanks to Indira from IALF Bali's Computer Services Dept. for her assistance with this technology - check what we have done already - your feedback appreciated.learn and enjoy English. Kang Guru Podcasts on the internet www.kangguru.org/Podcast/March2009_translations.html

www.kangguru.org/Podcast/March2009_translations.html

KGI's latest email-exchange program Life in Indonesia and Life in Australia

Over the past two years KGI has helped set up several e–learning exchange programs involving schools in Indonesia and Australia. In February/March 2009, Kang Guru facilitated a further email exchange program to build upon those e–learning exchange programs from 2008. This 2009 email exchange program involved 14 Indonesian schools and 12 Australian schools (see right). And what did they do? That's right, they exchanged information about life in Indonesia and Australia.

exchanged information about life in Indonesia and Australia. This KGI/Joeys e-exchange program received a lot of
exchanged information about life in Indonesia and Australia. This KGI/Joeys e-exchange program received a lot of
exchanged information about life in Indonesia and Australia. This KGI/Joeys e-exchange program received a lot of
exchanged information about life in Indonesia and Australia. This KGI/Joeys e-exchange program received a lot of

This KGI/Joeys e-exchange program received a lot of positive feed back from both teachers and students.

Kesempatan untuk saling berkiriman email dengan sekolah Indonesia sangat penting. Siswa-siswi di kelas saya di Australia didorong berbahasa Indonesia karena ada alasan yang berarti dan “authentic” untuk berkomunikasi. Tambah lagi, pasti jauh lebih memuaskan belajar tentang bahasa dan kebudayaan Indonesia dari remaja Indonesia. Diharapkan bahwa lewat “exchange ini” pandangan siswa-siswi akan diperluas dan hubungan persahabatan antara pemuda Australia dengan pemuda Indonesia (serta kaum guru) dapat terwujud. Semoga pada masa depan hubungan antara kedua bangsa kita akan lebih erat juga.

(Jo Fenton, Guru Bahasa Indonesia, Macarthur Anglican School, NSW)

Guru Bahasa Indonesia, Macarthur Anglican School, NSW) 0812380XXXX Is there mosques in Australia? KGI receives a
Guru Bahasa Indonesia, Macarthur Anglican School, NSW) 0812380XXXX Is there mosques in Australia? KGI receives a
Guru Bahasa Indonesia, Macarthur Anglican School, NSW) 0812380XXXX Is there mosques in Australia? KGI receives a
0812380XXXX Is there mosques in Australia? KGI receives a lot of SMSs and email about
0812380XXXX Is there mosques in Australia?
KGI receives a lot of SMSs and email about religion in
Australia. People ask if there are mosques, and are jilbabs
banned, in Australia? Is Christianity the only religion in
Australia? In the September magazine, KGI will tell you
about religion in Australia. We will answer your questions.
Send them NOW to SMS 08123870479.
(Photo left) Australian
participants in the 2009
Muslim Exchange Program
in Jakarta - May 18th.

KGCCs keep going strong

A letter from Benigno Narahawarin, STA’R – 92 English Club in Saumlaki

We would like to inform you about our STA’R EN- GLISH CLUB in Arui Das village. We are still in con- tact with KGI although the Kang Guru Connection has closed down. We still conduct our regular ac- tivities. First we have changed our name to STA’R 92. It’s a Science and English Club and for 95% of the activities we use Kang Guru magazines. We also have appointed new leaders for the new club. We are also going to conduct an English Workshop in June and the good news is that we got a new laptop and a printer from the Bupati after our club was featured in the December 2008 magazine. We would like to say thank you for visiting us and for the nice report about us in the magazine. We hope to see you soon in Arui Das again!

KGI Note: Sustainability! That's fantastic and all the best from KGI in Bali. Well done!

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SMPN 1 Cimahi, West Java

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SMPN 2 Gunung Talang, Sumatra

SMP YPK Bintan, East Kalimantan

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SMPK Immanuel, Pontianak, West Kalimantan

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SMP Al Taqwah, Bondowoso, East Java

SMPN 1 Gresik, East Java

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SMPN 5 Cilacap, Central Java

SMP Al Hikmah, East Java

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SMP Bustanul Makmur, Banyuwangi, East Java

SMPN 2 Kalibaru, East Java

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11. SMP Sandhy Putra, Bandung, West Java

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MTsN Tambak Beras, East Java

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SMP Muhammadyah 5, Surabaya, East Java

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SMPN 3, Denpasar, Bali

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Wilson Primary School, WA

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Macarthur Anglican School, NSW

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Leschenault Catholic Primary School, WA

Heathcote High School, NSW

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Carey Baptist College, Perth, WA

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Woollooware High School, NSW

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St. Joseph Catholic Primary School, WA

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Macksville High School, NSW

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Monte Sant. Angelo Mercy College, Sydney

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Bellingen High School, NSW

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Mt. Tarcoola Primary School Geraldton, WA

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South Grafton High School, NSW

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17
17

Indonesia and Australia are working together for better schools, roads and so much more

Do you sometimes think that you are very, very busy? KGI staff always think like that because we always seem to be busy going somewhere, meeting students or preparing materials and radio programs amongst other things. In early May this year KGI met with a very busy man from Australia. Check out what he did in Indonesia in just five days.

Parliamentary Secretary for International Development Assistance, Bob McMullan, visited Indonesia from 2-7 May, 2009. Indonesia is Australia’s largest development assistance partner. “Australia is committed to working in partnership with Indonesia to meet its Millennium Development Goals and to create a better life for the poorest people in Indonesia,” Mr McMullan said.

Mr McMullan was very busy during his five days in Indonesia. He attended the 42nd Asia Development Bank Annual Meeting in Bali and jointly launched a new Investment Case by the Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Network for Asia with Asia Development Bank Vice President, Dr Ursula Schaefer-Preuss. Mr. McMullan traveled to Lombok where he inaugurated a junior secondary school (SMPN 5 Gerung) that was constructed under the Australia Indonesia Basic Education Program (AIBEP). Mr. McMullan also discussed provincial development and impacts of the global financial

crisis when he met with the Governors of West Nusa Tenggara, East Nusa Tenggara, and vice-Governors of Papua and Papua Barat together with the Secretary General of the Indonesian Ministry of Home Affairs. He officially opened the NTB office of ANTARA – an AusAID activity across eastern Indonesia. In Bali, Mr. McMullan launched a road improvement project (EINRIP) that will support economic and social development and reduce road accidents.

Dion Bata/Pos Kupang for ANTARA
Dion Bata/Pos Kupang for ANTARA
Photo by Josh Estey
Photo by Josh Estey
The Future is bright for new schools across Indonesia with AIBEP On Tuesday, May 5
The Future is bright for new schools across Indonesia with AIBEP
On Tuesday, May 5 th , Principal Rahmat Pujiono at SMPN 5 Gerung (middle photograph) welcomed Australia’s Parliamentary
Secretary for International Development Assistance, Bob McMullan to his new school. The local school community in
Gerung, about 20 km from Mataram, has been involved from the very beginning in the planning and construction of
their new school. Local tradesmen even made the furniture for the classrooms - fantastic! The students, just like their
parents, are very proud of their new school, and so are the members of the surrounding community. This high-level of
community involvement is a very important part of the work of the Australia Indonesia Basic Education Project (AIBEP).
By the end of 2009, AIBEP will have assisted school communities to build 2000 schools across Indonesia since 2006.
Special congratulations to SMPN 5 student Husnan Azhari (middle photograph) for his wonderful speech, in English, at
the Opening Ceremony. Mr McMullan told KGI that he was very impressed by Husnan’s speech. In his speech, Husnan
talked about how the school was now the gateway to a brighter future for all the students there - a window to the
world.
For more information and photographs check the KGI website -
http://www.kangguru.org/travel/kgitravel2009jakarta_lombok_aibep.html
Photo by Josh Estey
Photo by Josh Estey I / A / L / F Education for Development KGI is

I / A / L / F

Education for Development

KGI is broadcast on 165 RRI and selected stations all over Indonesia EVERY WEEK

165 RRI and selected stations all over Indonesia EVERY WEEK PO Box 3095, Denpasar 80030 -
165 RRI and selected stations all over Indonesia EVERY WEEK PO Box 3095, Denpasar 80030 -

PO Box 3095, Denpasar 80030 - Bali

Kang Guru Indonesia magazines are free and should not be sold for profit

www.kangguru.org