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CONTENTS

No. of
Sl. Date of Unit Signature of
Title of the topic problems
No. submission No. the faculty
completed

Stress – Strain and Deformation of Solids


1. –1
Stress – Strain and Deformation of Solids
2. –2

Shear Force and Bending Moment


3.
Diagrams
Stresses in Beams – Bending and
4.
Shear Stress

5. Torsion of Circular Shafts

6. Helical Springs

7. Deflection of beams

8. Columns

9. Thin cylindrical and spherical shells

10. Principal planes and stresses

Place: SSMIET, Dindigul


Date: Faculty incharge

Tutorial No. 1 Date:


Stress – Strain and Deformation of Solids – 1
Part – A
1. State Hooke’s law.
2. List out the various elastic constant.
3. Define poison’s ratio.
4. What is thermal stress?
5. Define proof resilience and modulus of resilience.
Part-B
6. A compound tube consists of a steel tube of 140 mm internal diameter and 5 mm thickness and an
outer brass tube of 150 mm internal diameter and 5 mm thick. The two tubes are of same length.
Compound tube carries an axial load of 600 kN. Find the stresses carried by each tube and amount of
shortening. Length of the tube is 120 mm. Es = 2 X 105 N/mm2, Eb = 1 X 105 N/mm2.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

7. A reinforced concrete column 500 mm x 500 mm in section is reinforced with 4 steel bars of 25 mm
diameter; one in each corner, the column is carrying a load of 100 kN. Find the stresses in the
concrete and steel bars. Take E for steel = 210 x 103 N/mm2 and E for concrete = 14 x 103 N/mm2.
(May/June 2013 - ME 2254)

8. A steel tube of 20 mm internal diameter and 30 mm external diameter encases a copper rod of 15 mm
diameter to which it is rigidly joined at each end. If the temperature of the assembly is raised by 80
0

C, calculate the stresses produced in the tube. E s = 2 X 105 N/mm2, Ec = 1 X 105 N/mm2. Coefficient
of linear expansion of steel and copper are 11 X 10-6 per C and 18 X 10-6 per C.
0 0

(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

9. A steel bar 4.0 m long is acted upon by forces shown in Figure – 1. Determine the total elongation of
the bar. Take E = 205 kN//mm2.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

45 kN 20 kN 30 kN 55 kN
30 mm dia 35 mm dia

40 mm dia

1.6 m 1.2 m 1.2 m

Figure - 1
10. A bar 30 mm diameter was subjected to a tensile load of 54 kN and the measured extension on 300
mm gauge length was 0.112 mm and change in diameter was 0.00366 mm. Calculate Poisson’s ratio
and the values of three moduli.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

11. (i) Find the stresses in each section of the bar shown in Figure -2
(ii) Find the total extension of the bar shown in Figure – 2, E = 2.1 X 105 N/mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)
C D

B
A 70 kN
70 kN 20 mm dia 30 mm dia 50 mm dia

200 mm
250 mm

220 mm
Tutorial No. 2 Date: 24.01.2014

Stress – Strain and Deformation of Solids – 2


Part – A
1. The strain induced in an M.S bar of rectangular section having width equal to twice the depth is
2.5 X 10-5. The bar is subjected to a tensile load of 4 kN. Find the section dimensions of the bar.
Take E = 0.2 X 106 N/mm2. (Ans: b=20 mm, d=40mm)
2. What is bulk modulus?
3. Estimate the load carried by a bar if the axial stress is 10 N/ mm2 and the diameter of the bar is
10 mm.
4. What is the strain energy stored when a bar of 6 mm diameter 1 m length is subjected to an axial
load of 4 kN, E = 200 kN/mm2? [Ans: SE = 14114.74 N-mm]
5. Write the concept used for finding stresses in compound bars.

Part – B
6. An aluminum cylinder of diameter 60 mm located inside a steel cylinder of internal diameter 60
mm and wall thickness 15 mm. The assembly is subjected to a compressive force of 200 kN.
What are the forces carried and stresses developed in steel and aluminum? Take modulus of
elasticity for steel as 200 GPa and aluminum as 50 GPa. [Ans: Pal = 33.33 kN, Ps = 166.66 kN]
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

7. A rod is 3 m long at temperature of 15 0 C. Find the expansion of the rod, when the temperature is
raised to 950C. If this expansion is prevented, find the stress in the material of the rod.
Take E = 1 x 105 N/mm2 and α = 1.2 x 10-5 per C0
[Ans: δl = 2.88 mm, σ = 96 N/mm2]
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

8. The modulus of rigidity of a material is 38 kN/mm2. A 10 mm diameter rod of material is


subjected to an axial tensile force of 5 kN and the change in its diameter is observed to be 0.002
mm. Calculate the poisson’s ratio, modulus of elasticity and bulk modulus of the material.
[Ans:µ =0.314, E = 1 x 105 N/mm2, K = 0.89 x 105 N/mm2] (Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

9. A steel rod of 25 mm diameter is placed inside a copper tube of 30 mm internal diameter and 5
mm thickness and the ends are rigidly connected. The assembly is subjected to a compressive
load of 250 kN. Determine the stresses induced in the steel rod and copper tube. Take the
modulus of elasticity of steel and copper as 200 GPa and 80 GPa respectively. [Ans: σs = 351.72
N/mm2, σc = 140.69 N/mm2] (Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)

10. Find the total strain energy stored in a steel bar of diameter 50 mm and length 300 mm, when it is
subjected to an axial load of 150 kN. Take modulus of elasticity of steel as 200 X 10 3 MPa.
[Ans: 8593.2 N-mm] (Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)

11. A mild steel rod of 20 mm diameter and 300 mm long is enclosed centrally inside a hollow
copper tube of external diameter 30 mm and internal diameter 25 mm. The ends of the tube and
rods are brazed together and the composite bar is subjected to an axial pull of 40 kN. If E for
steel and copper is 200 GN/m2 and 100 GN/m2 respectively, find the stresses developed in the rod
and tube. Also, find the extension of the rod. [Ans: σs = 94.8 N/mm2, σc = 47.4 N/mm2]
(May/June 2007 - CE 1262)

12. A steel rod 5 m long and 25 mm in diameter is subjected to an axial tensile load of 50 kN.
Determine the change in length, diameter and volume of the rod. Take E = 2 X 10 5 N/mm2 and
Poisson’s ratio = 0.30. [Ans: δl = 2.546 mm, δd = 3.81 x 10-3mm, δV = 501.67 mm3]
(May/June 2007 - CE 1262)
Tutorial No. 3 Date:
Shear Force and Bending Moment Diagrams
Part – A
1. What do you mean by shear force and bending moment?
2. Mention the different types of beams.
3. What are the different types of supports for a beam?
4. What is the relationship between shear force and bending moment of a beam?
5. Draw the shear force and bending moment diagram for a cantilever of span 4 m carrying a
uniformly distributed load of 2 kN/m over the entire span.

Part – B

6. A simply supported beam of span 6 m is carrying a uniformly distributed load of 2 kN/m over the
entire span. Calculate the magnitude of shear force and bending moment at every section, 2 m
from the left support. Also draw shear force and bending moment diagrams.
(May/June 2013 - ME 2254)

7. A simply supported beam of span 8m long is subjected to two concentrated loads of 24 kN and
48 kN at 2 m and 6 m from left support respectively. In addition it carries a UDL of 36 kN/m
over the entire span. Draw shear force and bending moment diagrams. Mark the salient points.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

8. A simply supported beam of span 9 m carries uniformly distributed load of intensity 3 kN/m over
a length of 4 m from left support. In addition, the beam also carries two point loads of 10 kN and
20 kN at 4 m and 7 m respectively from the left support. Draw the shear force and bending
moment diagrams indicating salient points.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

9. A beam of length 10 m is simply supported at its ends carries two concentrated loads of 5 kN
each at a distance of 3 m and 7 m from the left support and also a uniformly distributed load of 1
kN/m between the point loads. Draw shear force and bending moment diagrams. Calculate the
maximum bending moment.
(May/June 2006 – CE 1262)

10. Draw the shear force and bending moment diagrams for the beam shown in Fig. Also
determine the maximum bending moment and location of point of contra flexure.
Tutorial No. 4 Date:
Stresses in Beams – Bending and Shear Stress
Part – A
1. State the relationship between the average shear stress and maximum shear stress in a rectangular
beam.
2. A rectangular beam 150 mm wide and 200 mm deep is subjected to a shear force of 40 kN.
Determine the average shear stress and maximum shear stress.
3. Draw the bending and shear stress distribution due to bending of beam with rectangular cross
section.
4. Mention any two assumptions in the theory of simple bending.

Part – B

5. A rolled steel joist 40 mm deep and 150 mm wide has a flange thickness of 20 mm and web
thickness of 13 mm. If the shear force at the cross section is 140 kN, calculate the maximum
intensity of shear stress and sketch the distribution of shear stress across the section.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

6. What do you mean by theory of simple bending? State the assumptions made in the theory of
simple bending and derive the simple bending equation.
(May/June 2013 - ME 2254) & (Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

7. A beam of rectangular cross-section 50 mm wide and 150 mm deep is used as a cantilever 6 m


long and subjected to a uniformly distributed load of 2 kN/m over the entire length. Determine
the bending stress at 50 mm from the top fiber, at the mid-span of the beam. Also, calculate the
maximum bending stress.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

8. A timber beam of rectangular section is to support a total load of 20 kN uniformly distributed


over a span of 3.6 m when the beam is simply supported. If the depth is twice the width of the
section and the stress in timber is not to exceed 3.5 N/mm2, find the dimensions of the cross
section?
(Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)

9. A cast iron beam is of T – section as shown in Fig – 1. The beam is simply supported on a span of
6 m. The beam carries a uniformly distributed load of 2 kN/m on the entire length (span).
Determine the maximum tensile and maximum compressive stress.
(Nov/Dec 2007 - CE 251)
100 mm

20 mm

80 mm

20 mm

10. A simply supported beam of span 6 m and of I section has the top flange 40 mm X 5 mm. It
carries an UDL of 2 kN/m over the full span. Calculate the maximum tensile stress and maximum
compressive stress produced.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)
Tutorial no. 5 Date:
Torsion of Circular Shafts
Part – A
1. Define polar modulus.
2. Give torsion formula.
3. Define torsional rigidity of a circular shaft.
4. What is the maximum shear stress produced in a bolt of diameter 20 mm when it is tightened by
a spanner which exerts a force of 50 N with a radius of action of 150 mm?
5. Find the minimum diameter of shaft required to transmit a torque of 29820 N-m, if the maximum
shear stress is not to exceed 45 N/mm2.

Part – B

6. A solid steel shaft has to transmit 75 kW at 200 rpm. Taking allowable shear stress at 70 N/mm 2,
find suitable diameter for the shaft, if the maximum torque transmitted at each revolution exceeds
the mean by 30%.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)
7. A solid shaft is subjected to a torque of 45 kNm. If angle of twist is 0.5 degree per meter length
of the shaft and shear stress is not to exceed 90M N/m2 find
(i) Suitable diameter of the shaft
(ii) Final maximum shear stress and angle of twist per meter length. Modulus of rigidity =
80 G N/m2.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

8. What do you mean by strength of the shaft? Compare the strength of solid and hollow circular
shafts.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

9. Find the diameter of a solid shaft to transmit 90 kW at 160 rpm, such that the shear stress is
limited to 60 N/mm2. The maximum torque is likely to exceed the mean torque by 20%. Also find
the permissible length of the shaft, if the twist is not to exceed 1 degree over the entire length.
Take rigidity modulus as 0.8 X 105 N/mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

10. A hollow steel shaft of outside diameter 75 mm is transmitting a power of 300 kW at 2000 rpm.
Find the thickness of the shaft if the shaft if the maximum shear stress is not to exceed 40
N/mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)

11. A solid cylindrical shaft is to transmit 300 k N power at 100 rpm. If the shear stress is not to
exceed 60 N/mm2, find its diameter. What percent saving in weight would be obtained if this
shaft is replaced by a hollow one whose internal diameter equals to 0.6 of the external diameter,
the length, the material and maximum shear stress being the same.
(May/June 2007 – CE 1262)

12. Calculate the power that can be transmitted at a 300 r.p.m by a hollow steel shaft of 75 mm
external diameter and 50 mm internal diameter when the permissible shear stress for the steel is
70 N/mm2 and the maximum torque is 1.3 times the mean. Compare the strength of this hollow
shaft with that of an solid shaft. The same material, weight and length of both the shafts are the
same.
(May/June 2006 – CE1262)

Tutorial no. 6 Date:


Helical Springs
Part – A
1. Compare closed and open coiled helical springs.
2. What are the uses of springs?
3. A close coiled helical spring of 10 mm in diameter having 10 complete turns, with mean diameter
120 mm is subjected to an axial load of 200 N. Determine the maximum shear stress and stiffness
of the spring. Take G = 9 X 104 N /mm2.
4. Write the expressions for stiffness of a close coiled helical spring.
5. Give the expression for finding deflection of a closely coiled helical spring.

Part – B

6. A closely coiled helical spring having 12 coils of wire diameter 16 mm and made with coil
diameter 250 mm is subjected to an axial load of 300 N. Find axial deflection, strain energy
stored and torsional shear stress. Modulus of rigidity = 80 GN/ m2.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

7. A closely coiled helical spring made out of a 10 mm diameter steel rod has 10 complete turns,
mean diameter of coil is of 80 mm. Calculate stress induced in the section of the rod, deflection
under the pull and the amount of energy stored in the spring during extension, if it is subjected to
an axial pull of 200 N. Take N = 0.84 X 105 N/mm2.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

8. A close-coiled helical spring is to have a stiffness of 1 kN/m of compression under a maximum


load of 45 N and maximum shearing stress of 126 MPa. The solid length of the spring (i.e., when
the coils are touching) is to be 45 mm. Find the diameter of the wire and mean diameter of the
coil required. Take G = 42 X N/mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

9. A close coiled helical spring is to have a stiffness of 1.5 N/mm of compression under a maximum
load of 60 N. The maxium shearing stress produced in the wire of the spring is 125 N/mm 2. The
solid length of the spring is 50 mm. Find the diameter of coil, diameter of wire and number of
coils, C = 4.5 X 104 N /mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2006 – CE 1262)

10. A helical spring of circular cross-section wire 18 mm in diameter is loaded by a force of 500 N.
The mean coil diameter of the spring is 125 mm. The modulus of rigidity is 80 kN/mm 2.
Determine the maximum shear stress in the material of the spring. What number of coils must the
spring have for its deflection to be 6 mm?
(May/June 2006 – CE1262)

11. A closely coiled helical spring of round steel wire 10 mm in diameter having 10 complete turns
with a mean diameter of 12 cm is subjected to an axial load of 250 N. Determine
i. the deflection of the spring
ii. maximum shear stress in the wire and
iii. stiffness of the spring and
iv. Frequency of vibration.
Take C = 0.8 X 105 N/mm2.
(May/June 2007 – CE 1262)

Tutorial no. 7 Date:


Deflection of beams
Part – A
1. State the expression for slope and deflection at the free end of a cantilever beam of length ‘L’
subjected to a uniformly distributed load of ‘w’ per unit length.
2. Calculate the maximum deflection of a simply supported beam carrying a point load of 100 kN at
midspan. Span = 6 m, EI = 20000 kN/m2.
3. A cantilever beam of spring 2 m is carrying a point load of 20 kN at its free end. Calculate the
slope at the free end. Assume EI = 12 X 103 kN-m2.

Part – B

4. A simply supported beam of span 8m is subjected to concentrated loads of 24 kN, 48 kN and 72


kN at 2 m, 4 m, 6 m from left support respectively. Calculate the slope and deflection at the
centre and also find maximum deflection.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

5. A cantilever 100 mm wide and 200 mm deep is loaded as shown in Figure -1. Find the slope and
deflection at B. take E = 210 kN/mm2.
5 kN/m
A C
B

1m 1m

2m
Figure 1
6. A simply supported beam is loaded as shown in Figure-2 is 200 mm wide and 400 mm deep.
Find the slopes at the supports, deflections under loads and location and magnitude of the
maximum deflection. Take E = 2 X 104 N/mm2
(Nov/Dec 2008 – CE 1262)

10 kN 20 kN

1m 1m 2m
Figure - 2
7. A beam is simply supported at its ends over a span of 10 m and carries two concentrated loads of
100 kN and 60 kN at a distance of 2 m and 5 m respectively from the left support. Calculate (i)
slope at the left support (ii) slope and deflection under the 100 kN load. Assume EI = 36 X 10 4
kN-m2.
(May/June 2006 - CE 1262)

Tutorial no. 8 Date:


Columns
Part – A
1. Define slenderness ratio.
2. Write the equivalent length of the column for a column with
(a) One end is fixed and other end is free
(b) Both ends are fixed.
3. Find the critical load of an Euler’s column having 4 m length, 50 mm X 100 mm cross-section
and hinged at both ends, E = 200 kN/mm2
4. Calculate the effective length of a column, whose actual length is 4 m when:
(a) both ends are fixed
(b) one end fixed while the other end is free.

Part – B

5. Find Euler’s crippling load for a hollow cylindrical cast iron column of 20 mm external diameter,
25 mm thick and 6 m long hinged at both ends. Comare the load with crushing load calculated
from Rankine’s formula. fc = 550 N/mm2. Rankine’s constant = 1/1600, E = 1.2 X 105 N/mm2
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

6. The external and internal diameters of a hollow cast iron column are 50 mm and 40 mm
respectively. If the length of this column is 3 m and both of its ends are fixed, determine the
crippling load using Eulers formula taking E = 100 GPa. Also determine the rankine load for the
column assuming fc = 550 MPa and α = 1/1600.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

7. Write the expressions for Euler’s critical load of long columns for different end conditions.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

8. A hollow cylindrical column of 150 mm external diameter and 15 mm thick, 3 m long is hinged
at one end and fixed at the other end. Find the ratio of Euler and Rankine’s critical load. Take E =
8 X 104 N/mm2, fc = 550 N/mm2 and Rankine’s constant as 1/1600
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

9. Find the Euler critical load for a hollow cylindrical cast iron column 150 mm external diameter,
20 mm wall thickness if it is 6 m long with hinged at both ends. Assume Young’s modulus of cast
iron as 80 k N/mm2. Compare this load with that given by Rankine’s formula. Using Rankine
constants α = 1/1600 and 567 N/mm2.
(May/June 2006 – CE 1262)
10. A 1.2 m long column has a circular cross-section of 45 mm diameter one of the ends of the
column is fixed in direction and position and other ends is free. Taking factor of safety as 3.
Calculate the safe load using
(i) Rankine’s formula, take yield stress =560 N/mm2 and α = 1/1600 for pined ends.
(ii) Euler’s formula, Young’s modulus for cast iron = 1.2 X 105 N/mm2.
(Nov/Dec 2007 - CE 251)

Tutorial no. 9 Date:


Thin cylindrical and spherical shells
Part – A
1. What is the hoop stress of a thin cylindrical shell subjected to internal pressure?
2. A storage tank of internal diameter 280 mm is subjected to an internal pressure of 2.5 MPa. Find
the thickness of the tank, if the hoop and longitudinal stresses are 75 MPa and 45 MPa
respectively.
3. Find the thickness of the pipe due to an internal pressure of 10 N/mm 2, if the permissible stress is
120 N/mm2. The diameter of pipe is 750 mm.
4. A boiler of 800 mm diameter is made up of 10 mm thick plates. If the boiler is subjected to an
internal pressure of 2.5 MPa, determine circumferential and longitudinal stress.
5. A spherical shell of 1 m diameter is subjected to an internal pressure 0.5 N/mm 2. Find the
thickness if the thickness of the shell, if the allowable stress in the material of the shell is 75
N/mm2.
Part – B

6. A cylindrical shell is 1.5 m diameter and 4 m long closed at both ends is subjected to internal
pressure of 3 N/mm2. Maximum circumferential stress is not to exceed 150 N/mm 2. Find changes
in diameter, length and volume of the cylinder. E = 2 X 105 N/mm2, Poisson’s ratio = 0.25.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

7. A cylindrical shell 3 meters long has 1 metre internal diameter and 15 mm metal thickness.
Calculate the circumferential and longitudinal stresses induced and also changes in dimensions of
the shell, if it is subjected to an internal pressure of 1.5 N/mm 2. Take E = 2 X 10 5 N/mm2 and
Poisson’s ratio = 0.3.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

8. A cylindrical shell, 3 m long which is closed at the ends, has an internal diameter of 1 m and a
wall thickness of 15 mm. Calculate the circumferential and longitudinal stresses. And find the
changes in dimensions of the shell, if it is subjected to an internal pressure of 1.5 MPa. Take E =
200 GPa and 1/m = 0.3
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

9. A steel cylindrical shell 3 m long which is closed at its ends, had an internal diameter of 1.5 m
and a wall thickness of 20 mm. Calculate the circumferential and longitudinal stress induced and
also the change in dimensions of the shell, if it is subjected to an internal pressure of 1.0 N/mm 2.
Assume the modulus of elasticity and Poisson’s ratio for steel as 200k N/mm 2 and 0.3
respectively.
(May/June 2006 – CE 1262)

10. A cylindrical shell, 3 m long which is closed at the ends, has an internal diameter of 1 m and a
wall thickness of 20 mm. Calculate the circumferential and longitudinal stresses induced and also
the changes in the dimensions of the shell, if it is subjected to an internal pressure of 2.0 N/mm 2.
Take E = 2 X 105 N/mm2 and 1/m = 0.3
(Nov/Dec 2007 - CE 251)

Tutorial no. 10 Date:


Principal planes and stresses
Part – A
1. What are principal planes?
2. What is principal stress?
3. State the expression for the principal plane.
4. What is Mohr’s circle method?
5. How do you obtain the maximum shear stress by Mohr’s circle method?
6. Define proof resilience and what is it’s magnitude?

Part – B
7. At a point with in a body there are two mutually perpendicular stresses of 80 N/mm 2 and 40
N/mm2 of tensile in nature. Each stress is accompanied by a shear stress of 60 N/mm 2. Determine
the normal, shear and resultant stress on an oblique plane at an angle of 45 0 with the axis of the
major principal plane.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1262)

8. At a point in a strained material the stress along the x – direction is 100 MPa and at 900 to the
direction, the stress is 50 MPa, both being tensile. These stresses are accompanied by shear stress
of 60 MPa. By Mohr’s circle or otherwiase, determine
(a) the principal stresses
(b) principal planes
(c) maximum shear stress.
(May/June 2009 - CE 1258)

9. At a point in a strained material, there is a horizontal tensile stress of 100 N/mm 2 and an
unknown vertical stress. There is also a shear stress of 30 N/mm 2 on these planes. On a plane
inclined at 300 to the vertical, the normal stress is found to be 90 N/mm 2 tensile. Find the
unknown vertical stress and also principal stresses and maximum shear stress.
(Nov/Dec 2008 - CE 1262)

10. The normal stresses in two mutually perpendicular directions are 110 N/mm2 and 47 N/mm2, both
tensile. The complementary shear stresses in these directions are of intensity 63 N/mm2. Find the
principal stresses and its planes.
(Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 1262)

11. At a point in a strained material, the principal stresses are 100 N/mm2 (tensile) and 40 N/mm2
(compressive). Determine analytically the resultant stress in magnitude and direction on a plane
inclined at 600 to the axis of major principal stress. What is the maximum intensity of shear stress
in the material at that point?
(Nov/Dec 2006 - CE 251)