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FULL TIME MBA

ELECTIVES

TERM 4 & TERM 5


Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MBA FULL TIME

Elective Courses - Term 4 & Term 5

Term 4 4
Term 5 87
Timetables 149

Courses Alphabetical Index

Advanced Strategy: Competing in the New Digital Environment (Intensive Course) 5


Agile Supply Chain (Intensive Course) 72
Applying Creative Thinking to Generate Novel Solutions 134
Branding 129
Business Intelligence 127
Collaborative Governance 88
Comunicación de Marketing y Corporativa 55
Consumer-Centric Marketing 131
Corporate Level Strategy 7
Creativity and Innovation (Intensive Course) 74
Entrepreneurial Marketing 10
Estrategia Financiera a Largo Plazo 102
Family Business Management 12
From Innovation to Cash Flows (Intensive Course) 14
From Performance Measurement to Performance Management (Intensive Course) 76
Geopolitics 144
Gestión de la Información Aplicada a las Finanzas 53
International Finance (Term 4) 37
International Finance (Term 5) 104
International Finance Simulation (Term 4) 40
International Finance Simulation (Term 5) 107
International Portfolio Management (Intensive Course) 42
Investment Banking in M&A 109
Leadership, Power and Influence 90
Leading the Management Consulting Firm 18
Management Control Systems 112
Managing Services 80
Managing Sustainability 83
Marketing Research 59
Media Convergence, Technology and New Business Models 118
Mergers & Acquisitions 47
Mobile Business 122
Modelos Cuantitativos en Operaciones 138
Negotiation and Strategic HR 49
Open Innovation & Open Business Models 125
Project Management 27
Risk Management with Derivatives 115
Simulación del Marketing Estratégico 61
Social Entrepreneurship 93

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Strategic Business Simulation (Intensive Course) (term 4) 32


Strategic Business Simulation (term 5) 99
Strategic Relations & Key Account Management 63
Strategic Sales Management 67
Strategy Making with CEOs (Intensive Course) 35
Supply Chain Management 140
The European Union: Genesis and Issues (Term 4) 85
The European Union: Genesis and Issues (Term 5) 147
The Transnational Manager 51

Departments Alphabetical Index

Business Policy Department (Term 4) 5


Business Policy Department (Term 5) 88
Finance Department (Term 4) 37
Finance Department (Term 5) 102
Human Resources Department (Term 4) 49
Information Systems Department (Term 4) 53
Information Systems Department (Term 5) 118
Marketing Department (Term 4) 55
Marketing Department (Term 5) 129
Operations (Term 4) 72
Operations (Term 5) 134
Social Sciences and Economy (Term 4) 83
Social Sciences and Economy (Term 5) 144

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

TERM 4

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

BUSINESS POLICY DEPARTMENT

ADVANCED STRATEGY: COMPETING IN THE NEW DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT

11M85229

Faculty: Silviya Svejenova & Luis Vives

Can avant-garde chef Grant Achatz or queen of pop Lady Gaga create and capture
value through a twit? Does Apple’s iPad constitute a threat or opportunity for
Amazon’s Kindle? How does a telecom giant Telefonica address the new digital
challenge? Why does Disney need Tapulous? Was it a good move for AOL to get
hold of the Huffington Post? How do ventures ranging from telemedicine clinics to
indie music platforms compete at intersections, where health care or art meet
technology, science, or design? Does a company’s source of competitive advantage
vanish, transform or remains valid as it engages with social media?

The course addresses these and other questions related to competition in the new
digital era by offering inspiring and insightful examples of leading companies in that
domain. It also introduces and offers possibilities for application of a set of
advanced level strategy notions and frameworks that seek to improve insights into
fast-paced competition, cooperation, and co-creation in and through social media.

It is structured in three main parts. In the first part, we delve into social media as
an arena of competition in its own right and explore the range and nature of
competitive interactions and moves. We identify and examine successful and failed
business models in that space, as well as trace why such models change and how
they monetize. Here we discuss cases, such as Facebook, Zynga, and Tapulous. The
second part of the course deals with the role of social media as a means and
explores how companies and professionals can go beyond social media presence
and develop competitive advantage in and through it. Here, we explore how firms
engage with LinkedIn in the quest for global talent and how those services can be
well monetized. Also, we discuss the models behind new ventures, such as actor
Edward Norton’s Crowdrise, as a social-media-mediated fund raising enabler.
Finally, we discuss the mobilizing effects of social media in the organization of
events and the pursuit of “hot causes”, such as CoachSurfing, the worldwide
network for making connections between travelers and the local communities they
visit. In the third part of the course, we zoom in on issues related to strategy
implementation in the social media space, such as creation and leverage of
organizational capabilities and management of hybrid organizational forms.

The course is intensive and builds on a range of learning methodologies, such as


cases, videos, individual and team projects and presentations, and talks by guest
speakers who have dared to introduce disruptive ideas in the digital space. It seeks
to unleash students' imagination as well as improve their strategic awareness,
competence and self-confidence, equipping them for competing in the digital age. It
also aims at creating an arena for reflection and discussion on the challenges the
new digital environment poses to competition in traditional sectors, such as book
publishing, as well as in newer ones, such as telephony.
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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Timetable:

September Intensive Course

Monday to Friday from 19/09/11 to 23/09/11

From 09.00 to 12.30 and from 15.00 to 18.30

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

CORPORATE-LEVEL STRATEGY

11M85079

Faculty:
Luis Vives De Prada

Objectives:

This course focuses on the Corporate Strategy of the firm, examining issues central
to its diversification decisions, with an impact in the short- and long-term of the
company. Whereas Business Strategy focuses on how to manage individual
business units to achieve competitive advantage, Corporate Strategy deals with the
strategic management of multi-business or multi-location firms.

The course further develops some of the strategic issues introduced on the
Business Policy mandatory courses. It has been designed assuming the students
know the basics of competitive strategy (vision, environmental analysis and internal
analysis), as well as the basics of corporate strategy. The familiarity with those
concepts allows the course to have a practical focus.

The course has been designed for helping students to:

- Get acquainted of several tools to formulate and implement strategies on the


corporate level from the top management perspective.
- Improve their analytical capabilities for analyzing complex corporative situations.
- Reflect on strategic issues at the corporate level.

Summary:

a)Introduction. Brief presentation of the course. Approach towards the scope of


corporate strategy: relationship among corporate and competitive strategy.
Review of the strategic management process and content.

b) Resources and industry analysis. Internal elements of the corporation that


sustain and limit growth options. Key characteristics of an industry from the
industrial organization and game theory perspectives. Key corporate resources
and capabilities.

c) Corporate growth. Analysis of the fundamentals for diversified expansion and


vertical integration, based on the resources and capabilities perspective as well
as from the industry analysis perspective. Different modes of expansion are
contrasted: internal development, mergers and acquisitions, and strategic
alliances.

d) Corporate governance. Managerial requirements for a superior global


management are introduced. Main ideas on the mechanisms for management
control in corporations. Evaluation of the challenges for running a multi-

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

business corporation from a corporate governance perspective. How to choose


localization on a global economy.

e) Relationship among corporate center and strategic business units. Corporate


value creation according to the Parenting Advantage model. Introduction to the
model of Strategy Harmony and Dissonance. Remarks on Corporate Influence
Failures. Remarks on the measurement of the corporate effect on corporate
value creation.

f) Summary and conclusions. Re-examination of corporate strategy.


Retrospective sense-making of the process of corporate advantage creation and
leadership from the corporate center. Current debate on corporate strategy

Methodology:

The course is oriented towards individual and group learning. It is intended to


facilitate the integration of knowledge and skills learned in prior courses on
business policy and functional areas with the corporate strategy field. Therefore the
pedagogical methodologies are:

- Case Discussion. The case method is being used in business schools to enhance
the learning process in managerial training. The cases have been chosen for its
relationship to the core issues on the Corporate Strategy course. In order to
prepare cases, the class is divided in groups. The students are expected to prepare
deeply and participate actively in class discussions. However, read and prepare is
not enough, students are required to contribute with interventions in group and
plenary sessions. Finally, as a reminder, the learning process under the case
method requires active participation and deep discussion.

- Conceptual class discussions. The objective is to present and discuss collectively


the conceptual frameworks and tools that build the core of the course. The faculty
will facilitate the process of discussion and will remark the key concepts and
lessons. However, each student is responsible for formulating his/her own synthesis
building upon the conceptual readings, class attendance, class participation and
class discussion. For a proper follow up of the course the students must read and
prepare the assigned readings before classes. The content of the course is
structured in sequence, being each session a base for the next one. Accordingly, it
is very important that students prepare each session and attend classes.

- Forums with guest lecturers. The faculty invites several guest lecturers to share
their experiences on corporate strategy. The objective is to bring the students
closer to reality and contrast the conceptual frameworks and tools with real life
experiences.

Assessment:

Class participation (30 points):

- Individual introduction to any session (voluntary or mandatory)


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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

- Quality and quantity of class interventions in case discussions, lectures, forums,


debates and synthesis sessions,

Team Assignment (30 points)

- Any written comments for any session about the content of a case or reading
material.

Final exam (40 points).

Bibliography:

Some basic references, although not extensive, are:

- COLLIS, D; MONTGOMERY, C. "Corporate strategy: resources and the scope of


the firm". Boston: Irwin, 2002.

- GRANT, R.M. "Contemporary Strategy Analysis". Blackwell Publishing, 2005.

- GOOLD, M.; CAMPBELL, A.; ALEXANDER, M. Corporate-level strategy: creating


value in the multibusiness company. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1994.

- GUPTA, A.K.; GOVINDARAJAN, V. "The quest for global dominance". Jossey Bass,
2001.

- KHANNA, T. "Billions of Entrepreneurs: How China and India are Reshaping their
Futures and Yours". Harvard Business School Press, 2008.

- PORTER, M.E. "The competitive advantage of nations: with a new introduction",


1998.

Timetable:

Every Thursday from 06/10/11 to 22/12/11. No class on 27/10/11 and 08/12/11


From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING

11M85076

Faculty: Jan Brinckmann

Number of students: 40 (suggested)

Pre-requisites: Entrepreneurship (intro course)

Objectives:

At the end of the course students will have a more profound understanding of

1. Experience innovative marketing paradigms

2. Marketing research in an environment of innovation and dynamism

3. Gaining marketing advantages in spite of limited marketing resources

4. Instruments to successfully launch and promote new offerings

5. Instruments to establish build and leverage customer relationships

6. New and innovative marketing instruments

7. Develop a especial understanding of business the business contexts

Summary:

The course “entrepreneurial marketing” is aimed at students who plan to start a


new venture or take a job as a marketing professional in an established firm which
wants to pursue an entrepreneurial marketing approach. Students will study a full
spectrum of marketing instruments that are especially suitable for entrepreneurial
firms aiming for high growth and innovation yet faced by limited resources and
industry dynamism. Students will work in teams on marketing plans for their own
venture or for other high profile entrepreneurs or executives. The focus of this
course is on hands-on experiences and practical relevance of innovative marketing
concepts.

Methodology:

Class discussions, guest-speakers, Harvard business cases, group marketing project


work, interview an entrepreneur, innovative practices and group presentations. In
general the three hours are partitioned into three parts. This assures that various
formats are used to facilitate learning.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Assessment:

1. Oral participation (including pop quizzes on cases and write-ups) 25%


2. Final quiz (25%) 25%
3. Marketing plans (40%) and final presentation (10%) 50%

Bibliography:

• The Harvard business cases:


http://harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu/relay.jhtml?name=cp&c=c6
9689
• Lodish, L.M., Morgan, H.L., Archambeau, S., 2007: Marketing That Works,
Wharton School Publishing

Timetable:

Every Thursday from 06/10/11 to 22/12/11. No class on 27/10/11 and 08/12/11.

From 15.00 to 18.30 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

FAMILY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

11M85228

Faculty: Alberto Gimeno

Objectives

The management of the relations between family and business is a dimension of


management that every family business should develop. It has a direct effect on
the management of the company and its performance.

There are different ways of belonging to a family business, as shareholder, as


member of the board, as an executive. Esade’s students have a high probability of
belonging to a family business and therefore should have enough sensitivity and
knowledge to understand family-business dynamics and should be able to manage
this relationships with the proper management tools.

The subject wants to develop competent professionals in the family business. The
goals of the course are:

- Learn a conceptual framework that allow the student to understand family-


business dynamics
- Know and be able to apply the specific management tools for family business
- Develop the proper strategies and processes to implement the right management
structures

Methodology:

A great variety of methodologies are used during the course. There will be a
combination of conceptual presentations, cases, role playing, group work.... etc.
During the course and in the final case an expert system specially develop for this
purpose will be used.

At the end the student will do a practical case in which each student will analyse
and make suggestions to a real case. This work will replace the final examination.

Syllabus

1.- Conceptual Framework. Concept of family business. The family business


dynamic. Family and business as social systems.
2.- Systems Theory and its application. Family and business complexity. Cognitive
maps and their application to family business understanding
3.- Structures as regulators. Family-business interrelation structures
4.- Family complexity and business complexity. The relation between complexity
and structure. Structural risk as a family business management guide
5.- Identifiction of problems in family businesses. Mental model problems (vs)
factual problems. Family business models. Narratives as a management tool.
6.- Institutionalization: family council, board of directors, executive committee.
Functions and interrelations
7.- Rules. Explicitation and formalization. Family protocols. Family business
differentiation and ownership recognition.
8.- Succession: Planning and Ceo dependence. Profesionalisation of management
practices and entrepreneurial capabilities.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

9.- Communication. Relational patterns. Diads and triads. Information (vs)


relations. Family accountability
10.- Implementation of family business structures
11.- Discussion and feedback about the field work of the alumni

Bibliography:

1. Gersick, Kelin E, Lansberg Ivan, Desjardins Michele, Dunn Barbara (1999) Stages
and Transitios: Managing Change in the Family Business. Family Business Review
(4)
2. Gimeno, A.; Labadie, G.; Saris, W.; Mendoza, X. (2007). Internal Factors of
family business performance. Handbook of Reserach on Family Business (pp.154-
164). Edward Elgar
3. Habbershon, T.G., Williams, M.L. (1999). A Resource-Based Framework for
Assessing the Strategic Advantages of Family Firms. Family Business Review 12(1).
4. Lansberg, Ivan: (1999). Succeeding Generations. Harvard Business School Press
5. Ludewig, Kurt (1996). Terapia Sistémica, Barcelona, Herder
6. Minuchin, S. (1974) Families and Family Therapy Harvard University Press
7. Neubauer, Fred & Lank, Alden (1998). The Family Business : In Governance For
Sustainability. Palgrave
8. Watzlawick, Paul, Weakland, John H., Fisch, Richard (1974) Change; Principles of
Problem Formation and Problem Resolution. Norton, London
9. Ortega y Gasset, José: (1997) Ideas y Creencias. Madrid, Alianza Editorial

Timetable:

Every Tuesday from 04/10/11 to 18/10/11


From 09.00 to 13.00 h.

No class on October 25th, November 1st and December 6th

Every Tuesday from 08/11/11 to 29/11/11


From 09.00 h. to 13.00 h.

Every Tuesday from 13/12/11 to 20/12/11


From 09.00 to 12.30 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

FROM INNOVATION TO CASH FLOWS

11M85886

Faculty: Constance Lütolf-Carroll

Pre-requisites:
Completion of the first-year required core courses. This elective is complementary
to other courses being offered in corporate strategy, entrepreneurship, mergers &
acquisitions, entrepreneurial finance, and innovation.

Objectives:

In this course, participants will learn about the essentials of crafting, structuring,
and managing collaborative alliances and joint ventures. Often alliances and joint
ventures provide the most flexible means for start-up companies to share
intellectual property (IP) rights, obtain funding, and gain access to the know-how of
strategic partners. Firms of all sizes use alliances and joint ventures as vehicles to
enter new markets, share or gain distribution channels, and access new customers.
Knowing the benefits and pitfalls of collaboration, intellectual property rights, and
venture financing are important topics for all entrepreneurs, business development
managers, or their advisors. For high-tech ventures, strategic partnerships and
alliances may be vital to survival.

Summary:

The general aims of this course are to enrich student awareness, knowledge and
know-how about the importance of intellectual property rights when creating new
business ventures. The specific aims of the course are to improve student skills in
structuring and negotiating strategic alliances and joint ventures, particularly in the
context of overseas market entry.

By participating in case discussion, participants will learn about different types of


strategic alliances and their distinguishing contractual features. They will learn how
to search, screen, and select alliance partners. They will observe how the purpose
and objectives of an alliance often changes over its life cycle. Through case
discussions, participants will sharpen their decision-making skills about selecting
the appropriate form of entry vehicle (export, license joint venture, or direct foreign
investment) when deciding how to enter a foreign market. They also will improve
their ability to appraise the risks and benefits of various alliance options for
different kinds of industries and markets. Finally, they will learn the basic principles
of how to value an alliance using a variety of methods.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Learning Outcomes:

1. By the end of the course, students should be able to explain the basic types
of intellectual property (IP) rights and the general legal principles behind
intellectual property laws.

2. They should know how to identify the intellectual property assets and
assigned rights in a company or organization (trademarks, patents, copyrights,
proprietary know-how, and registered design rights).

3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to develop search criteria to screen


and select appropriate alliance partner candidates.

4. Explain the different phases of the typical alliance life cycle and understand
the managerial implications for the various parties to the alliance.

5. Demonstrate knowledge of how to set the royalty rate for a simple patent
licensing agreement.

6. Be capable of structuring and negotiating the terms and conditions of a


simple joint venture agreement.

Methodology:
The pedagogical approach will be based on active learning and teamwork. The
appropriate teaching method will be chosen depending on the learning objectives of
each class session. During class, students will be discussing case studies, listening
to mini-lectures, watching and discussing videos, doing in-class exercises, giving
oral presentations, and participating in role-plays.

All students are expected to be well-prepared for class. They should read the
required cases and assigned chapters in the textbook. All participants are expected
to contribute their ideas to their teams and to class discussions.

Assessment:
Student assessment will be based on class participation, two written group case
study analyses and accompanying team oral presentations, and a final individual
exam. These are the component weights as a percentage of the total grade:

- Class participation (25%)

- Two case assignments (to be done in groups) (35%)


- Individual two-part final examination (40%) explained below

The individual final exam will consist of two parts: (1) a personal journal, worth
15% of the total mark; and (2) an in-class final exam of two hours duration, worth
25% of the total mark.

The first part of the exam will consist of a personal journal of each student’s
reflections on what he or she personally learned from each day’s case and readings.
The journal is meant to be brief, no more than 250 words per case, and ought to
relate what was learned in class to one’s personal life experiences, or work
experiences, or both. Taking the time to reflect upon what has been learned is an
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Term 4 & Term 5

important step in assimilating new knowledge and best practice. By reflection, this
new know-how becomes embedded into long-term memory. You will be given some
examples of what is expected from a journal entry on the first day of class.

The second part of the final exam will be done in-class on the last Friday afternoon
of the course. It most likely will consist of a few short essay questions to answer
and some problems to solve based on the assigned readings and cases we have
done in the course. There most likely will also be a brief case to analyze and write-
up. More details on the final exam will be discussed in the final version of the
course syllabus and during the course.

Incompatibilities:
There are no incompatibilities.

Observations:

Prof. Constance Lütolf-Carroll is an educator and entrepreneur. She has a BS in


civil engineering from UC Berkeley and an MBA degree from Stanford University
Graduate School of Business. She is a Lecturer of the Business Policy Department
at ESADE Business School, Ramon Llull University. For many years, Connie has also
been Visiting Professor at leading business schools in Europe and South Korea. She
is cofounder, principal and board member of Netspan AG, a technology company, in
Switzerland, that is an Internet applications service provider, primarily for Swiss-
German companies and non-profits

Who should take this course?

This course will be especially appealing to those MBAs who are thinking of working
in business development for start-up firms in fast-changing markets. Business
developers are often the ones who are involved at a very early stage of the deal, in
designing the alliance strategy, finding suitable alliance partners, and helping with
the valuation or negotiations of deal terms and conditions.

This elective will also be of keen interest to those MBAs who are contemplating
setting up their own venture, or who may go to work for a start-up company or
organization. For those who will be working in the fields of strategy consultancy,
investment banking, M&A, private equity, or venture capital, this seminar will be
worthwhile taking for the insights it offers on how to protect novel inventions, and
the tips that will be given on how to scale up and grow new ventures profitably.

The course will be valuable for anyone who needs to conduct alliances negotiations
with strategic investors, technology partners, key distributors, or major customers.
Or for anyone who is curious about the ins and outs of licensing patent rights or
structuring other types of technology transfer agreements.

Finally this course is for those students who wish to do cases about science-driven
ventures (either in the cosmetics, telecom equipment or life sciences industries, or
in other types of industrial manufacturing or engineering service sectors ) where
often a high percentage of the company’s value is tied up in the management of

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

intellectual property rights and strategic alliances.

Syllabus:
This is the tentative outline of the course contents. It may be revised or modified in
the final version of the syllabus.

Session 1 - Creativity and the entrepreneurial process


Session 2 - Developing new product opportunities. Choosing among strategic
marketing options. Evaluating a trademark licensing agreement.
Session 3 - Identifying Intellectual Property for a luxury brand sold in a retail
format.
Session 4 - Intellectual property protection: comparative advantages of patent,
copyright, trade secret, trademark or service mark.
Session 5 - Growing via cross-border exports, or licenses. Screening and choosing
alliances partners.
Session 6 - Foreign market entry via joint ventures. Managing alliances over their
life cycle
Session 7 - Formation of international joint ventures (IJVs). Special challenges of
negotiating cross-border alliances.
Session 8 - Managing global licensees.
Session 9 - Managing high-tech IP rights. Understanding the rationale driving life
sciences technology out-licensing agreements; the role of university tech transfer
offices; early stage biotech patent and licensing decisions.
Session 10 - Final in-class examination.

Bibliography:
Required Textbook: From Innovation to Cash Flows: Value Creation by Structuring
High Technology Alliances (2009) by Constance Lütolf-Carroll with the collaboration
of Antti Pirnes and Withers LLP. Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc - Hoboken, New
Jersey.
ISBN 978-0-470-11809-2

Participants will be given the required textbook along with a course packet of the
assignments and cases.

Timetable:
Monday 05/09/11 to Friday 09/09/11
From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h. and from 15:00 to 18:30 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

LEADING THE MANAGEMENT CONSULTING FIRM

11M86000

Faculty: James J. McGonigle

Number of Students: maximum of 50

Course Objectives:

This course provides a broad overview of the management consulting industry. It is


designed to appeal to students considering management consulting as a training
ground or a career, as well as to those interested in applying the analytic tools used
by management consultants to business problems in almost any context. Given the
prevalence and continued growth of the management consulting industry, it is likely
that most business students will come in direct contact with a consulting team –
either as client, client-team member, or management consultant – at some point in
their career.

Specific course objectives include:

1. To give students a deep understanding of the management consulting


industry, the major firms and how they work, and what separates winning
and losing strategies.
2. To prepare students for a successful early career in management consulting
3. To arm students with frameworks and analytic tools they can use in
consulting or in other business problem-solving contexts

Pre-Requisites:

There are no formal prerequisites for this course. However, students will greatly
benefit from having completed an introductory course in business strategy. In
addition, all students must read, “Learning by the Case Method” (HBS 9-376-241)
before the first class session.

Methodology:

The course will be taught in ten sessions that generally follow a trajectory from the
broad to the narrow as the course progresses. We will begin with an overview of
the external environment in which management consulting firms operate, some of
the business and regulatory history that has shaped the consulting industry, and
explore the structure of the consulting industry today. From there, we will discuss
the stages, outputs and key factors for success in the consulting project itself. We
then move to the strategic positioning questions firms face, the implications of
making one set of choices versus another, and the importance of alignment within
the firm and through time. The course then delves into operations and studies the
drivers of profitability in consulting firms -- contrasting these with other
professional service firms and with more traditional C-corps. From there, we
explore talent management -- perhaps the core of consulting firm leadership. These
early sessions will highlight some of the key tradeoffs consulting firm leaders are
forced to make -- particularly in organization design, growth strategy, and incentive

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

systems. Then, we will ultimately examine these tradeoffs within various contexts;
including multi-practice management, global operations, non-profit consulting, and
mergers and acquisitions.

Having mastered the economics, business models and key design issues and
tradeoffs prevalent in the consulting industry, students will then engage a series of
more specific challenges; including engagement sales process design, marketing
and branding, choice of projects, client service issues, and some of the ethical
issues and conflicts that can (and do) arise. Finally, we will shift our perspective
and evaluate the consulting industry “from the outside in,” through the lens of
some of the newer and potentially disruptive models that are beginning to gain
traction in management consulting. This will serve not only to deepen our
understanding of the current industry and players, but also to identify the points at
which the traditional approach to consulting – to date highly successful -- might
now be competitively vulnerable.

As a capstone to the course, the final sessions will be dedicated to exploring the
key success factors both for getting hired into a top management consulting firm,
and also for architecting a successful and rewarding early career in consulting.

During the final week, students will turn in a take-home final exam and participate
in a post-exam review session.

Bibliography:

This course will be primarily case-study based, supplemented by a combination of


lecture and in-class exercises, and 2 short written assignments to be completed
outside of class. Students will receive a course packet containing all the cases and
other required readings (except as otherwise noted). Assignments, supplemental
course materials and the specific questions for discussion at the next class session
will be posted to the course website each week.

Required readings:

Oct. 17 Introduction to Management Consulting

 Course Syllabus AND Detailed Timetable;


 “Learning by the Case Method.”
(HBS 9-376-241);
 McKenna, “The World’s Newest Profession,” Chapters 1 and 2;
 Case: Miles Everson at PricewaterhouseCoopers (HBS 410-062)

Oct. 19: Firm Strategy, Structure, and Alignment

 Nanda, “Strategy and Positioning in PSFs” Note (HBS 9-904-060);


 Gabarro, “Organizational Alignment, Performance and Change in PSFs” (HBS 9-
904-060)
 Case: McKinsey (HBS 9-903-080)
 Case: International Profit Associates (HBS 9-801-397)

Nov. 2: Consulting Projects

 “Anatomy of a Consulting Engagement/BCG Proposal”


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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

 Case: Exeter Group Inc. (HBS 409-001)

Nov. 9: Economics and Operating Systems; Service Delivery, Sales and


Marketing

 Nanda “Profitability Drivers” Note (HBS 9-904-064);


 Case: “Planning in PSFs” (HBS 903-085)
 [Excel spreadsheet accompanying the case will be provided by professor]
 Heskett et al., “The Service Profit Chain,” Chapter 1

Nov. 16: Talent Management

 Kiechel, “Lords of Strategy,” Chapters 4 and 5


 Case: Developing Professionals the BCG Way (A) (HBS 9-903-113)
 Case: Bain & Company Inc: Making Partner (HBS 9-899-066)

Nov. 23: Client Service and Client Conflicts

 [Case: When Consultants and Clients Clash (HBS 1-902-022, 1-902-095) –


case will be distributed by the Professor]
 Case: Sherif Mityas at A.T.Kearney: Negotiating a Client Service
Predicament (HBS 9-904-031)

Nov. 30: Consulting to Not-for-profit Organizations

 Case: The Bridgespan Group (HBS 9-301-011)


 Christensen, “The Innovator’s Dilemma” Introduction and Chapter One;

Dec. 7: Disruptive Innovations

 Case: Infosys Consulting in 2006 (Stanford GSB SM-151)


 Eden-McCallum (A) (HBS 9-410-056)

Dec. 14: Architecting an Early Consulting Career

 Case: Tim Keller at Katzenbach Partners LLC (A) (HBS 9-407-037)


 Case: George Martin at BCG (A) (HBS 410-112)
 Composite Candidate and First Year Associate Performance Evaluation Forms
[posted by professor]

Assessment: attendance and participation

Attendance and participation are absolutely essential for success in this course. All
students are expected to come prepared and to participate actively in class
discussion.

“Prepared” for this course means three things:

1. I have carefully read the case(s) and any other required readings to be
discussed in the next class session.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

2. I have thought about and written down my notes in support of my


answer to each question for discussion.
3. If a question asks for a specific answer, number, or exhibit, I have
prepared that for class and will arrive ready to present and defend.

Students are allowed to (and even encouraged to) form small study groups to
discuss and prepare each week’s case. However, grading for the course will be
based solely on individual performance and each individual is responsible for
completing all assignments and coming to class well-prepared -- as defined above.
In evaluating an individual’s class participation, I will consider attendance as well as
the quality and frequency of your participation. Quality comments reflect thought
and analysis that moves our understanding of the case forward. They are clear and
concise, fit into the flow of conversation, and most often build on (or disagree
constructively with) what others have said. They do not merely rehash the written
material, repeat comments others have made, or cause others to feel that they
have been treated with disrespect.

All students are also strongly encouraged to sit in the same seat as of the
second class session (the choice is yours on the first day) and to display
their name cards in each class.

Assessment: assignments and final exam

There will be 2 short written assignments given in this course as well as an in-class
or take-home final exam (see detailed course outline below). In contrast to the
weekly case preparation, the assignments and the exam are to be completed by
each individual in the class working alone. There is to be no discussion of these
exercises before they are due, and no outside research undertaken beyond the
course materials unless specifically directed by me. In the event that two or more
students’ work appears substantially similar, I reserve the right to interview each
student during office hours to confirm that each assignment reflects that student’s
individual effort.

The assignments will be distributed and reviewed in class, and will be posted to the
course website one week before they are due. Each is to be completed and handed
in by the beginning of the following week’s class session. Page and/or word limits
must be strictly adhered to – nothing will be read and considered in the grading
beyond the specified limits. The assignments and the final exam must be double-
spaced (except as below), have 1” margins on all four sides and use 12 font. Text
may be written in paragraph format or in more traditional “business memo” bullet-
point format. Exhibits that accompany the text may be hand-drawn or computer-
generated and must also fit within the font and margin requirements. When using
numbered/dot points or exhibits, two (but not more than two) contiguous lines of
text may be single-spaced.

For all written assignments, please make sure to read each numbered question
carefully and to answer each separately and clearly.

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Assessment: Grading

Final grades will be calculated as follows:

Assignments 30%

Final Exam 40%

Class Participation 30%

In a case-based course such as this, I view it as entirely reasonable to consider


class participation (or lack thereof) as a major factor in assigning a course grade.
However, I also reserve the right to take into consideration culture, language and
any other legitimate barriers to class participation and to re-weight any individual’s
grading towards the written assignments and/or final exam if I feel that such
legitimate barriers have come into play.

Observations:

JAMES J. MCGONIGLE

Former Chairman and CEO

Corporate Executive Board

Jay McGonigle is currently an advisor to the Corporate Executive Board Company


(NASDAQ: EXBD) providing counsel to Chairman/CEO Tom Monahan on board
leadership, high-level strategic issues, and business development at this public
company. Mr. McGonigle joined CEB in 1995 when it was a division of the
privately-held Advisory Board Co., led the company’s spin-out in 1997 and IPO in
1999, and served as Chairman and CEO with responsibility for all strategy and
operations until mid-2005. He then continued as Chairman until January 1, 2008.

The Corporate Executive Board Company is a leading provider of best practices


research and analysis focusing on corporate strategy, operations and general
management issues. The company provides an integrated set of information and
decision-support services on an annual subscription basis to more than 5,200 of the
world's largest corporations in 50 countries, including over 85% of the Fortune 500

In 2009, Mr. McGonigle became an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s


McDonough School of Business, where he teaches a course called “Leading the
Management Consulting Firm.” He has twice won “professor of the mod” – best
teacher that term at MSB as voted by the students. In 2011-12 he will teach at
ESADE in Barcelona, Spain as part of a faculty exchange through Georgetown
University.

Mr. McGonigle currently serves on the U.S. State Department’s 60-person Advisory
Committee on International Economic Policy and on the Democratic National
Committee’s National Finance Committee. Following the 2008 election, he also
served as an advisor to President Obama’s transition team for Technology and
Innovation.

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Mr. McGonigle holds a JD from Harvard Law School and a BA from the Woodrow
Wilson School at Princeton University.

Timetable:

The first session will be on Monday October 17th. The rest of sessions will be on
Wednesdays from October 19th to December 21st from 15.00 to 18.30

No class on October 26th.

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TIMETABLE - LEADING THE MANAGEMENT CONSULTING FIRM

Fall 2011

Session Dates Topic Required Supplemental Assignment


Materials Due
Pre-Reading

I October  Introduction to  Course Syllabus;  “History and


17* Management Consulting  “Learning by the Case Method.” Overview” (Lecture
(HBS 9-376-241); Slides)
 McKenna, The World’s Newest  “Global Management
Profession, Chapters 1 and 2; Consulting Sector,”
 Case: Miles Everson at FOI, Business
PricewaterhouseCoopers (HBS 410- Economics, October
062) 2008
 “Quest for Size,”
Economist, March 20,
1997
II October 19  Firm Strategy, Structure  Nanda, “Strategy and Positioning in  “Seeing Behind the
and Alignment PSFs” Note (HBS 9-904-060); Look-Alike
 Gabarro, “Organizational Alignment, Management
Performance and Change in PSF’s,” Consultants,”
Note (HBS 9-904-060) Organizational
 Case: McKinsey and Co. (HBS 9-903- Dynamics, 2002
080)  “The Advice Business”
 Case: International Profit Economist, March 20,
Associates (HBS 9-801-397); 1997;

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III November  Consulting Projects  “Anatomy of a Consulting


2 Engagement/BCG Proposal”
 Case: Exeter Group Inc. (HBS 409-
001)

IV November  Economics and Operating  Nanda “Profitability Drivers” Note (HBS  “Compensation in Take-home
9 Systems 9-904-064); Consulting 2007- Assignment
 Service Delivery, Sales  Case: “Planning in PSFs” (HBS 903- 2008,” Report, #1
and Marketing 085) Kennedy Information
 Excel Spreadsheet to accompany
Planning Case **
 Heskett et al., “The Service Profit
Chain,” Chapter 1
V November  Talent Management  Kiechel, “Lords of Strategy,” Chapters 4  “Drivers of Employee
16 and 5. Retention” CEB
 Case: Developing Professionals the Executive Summary
BCG Way (A) (HBS 9-903-113)
 Case: Bain & Company Inc: Making
Partner (HBS 9-899-066)
VI November  Client Service and Client  Case: When Consultants and Clients  Nanda, Managing Take-home
23 Conflicts Clash (HBS 1-902-022, 1-902-095)** Client Conflicts (HBS Assignment
 Case: Sherif Mityas at A.T.Kearney: 9-904-509) #2
Negotiating a Client Service  “Consultant, Heal
Predicament (HBS 9-904-031) Thyself,” Crain’s
Chicago Business,
2005
VII November  Consulting to not-for-  Case: Bridgespan Group (HBS 9-301-  Wright and Kitay, “But
30 profit organizations 011) Does it Work?
 Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma Perceptions of the
Introduction and Chapter One; Impact of
Management
Consulting,” Strategic
Change, August 2002

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VIII December 7  Disruptive Innovations  Case: Infosys Consulting in 2006  Van Bever et
(Stanford GSB SM-151) al.“When Growth
 Eden-McCallum A (HBS 410-056) Stalls,” HBR March
 “Experienced Clients Are More Wary,” 2008
FT Nov. 17, 2006  “The Backlash
Begins,” Economist,
March 20, 1997
IX December  Architecting an Early  Case: Tim Keller at Katzenbach  McKenna, The World’s Course
14 Consulting Career Partners LLC (A) (HBS 9-407-037) Newest Profession, Feedback
 Case: George Martin at BCG A (HBS Chapter 13 Form
410-112)  “Best Firms to Work
 Composite Candidate Evaluation and for 2010,” Consulting
First Year Associate Performance Magazine
Evaluation Forms  “Giving Advice in
Adversity,”
Economist Sept. 25,
 TAKE-HOME FINAL EXAM** (handed 2008
out at end of class)

X December • Final Exam Review • FINAL EXAM DUE AT 15:00 Take home
21 (Start of Class) final (2
copies – one
to hand in
and one to
use during
the review)

*Note: All classes take place on Wednesday except for the first class on Monday October 17. There will be no class Wednesday, October 26th
due to Career Forum

**All assignments and any readings marked with “**” will be handed out in class or posted to the course website by the Professor.

Copyright: James J. McGonigle. All Rights Reserved.

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT

11M85058

Coordination:

Pablo Vega

Faculty:

Marc Martija

Pablo Vega

Number of students:

Minimum 24 to enable to have at least 6 teams of 4 people.

Objectives:

Course aims and objectives


The aim of this course is to enable you to contribute to the design, planning, implementation
and evaluation of organizational projects in order to improve your managerial practice.

Summary:

Project Management (PM) can be defined as “the application of knowledge, skills, tools and
techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholders needs and
expectations from a project” (Project Management Institute, 1998) and covers a wide range of
situations and activities, directed primarily at causing change. For example, PM can be used in
implementing new strategies, developing new products, or changing specific processes within
the organization.

Specific objectives of this course include:


Improving technical skills
There are a number of issues that are specific to projects, especially in relation to planning and
control of time and budgets. During this course, you will be provided with opportunities to
analyze and practice some tools and techniques that are helpful in the development of
projects. By the end of the course, you will have a range of new technical skills, which will help
you to be more successful when implementing projects for which you are responsible.
Improving interpersonal skills
However, it should not be forgotten that project management is successful only if the
interpersonal aspects are given high priority. Thus, we will be paying attention to your own
and others’ interpersonal competencies, especially in relation to team and teambuilding. A key
factor in implementing successful projects is the ability to analyze and work towards client
needs, and for this, inter-personal skills are essential. Included in this area are topics such as
analysis of personal motivations; negotiation skills; assessing stakeholder interests; and
improving communication and presentation skills.
Improving intellectual skills
In many ways, project management requires integration of intellectual skills. So during this
course, you will be asked to analyze and assess complex problems; reach decisions; and then
synthesize your learning into action plans and “real life” projects. This will require you not only
to read and study what others have done, but also to develop your abilities to think
innovatively, laterally and holistically. This in turn will assist you in implementing your
projects.

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Methodology:

Methodology used consists of different teaching tools:


Lecture presentations of the key tools, techniques and skills required for a successful project
management.
Discussion of business cases specific in PM tools & skills practice.
Link to business: Project presentations & discussions by Guest Speakers experienced in
Project Management.
Selected reading discussions previously worked by each Team.
Team Project Assignment: practical application: Project selection, preliminary presentation,
final presentations and contract book.

We want to consider this course as an open book where everyone will have the opportunity to
exchange his/her experience in project management. We want you all to share your opinion
and experiences in PM, all of which will contribute to enhance the learning experience of the
course.
Assessment:

The assessment of course work will consist of two parts:


Individual assessment (50%)
Based on attendance, active participation*, individual assignments (cases), a peer evaluation
on the project contribution and a multiple choice quiz.

*Active participation, in the form of insights, practical examples, questions, etc. will be
rewarded on an individual basis. Focus will be on the contributions’ quality rather than on
quantity.

Team assessment (50%)


During the course, you will be asked to work in a team on a specific project (chosen by the
team). This is a team responsibility for the final outcome, which represents how it happens in
the real world. The assessment is broken down into 4 deliverables (Project selection, 1st
presentation, Final presentation and Project Contract Book) and a class assessment. Both
presentations will be delivered to a simulated “steering committee”. The team score will be
allocated to the all team members.

Incompatibilities:

None

Observations:

Language
The course language will be English. The team products and presentation must be delivered in
English.

Marc Martija

Marc holds a Degree in Industrial Engineering and Master in Business Administration from
ESADE Business School. He works as an associate Tutor and Professor of the Business Policy
Department at ESADE and has been collaborating with the EMBA Program since 2003.

He works today as Business Unit Director at Applus+ LGAI Division, managing the Transport,
Energy & Telecom Market Business.

Marc has large experience as Program Manager for New Products Development Programs and
for Technological Services Projects in Industrial Multinational Companies, working with multi-
functional and international teams. He also has big experience in the engineering markets

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Term 4 & Term 5

focused in the aeronautical sector. He has been Project Director at Schneider Electric Group
and he has implemented a Project Management Office at Applus+ LGAI.

Marc has also worked as a General Manager at INGENIA, AIE, group of technological
companies created to develop the Engineering Aeronautical Sector in Europe. Nowadays he’s
still linked to INGENIA as a Board of Direction Secretary.

Pablo Vega
Pablo is currently an independent consultant and entrepreneur. He has worked for Sun
Microsystems where he led the joint ventures program for the South East EMEA region
(covering 104 countries). He developed and delivered the business governance training for the
JVs’ Board of Directors. He has also worked for Procter & Gamble as Department Manager for
the Environmental Affairs Department and Supervisor at the Central Engineering Department.
Pablo has launched and managed an NGO fully financed by a bilateral agreement between
Spain and Mexico’s governments. He has been Vp of Public Relations and Communications and
Executive Director for Iniciativa GEMI (environmental Think Tank organization).

Since year 2000 he has been an associate professor in business policy at ESADE.

Pablo has a Diploma in Finance for Executive Managers from ESADE and holds MSc Science
and Technology Policy -Major in corporate strategy- from Sussex University, UK, an MBA from
ITAM Mexico and a BSc Chemical Engineering from UIA Mexico. He is also a fully trained Sigma
Black Belt and a certified Green Belt.

Syllabus:

Course Outline: The Project Life-Cycle


There are a number of variations on a theme when it comes to describing a project life cycle.
Some frameworks use a three-stage life cycle; others use up to nine stages. Here, we will be
considering a five-stage life cycle:
Project Initiation
How do projects begin? In some cases, the need for change will come from the external
environment or the competitive environment. In other cases, the need might arise from within
the organization.
Project Definition
Once you have identified a need, it is important to define more precisely what the outcomes
will be and how they will be achieved.
Project Planning
In this stage, the detailed plans are drawn up, including schedules and budgets, so that
everyone in the team knows what exactly is expected from them.
Project Execution & Control
Now the project is actually put into practice and things begin to happen. As long as the
planning has been effective, this stage should proceed without hindrance. Too often however,
difficulties arise which make this stage the most problematic of all.
Project Closure
Once the project has been completed, an evaluation process should take place. All too often,
this is overlooked in the relief of having completed the project, and yet it is important that it
should take place, since in future the lessons learnt can be applied and project management
improved.

Course Programme

What is Project Management?


What is a project?

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Project vs operational work


Project and strategic planning
What is Project Management?
The PM Knowledge Areas

Why do we need PM?


Ubiquity
The new business environment
Why do so many projects fall?

The Project Life Cycle


The Project Initiation Stage
Origins of projects
Method for selecting projects
Selling projects

The Project Definition Stage


Project Charter: Logframe
Defining stakeholder management
The diamond framework

The Project Planning Stage


Work Breakdown Structure
Responsibility assignment
Project schedulling: Gannt Chart, PERT/CPM, Critical Chain
Project budgeting and resources

Risk Management & Economical Business Case


Risk management planning
Profitability analysis
Earned Value Analysis

Project Organization & Culture


Organizational context
Project based Organization
Organizing for Project Management
Project Office
Project Authority
Project Portfolio Management
Cultural considerations in Project Management

Project Team & Leadership


Competences for a project leader
Situational Leadership & Project Life Cycle
Develop & manage project team
Conflict management

Project Communication
Communication planning
Information distribution
Managing stakeholders

The Project Execution & Control Stage

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Term 4 & Term 5

Scope verification
Schedule control
Cost control
Quality control
Risk monitoring & control

The Project Closure Stage


Project integration
Project evaluation

New Project Management approaches


Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM)
Extreme Project Management (XPM)
Lean Six Sigma

Bibliography:

E. Verzuh, “The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
2008.

H. Ken Bowen, “Project Management Manual”, Harvard Business School, 2002.

“Managing Projects Large & Small”, Harvard Business Publishing, 2004

Timetable:

Every Monday from 03/10/11 through 12/12/11


9:00 to 12:30 h. (no class on 24 Oct).

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STRATEGIC BUSINESS SIMULATION

11M85082

Pre-Requisites:

Business Policy, Business Strategy and Corporate Strategy. Basic Marketing, Finance and
Accounting.

Objectives:

To gain experience and top management vision, while validating and assessing the necessity
and importance of proven business management tools and the impact that effective
implementation has on all this. To manage an organization in a rapidly moving and competitive
environment.

Summary:

The Strategic Business Simulation is an interactive experience integrating Business


Administration's and Strategic Management's most relevant concepts, specially focusing in the
areas of Corporate Management and Business Policy, through the use of one of the top
Business School's (FT top 100) most widespread software.

During the Business Simulation, participants have the opportunity to manage from the highest
level, a number of companies for a period of time simulating one and a half years. The most
relevant functions of the company are included (from small and free-lance to multi-national
companies); finance and administration, sales and marketing, production and operations,
alliance, negotiation, organization, relations with Governments, etc.

Participants will tell the most analytical business vision from the latest Management theories,
the best known administration models, and the most widely used management concepts, all
this with a large company's outrageous day to day business. The goal for reproducing this is to
amplify the need to keep strategy at sight guiding the company towards its objectives, within
an environment and market that, in a similar manner as would certainly happen in reality, will
not make things easy.

In this highly realistic exercise, each participant, playing his senior executive role, not only
gains experience and director qualities, but also validate and assess the necessity and
importance of proven business management and the impact that effective implementation has
on all this.

As an additional value of the business simulation, each team member has the opportunity to
recognize his management abilities, his capabilities as administrator, director, entrepreneur,
and leader; all those fascia provide the profile the business world expects him to have and his
working tools. Furthermore, participants will experience and sense the different competencies
that need to be developed in order to fully deploy his professional qualities.

A dynamic experience, combining case study realism with real management activity, providing
the required link between the different contents of the MBA program and the integrating view
of strategic management.

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Methodology:

Companies are managed by working groups (minimum 4 participants) taking decisions that
cover the most representative functions of businesses. A business and consultancy experienced
team of professors will be responsible for introducing the most credible degree of realism to
the complete process. Their role is both as administrators / guiding professors and as
professional consultants, allowing each individual turn this learning experience into
professional experience and personal development tool.

The environment and companies are designed from current and real models, and the
represented countries are closely pictured along the complete business game. Other external
agents that are also included in the simulation are; the Banks, the Shareholders, Consultancy
Services, the Public Administration, etc.

Step by step results are obtained through economic statements, both internal and market-
wise. These will allow constant assessment of both the absolute position of the company, and
the relative place in which the company positions versus the rest of competitors, increasing
realism within the business game and strengthening in-company ties.

All material, presentations and software is delivered in English (Spanish and Catalan may be
available).

Assessment:

Final grade is defined by:

1) the achievement of the original business objectives as established by the shareholders'


board,

2) the final Audit as presented by the Company's Executive Committee,

3) the individual score as given by the professors' assessment of the participants' value added.

Incompatibilities:

Participants are expected to follow the management of their simulated companies during the
complete run. Partial participation is not recommended.

Observations:

Coordinator: Prof. Jordi Brunat, Industrial Engineer, MBA, MSc in Research, undergoing
Doctoral studies, Associate Professor of Business Policy Dept. Counting with extensive working
experience including Member of the Executive Committee and Director posts in Multinational
Companies, of automotive industry's manufacturing Groups including Volkswagen and Nissan.
He has had responsibility for Marketing Services, Sales and Exports, of well known brands as
Audi, Nissan, Volkswagen, Skoda, etc. Has held the Credit Manager post for Banco Bilbao
Vizcaya NY Branch and currently is advisor and consultant for several companies and professor
of the Business Policy department at ESADE.

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A team of experienced practitioners and collaborating professors of the Business Policy


department will support Prof. Brunat and hold the different roles in the Business Simulation.

Syllabus:

Business Game Schedule:

Session. 1 Preliminary presentation, delivery of material and Simulation Presentation


Session. 2 Manual and Technical Notes Annex, History of the Company, Scenarios and Decision
Making, group allocation.
Session. 3 First Decision
Session. 4 Second Decision
Session. 5 Third Decision
Session. 6 Corporate Portfolio Analysis (Presentation) and Applying Corporate Portfolio Analysis
Session. 7 Fourth Decision
Session. 8 Fifth Decision
Session. 9 Sixth Decision
Session.10 Corporate Audit

Timetable:

September Intensive Course

Monday to Friday from 12/09/11 to 16/09/11


From 09.00 to 12.30 and from 15.00 to 18.30

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Electives Full Time MBA
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STRATEGY MAKING WITH CEOs

11M85230

Faculty:

Professor Xavier Mir

Number of students:

Maximum 25

Objectives:

To put in practice knowledge acquired on Strategy.

Summary:

Industries all over the world are living an intense process of CONSOLIDATION.

GLOBALIZATION is changing the scenario; the entire world is the new battle field.

Economic RECESSION is putting more pressure everywhere, and CEO´s must redefine
STRATEGIES in this

context.

How to combine Organic and Inorganic Growth? M&A´s opportunities ahead?

An opportunity to work as a CEO and work with CEO´s

Participants will have the opportunity to develop a real strategic plan for a given company in a
given

industry and also to participate in an exercise of M&A´s real negotiations

Methodology:

Professors with past experience as CEO´s in the confectionery industry will coach the
participants to

evaluate the industry, to understand drivers and to define a sound strategy for the assigned
company.

Participants will play a key role in an exercise of integration. Acting as Top Management of the
top 12

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

leading companies in the world of Confections must define a sound strategy for the company
(organic

and inorganic) and participate in an exercise of negotiation

(Participants organized in groups representing the top 12 companies in the world in those
industries will

participate in an exercise of M&A that will “consolidate” the sector)

Current CEO´s will come with their own views

Assessment:

Strategic Plans & Negotiation Exercise: Evaluation will be based on class participation and the
quality of

the strategic plan and final negotiation.

Bibliography:

To be provided by faculty during the program

Observations:

Guest speakers with today responsibilities in the same industry will bring his view on those
issues.

Timetable:
September Intensive Course
Monday to Friday from 26/09/11 to 30/09/11
From 09.00 to 12.30 and from 15.00 to 18.30

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

11M35026

Faculty:
Lydia Ros Frizón

Number of students: Maximum 30

Pre-requisites
The core courses of the finance area, so the participant will have a previous
knowledge of basic general and analytical accounting concepts, short-, medium-
and long-term financial analysis and planning, investment selection and company
valuation.

Professor’s Recommendation

The perfect complement is the elective course: "International Finance


Simulation" (worth 1 credit) of a multinational company (Read more in
methodology chapter)

Objectives:

The globalization of markets and company management, and the great


development of derivative markets, demands, every day, young managers with an
intensive knowledge on the opportunities that the new markets and new
instruments offer for a really global management, not only in front of exchange risk
but in front of interest rate risk too.

Summary:

THEME I: THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKET

- A brief history & the basic concepts


- The foreign exchange & the Euromarkets. Spot versus Forward

THEME II: FOREIGN EXCHANGE PREDICTIONS

- Can exchange rates be predicted?


- Theory of purchasing power parity & theory of interest rate parity
- The Fisher effect and the international Fisher effect
- The effective speculation theory: Forward as unbiased predictor of future spot

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Electives Full Time MBA
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THEME III: FOREIGN EXCHANGE RISK: CLASSIFYING & QUANTIFYING IT

- Economic risk & Transaction risk


- Translation risk

THEME IV: TRANSACTION RISK:

Short term "traditional" hedging - forward market versus money market hedge
- Perfect hedge: Forward & Money market hedge
- Reducing risk: Netting, Cross-hedge, Leading and Lagging & Rolling Forward

Short term "new" hedging - an introduction to currency options


- What are options? How the market originated. How it works.
- Currency options hedge versus forward hedge. The premium
- Basic strategies to speculate with options.

Long term hedging - an introduction to currency swaps


- The first swaps: Back to Back loan & Parallel loan.
- What they are and how they work

THEME V: INTEREST RATE RISK: INTERNATIONAL FINANCING

Quantification
- The concept of hedge interest rate
- Calculating explicit costs

Short term "traditional" hedging - forward rate agreements


- Time/interest rate structure :Forward-Forward
- FRA's: what they are and how to use them.

Short term "new" hedging - an introduction to financial futures


- The instrument & the market
- How to use them to hedge & to speculate

Long term hedging - an introduction to interest rate swaps


- Floating versus fixed rates
- The price of swaps using zero coupon bonds.

Methodology:

A good mixed between theory and practice due not only to concepts but to
exercises, real cases, and the analysis of articles on daily news.

The perfect complement is the elective course "International Finance


Simulation" (worth 1 credit) of a multinational company. It will allow the
participant to take decisions to optimize the financial management, using,
in a very practical way, all the instruments he will learn how to use during
the theoretical sessions.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

The simulation will be run using figures from real life, so the participant will be
obliged to pay atention to the economic situation and to the movements in
currency markets. The participant could take part on tutorials, managed by
professionals, in a CPD room at ESADE, but they could also use the model in their
own PC.

Assessment:

There will be a continuous evaluation of practices and also a final exam.


The students that will participate in the computer simulation:
International Finance Simulation will be continuously assessed, and their
result could only improve the overall grade of the course.

Bibliography:

- EITEMAN, STONEHILL & MOFFETT, Multinational Business Finance, 11/e ©2007 |


Addison-Wesley | Cloth; 848 pp | ISBN-10: 0321357965 |ISBN-13
9780321357960

- O.GRABBE. International financial markets. 1996 - Prentice-Hall. 3rd. edition

- A.C. SHAPIRO. Multinational Financial Management. 1996 - Prentice-Hall. 5th.


edition.

- IAN H. GIDDY. Global Financial Markets. 1994 - Houghton Mifflin.

- Don M. CHANCE. An Introduction to Derivatives. 1995. The Dryden Press


Harcourt Brace College Publishers. 3rd. edition.

- J. HULL. Futures, Options and other derivatives.1997 (third edition) - Prentice


Hall.

- P. FERNÁNDEZ y J. PALAU. Introducción al mercado de opciones.1990 - BBV.


Interactivos. Expansión.

- M. BORRELL y A. ROA. Introducción a los mercados de futuros.1990 - BBV.


Interactivos. Expansión.

- L. ROS. International Finance Notes. 2011-2012- ESADE.

Timetable:
Every Thursday from 06/10/2011 to 22/12/2011. No class on October 27th and
December 8th.
From 09:30 h. to 13:00 h.

39
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE SIMULATION

11M35169

Faculty:
Sara Bosch Riera
Lydia Ros Frizón

Number of students: Maximum 30

Pre-requisites:

To be a participant in this course you must be also a participant of the


International Finance course in the same trimester.

Objectives:

Apply the concepts and instruments learned during the International Finance
course to a real situation. That means:

- Acquire adequate knowledge of the financial instruments and markets available


for the Financial Director of a company to carry out the management of cash,
investments and results in the international sphere.

- Acquire the ability to identify and select the appropriate instruments for each
situation.

Summary:

A computer simulation of the financial management of a multinational company in


which participants will make the decisions that allow them to optimize this
management, using for this, in a practical manner, all those instruments learned
during the theoretical sessions.

This simulation will take place in real time, which will oblige participants to be
abreast of the economic situation and of the movement of the main currencies.
Participants will attend group sessions in ESADE's Data Processing Centre,
supervised by a team of lecturers whose professional life comes within this area,
but can also use their own PCs outside the classroom hours for decision-making.

Methodology:

A real time simulation

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Assessment:

The computer simulation will be continually assessed.

Timetable:
Every Thursday from 06/10/11 to 15/12/11
From 19.00 to 22.00 h.
No class on October 27th and December 8th

41
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INTERNATIONAL PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

11M35036

Faculty:
Constance Lütolf-Carroll

Prerequisites:

This elective builds on concepts introduced during the MBA core courses. You must have
completed the core courses before enrolling in this finance elective.

Objectives:

The primary objectives of this course are to:

• Develop an understanding of the differences between an investor and a speculator.


• Consider investing as a process and begin to develop one’s own investment philosophy.
• Expose participants to the global equity markets and their evolution in terms of market
structure, organization, price discovery mechanisms, turnover, and size.
• Enhance participant awareness and understanding of various types of institutional
investors (sovereign wealth funds, university endowment funds, mutual funds,
exchange traded funds or ETFs, pension funds, hedge funds, private equity limited
partnerships and early-stage venture capital funds).
• Give students the opportunity to do their own field research and learn about stock
exchanges around the world.

Summary:

This elective course is an introduction to the asset management industry from the point of
view of an equity investor. We focus on three themes: 1) investment policy, (2) portfolio
construction, and (3) global equity portfolio management.

In this seminar, we take the mindset of a global equity investor who is seeking exceptional
investment opportunities in the world’s equity markets. We shall strive to understand how the
world’s leading equity investment funds pursue their different investment goals in order to
meet the needs of their investors. The knowledge and skills gained from this course will help
you learn not only about stock markets and how they function, but also will help you learn how
professional investors combine different “asset classes” into diversified portfolios. By “asset
classes” we mean investments in publicly-listed equities (from both emerging markets and
developed countries), and investments in alternative assets (private equity limited
partnerships, venture capital funds, hedge funds, real estate investment trusts, commodities,
timberland, and infrastructure projects).

This course will help you practice these fundamental investment management skills:

• Develop an investment policy for a client.


• Construct equity portfolios tailored to the needs of specific kinds of investors.
• Rebalance a portfolio.
• Evaluate the risk adjusted performance of a portfolio.
• Screen and select fund managers. Develop and design appropriate remuneration
schemes for them. Coordinate and manage them as a team.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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Learning outcomes:

After taking this class, participants should be able to

• Understand the difference between a speculator and an investor.


• Consider investing as a process and begin to develop one's own investment philosophy.
• Differentiate between an “order-driven” stock market and a “price-driven” stock market
and discuss the risks and advantages of each.
• Summarize the investment philosophies and approaches of these equity styles:
“value”, “growth”, “momentum” and “quantitative” investing.
• Explain what a sovereign wealth fund is, how it is set up and governed, and how it
might invest and over what time horizon.
• Evaluate the asset allocation decisions of a university endowment fund.
• Be able to compare and contrast the investment policy and allocation decisions of a
university endowment to that of a sovereign wealth fund.
• Understand the legal structure, investment approaches, and remuneration schemes of
private equity and venture capital funds.
• Be able to explain the risks and advantages of investing in mutual funds, closed-end
funds, and exchange-traded fund.
• Describe the components of trading execution costs: commissions and fees, market
impact and opportunity cost.
• Explain ways to reduce trading implementation costs, and discuss the advantages and
disadvantages of each.

Methodology:
This course will be taught using a variety of student-centered teaching methods, including in-
class exercises, short numerical problem sets, mini-lectures on theory, role plays, case
discussion, written case analysis, and group oral presentations. These teaching methods are
designed to enhance student learning and stimulate class discussions.

Student Assessment:

Student assessment will be based on these grade components, each of which is explained in
more detail in the paragraphs that follow:

• One team case analysis 15%


• Stock exchange research project 30%
• Individual class participation 25%
• Individual final take-home exam 30%

Team Case Analysis (15%)

Each group will need to write up their analysis and recommendations for an assigned case and
submit it for grading. In addition, the teams should be prepared to discuss their findings in a
brief oral presentation to the class in plenary session. More details will be given in the final
course syllabus.

Stock Exchange Research Project (30%)

Each team will be asked to select, research, and write a brief report about a stock exchange. It
may be either an emerging country’s stock exchange or a developed country’s stock exchange
that is undergoing a major transformation (or about to be transformed because of a planned
merger or take-over announcement). The group will be responsible for describing the basics

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

strategy of the stock exchange, how it functions and how it is governed. In addition, the team
should highlight any interesting equity company investment opportunities discovered while
researching the exchange. Each group will also be asked to prepare a brief oral presentation
with power point slides to inform the class about the main findings of the team’s research. The
stock exchange written report will be worth 20% of the total grade and the team’s oral
presentation of their research findings will be worth 10% of the total grade.

Individual class participation (25%)

Students are expected to prepare the cases individually and to have read the assigned
materials before meeting in their groups to discuss the cases. Students can expect to be “cold-
called” at various times during the course to present their views, concerns, and possible
“solutions” to the rest of the class. Each class builds on prior sessions. Attendance is
mandatory and only two sessions may be missed according to ESADE program rules. Class
participation will be graded on the depth and quality of the comments contributed and also the
consistency of the class participation throughout the course.

Individual take-home final examination (30%)

The final examination will most likely consist of a case study that is to be analysed and written
up. More details on the exam will be in the final course syllabus. The length of the paper will
depend on the case, but usually the requirement is for a maximum of 8 pages using 1.5 line
spacing and normal font size. The exam instructions and case will be distributed to the class
during the last days of class. The final exam submission deadline will be Tuesday, October
11th by 10:00 am via the Moodle e-learning platform.

COURSE MATERIALS

Required Cases:

CASE 1: Warren E. Buffett, 2008 (UVA F-1550) by Yiorgos Allayannis

Abstract: In January, 2008, as the subprime-mortgage crisis is unfolding, legendary investor


Warren Buffett is searching for good investment opportunities in which to place his bundle of
nearly $50 billion in cash. Shrewd observers of Buffett know that he has refined and improved
his investing processes over the years. In class, we will compare and contrast Buffett’s
philosophy with that of his mentors, Prof. Benjamin Graham of Columbia University in New
York, and Phil Fisher of Woodside, California.

CASE 2: Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (www.adia.ae)

Abstract: The Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) has an estimated $600 billion in assets
under management (total amount is not publicly disclosed). We will be examining the
investment goals and processes of this large sovereign wealth fund. Our aim is to better
understand ADIA’s investment philosophy, human resource practices, and portfolio
diversification guidelines. Only recently has ADIA begun disclosing to the public, releasing its
first ever Annual Review in 2009, and creating a website. As our source material for this “real-
life” case, we will be using public documents available from ADIA.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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CASE 3: Harvard Management Company 2010 (HBS 9-211-004) by Andrè Perold

Abstract: Jane Mendillo, chief investment officer of Harvard Management Company (HMC),
reviews the portfolio strategy for Harvard University, which benefits from the world’s largest
university endowment. HMC has relied heavily on private equity and other illiquid securities to
achieve excess returns. Changing market conditions during the global 2007-2008 financial
crisis cause Mendillo to rethink HMC’s historically successful approach. Come to class prepared
to advise Mendillo on how she should rebalance Harvard’s portfolio, reallocate resources, and
improve internal processes and hiring procedures.

CASE 4: TSP Enterprises by Constance Lütolf-Carroll. [NB: This case may be found in the
book From Innovation to Cash Flows, 2009, chapter 19, pages 497-516.]

Abstract: The case illustrates the venture capital (VC) method of valuing young start-up
companies. During class, we will be discussing the VC valuation method, its benefits and
pitfalls and practice applying the VC method using the Excel spreadsheets accompanying the
case.

CASE 5: To be announced.

REQUIRED READINGS

1. MacKay, Charles “Tulipomania,” excerpted from Extraordinary Popular Delusions and


the Madness of Crowds, 1841 edition, London. Reprinted (1980) by Harmony Books,
Crown Publishers. ISBN 0-517-53919-5.

2. Graham, Benjamin, “Mr. Market” 1-page excerpt from from The Intelligent Investor—A
Book of Practical Counsel, 4th edition, Harper & Row, New York.

Fisher, Philip A. Selected excerpts from Developing an Investment Philosophy reprinted


in the 1980 edition, Business Classics Publishing, Woodside, California, pages 43-47.

Nasdaq Educational Foundation, “Stock Market Overview” (slides posted on class e-


learning platform).

Nasdaq Educational Foundation, “Stock Market Mechanics” (pdf brochure, posted on


class e-learning platform).

Solnik, Bruno and Dennis McLeavey, “Equity Markets and Instruments” from Global
Investments, 2009, 6th edition. Prentice Hall Series in Finance. Pearson Education
International.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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The Vanity Fair article about Harvard’s endowment may be found at this link:
http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2009/06/harvard.html

Jacob, Nancy L. “Evaluating Investment Performance” from The Portable MBA in


Investment, edited by Peter L. Bernstein, c. 1995 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-
471-100661-5.

Lütolf-Carroll, Constance with the collaboration of Antti Pirnes and Withers LLP.
Chapters 18 and 19 From Innovation to Cash Flows. (August, 2009) John Wiley & Sons,
Inc. (Wiley Finance series). ISBN 978-0-470-11809-2.

Observations:

Prof. Constance Lütolf-Carroll is an educator and entrepreneur. She has a BS in civil


engineering from UC Berkeley and an MBA degree from Stanford University Graduate School of
Business. She is a Lecturer of the Business Policy Department at ESADE Business School,
Ramon Llull University. For many years, Connie has also been Visiting Professor at leading
business schools in Europe and South Korea. She is cofounder, principal and board member of
Netspan AG, a technology company, in Switzerland, that is an Internet applications service
provider, primarily for Swiss-German companies and non-profits.

Timetable:
September Intensive Course
Every day from 19/09/11 to 30/09/11. No class on 23/09/11
From 09.00 to 13.00 h
On 30/09/11 class will be from 09.00 to 12.00 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

11M35172

Faculty:

Santiago Simón

Objectives:

This course is designed to give participants an introduction to the complex world of


strategic alliances seen as an integrated process rather than watertight
compartments of finance, business policy and human resources. By the end of the
course, participants should have grasped the complexity of such operations and be
well aware of the risks they entail: more than 50% of operations generate no profit
for shareholders. They should also have learnt how to increase the success factor of
the operations they take part in.

Methodology:

The course will consist of theoretical classes with a comprehensive reading list
tailored to the needs of each class. It will also feature the preparation and class
discussion of real-life case studies to provide an insight into the difficulties and
issues involved in this sort of operations. Students are responsible for preparing the
case studies and doing the reading before the respective class.

Assessment:

Assessment is based on three items:

1. 40% of the final mark: case study presentation in writing.

2. 20% of the final mark: class participation (group discussions and presentations).

3. 40%: the final exam.

Course content

1. Introduction to M&As: different types.

2. Strategic planning: the reasons for M&As.

3. Choice of candidate.

4. Negotiations.

5. Appraisal.

6. Due diligence.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

7. M&A funding.

8. Acquisition of listed companies.

9. Risk capital and MBOs.

10. Cultural issues.

11. Soft factors and their impact on the rate of failure.

12. Post-acquisition and integration phases.

Bibliography:

BUONO, Anthony; BOWDITCH, James (1989): The Human Side of Mergers and

Acquisitions. Jossey-Bass.

CARTWRIGHT, Sue; COOPER, Gary (1996): Managing Mergers Acquisitions &

Strategic Alliances. Utterworth Einemann.

MASCAREÑAS PÉREZ-IÑIGO, Juan (1996): Manual de fusiones y adquisiciones de

empresas. McGraw-Hill.

PALACÍN, Maria José (1997): El mercado de control de empresas: El caso español.

Ariel Economía.

RAPPAPORT, Alfred (1998): Creating Shareholder Value. The Free Press.

ROCK, Milton; ROCK, Robert H.; SICORA, Martin (1994): The Mergers &
Acquisitions

Handbook. McGraw-Hill.

WESTON, J. Fred; CHUNG, Kwang; SIU, Juan (1998): Takeovers, Restructuring and

Corporate Governance. Prentice Hall.

Timetable:

Wednesdays from October 5th to December 21st.


From 09.00 to 12.30 h.
There will be no class on October 12th and 26th.

48
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

NEGOTIATION AND STRATEGIC HR

11M10903

Faculty: Steven Guest

Number of students: maximum 30

Pre-requisites:

Students will have completed the compulsory HR course in first year of MBA

Objectives:

This course is designed to show the importance of negotiating processes within organizations
and has a strong focus on HR issues. The negotiating models of the Harvard PON and Fisher &
Ury and Gavin Kennedy are applied to major decision making areas involving M&A’s labour
agreements, productivity deals, strategic payment issues, work-life balance, flexi-time and
other concerns involving the labour / management relationship. Resolution of conflict and
potential conflict between social agents and areas of the organization are key areas covered by
the course. This can be interpreted on three levels: the strategic macro HR level concerning
issues such as mergers; the individual level in which managers as stakeholders negotiate
recruitment, condition and performance appraisal issues, finally the skills level on which
individuals work on their personal negotiating competences.

Summary:

Using a series of cases and basic theoretical models of integrative negotiating cases involving a
series of concerns centring on the HR function in organizations are presented and analyzed.
Visiting experts from HR departments of large organizations will be intervening in the course to
illustrate the theoretical models with practical applications and experience.

Areas covered include collective agreements: negotiating productivity deals, flexible


timetables, strategic payment issues, rewards (i.e. compensation deals) for results and
strategic indicators; negotiating redundancies, early retirement and other downsizing deals;
HR labour relationship models, worker participation models; negotiating the basis of long
term relationships with employee representatives and other social agents (suppliers, local
community, client organizations…); negotiating in M&A processes: how corporate culture is
taken into account, HR practices reconciled and staffing agreements in newly formed company.

On a second level we consider individuals in the organization negotiating their career


plans, salaries and conditions, agreement on MBO objectives and terms and conditions of
employment. This leads to the practical level of developing skills and competences to improve
the individual’s capacity to negotiate, developed in hands-on practical negotiating
sessions.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Methodology:

Students are involved in analyzing cases and preparing feedback on negotiating models
applied to internal organizational and HR issues. This means reading, preparing presentations
and giving feedback on material provided by faculty. Outside speakers will be invited and
students are expected to give feedback and write papers on the cases presented. Participation
is key as is out of class work preparing materials and covering assigned readings.

Assessment:

70% is measured in terms of their participation and their completion of a negotiation


journal and a case report. The journal is a weekly diary featuring the reflection of students
after the simulations. They include the people they have worked with and the take-aways from
the simulations and how they relate to the theoretical inputs from class. The journal represents
30% of the participation score. The rest is completed with simulation results from scored
exercises and contribution in general. Attendance is obligatory.

30% of the mark comes from a 2,000 word report on learning from the course and account
of a real negotiation

Bibliography: will be provided before the course

Timetable:

Thursdays from Oct 6th to Dec 15th (excluding Dec 8th)

From 15.00 to 18.30h

50
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

THE TRANSNATIONAL MANAGER

11M15132

Faculty: Roger Bell

Introduction and Objectives:

Companies form partnerships worldwide offering managed communications services to multi-


national enterprises under pressure to enhance efficiency and reduce costs. But within this
global scenario local cultural conditions must be taken into account: global principles need
local applications.

Outbound business and leisure travelers see destinations and markets globally and
international roaming data services make the world a small place but employers need to meet
managers’ needs when posted overseas offering on-site support and cultural knowledge.

Businesses operating worldwide need to know history, religions, social and ethnic structure and
communication styles of areas where they operate. We cannot operate globally without
knowledge and awareness of the values and concerns of people we do business with.

International virtual teams require a balance of inter-personal and technological skills to make
them work productively over the life cycle of the project. The digital and human dimensions
are complementary.

This course aims to heighten awareness of cross-cultural issues in communication and


teamwork in global and inter-cultural projects, offering frameworks to analyze multi-cultural
project environments and international postings.

Summary :

• We analyze diverse teams, postings overseas, acculturation and adjustment, cross-


cultural diversity and the impact of culture on global organizations.
• We develop theoretical frameworks applied through cases to deal with practical
problems including cultural, ethical, knowledge sharing and communication.
• We deepen experience of multi-cultural virtual teamwork through a business project
with strict deadlines and joint outcomes, and evaluate strategies and processes.
• Cases include transformer joint venture in Vietnam, ethical issues in Thailand, retailing
in India, product recalls in China, international labour practices, dealing with
bureaucracies, motivation in West Africa.

Methodology:

• Interactive class groups with facilitator presentation of models


• Teams deal with cases and critical incidents followed by feedback and interpretation.
• Virtual project involving contacting, planning, co-ordinating and producing output with
minimal orientation from faculty. Analysis and feedback on the virtual experience
• Presentations by managers to relate class material to corporate realities.

Assessment:

• There are four elements in course evaluation; all must be passed satisfactorily.
A) Participation: readings, preparation, assignments, contribution in class, individual
writing tasks and quizzes. (30%)

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

B) Team preparation and case presentations: (20% including peer evaluation)


C) Virtual business case and analysis: (20%).
D) Individual project of around 3000 words on application of course concepts to business
life (30%)

Background reading :

• Schmidt P L (2007) In Search of Intercultural Understanding, Vienna, Meridian


World Press
• Bartlett C, Ghoshal, S & Beamish, P (2008). Transnational Management 5th ed..
Irwin-McGraw Hill.
• Adler, N.J & Gundersen A (2008): International Dimensions of Organizational
Behavior, 5th Ed., Thousand Oaks: Sage,(chapters 3-5)
• Moran R T, Harris P R & Moran S V (2007) Managing Cultural differences, 7th ed.
Oxford UK, Elsevier (chapters 7 and 11-15)

Articles (to be delivered to mailboxes):

• DiStefano, J. J., & Maznevski, M. L. (2000). Creating value with diverse teams in
global management. Organizational Dynamics, 29(1): 45-63.
• Kirkman, B. L., Rosen, B., Gibson, C. B., Tesluk, P. E., & McPherson, S. O. (2002).
Five challenges to virtual team success: Lessons from Sabre, Inc. Academy of
Management Executive, 16(3): 67-79.
• Malhotra, A., Majchrzak, A., & Rosen, B. (Februrary, 2007). Leading virtual teams.
Academy of Management Perspectives, 21(1): 60-70.
• Hooker J (2009): Corruption from a cross-cultural perspective. Cross-cultural
Management: an international Journal Vol 16 (3) Pp 251-267

Timetable:

Wednesdays from Oct 5th to Dec 21st excluding Oct 12th and 26th

From 15.00 to 18.30h

52
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT

GESTIÓN DE LA INFORMACIÓN APLICADA A LAS FINANZAS


11M11092

Faculty:
Francesc Alcaide Alcaide

Objectives:
Hoy en día el conocimiento y utilización de la hoja de cálculo está muy extendido entre los
estudiantes y profesionales del management; sin embargo su conocimiento como herramienta
y la capacidad de modelizar mediante la misma, distan bastante de ser óptimos.

Pretendemos ofrecer una capacitación suficiente, que permita un alto nivel de excelencia en el
desarrollo de modelos financieros y que se constituya como un factor diferencial (ventaja
competitiva), en el ámbito laboral.

Summary:
Excel:
• Introducción a la modelización.
• Parametrización.
• Validación de datos.
• Estilos y formatos condicionales.
• Gráficos avanzados.
• Uso de funciones en Excel.
• Estadística – Análisis de datos.
• Buscar Objetivo (Goal Seek).
• Solver.
• Tablas de Resultados.
• Protección.
• Escenarios.
• Tablas de bases de datos.

• Filtros.
• Subtotales.
• Querys.
• Tablas dinámicas.

• Importación de datos externos.


• Controles.
• Macros de grabación.
• Macros de programación con VBA.

@Risk:

• Desarrollo de un modelo.
• Identificación de la incertidumbre.
• Análisis del modelo con simulación.
• Toma de decisión.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Methodology:
Clases prácticas donde se introducen paulatinamente los conocimientos teóricos necesarios,
para poder desarrollar la colección de ejercicios.

Assessment:
La evaluación se realizará en base a dos conceptos:

A. desarrollo de los ejercicios prácticos y participación en clase - 50%


B. examen final - 50%

Bibliography:

• Excel 2007 Bible - John Walkenbach - ISBN: 9780470044032 - John Wiley & Sons.
• Financial Models Using Simulation and Optimization: A Step-By-Step Guide with Excel and
Palisade’s DecisionTools - Wayne L. Winston - ISBN: 978-1893281080 - Palisade
Corporation
• Financial Models Using Simulation and Optimization II: Investment - Wayne L. Winston -
ISBN: 978-1893281042 - Palisade Corporation
• Decision Making Under Uncertainty With RISKOptimizer : A Step-To-Step Guide Using
Palisade’s RISKOptimizer for Excel - Wayne L. Winston - ISBN: 978-1893281011 – Palisade
Corporation
• Financial Modeling for Managers with Excel Applications - Dawn E. Lorimer, Charles R.
Rayhorn - ISBN: 0-9703333-1-5 - Authors Academic Press
• Excel 2007 Formulas - John Walkenbach - ISBN: 9780470044025 - John Wiley & Sons

Timetable:
Every Tuesday, from October 4th through October 18th

9:00h to 12.30h

Every Tuesday, from November 8th through December 20th (December 6th excluded, bank
holiday)

9:00 to 13:00hrs.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MARKETING DEPARTMENT

COMUNICACIÓN DE MARKETING Y CORPORATIVA

11M20064

Faculty: Josep Maria Oroval & Ana Varela


Objectives:

La asignatura se propone ayudar a los participantes a

• Comprender el papel estratégico de la comunicación en la empresa y su


importancia como instrumento de gestión.
• Entender la necesidad de integración de las diferentes formas de
comunicación, así como la necesidad de coordinar a los gestores de las diferentes
actividades.
• Aprender cuáles son las responsabilidades directivas clave y cómo actuar
frente a las mismas.
• Conocer las diferentes herramientas y actividades de la comunicación de
marketing. Qué es y en qué consiste cada una de ellas, para qué sirve y cómo se
gestiona.
• Asimilar la importancia de la comunicación corporativa y conocer las
principales actividades a través de las cuales se ejerce.

Methodology:
En cada sesión habrá una parte expositiva que consistirá en la presentación de cada uno de los
temas del programa. Estas presentaciones irán a cargo de los profesores de la asignatura o de
directivos invitados que tratarán temas especializados.

También en cada sesión se pedirá a los participantes una preparación previa que, según las
sesiones, puede consistir en unas lecturas, en la resolución de un caso o en la búsqueda y
valoración de información. El resultado de esta preparación previa podrá dar lugar a un trabajo
de puesta en común durante la sesión en forma, o bien de presentaciones, o bien de discusión
de un caso.

Para el estudio del contenido de cada sesión se facilitarán apuntes y lecturas, consistentes en
algún artículo de revista o algún capítulo de libro.

Además de la preparación y estudio de cada tema del programa, los participantes


desarrollarán, a lo largo del curso y en grupo, un trabajo práctico consistente en el análisis de
la comunicación de marketing de un mercado específico. El primer día de clase los profesores
presentarán una propuesta para este trabajo práctico.

Assessment:
La evaluación de los participantes se hará de acuerdo con la orientación del curso y la
metodología pedagógica propuesta, y constará de casos individuales, casos en grupo y la
realización de un Trabajo Práctico, además de la valoración de la participación en el desarrollo
de la asignatura por parte de los profesores.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Syllabus:
Tema 1. Comunicación de marketing integrada

Tema 2. La estrategia de comunicación


Tema 3. Creatividad y las actividades ATL

Tema 4. La gestión de la comunicación


Tema 5. Sponsoring y las actividades BTL

Tema 6. Nuevas tecnologías


Tema 7. La gestión de la eficacia de la comunicación

Tema 8. La comunicación corporativa

Bibliography:
Manuales de comunicación corporativa y de comunicación de marketing
Argentí, P. A., & Forman Janis. (2002). The Power of Corporate Communication. New York:
McGraw-Hill.
Aristóteles. (1990). Retórica. Madrid: Gredos.

Belch, G. E., & Belch, M. A. (2004). Advertising and Promotion. An Integrated Marketing
Communications Perspective. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Cornelissen, J. (2008). Corporate Communication. A guide to theory and practice. London:


Sage Publications.

O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C. T., Semenik, R.J. (2004). Publicidad y comunicación integral de marca.
México: Thomson.

Riel, Cees B.M. van and Fombrun, Ch. (2007). Essentials of Corporate
Communication. London: Routledge.

Wells, W., Burnett, J., & Moriarty, S. (2000). Advertising. Principals and Practice. Englewood
Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

Textos sobre las diferentes actividades de comunicación

Aaker D.A (2008). Spanning Silos. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Aaker D.A. ”Una estrategia de marca para la innovación”, en Harvard Deusto Business Review,
núm. 173, noviembre 2008, pp 37 a 52.
Aaker D.A. , & Davis, S. M. (2000). Brand Asset Management. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Alet, J. (1994). Marketing directo integrado. Barcelona: Ediciones 2000, S.A.


Anholt, S (2007). Competitive Identity. The New Brand Management for Nations, Cities and
Regions. New York: Palgrave Macmillan
Bedbury, S. (2002). A new brand world. New York: Viking.

Bird, D. (1991). Marketing Directo con sentido común. Barcelona: Ediciones Díaz de Santos.
Broadbent, S. (1989). Te Advertising Budget. Te advertiser’s guide to budget determination.
London: McGraw-Hill.

Bullmore, J. (1991). Behind the Scenes in Advertising. Oxfordshire: NTC Publications Limited.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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Clifton, R. & Simmons, J. (ed.). Brands and Branding. London: Profile Books
Cowley, D. (1997). Understanding Brands. London: Kogan Page Ltd.

Davies, G. et al. (2003). Corporate Reputation and Competitiveness. London: Routledge.

Davis, S. M. (2000). Brand Asset Management. Driving Profitable Growth Through Your
Brands. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Dinnie, K. (2009). Nation Branding. Concepts, Issues, Practice. Oxford: Elsevier BH.

Dowling, G. (2001). Creating Corporate Reputation: Identity, Image, and Performance .


Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ferguson, S. D. (1999). Communication Planning. An Integrated Approach. Thousand Oaks:


Sage Publications.

Fog, K. Budtz, C. Yakaboylu, B. (2005). Storytelling. Branding in Practice. Berlin: Springer.


Fombrun, C. J. (1996). Reputation: Realizing Value from the Corporate Image. Boston:
Harvard Business School Press

Fombrun, C.J. y van Riel, C. (2004). Fame & Fortune. How Successful Companies Build
Winning Reputations. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Gobe, M., & Zyman, S. (2001). Emotional Branding. New York: Allworth Press.
Hameroff, E. J. (1998). The Advertising Agency Business. Chicago: NTC Business Books.

Hannington, T. (2006). Cómo medir y gestionar la reputación de su empresa. Barcelona:


Ediciones Deusto.

Hatch, M.J. & Scultz, M. (2008). Taking Brand Initiative. How Companies Can Align Strategy,
Culture, and Identity Through Corporate Branding. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hopkins, C. (1992a). Mi vida en publicidad. México: McGraw-Hill.

Hopkins, C. (1992b). Publicidad científica. México: McGraw-Hill.

Ind, N. (2001). Living the brand. How to transform every member of your organization into a
brand champion. London: Kogan Page.

Ind, N. (1992). La imagen corporativa. Madrid : Ediciones Díaz de Santos.


Joannis, H. (1995). De la Stratégie Marketing á la Création Publicitaire. Paris: Dunod.

Kapferer, J.-N., (2001). Reinventing teh brands. London : Kogan Page.


Kapferer, J.-N., & Laurent, G. (1992). La sensibilité aux marques. Paris: Les Éditions
d'Organizations.

Keller, K. L. (2008). Strategic Brand Management. A European Perspective. Harlow: Prentice


Hall.

Kim, W.C. & Mauborgne, R. (2008). La estrategia del océano azul. Cómo crear en el Mercado
espacios no disputados en los que la competencia sea irrelevante. Barcelona: Management.

Levensin, B. (1987). Bill Bernbach's Book. A History of the Advertising That Changed History
of Advertising. New York: Villard Books.

Moilanen, T. And Rainisto, S. (2009). How to Brand Nations, Cities and Destinations. New
York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ogilvy, D. (1967). Confesiones de un publicitario. Barcelona: Ediciones Oikos-Tau.

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Ogilvy, D. (1984). Ogilvy y la publicidad. Barcelona: Ediciones Folio.


Olins, W. (1994). Corporate Identity: Making Business Strategy Visible Through Design.
London: Thames and Hudson.

Schmitt, B. H., & Simonson, A. (1997). Marketing Aesthetics: The Strategic Management of
Brands, Identity and Image. New York: Free Press.
Schultz, D. E., Tannenbaum, S. I., & Lauterborn, R. F. (1993). Integrated Marketing
Communications. Chicago: NTC Business Books.
Schultz, M., Hatch, M. J., & Larsen M. H. (2000). The Expressive Organization: Linking
Identity, Reputation, and the Corporate Brand. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Seguela, J. (1982). Hollywood lave plus blanc. Paris: Flammarion.

Steidl, P., & Emery, G. (1997). Corporate Image and Identity Strategies. Designing the
Corporate Future. Warriewood : Business & Professional Publishing.
Stone, B. (1992). Marketing Directo, métodos para alcanzar el éxito. Barcelona: Asociación
Espańola de Marketing Directo (AEMD).
Villafañe, J. (2004). La buena reputación. Claves del valor intangible de las empresas. Madrid:
Ediciones Pirámide.
Wilson, L.J. & Ogden, J.D. (2004). Strategic Communications Planning. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt
Publisihing Company.
Young, J. W. (1992). Cómo llegar a ser publicista. México: McGraw-Hill.

Estudios sobre el funcionamiento y la eficacia de la comunicación

Butterfield, L. (ed.) (2003). Advalue. Twenty ways advertising works for business. Oxford:
Butterworth Heinemann.

Butterfield, L., & Leslie(ed.). (2001). Excellence in Advertising. Oxford: Butterworth


Heinemann.

Franzen, G. (1994). Advertising effectiveness. Findings from empirical research. London: NTC
Publications Limited.

Hoad, A. (Ed.) (2005). Advertising Works 13. Proving the effectiveness of marketing
communications. London: WARC.
Joannis, H. (1995). De la Stratégie Marketing à la Création Publicitaire. Paris: Dunod.

Jones, J. P. (1995). When ads work. New proof that advertising triggers sales. New York:
Lexington Books.

Mcdonald, C. (1992). How Advertising Works. London: NTC Publications Limited.


Moline, M. (1988). La comunicación activa. Bilbao: Deusto.

Timetable:
Every Monday, from October 3rd through December 19th
15.00 to 18.30 hrs.

58
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MARKETING RESEARCH

11M20274

Faculty:

Jatinder J. Singh, Ph.D. (Marketing), M.B.A., B.S.


Department of Marketing Management, ESADE.
http://www.esade.edu/faculty/cv/jatinder.singh

Pre-requisites:

Quantitative Techniques/Statistics

Objectives:

Given the current marketing orientation paradigm (i.e. focus on the needs of the
consumers/customers), it is certain that every manager will come in frequent contact with
marketing research that is focused on understanding the customer preferences and behaviors.
But marketing research is not just limited to surveying the customers and asking them a few
questions. Instead, it has a quite wide scope and application. It is a tool that enables the
managers to make important decisions based on relevant information. Some of the areas
where marketing research is used are segmentation, positioning, new product development,
measuring customer attitudes and behaviors, developing communication strategies and
measuring their effectiveness, etc. The aim of this course is to assist the students in
understanding the mechanism and application of research in marketing, including the
components of problem formulation, methodology selection, data collection, analysis,
interpretation and use of results. The main focus of the course will be to learn the different
applications of research in marketing.

The students should be able to achieve the following by the end of this course:
1. Improve critical analysis and interpretation skills.
2. Understand and evaluate qualitative and quantitative research designs.
3. Learn the research process, from problem formulation to interpretation of results.
4. Learn commonly used analysis tools (e.g. Regression, MDS, Factor Analysis) using data
based case studies. Learning the analysis and interpretation of these tools using SPSS.

Methodology:

The teaching methodology will include:


1. Lectures: Lectures by the faculty, and invited talks by guest experts.
2. Case discussions: Discussion of relevant cases that help us learn the managerial use of the
concepts.
3. Data Analysis and Interpretation: Learning the use of SPSS for analysis and interpreting
data for major MR techniques.

Assessment:

The following are the major evaluative criteria-

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

-In class participation (20 %): Students are required to attend all class sessions and are
encouraged to actively participate in class discussions.

-Final exam (30 %): There will be an open book exam at the end of the course.

-Research Proposal (10 %): Students are required to develop a research proposal. The details
will be provided on the first day of the class.

-Case reports (40%): Students have to turn in their responses to case studies that are given
to them. The cases and due dates for turning in the assignments will be given on the first day
of the class.

Observations:

Although we will talk about qualitative techniques as well, the course mainly will focus on
quantitative research methods. The students will have to work on cases and data analysis as a
part of their weekly assignments.

This syllabus is a tentative one, and some elements are subject to modifications. However, the
main aim and objectives of the course will remain the same.

If prospective students have any questions, they are welcome to contact the professor in
advance.

Syllabus:

Detailed syllabus and schedule will be provided on the first day of the course.

Bibliography:

Marketing research books that can be used as references:

Aaker, David A., V. Kumar and George S. Day (2000), Marketing Research, Wiley.
Churchill, Gilbert A. and Tom J. Brown (2003), Basic Marketing Research, South-Western.
Malhotra, Naresh and Mark Peterson (2006), Basic Marketing Research, Prentice Hall.
McDaniel, Carl and Roger Gates, Marketing Research Essentials, 6th Edition, Wiley.
Zikmund, William G. (2003), Essentials of Marketing Research, South-Western.

In addition, the students will be given readings and articles when the course starts.

Timetable:

Every Tuesday, from October 4th through October 18th

9.30 to 13.00 hrs.

Every Tuesday, from November 8th through December 20th (December 6th excluded, bank
holiday)

9.30 to 13.30 hrs.

60
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

SIMULACIÓN DEL MARKETING ESTRATÉGICO

11M25074

Faculty: Josep Mª Rius Bresco

Number of students: Máximo 60

Objectives:

La Simulación de Marketing Estratégico sirve para cerrar el proceso de aprendizaje de


marketing estratégico por la via de la implementación, en un entorno simulado, de los
conocimientos ya adquiridos en el MBA.

Summary:

Los tópicos fundamentales sobre los que se constituirá la asignatura, siempre desde un punto
de vista metodológico de investigación y análisis, serán:

- CICLO DE VIDA DE LA SOLUCIÓN. Piedra angular para consolidar el conocimiento


estratégico: saber cuándo y por qué procede tomar un tipo de decisiones u otras.

- POSICIONAMIENTO. Análisis de la percepción de los consumidores, elaboración de mapas


de posicionamiento.

- SEGMENTACIÓN. Técnicas de clasificación estadística y su aplicación a la segmentación.

- ANÁLISIS DE ATRIBUTOS. Determinación de las características relevantes de los productos


y servicios (tanto con aspectos tangibles como aspectos subjetivos: dependiendo del
momento del ciclo de vida de la solución!), funciones de utilidad: Conjoint Analysis.

- ANÁLISIS DE PREFERENCIAS. Análisis de las preferencias de los consumidores, su


relación en los mapas de posicionamiento y percepciones.

Methodology:

La clase se dividirá en grupos, gestionando cada grupo una empresa que tiene una realidad
empresarial distinta pero con el mismo "bottom line": Valor de la Acción.

A partir de esa situación de partida, cada grupo tendrá que tomar una serie de decisiones de
marketing estratégico, que equivalen a un año. Siendo una Simulación de estrategia de
marketing, la escenificación es que cada grupo tiene un contrato blindado de 6 años dentro de
los cuales pueden tomar cualquier tipo de decisión, lo importante es conducir al éxito a su
empresa al final de su Contrato.

En función de los resultados de cada decisión, se dará un feed back para reconducir el proceso
de aprendizaje ya que el objetivo final es el anclaje del aprendizaje y el subsanamiento de
cualquier laguna que pudiere observarse.

Assessment:

El dia previsto para examen se dedicará a la presentación por parte de los/as alumnos/as de
su gestión realiza en su compañía gestionada en la Simulación. Esta presentación se escenifica
en clave de hacerla ante la Junta de Accionistas y cada alumno/a tiene que asignar un
presupuesto de inversión a cada uno de los otros grupos según la confianza que le transmitan.

Las inversiones recogidas por un grupo en esta presentación, así como los resultados objetivos
obtenidos (tanto absolutos como tendencia) por las distintas compañías, constituirá la base de
la evaluación de cada alumno/a.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Bibliography:

To be provided by faculty during the program

Timetable:

Every Thursday, October 6th through December 22nd

15.00 to 18.30 hrs.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

STRATEGIC RELATIONS & KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

11M27001

Faculty: Manuel Alfaro & Victor Noguer

Pre-requisites:

Apreciado/a participante del MBA,

En contextos empresariales altamente competitivos como el actual, los clientes suponen el


activo más importante para las empresas, y la diferenciación por producto/servicio o por precio
es cada vez menos sostenible en el tiempo.

En estos entornos, el factor diferencial con nuestros competidores se fundamenta, cada vez
más, en las relaciones que seamos capaces de construir con nuestros clientes, y en la
aportación de valor que seamos capaces de canalizar y transmitir a través de estas relaciones.

Los directivos al frente de empresas o unidades de negocio deben conocer que el éxito o
fracaso de una organización reside en gran parte en su capacidad de construir y hacer
perdurar las relaciones con sus clientes, y seguidamente, saber crecer con ellos y en ellos,
siendo esto válido tanto para corporaciones multinacionales, como también para PYMES y
proyectos “start-up”.

A lo largo de este módulo, vamos a profundizar en este ámbito, aportando las claves para
desarrollar con éxito un modelo de Gestión Integrada de las Relaciones con nuestros clientes,
combinando una aproximación conceptual integrando los modelos basados en desarrollos de
Relationship Marketing y en Key Account Management. El planteamiento va a ser dinámico y
participativo, orientándose a la comprensión de los modelos y en su aplicación práctica en
negocios y organizaciones de todo tipo.

Si deseas consultar alguna información acerca del programa que encontrarás a continuación,
estamos a tu entera disposición en: victor.noguer@esade.edu / manuel.alfaro@esade.edu

Recibe un cordial saludo,

Manuel Alfaro & Víctor Noguer

Objectives:

A lo largo de las sesiones plantearemos los factores críticos de éxito para desarrollar un
Programa Estratégico de Gestión de Clientes, así como los conocimientos necesarios y una
metodología contrastada, que será aplicable tanto en el contexto de las empresas en las que
trabajamos, como para el desarrollo directivo del propio participante.

OBJETIVOS DEL MÓDULO

- Aportar los conocimientos y las herramientas necesarias para implementar modelos de


gestión del mercado basados en “Relationship Marketing” y en “Strategic Account
Management”.

- Generar un espacio de aprendizaje dinámico y de debate abierto con los participantes


para profundizar en la gestión estratégica de clientes.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

- Interiorizar y adquirir un concepto estratégico de gestión comercial (tanto a nivel


corporativo como directivo/personal).

- Generar un contexto de reflexión conceptual pero con directa implicación práctica


acerca de la gestión estratégica de clientes.

Summary:

Sesión Introductoria

MÓDULO B2C:

- Gestión estratégica de clientes: de intercambios a relaciones. El enfoque Marketing


Relacional: la creación de valor en un esquema de relaciones de colaboración.

- La gestión integral del cliente en siete pasos: captación selectiva, gestión de la


experiencia, gestión de la vinculación, gestión de la retención, gestión de la
comunicación y relación, gestión de la recomendación, gestión de la co-creación.

- CRM para la gestión relacional de clientes

MÓDULO B2B:

- Punto de partida: ¿Cuándo empieza la relación con un cliente?. Proceso de Generación


de Clientes en B2B (B2B Sales Process).

- La Selección de Clientes Estratégicos en B2B: Análisis de portafolio de clientes.


Definición de Criterios de Selección. Metodología de selección de clientes estratégicos.

- La Creación de Valor para el cliente estratégico como objetivo: La formulación y


aportación de valor. El gran salto: de ”Qualified Supplier” a “Partnership”.

- Objetivos y filosofía “KAM”. Factores críticos de éxito en Strategic Account


Management. Cultura organizativa en Key Account Management.

- Panificación Estratégica de Clientes: PECLI – Plan Estratégico de Cliente. Análisis de


posición y estrategia. Modelos estratégicos aplicables en Key Account Management.

- Estructura Organizativa: Desarrollo del KAR. Planteamientos organizativos en Key


Account Management. El Key Account Manager: Perfiles, funciones, responsabilidades.

- Construcción y gestión de Relaciones con nuestros clientes estratégicos. Desarrollo de


habilidades relacionales. Etapas en la gestión de las relaciones. Modelos relacionales
con nuestros Key Accounts.

- Strategic Account Contact Plan y vinculación con los perfiles clave.

- Sistemas de información: Sistema de comunicación con clientes y de difusión en la


organización. Observatorio de mercados y tecnologías.

- Revisión de mejores prácticas en la Gestión Estratégica de clientes en los principales


sectores de actividad: Automóvil, alimentación/gran consumo, servicios empresariales,
consultoría, industria farmacéutica, TICs, marketing y publicidad, etc.

Methodology:

- Aproximación conceptual mediante slides presentadas a lo largo de las sesiones.

64
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

- Aplicación continua de ejemplos ilustrativos por parte del equipo tutor como
incentivación a las aportaciones de los directivos participantes.
- Mini-casos en grupos de trabajo.
- Business Case Project & Discussion: ENSR International (HSB).
- Mesa redonda con Key Speaker invitado.
- Aportación de lecturas y artículos de interés.
- Blog abierto en el Espacio de aprendizaje.

Assessment:

La asignatura se evaluará mediante tres parámetros:

- Módulo B2C: 40% (Business Case y Participación activa en las sesiones)

- Módulo B2B: 40% (Business Case y Participación activa en las sesiones)

- Test Final: 20%

El Test Final se realizará a lo largo de la última sesión y tendrá una duración aproximada de 30
minutos. Se centrará en aspectos conceptuales de carácter general de la asignatura. Será
necesario superar este test para aprobar la asignatura, aunque su peso en la evaluación final
será del 20%.

Observations:

Dr. Manuel Alfaro

Director y Profesor titular del Departamento de Dirección de Marketing de ESADE.

Es autor de los libros 'Gestión rentable de clientes' y 'Temas clave en marketing relacional',
publicado por McGraw Hill.

Combina la dirección del Departamento de Dirección de Marketing en ESADE con la


colaboración como socio fundador de Client Consultores en Marketing, consultora especializada
en marketing relacional.

Es asesor y consejero de distintas empresas industriales y de servicios. Anteriormente, fue


socio fundador y gerente de diversas sociedades en el ámbito de la publicidad (Dos x Dos) y la
información empresarial (D.AD, Developing Advantages Through Business Information).

Licenciado en Filosofía y Letras. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. DEA y PhD Universidad


de Zaragoza.

Víctor Noguer

Profesor colaborador del Departamento de Dirección de Marketing de ESADE.

Director de Sponsorship & Events, empresa especializada en proyectos de patrocinio y event


marketing.

MBA por ESADE.

65
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Bibliography:

Business In Networks

Hakansson, Hakan; Ford, David; Gadde, Lars; Snehota, Ivan ; Waluszewski, Alexandra

Wiley (2009)

Key Account Management, The Definitive Guide

Malcolm McDonald, Diana Woodburn

Butterworth- Heinemann (second Edition, 2007)

Relationship Marketing, Strategy and Implementation

len Peck, Moira Clark, Adrian Payne, Martin Christopher

Butterworth- Heinemann (1999)

Temas Clave en Marketing Relacional

Manuel Alfaro

McGraw Hill (2004)

Handbook of Relationship Marketing

Jagdish N. Sheth, Atul Parvatiyar

Sage Publications (2000)

Key Account Management

Peter Cheverton

Koran Page (4th Edition, 2008)

Successful Global Account Management

Kevin Wilson, Nick Speare

Miller Heiman

Timetable:

Every Tuesday, from October 4th through October 18th

15.00 to 18.30 hrs

Every Tuesday, from November 8th through December 20th (November 1st excluded –bank
holiday-)

15.00 to 19.00 hrs

66
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

STRATEGIC SALES MANAGEMENT

Faculty: Jaime Castelló, course coordinator and main lecturer.

Jaime Castelló holds an Economics Degree from the University of Valencia (Spain) and an MBA
from ESADE Business School (also in Spain) and is currently an Associate Professor within the
Marketing Management Department at ESADE, where he is the leader of the Sales and Key
Account Management Knowledge Cluster. This knowledge cluster is a dedicated team of
professors and executives with a common goal of improving the way that companies manage
their Sales initiatives. The activities of the cluster include academic research, conference and
“knowledge meetings” among the participating professors. He is also the Associate Director of
the ESADE Executive MBA in Madrid (Spain), where he is based.

Before joining ESADE, Jaime Castelló worked in different management positions, always in the
Marketing and Sales fields, in various multinational companies in Spain and in France.

Since joining ESADE, Jaime Castelló has led workshops and taught courses to top executives
both in Spain and abroad. He teaches courses ranging from Marketing Strategies, to master
students, Channel Management and Go-To-Market Strategies, Sales Management and Trade
Marketing Management. He is active as a professional speaker, giving conferences to different
audiences, and he also collaborates with the Spanish and international media on Marketing,
Sales and Executive Education issues. He writes a blog on CincoDias.com, one of the leading
Spanish economic newspapers. He is currently preparing his Doctorate in Business
Administration at the Kingston University in London, which will be focused on the influence of
industry factors on KAM effectiveness.

Jaime is an avid endurance athlete, and he tries to set some time aside every day to train for
marathons and long distance triathlons. He hopes to return to a competitive shape when he
finishes his DBA.

Other professors from the ESADE Sales and Key Account Management Cluster, and also
practicing Sales Management executive from leading companies, will join Jaime for key
interventions in some of the sessions.

Pre-requisites:

The participants will need to have fundamental notions of:

- Corporate Strategy (company mission, strategic goals, culture)


- Marketing Strategy (Market understanding, Segmentation, Positioning, Marketing
Tools and Operations)
- Finance (ROI calculations, margins and profits)

Objectives

“The fundamental changes reshaping the business landscape require that management view
the sales function in a radically different way than what has been prevalent and productive for
the past three decades. The sales function has evolved from a tactical to a strategic boardroom
issue.” Benson P. Shapiro Adrian J. Slywotzky and Stephen X. Doyle, “Strategic Sales
Management: A Boardroom Issue”, Harvard Business School, 1998.

67
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

“Most CEOs have financial, science, marketing, legal, or manufacturing backgrounds–and no


sales experience. So they don’t identify with the people who interact with customers. I think
that’s where the disconnect comes from”

Fred Hassan, then CEO of Schering-Plough, on “Leading Change from the Top Line” Harvard
Business Review, July-August 2007

The question is not why you should take this course, but rather why not… as a future MBA
from ESADE, Sales Management knowledge will be crucial for your future career. Not just
“how-to-sell” knowledge, which can be gleaned from any “motivational” speaker or sales
techniques books, but the specific knowledge of how to use and manage your sales efforts to
create a sustainable competitive advantage for your company.

In this course we will explore the strategic dimensions of Sales Management, and by strategic
we mean the dimensions that impact the company’s revenue creation capacity and its ability to
create and develop a competitive advantage.

Companies are relying on their sales forces as engines of economic growth and profitability,
yet the sales role has never been more difficult, as products and services become more
complex, customers more sophisticated and demanding, and competitors more aggressive. As
new people enter sales roles and experienced ones leave them, sales organizations are
struggling to help salespeople reach competence quickly, and to provide the leadership and
support necessary for them to perform well. Not surprisingly, senior executives often lack
confidence in their sales force’s ability to execute their strategies; they tend to be disappointed
in their results.

A few of the business challenges that we are observing in the selling environment are:

 Competition is intense. New players entering the markets and old players are
challenging traditional boundaries of service and product offerings.
Differentiation is seen as crucial and extremely hard to achieve.
 Customers are more sophisticated, knowledgeable and demanding. This raises
the bar for sales interactions and requires sales organizations to deliver value.
Procurement departments are playing a stronger role in the buying process
today. Sales organizations need to understand the value drivers in each buying
center and respond effectively.
 Acquiring new customers and opening new channels are increasingly important
to growth strategies. Often customer acquisition is tied to customer retention
strategies that seek to expand relationships and increase buying centers in
existing accounts.
 Profitability has replaced revenue growth as a critical focus of sales
organizations. The sales force is expected to achieve price targets and deliver
margins—but also to be more consultative and solutions-oriented.
 Commoditization/shrinking markets is a theme in most industries. There is a
perceived need to differentiate through value-added services, innovative
product-applications, and insights about customers’ customers.
 The roles of sales representative and sales manager are more complex and
demanding. The search for talent seems universal, and expectations that the
current sales organizations can achieve growth targets are generally low.

This course is designed to provide MBAs with the best tools, techniques, and concepts for
improving the total effectiveness of a sales organization The goal is to help participants
understand how they can transform a sales force into a high-performing sales team, and how

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they can impact the company’s ability to create and sustain a competitive advantage.
Participants will also develop a better appreciation of the need for a more integrative approach
to developing comprehensive marketing strategies through closer ties between marketing and
sales. The course will tackle every possible sales environment, but we will specifically address
the issues of B2B and corporate sales management.

Learning objectives:

After completing this course, the participants will:

1. Understand the role of the sales organization in the implementation of a company’s


strategy.
2. Know how to create a sales strategy in the context of multi-channel go-to-market
strategies.
3. They will know how to analyze and manage a company’s customer portfolio, and they
will be able to strategically segment the company’s accounts.
4. Be able to define the best sales process to match the specific customer segment needs.
5. Understand the concept of “Inbound Marketing” and how it fits in the Sales process, in
a B2B context.
6. Learn how to design the most effective sales organization, to deliver the greatest value
to specific customer segments.
7. Analyze the key issues in managing sales teams and its implications in the company’s
P&L.
8. Understand the role of IT in managing the sales organization.
9. Analyze the interface between sales and marketing, and discuss the different views on
how to manage the relationship between the two areas.
10. Understand the concept of Customer Centric Organizations, and how it will impact the
way in which companies will be built in the future.

The contents that will be addressed during the course, in their sequential order, will be:

1. Why Strategic Sales Management? Exploration of the implications of Sales Management


in creating and sustaining a competitive advantage.
2. The role of Sales Management in Corporate Strategy
3. Sales Strategies and Multi Channel Go-To-Market Strategies.
4. Customer Portfolio. Evaluating and managing a company’s customer portfolio.
5. Strategic Customer Segmentation. The role of the Customer in Corporate Strategy.
6. “The Age of Customer Capitalism”: a new corporate vision.
7. Creating a Sales Process. Communicating value to specific customer segments.
8. “Sales Funnel 2.0”: The role of social media and inbound marketing in the new sales
process.
9. Creating the Sales Organization: meeting the customers where they need it.
10. Managing sales teams: transforming a sales force into a high performance sales team.
11. The role of IT in Sales Force Management. Tools and cautionary tales.
12. The Sales and Marketing interface: navigating the divide.
13. Customer Centric Organizations: The new frontier in market orientation.

Methodology:

The methodologies used in this course will address the needs of the learning objectives stated
earlier.

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- Case studies: will help the participants in understanding the issues and options in
different business situations.
- Role Plays: will allow the participants to stand in an executive’s shoes and to better
understand the use of the tools provided.
- Simulations: will provide the participants with direct feedback on the consequences of
the decisions made, allowing them to reflect on the intertwined nature of the decisions
in the management of sales teams
- Group / Class discussions: will provide with the opportunity to share and confront views
on the most controversial topics.
- Executives presentations and Q&A: will allow the participants to have a direct
impression of what the concepts and issues explored in the class look like in the “real
world”.

Assessment:

The dynamic nature of the class requires a continuous assessment. The participants will be
evaluated based on their contribution to the class and on their participation on the different
activities. The participants will be informed of the evaluation criteria for each activity. 60% of
the evaluation will be based on individual performance and 40% will be based on group
performance in the various group activities (role plays and simulations).

Bibliography:

Erin Anderson, George S. Day and V. Kasturi Rangan “Strategic Channel Design” MIT Sloan
Management Review, Summer 1997.

James C. Anderson and James A. Narus, “Business Marketing: Understand what customers
value” Harvard Business Review, November – December 1998.

Anupam Argawal, Eric Harmon and Michael Viertler, “Cutting Sales Costs, not revenues”
McKinsey Quarterly, 2009, number 2.

Jeanne Bliss, “Chief Customer Officer: Getting Past Lip Service to Passionate Action” Jossey-
Bass, 2006

Jerry Colletti and David Fritz, “Sales Force Transformation” white paper for the Sales
Management Association, March 2010

George S. Day and Christine Moorman, “Strategy from the Outside IN: profiting from Customer
Value”, McGraw – Hill, 2010

V. Kasturi Rangan, Rowland T. Moriarty and Gordon S. Swartz “Segmenting Customers in


Mature Industrial Markets”, Journal of Marketing, September 1992.

V. Kasturi Rangan and Marie Bell, “Transforming your Go-To_market Strategy: The Three
disciplines of Channel Management”, Harvard Business Press, 2006

Philip Lay, Todd Hewlin and Geoffrey Moore “In a Downturn, provoke your customers” Harvard
Business Review, March 2009

Josh Leibowitz and Ben Vonwiller, “Rapid Transformation of a Sales Force”, The McKinsey
Quarterly, August 2008

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Rob Markey, Fred Reichheld and Andreas Dullweber, “Closing the Customer Feedback Loop”,
Harvard Business Review, December 2009

Roger Martin, “The Age of Consumer Capitalism”, Harvard Business Review, January-February,
2010

Andrew P. McCaffee, “How a connected Sales Force Innovates”, Harvard Business Review,
December 2009.

Vikas Mittal, Matthew Sarkees and Feisal Murshed, “The Right Way to Manage Unprofitable
Customers”, Harvard Business Review, April 2008

Neil Rackham and John De Vincentis, “Rethinking the Sales Force: Redefining selling to create
and Capture Customer value” McGraw-Hill, 1999

Benson P. Shapiro and Thomas V. Bonoma “How To Segmnet Industrial Markets”, Hervard
Business Review, May-June 1984.

Benson P. Shapiro Adrian J. Slywotzky and Stephen X. Doyle, “Strategic Sales Management: A
Boardroom Issue”, Harvard Business School, 1998.

Benson P. Shapiro, V. Kasturi Rangan and John J. Sviolka, “Staple Yourself to an Order”
Harvard Business Review, July-August 2004.

Andris A. Zoltners, Prabhakant Sinha and Greggor Zoltners, “The Complete Guide to
Accelerating Sales Force Performance” AMACOM, 2001.

(Various Authors) Harvard Business Review, July-August 2006, special issue on Sales
Management.

Timetable:

Every Tuesday, from October 4th through October 18th

15.00 to 18.30 hrs

Every Tuesday, from November 8th through December 20th (November 1st excluded –bank
holiday-)

15.00 to 19.00 hrs

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT

AGILE SUPPLY CHAIN

10M45050

Faculty:
Alan Harrison
Mike Sweeney

Objectives:

- To position supply chain management in the context of globalisation and fast


response.
- To show how supply chain processes can be aligned with end customer needs.
- To explain the different human resource needs of different supply chain strategies.
- To explore the challenges of meeting end customer needs in markets where
demand is difficult to forecast and where product life cycles are becoming shorter.

Summary:

Increased consumer choice and shorter product life cycles are features of more and
more of today's rapidly changing markets. Both features place tough demands on
the way the supply chain is managed. And they will become features of more and
more of tomorrow's markets. This option offers guidance in understanding the
supply chain implications - both technical and human. We address the issues that
affect strategy setting, as well as the management issues for planning and
controlling the challenges the new market conditions present. Finally, we address
the emerging tools and techniques to help - e-hubs, collaborative planning and
virtual organisations.

Methodology:

The course will be based on lectures with class participation, case studies with
group presentations. It will be supported by a guest speaker, and by a supply chain
game to demonstrate the issues at stake.

Assessment:

Group project and report. Target length 2,000 words, exhibits and attachments
additional to this:
- Using the principles of ‘lean’ and ‘agile’, investigate a selected organization that
serves end customers (for example, a car dealership or a retailer), and evaluate its
position in the supply chain. How well equipped is the organization to meet
customer demand in the market that it serves?

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Bibliography:

- Fisher M.L., Raman A. and Sheen McClelland A. (2000) ‘Rocket Science Retailing is
almost here - Are you ready?, Harvard Business Review, July - August.
- Fisher, M. L.; Janice H. Hammond, Walter R. Obermeyer and Ananth Raman
(1994), "Making Supply Meet Demand in an Uncertain World", Harvard Business
Review, May-June
- Gilmore, J. H. and B. Joseph Pine II (1997), "The Four Faces of Mass
Customization", Harvard Business Review Jan-Feb pp. 91-101.
- Harrison A. and van Hoek R, Logistics Management and Strategy, Pearson
Education, 2002
- Preiss, K. Goldman, S. L. and Nagel, R. N. (1996): Cooperate to Compete, Van
Nostrand Rienhold
- Scarborough, H. (2000) The HR implications of supply chain relationships , Human
Resource Management Journal, 10,1, 5-17.
- Womack, J.P. (1996) Lean Thinking. Banish Waste and Create Wealth in your
Corporation, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Timetable:
Monday 19/09/11 to Friday 23/09/11
From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h. and from 15.00 to 18:30 h.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION

11M45053

Faculty:
Juan Ramis Pujol

Pre-requisites:

Have an attitude of eagerness, be emphatic and open to collaborate with peers and
work very hard for a week!
If you are of those who don’t like others, like to think on your own and don’t share
thoughts and think your ideas are the best in town…better do not enrol!

Objectives:

1 - Understand the links between innovation and value creation and the role
creativity plays.
2 - Be able to design and manage innovation projects by actually following the path
of a real innovation project
3 - Understand the dynamics of learning and knowledge management necessary for
innovation projects.
4 - Know how to foster creative and innovative groups
5 - Develop communication and presentation skills.

Methodology:

The methodological approach is designed to foster active learning and ensure that
students correctly implement their innovation projects. .
The innovation project is the basic foundation of this course. The accompanying
exercises and the actual practice are essential to generate deep learning. The
innovation project presentations at the end of the course are fundamental to share
different experiences with each other. Active participation is required from all
students.

Assessment:

Participation: 15%
Assignments: 20%
Final project presentations: 50%
Peer's evaluation: 15%

Syllabus:

From Opportunity identification to market:

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Topic 1: Innovation opportunities identification


Topic 2: Project definition
Topic 3: Conceptual development
Topic 4: Mock ups / Prototyping
Topic 5: Validation
Topic 6: Selling (elevator pitch)/ Cross-learning Presentations

Bibliography:

- Berry, L. L.: Discovering the Soul of Service, The Free Press 1999
- Chesbrough, H., "Open Innovation", HBS Press, 2003
- Christensen, C., "The Innovator´s Dilemma", Collins, 2003
- Csikszentmihalyi, M., "Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and
invention", Harper Perennial, 1997.
- Kim, W. C. and Mauborgne, R., Blue Ocean Strategy, Harvard Business School
Press 2005
- Michalko, M., "Thinkertoys a handbook of creative-thinking techniques" Ten Speed
Press, 1991.
- Pink, D. H., "A whole new mind. Why right-brainers will rule the future", The
Berkley Publishing Group, 2006.
- Ramis-Pujol, J., Guía Práctica de la Innovación para PYMES. Anetcom, 2005,
www.anetcom.es
- Segarra, E., "¿De dónde proceden las ideas?: las fuentes de innovación en la
empresa", Harvard-Deusto Business Review, 2010
- Siebiera, G., Ramis-Pujol, J., "Discovering the Patterns for Service Innovation",
SMS Conference, Viena, October 2006
- Tushman, M.L., O'Reilly, C.A., Winning through Innovation, Ed. Harvard Business
School Press, 1997
- Von Hippel, E., "Usuarios y administradores como fuentes de innovación", ed.
COTEC, 2004, 1988

Timetable:
Monday 26/09/11 to Friday 30/09/11
From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h. and from 15:00 to 18:30 h.

75
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

FROM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT TO PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

11M45123

Coordination:
Dr. Miguel Heras

Faculty:
Dr. Monica Franco Cranfield School of Management

Dr. Miguel Heras ESADE Business School

Introduction:

Performance measurement is on today’s management agenda. Different measurement


frameworks and methodologies, such as the balanced scorecard, the performance
prism and the business excellence model, are being adopted the world over. Interest
in the topic pervades the public arena, as well as the private and public sectors, with
governments introducing performance league tables for schools, hospitals, universities
and local authorities. Software vendors, consultants and conference organisers have
also recognized the massive market interest, hence the growing plethora of reporting
packages, consulting products and performance measurement conferences. Research
data suggests that most organisations currently use some sort of performance
measurement system in order to implement their business strategy. However, many of
these systems deliver a fraction of their potential benefits as they tend to be poorly
designed and implemented. Why? Because far too often when managers re-engineer
their organisation's measurement systems they simply restructure their existing
measures into a new measurement framework. Even when this is not the case, there
are usually serious shortfalls in their implementation, as people do not know how to
interpret and act on the measurement data that they are presented with. The aim of
this elective, then, is to address these issues.

Objectives:

• Introduce the concepts of indicators and performance measurement systems or


scorecards as tools for strategy implementation;
• Explain the KPI concept and present the features that a ‘good’ indicator should
have;
• Study strategy map concept and how to design one;
• Learn about the risk management approach that is linked to the indicator
system;
• Develop strategic indicators from the strategy map;
• Cascade strategic indicators into operational indicators;
• Study how to measure innovation;
• Identify pitfalls in implementing a performance measurement system and how
to overcome these;
• Share participants’ experiences with performance measurement systems;
• Review key issues associated with:
o Measuring financial and non-financial performance, and
o Using performance results to determine rewards;
• Critically examine the ‘art and science’ of setting performance targets;
• Understand how to manage underperformance;
• Understand the motives behind the organization of new management teams

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Term 4 & Term 5

meetings focused on strategy;


• Analyse the resistance to change sparked by performance measurement
system and how to overcome this problem.

Summary:
How do organisations manage the use of performance measures and targets? When
does it make sense to adopt performance related rewards to manage performance?
How are performance targets set? To what extent do targets affect employees’
motivation, behaviour and performance? How can organizations manage
underperformance?

These sessions will encourage you to think critically about the answers to the above
questions based on practical experience and the results of academic research. We will
work on a case study that will help you to better understand the difficulties associated
with measuring and managing performance in organisations.

Methodology:
Several case studies, readings, videos and a variety of syndicate group
exercises will be used throughout the course.

Participants will be split up into groups several times throughout the course to
simulate a senior management team drafting a strategy map, identifying risks,
setting targets, etc. Professors will act as facilitators for group discussions.

Assessment:
The grading and performance standards include the following:
- Case discussions, practical exercises and participation*: 60%
- Team reports on a case study: 40%.

(*) Participation comprises of class attendance, oral presentations based on the case
studies and individual contributions during the sessions.

Syllabus:

The course will last five days:


- Day one will explore the different performance measurement frameworks and how to
link strategy to operations. We will also discuss how to measure innovation.
- Day two will examine the processes required to design, implement, and review a
balanced scorecard system and how to integrate it within a Business Process
Management approach. We will also study the strategy map and risk management
concepts.
- Day three will address strategic indicators and how to deploy them as operational
indicators. We will also study performance measurement issues and the impact of
using performance measurement systems.
- Day four will deal with linking performance indicators to reward systems and setting
appropriate targets.
- Day five will be dedicated to conducting successful performance reviews; potential
biases and how to overcome conflicts in performance appraisal.

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Bibliography:

- Franco-Santos, M. (2007). “Theoretical perspectives on performance-based pay”, in


MSc Course Notes, Centre for Business Performance, Cranfield School of Management.

- Franco-Santos, M. (2007). “The Performance Impact of Using Measurement Diversity


in Executives” Annual Incentive Systems, Cranfield, UK: Cranfield University, Cranfield
School of Management.

- Heras, M., Sierra, V. and Cusumano, J. (2006), "A Set of Requirements For Analysis
of Performance Measurement Systems", presented at the Fifth International
Conference on Performance Measurement and Management.

- Kaplan, R.S. and Norton, D. S. (2001), The Strategy Focused Organization. Boston,
Massachussets: Harvard Business Scool Publishing.

- Kaplan, R. and Norton, D. (2006) Alignment: Using the Balanced Scorecard to Create
Corporate Synergies, Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

- Kaplan, R.S. and Norton, D.P. (2008), The Execution Premium. Linking Strategy to
Operations for Competitive Advantage. Boston, Massachussets: Harvard Business
Scool Publishing.

- Kerr, S. (2003), “The Best-Laid Incentive Plans”, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 81,
No. 1, pp. 27-

- Neely, A.D. (2008), Business Performance Measurement: Unifying Theory and


Integrating Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

- Paladino, B. (2007), Five Key Principles of Corporate Performance Management. John


Wiley & Sons, New Jersey.

- Parmenter, D. (2010), Key Performance Indicators. Developing, Implementing, and


Using Winning KPIs. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons,.

- Pfeffer, J. and Sutton, R. (2006). ‘Do financial incentives drive company


performance?’, in Hard facts, dangerous half-truths and total nonsense: profiting from
evidence-based management, Boston, MA: Harvard Business Publishing:. ecch
2565BC.

Links

http://www.bain.com/management tools/home.asp

http://www.balancedscorecard.org/

http://www.e-reward.co.uk/

http://www.cipd.co.uk/

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Term 4 & Term 5

http://www.performanceportal.org/

http://www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/research/centres/cbp/index.asp

http://www.thepalladiumgroup.com/

http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/home/html/home.jsphttp://www.cipd.co.uk/

Timetable:

From Monday 12/09/2011 to Friday 16/09/2011


From 9.00 to 12.30h and from 15.00 to 18.30h

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MANAGING SERVICES

11M40388

Faculty:

Juan Ignacio Moreu

Ivanka Visnjic

Objectives:

• Study the management of services companies from the definition of its strategy to
making it reality by means of the performance measurement systems or scorecards.
• Equip attendants with the conceptual and analytical frameworks to better manage
service businesses from its strategy definition to its service delivery.
• To identify the ways of value creation in the services companies and especially the
achievement of the satisfaction and loyalty of the persons of the organizations as
foundation of the satisfaction and loyalty of their clients.
• Learn about the idiosyncrasies of different service settings.
• Apply the models and theories on particular service settings.
• Help attendants to design your service company and service operations.
• Equip future service managers with the professional competencies to work within this
field, especially: systematic thinking, empathy, communication skills, inspiriting
leadership, achievement orientation, organizational competence and teamwork.

Summary:

Today we live in an economy that is increasingly focused on services in growth and constant
innovation. Services in the industrialized countries currently represent more than two thirds of
the gross domestic product and employment. Moreover, a growing number of manufacturing
companies are aware that they can create greater value for their clients and differentiate
themselves through services. As a result, issues of operating efficiency and competitiveness
are becoming more critical than ever for success in service industries.

In services, the achievement of growth and sustainable profit is closely linked to customer
satisfaction and loyalty, which at the same time is based on the satisfaction and loyalty of
those who work in these services.

The nature of service organizations is sufficiently specific to require a separate management


focus. In this course, we shall develop a series of benchmarks, tools and concepts required to
design and implement operating strategies in services. We will consider both traditional and
new approaches for achieving operational competitiveness in the service company, preparing
you to take decisions about products, employees, processes and customers. The course will
examine different service settings in healthcare, financial services, tourism and professional
services among others.

Methodology:

The course is a combination of real application situations, based in case discussion, with theory
and practice models, based in the most relevant research and experts in Service management.

Hence, the primary teaching tool is a collection of cases along with several lecture/discussions
on important concepts. Also, two company presentations and one company visit will give

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Term 4 & Term 5

attendants the opportunity to have first hand information and an exchange of point of view
with professionals working in Service firms.

A case is a rather comprehensive exposition of a real managerial situation describing a set of


problems and requiring a plan of action. Success during the course depends heavily on student
preparation before class and active participation in class discussions.

• In teams, the participants should discuss and analyze the case studies and prepare a
report. The team reports should be sent prior to each class (at least 24 hours in advance)
to the professors by e-mail.
• The discussion of case studies will follow different structures (individual presentation, role
playing, group debate...) so the individual members of groups should come well prepared.
• Content is not the only course take-away. Every session should be seen as a management
meeting where you will be able to improve your communication skills. Come well prepared
and learn from each other.

Assessment:

- Case Studies Reports and Practical Exercises 50%


- Participation (*) 30%
- Take-away Exam: Team Case Report 20%

(*) Participation comprises class attendance, oral presentations from case studies, and
individual contributions during the sessions.

Syllabus:

In the first session, an introduction to the Service Management world will be developed,
analyzing different types of services and its specific characteristics and management
challenges.

After this introduction, first part will review how to define Service Strategy, from
environment review, global competitive strategy, to definition of target markets and the design
of a service delivery system.

The second part will consist in applying the concepts of BPM (Business Process
Management) given during Operations general course, combined with indicators models to
track the performance of the organization

The most extended and last part will present how to design or built innovative services
to win in the market place. It will cover tools for assessing current situation vs desired one
(Blueprinting), and an in-depth check of different critical areas to achieve it (quality,
outsourcing, service recovery and CRM, professional service companies…)

Along the course, two company presentations and one company visit will challenge attendants
to compare its previous experience and class key learnings, with the insights of professionals
that have rooted experience in delivering excellent services.

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Bibliography:

Basic Textbook

• Fitzsimmons, J.A. y Fitzsimmons, M.J. (2008), Service Management. Operations, Strategy,


Information Technology. New Cork, McGraw-Hill.

Other Complementary Material

• Heskett, J. L., Sasser, W. E. y Schlesinger, L.A. (1997), The Service Profit Chain, The Free
Press, New York .
• Heskett, J. L., Sasser, W. E. y Schlesinger, L.A. (2003), The Value Profit Chain, The Free
Press, New York .
• Johnston, R., and Clark, G. (2005), Service Operations Management, Prentice Hall, London.
• Metters, R., Pullman, M. and Walton, S. (2006), Successful Service Operations Management.
Thomson, London.
• Van Looy, B., Gemmel, P. and Van Dierdonck, R. (2003), Service management. An Integrated
Approach, Prentice Hall, London.

Internet Addresses

• http://www.asq.org
• http://www.efqm.org
• http://www.quality.nist.gov/
• http://www.mycustomer.com/
• http://www.1to1media.com/VoiceOfTheCustomer
• http://www.customerthink.com/
• http://www.customersat.com/

Timetable:

Thursdays from 06/10/2011 to 15/12/2011 (excluding 08/12) from 9.00 to 12.30h

82
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

SOCIAL SCIENCES & ECONOMY DEPARTMENT

MANAGING SUSTAINABILITY

11M05210

Faculty:

David Murillo Bonvehí

Marc Vilanova Pichot

Objectives:

The objective of the course is to present the students with some specific tools and
methodologies for managing sustainability strategies, including embedding sustainability
practices and designing specific solutions for companies, sectors or units.

Summary:

Sustainability embraces a wide variety of approaches and of initiatives which over recent years
have transformed the agendas of companies, their vision, identity, governance and strategy.

Despite the diversity of approaches, most sustainability instruments and initiatives have a
common goal which is to analyze and manage the impact companies have on their
stakeholders and on the world. This approach has a deep impact on the identity and mission of
organizations, as it changes some of the core values that govern business practices and
actions.

Companies are approaching this from four distinct perspectives: (1) as a risk management
issue, (2) as a responsibility to society issue, (3) as an innovation driver or (4) as a
competitiveness issue. That is, some companies understand that managing sustainability and
maximizing stakeholder value is central to the long term competitiveness of the company. As
Porter and Kramer suggest in their recent article published in 2011, to be competitive in the
long run companies must generate simultaneously private and public value. This is something
that many companies have understood and applied for many years, and which has generated
divergent business models.

Traditionally many companies have looked at sustainability as a compliance issue. Other


companies look at sustainability from a philanthropic perspective, understanding that the
company has a duty to return to society some of its benefits and to act responsibly. However,
some companies understand that sustainability is a source of innovation and, therefore, a
competitive advantage. This course focuses on this last group of companies that understand
sustainability as a central strategic asset, and therefore we aim to explore how these
companies developed alternative business models. We will also discuss how other companies
can capture and integrate some of these issues into their own organizations. Furthermore, this
course aims to provide tools to manage sustainability in a company, from issue framing to
action planning. That is, we want to discuss how companies transform sustainability into

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strategies, policies and practices, and the impact this has on the organization.

Methodology:

The course will be divided into plenary sessions, discussion groups and work on case studies.
Most sessions will include a guest speaker, which most times will be a practitioner. All sessions
and texts will be in English.

The basis of the course will be dialogue, starting from a series of selected cases, websites and
readings in order to offer a panorama of the issues which are currently raised by companies in
relation to sustainability.

Assessment:

Attendance, participation in class and a final project on one of the issues discussed will be
assessed.

Evaluation:

Final project: 30%


Threads: 30%
Participation and attendance: 40%

Syllabus:
The course will cover the following issues:

• Introduction to the sustainability framework: relation between CSR and sustainability


and corporate governance
• Human rights: why they are important to management and how they can be integrated
• Bottom of the pyramid: innovative sustainability policies in emerging markets
• Socially responsible investment: how the financial sector and institutional investors are
shaping the sustainability agenda
• Sustainability policies at small and medium size companies
• Green versus greenwashing: embedding environmental issues in core business
processes
• Sustainability issues in the supply (or value) chain
• Social innovation: generating social innovation that produces value for society as well
as the organization
• Sustainable competitiveness: integrating sustainability in the competitiveness model

Timetable:

Wednesdays from 05/10/2011 to 21/12/2011

From 9.00 to 12.30h

84
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

THE EUROPEAN UNION: GENESIS AND ISSUES

11M65081

Faculty:

Valentí Llagostera Español

Objectives:

The objective is to present and discuss the role of the European Union as a world
player. The analysis of the economic, political and social background will be done to
understand the evolution, process and perspectives of the European Union
integration process in the frame of today’s context.

The European Union is looking how to fit its economic and political interests taking
into account the enlarged number of members as well as the rapid evolution of the
international agenda. To what extend the European Union is giving the right
answers? What is the European Union standing for?
How the European Union is re setting their objectives?

Summary:

1- The European Union: A work in progress.


With a general updated perspective, the objective is to identify the main
topics concerning the EU. To understand the complexity of the process in
terms of the number of countries involved and the international context.
Where are we?
2- The European Union integration process: From the Treaty of Rome to the
Treaty of Lisbon.
The evolution of the European integration process can be followed through
the treaties that have been agreed by the member’s states. How the
objectives have been changing, as well as the European and international
context. Deepening and widening the European Union. Does it holds?
3- How the European Union is ruled:
The European institutions (European Council, European Commission,
European Parliament, Council Of Ministers, COREPER ...) Who proposes, who
legislates, who decides…How does this fit? Is the EU prepared for the XXI?
4- How the European Union is financed (resources) and which are the
expenditures.
Looking at he European Union budget to understand how and which EU
policies are financed. The contributions of the Member States. Is
sustainable? Does everybody agrees? How the crisis is affecting?
5- The European Union versus the world. EU economic and financial
indicators.
The relative position of the EU in the word: trends and perspectives
The economic and the political perspectives for the EU. Is the EU a global
player?
6- The euro: Birth and crisis.

7- Structural and Cohesion Policies – The European social model.

8- The external relations of the EU

9- Future trends: Governance of the European Union, Turkey, Relations with the
US and China

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Methodology:

1- Each session will begin will a follow up of the daily international press related
with the European Union to point how the European Union fits in the international
agenda.

2- Presentation of the topic to be developed, discussion and conclusions.

All the material presented (slides) will be previously available in the intranet.

3. Readings will be given previous to each class, to be prepared or presented.

Assessment:

Each participant will have to follow on a daily basis the international journals
identifying three topics to be presented (oral presentation).

Each participant will have to prepare a one page essay on a "driving idea"
concerning the European Union to be presented during the course (oral
presentation of a written report).

Class participation will be required.

A final essay during the last day of the course will be done.

Bibliography:

All European institution publications (mainly European Commission, European


Parliament...) are available in the European Documentation Center, which is located
within the ESADE library. During the session a number of documents will be
mentioned and will be available.

www.europa.eu.int European Union site


www.ceps.be European Policy Studies

"A History of Europe"


Norman Davis, Oxford University Press 1996

"Dark Continent"
Mark Mazover, London: Allen Lane, 1998

"The building of the European Union",


John Pinder, Oxford University Press 1998

"Ever closer Union: An introduction to European Integration"


Desmond Dinan, Basignstoke: Macmillan, 1999

Timetable:

From Monday 12/09/2011 to Friday 16/09/2011 and from Monday 19 to Friday


23/09/2011

From 15.00 to 18.30h

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TERM 5

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BUSINESS POLICY DEPARTMENT

COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE

11M85100

Faculty:

Tamyko Ysa

Pre-requisites:

‘The project has worked out, but oh boy, it has caused pain’– senior health promotion officer,
health promotion partnership. Not everyone who works daily in collaborative alliances,
partnerships or networks reports such negative experiences as those quoted above. Indeed the
Financial Times (24 June 2003, p. 14) reports a Nokia executive as saying that their linkages
are paying off. Others talk similarly enthusiastically about their partnership experiences: ‘When
it works well you feel inspired ... you can feel the collaborative energy’.

However, very many do express frustration. There has been much rhetoric about the value of
strategic alliances, networks, public service delivery partnerships and many other collaborative
forms, but reports of unmitigated success are not common. This course is designed to foster
active learning and ensure that participants correctly implement their collaborative projects,
focusing in particular on Collaborative Governance: the process of facilitating and operating in
multiorganizational arrangements -within the private, public, and civic sectors- to solve
problems that cannot be solved or easily solved by single organizations.

Objectives:

1. Learn the essentials of crafting, structuring, and managing collaborative governance.


2. Understand the links between collaborative governance and value creation.
3. Be able to design and manage collaborative projects by actually following the path of a real
collaborative project.
4. Understand the dynamics of active network management and strategies necessary for
collaborative projects.
5. Know how to foster outcomes from collaborative and innovative groups.

This course should be of value to:


- participants who tried collaborative governance but where unsatisfied with outcomes
- participants who are aware of the issues that this course examines, but would like to deepen
or broaden their understanding of these issues.

Methodology:

The methodological approach is designed to foster active learning and ensure that students
correctly implement their collaborative governance projects. The collaborative governance
project is the basic foundation of this course. The accompanying exercises and the actual
practice are essential to generate deep learning. The collaborative governance project
presentations at the end of the course are fundamental to share different experiences with
each other. Active participation is required from all students.

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Assessment:

Participation: 15%
Assignments: 20%
Final project presentations: 50%
Peer's evaluation: 15%

Timetable:

Every Tuesday from 10/01/12 to 13/03/12


From 15.00 to 18.30 h.

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LEADERSHIP: POWER AND INFLUENCE

11M80236

Faculty: José Luis Alvarez Alvarez

Objectives:

People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in
circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the
circumstances they want, and, if they can't find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw.

This is a course about learning to use power and influence as effective tools for both
understanding your surroundings and achieving your goals. It is a course about getting things
done in the real world, where politics and personalities can often seem to hinder rather than
help you. It is a course for those of you who want to make things happen, despite the
obstacles that might stand in your way. Consequently, this is a course about you.

This course presents conceptual models, tactical approaches, and self-assessment tools to help
you understand political dynamics as they unfold around you and develop your own influence
style. By focusing on specific expressions of power and influence, this course gives you the
opportunity to observe their effective "and ineffective" uses in different contexts and stages of
a person's career. This subject matter will introduce difficult ethical questions. By design, this
course should challenge you to define for yourself what will constitute the ethical exercise of
power and influence in your life. The objectives of the course are to help you:

1. Develop a conceptual framework for understanding power and influence. You should be able
to define power and influence and begin to appreciate how essential they are for your own
productivity. By identifying critical sources of political conflict, you can learn to ameliorate or
harness them to produce constructive outcomes for you and your organization.
2. Practice diagnostic skills that will enable you to map out the political landscape, understand
others' perspectives, and learn to predict their actions.
3. Assess your own power bases and influence style, and consider strategies for expanding
them.
4. Begin to build a repertoire of influence tactics so you will be effective in a variety of contexts
and situations.

Summary:

The course is based upon four conceptual building blocks: Bases of Power and Political
Dynamics; Influence Tactics, Style and Image; Coalitions and Networks; and Developing a
Power Style. Each is briefly described below.

Bases of Power and Political Dynamics

We set the foundations for dealing with the basic issues to be covered in the course: What is
power? Where does it come from? Why do we see political conflict in organizations? How can
political conflict be handled to serve constructive ends? How can you exercise influence in an
effective and ethical manner? How can you acquire power and influence over the course of
your career? We introduce the power dynamics framework to explore these questions.

These questions are also intended to unearth your implicit theories and feelings about power
and influence. These have a profound impact on how you perceive problems and opportunities,
and hence, how you decide upon particular courses of action. To help you develop a realistic
point of view -that is neither naïve nor cynical- you will start from day one to become aware

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and to test your assumptions about power and influence.

Influence Tactics, Style and Image

We will also consider how to convert power bases into influence tactics that fit personal and
situational factors. Our focus is on understanding our "influence targets", so as to tailor our
approach accordingly. We explore a variety of settings -one-on-one and group influence
situations- as well as tactics for influencing key constituencies outside the boundaries of our
firms. Given today's business world, we emphasize exercising influence without relying on
formal authority.

We also examine tactics for building credibility and conveying an effective image as well as
tactics for winning over larger audiences. We explore "impression management" dilemmas in a
variety of different contexts.

Coalitions and Networks

We will focus on network position and control of critical resources as key power bases. Our
objective is to consider strategies for building networks and coalitions to get things done. We
examine how to diagnose the political landscape and how informal networks of relationships
shape the distribution of power. This module includes exercises designed to help you practice
coalition-building strategies and assess your own network of relationships.

Developing a Power Style

Finally, we look at building your career and political style from a power and influence
perspective. We map out common early career challenges including building credibility quickly,
cultivating mentors and networks and managing ethical dilemmas. We consider strategies for
acquiring power over the course of your career in an effective and ethical manner and explore
typical early career transitions with an eye towards crafting strategies for navigating key
inflection points successfully.

Methodology:

In this course, we will rely on a mix of traditional case studies, video-materials, exercises, self-
assessment tools, and readings.

Syllabus:

Session 1: Introduction & The politics of promotions and surviving political attacks

Case: Karen Green (Video to be shown in class)


Overview
After introducing the course, in this class, we will watch and discuss a video of a company
retreat in which a decision is made between two candidates for a project manager position.
Karen and Richard are two young managers competing for a promotion. The two managers
have very different styles.
Questions to guide the video discussion will be presented at the beginning of the session. No
pre reading is required for this first session

Session 2: Power bases

Cases Lyndon B. Johnson and Margaret Thatcher


Overview
These cases portray the rise to leadership positions of former US President Lyndon B. Johnson

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and former British Prime Minister Margaret (now Lady) Thatcher. They will help us to
understand how leaders can build power bases that are consistent with their personalities and
influence styles, as well as to reflect on the downside of relying too much on a single style. We
will also watch in class fragments of documentaries on them.
Readings
- Lyndon Baynes Johnson (Book excerpts)
- Margaret Thatcher (HBS 9-497-018)
Preparation
1. What bases of power did Thatcher and LBJ develop in their early career?
2. How did they exercise influence? How did they build credibility?
3. What were the strengths and weaknesses of each leader's sources of power and influence
style?

Session 3: Influencing others

Case: EIS Simulation


Overview
The class will be splitted into small groups to do a Simulation in which a team of junior
managers are trying to influence a group of senior managers to accept an innovation. the
simulation helps the students understand the nuances of tactics of influence, especially when
one is young and does not have much power

Session 4: Tactics of Influence

A review of basic tactics of influence, and their appropriate timing and targets will be carried
out with the support of fragments of movies and documentaries

Session 5: Learning and Exercising Power when you are young

As a summary of the course, in class we will see and then discuss a video about the young
president (28 years old) of a family business. With the reputation -and background-- of a
reckless youth, and without management education, Henry Bolingbroke takes charge of the
family business after the sudden death of his father. We will watch him reacting to
stakeholders' pressures, and embarking on an expansion strategy. We will also have the
opportunity to discuss his personal, moral and professional development.
No reading is required.

Bibliography:

To be recommended at the end of the course

Timetable:
Every Wednesday from 08/02/12 to 07/03/12
From 15:00 h. to 18:30 h.

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SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

11M85093

Faculty: Alfred Vernis

Objectives:

Teach participants the importance of social entrepreneurship and social enterprises that help
find solutions to the major social challenges facing today's societies.

- Ensure that participants learn some of the most important elements required for social
entrepreneurship in the 21st century. For example, they should be aware of the importance of
working transparently, with sound government bodies that ensure accountability, but also
guarantee the development of initiatives in the long term. Moreover, they should learn the
importance of creating social projects, which help generate economic and social values
simultaneously, and are economically viable in the long term.

- Ensure that participants learn the importance of social entrepreneurship and consider
becoming involved in some way in a social enterprise initiative in the future.

Summary:

This course examines the nature and major trends on social entrepreneurship and key
challenges for companies and nonprofits organizations in a sustainable development
perspective. Until recently, social entrepreneurship management improvements were mainly
thought to relate solely to human resources, communications, fund-raising, information
systems, etc. However, experience has shown that several other aspects have been neglected
when it comes to strengthening social entrepreneurship organizational skills. These aspects,
which we will analyze in depth during this course (strategy alignment, accountability,
governance, collaboration, etc), are associated with the changes shaping society and markedly
affecting social enterprise operations and interactions with all the other social actors.

It is widely accepted that contemporary democratic societies are built around three sectors:
public administrations, business companies and nonprofit organizations. Like a three-legged
stool, these three sectors have to work together to drive societies towards a state of
equilibrium. In an ever-changing, fast-paced environment, social enterprise organizations (for
profit and nonprofit) need the appropriate skills in order to face new challenges and continue
to help improve the lives of people and communities. In other words, these organizations must
be truly capable of leading the complex world of social intervention.

Syllabus:

Please, note that this is not exactly the final Course Syllabus, but gives a clear idea of the
contents of the course.

The course is structured in two parts. Following an introductory session, a first block (3
sessions) will address the four key variables in the social entrepreneurship concept (strategy
alignment, accountability, governance and social funds).

A second block, entitled Social and sustainable partnerships (5 sessions), is devoted to the
multiple stakeholder approach, social entrepreneurship in a multinational corporation
("intrapreneurship"), social entrepreneurship in a nonprofit organization, sustainable
development and social partnerships. We also plan to go on a field trip to visit a social

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enterprise initiative.

First session:
Introduction to social entrepreneurship

The business of businesses increasingly consists of the creation of social value together with
economic value. The addressing of social problems, and better understanding of the context in
which companies operate, is now becoming part of leading companies' core strategies. Large
numbers of nonprofit organizations also strive for management breakthroughs, which will
enable

them to improve social development performance. Many consider social actions to be the
exclusive realm of nonprofits and governments, excluding business from sharing in the task of
addressing a common need. Our concept of social enterprise shows how business, working
alone or in partnership with government and civil service organizations, can help accelerate
progress in bettering the course of mankind. Naturally, businesses contribute to social welfare
by providing goods and services sought by consumers, generating employment, and paying
taxes to fund public services. These benefits are inherent to doing business, but do not make
business a social enterprise.On the other hand, when businesses undertake actions with the
explicit purpose of generating social value, they enter the realm of social enterprise. Such
actions have the potential to generate a large number of different benefits for companies,
ranging from consumer appeal to improved government relations, new product development,
knowledge of the market, in addition to success in employee recruitment, motivation, and
retention.

Reading:
Alvord, Sarah H., Brown, L. David David and Letts, Christine W., "Social Entrepreneurship and
Social Transformation: An Exploratory Study" (November 2002). Hauser Center for Nonprofit
Organizations Working Paper No. 15. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=354082 or
DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.354082

Case:
Garcia, Tonya; Lesova, Polya; Swindler, Josie and Tuggle, Kathryn. "Class of ’07: The Fast
Company/Monitor Group Social Capitalist Award Winners".Fast Company, Issue 111, December
2006. 2006.

Other recommended Readings and resources:


Mosher-Williams, Rachel (Editor), "Research on social entrepreneurship: understanding and
contributing to an emerging field". ARNOVA Occasional Paper Series. Volume 1, Number 3
(2006)

Skoll Foundation: http://www.skollfoundation.org


Center for Advancement of SE: http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/centers/case/
Schwab Foundation: http://www.schwabfound.org/
Ashoka http://www.ashoka.org

First part: Social Entrepreneurship key variables

Second session
Aligning Mission, Strategy and Structure

The importance of having a clear strategy lies in the need to establish the direction an
organization should follow and to guide it along its way. Although such strategies are often not
implemented in their entirety, they nevertheless help an organization know where it is in
relation to where it would like to go.

Reading:

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SEKN. Strategy in Social Enterprise. Chapter 3 in Effective Management of Social Enterprises.


Lessons from Business and Civil Society Organizations in Iberoamerica. SEKN. David
Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University Press, (April 2006).

Case:
Intermón Oxfam: the tension between efficiency and values
Alfred Vernis and Angel Saz (SEKN-Harvard Business School).

Other recommended Readings and resources:


Oster, Sharon M. Strategic Management for Nonprofit Organizations. Chapter 1, Introduction
and Chapter 2, The Mission of Nonprofit Organizations.Oxford University Press (1995).

Oxfam International: http://www.oxfam.org/en/

Third session
Accountability and governing bodies in the business and nonprofit sectors

Society at large should hold social enterprise organizations accountable for all their operations
- especially those individuals and institutions that support them. Social entrepreneurship
accountability encompasses economic reporting and transparency, but also entails project
evaluation processes to measure mission accomplishment. For accountability to be feasible,
social enterprises need to have competent governance bodies, executive boards and trustees.
In social enterprises, board members or trustees are accountable for organizations'
achievements and

failures - they are also in charge of setting strategic goals. If these bodies do not operate
effectively, social enterprises may easily drift away from their missions.

Reading:
Vernis, Alfred ; Iglesias, Maria ; Sanz, Beatriz ; Saz-Carranza, Àngel. Accountability Elements
in Nonprofits. Chapter 5 in Nonprofit Organizations. Challenges and Collaboration. Palgrave
Macmillan,
forthcoming (April 2006).

Case:
Annual Reports Exercise (explain in case, due 22nd February).

Other recommended Readings and resources:


Global Reporting Initiative: http://www.globalreporting.org/Home
Independent Sector: http://www.independentsector.org
Board Source: http://www.boardsource.org/

Fourth Session
Revenue generation and marketing in the social sector

The mobilization of financial resources for social enterprise is decisive: its inadequacy hinders
the emergence and/or development of these initiatives significantly and, in extreme cases,
becomes the cause for a suspension of activities. Consequently, it is fundamental to study the
form by which resources are attracted and generated in order to be channelled to social
enterprises, mainly in the case of the private sector. Equally, there are cross-sector lessons
that can be adapted from one sector to another in order to maximize the creation of social and
economical value. While for companies the benefits drawn from the creation of social value
(SV) through strategic social enterprise can boost the creation of economic value (EV), in the
case of nonprofits the opposite is the case, since the creation of EV, through market
mechanisms, can enhance the generation of SV.

Case:

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Accion International
John Quelch and Nathalie Laidler
Guest speaker:
Àngel Font, Director "Un Sol Món" Foundation (Caixa de Catalunya)

Other recommended Readings and resources:


Microcredit Summit: http://www.microcreditsummit.org/index.html
Raising Money: http://www.raisingmoremoney.com
The National Network of Grantmakers: http://www.nng.org
National Committee for Responsive Philanthopy (NCRP): http://www.ncrp.org

Second part: Social and sustainable partnerships

Fifth Session
The multiple stakeholder approach

In the XXI century business has to make decisions in a more demanding and informed global
society. Increasing competition, more domestic and international pressure to be transparent
and changing societal expectations, demands in sustainable development, make it impossible
for companies to operate without being in close contact with those around them.

Among companies, there has been a sharp increase in stakeholder engagement activities as
they have come to realize that people or groups outside the core areas of influence can also be
stakeholders. The traditional circle of stakeholders has expanded. Previously, the principal
groups were shareholders, employees, suppliers, customers, contractors, authorities, media,
the financial and the direct community. This group has now grown to embrace a wider range of
actors such as, NGOs, environmental groups, global institutions, and many more.

Reading:
Stakeholder Research Associates & UNEP & Accountability. From Words to Action: The
Stakeholder Engagement Manual. Volume 2: The Practitioner's Handbook on stakeholder
engagement. October 2005.
(in order to download the whole Manual:
http://www.accountability.org.uk/training/default.asp?pageid=226#summary)

Case:
Presentation Annual Reports Exercise

Attention: Mid tenure Exam

Sixth Session
Social entrepreneurship in a nonprofit organization: from charity projects to social
transformation actions.

There is a urgent need to strengthen the managerial capacity of leaders of non-governmental


organizations (NGOs) that are key implementers of socioeconomic change and betterment. In
class we will explore some of the major challenges and opportunities that social entrepreneurs
in the nonprofit world face today.

Reading:
Wei-Skillern, Jane; Austin, James E.; Leonard, Hermann B.; Stevenson, Howard:
Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector. Sage Publications (2007, Forthcoming)

Case:
Fundación Pro Vivivienda Social: The entrepreneurs network as a source of resources. Sergio
Postigo (SEKN-HBS).

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Other recommended Readings and resources:


Social Enterprise Knowledge Network: http://www.sekn.org
Social Enterprise Alliance: http://www.se-alliance.org/
Social Venture Partners International : http://www.svpi.org

Seventh Session
Social entrepreneurship in a multinational corporation: from social action to corporate social
responsibility

There are two major drivers for companies to selflessly develop social entrepreneurship
activities. The first stems from the notion of returning a share of profits to society -this notion
recognizes that society has contributed to companies- profitability. The second one, instead,
relates to the desire to donate a share of company profits - which does not entail an
acknowledgement of society's contribution, but a strictly generous offering to society. Social
entrepreneurs are usually enabled by the first driver, whereas individual donations generally
originate in the second one. Clearly, the notion of returning a share of profits to society
constitutes a strategic concept and implies a greater awareness of companies’ role in society,
as well as a stronger, more proactive commitment to social issues.

Reading:
Ashridge. Catalogue of CSR Activities: A broad overview
An Ashridge report produced for The Danish Commerce and Companies Agency, September
2005.

Case:
Inditex: Outsourcing in Tangers.
Alfred Vernis, Marc Vilanova and Verónica Figueroa (SEKN-HBS).

Other recommended Readings and resources:


Clean Clothes Campaign: http://www.cleanclothes.org/
Ethical Trading Initiative: http://www.ethicaltrade.org/

Eighth Session
Field visit (details will be given in advance).

Attention: Due mid term exam

Ninth Session
Sustainable Development: Business Drivers And Responses
Guest professors: Alice Bisiaux and Heloise Buckland

Why business managers should care about environmental issues?


I. Overview of sustainable development and business:
II. The international legal framework of sustainable development:
III. Competitiveness and sustainable development

Reading:
New Futures media: Green Business Equals Good Business. Special Advertising Section
appeared in the December 2006 issue of Scientific American Magazine.

Case:
The Forest Stewardship Council.
James Austin and Ezequiel Reffico (HBS)

Other recommended Readings and resources:


World Business Council for Sustainable Development: http://www.wbcsd.ch

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Tenth Session
Social entrepreneurship partnerships

In order to enhance their credibility, social enterprises should collaborate with one other.
Indeed, many people wonder why so many of them work in similar fields. NGOs will strengthen
their positioning if they collaborate in joint projects. This cooperation should also include
activities with public administrations and business companies. All organizations -public,
private, for profit or nonprofit alike- operating in a single territory may provide solutions for
specific conflicts. Relating to other NGOs, public administrations and companies constitutes an
ongoing challenge for most of the current third sector.

Conditions seem to have improved sufficiently for this type of collaboration to blossom. In
many areas of public administration, public-private confrontational stances appear to have
faded away. Now the focus is on getting things done - with the highest quality results possible.
More and more companies are incorporating social responsibility into their modus operandi in
an attempt to repay society for its opportunities. Most of the associative world has overcome
the misguided charitable and patronizing models of the past and is currently working with their
specific values, striving to accomplish true social improvements. Naturally, there is still a long
way to go.

Unquestionably, in order to move towards this threefold cross-sector collaboration, bilateral


collaborations -between public administrations and nonprofits and between companies and
nonprofits- should continue in the future. However, it is also necessary to build trust in all
three sectors. Trust develops, partly, from interpersonal relationships. Public, private and
nonprofit workers should reach out to their peers in other sectors, trying to understand their
realities. The stereotypes coined by society -public officials, yuppies, and missionaries- should
be left behind, since they prevent people from coming together.

Finally, it is necessary to understand that promoting threefold collaborations may, in the long
run, undermine and eliminate the boundaries between the three sectors. Soon we will find we
are networking.

Reading:
Austin, James; Herrero, Gustavo; Reficco, Ezequiel. The New Road: Strategic Social
Partnerships. Harvard Business Review América Latina 82, no. 12 (December 2004): 42-56.

Case:
Posada Amazonas
Felipe Pérez (SEKN-HBS).

Timetable:
Every Thursday from 12/01/12 to 15/03/12
From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h.

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STRATEGIC BUSINESS SIMULATION

11M85082

Faculty: Jordi Brunat Campamany

Pre-Requisites:

Business Policy, Business Strategy and Corporate Strategy. Basic Marketing, Finance and
Accounting.

Objectives:

To gain experience and top management vision, while validating and assessing the necessity
and importance of proven business management tools and the impact that effective
implementation has on all this. To manage an organization in a rapidly moving and competitive
environment.

Summary:

The Strategic Business Simulation is an interactive experience integrating Business


Administration's and Strategic Management's most relevant concepts, specially focusing in the
areas of Corporate Management and Business Policy, through the use of one of the top
Business School's (FT top 100) most widespread software.

During the Business Simulation, participants have the opportunity to manage from the highest
level, a number of companies for a period of time simulating one and a half years. The most
relevant functions of the company are included (from small and free-lance to multi-national
companies); finance and administration, sales and marketing, production and operations,
alliance, negotiation, organization, relations with Governments, etc.

Participants will tell the most analytical business vision from the latest Management theories,
the best known administration models, and the most widely used management concepts, all
this with a large company's outrageous day to day business. The goal for reproducing this is to
amplify the need to keep strategy at sight guiding the company towards its objectives, within
an environment and market that, in a similar manner as would certainly happen in reality, will
not make things easy.

In this highly realistic exercise, each participant, playing his senior executive role, not only
gains experience and director qualities, but also validate and assess the necessity and
importance of proven business management and the impact that effective implementation has
on all this.

As an additional value of the business simulation, each team member has the opportunity to
recognize his management abilities, his capabilities as administrator, director, entrepreneur,
and leader; all those fascia provide the profile the business world expects him to have and his
working tools. Furthermore, participants will experience and sense the different competencies
that need to be developed in order to fully deploy his professional qualities.

A dynamic experience, combining case study realism with real management activity, providing
the required link between the different contents of the MBA program and the integrating view
of strategic management.

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Methodology:

Companies are managed by working groups (minimum 4 participants) taking decisions that
cover the most representative functions of businesses. A business and consultancy experienced
team of professors will be responsible for introducing the most credible degree of realism to
the complete

process. Their role is both as administrators / guiding professors and as professional


consultants, allowing each individual turn this learning experience into professional experience
and personal development tool.

The environment and companies are designed from current and real models, and the
represented countries are closely pictured along the complete business game. Other external
agents that are also included in the simulation are; the Banks, the Shareholders, Consultancy
Services, the Public Administration, etc.

Step by step results are obtained through economic statements, both internal and market-
wise. These will allow constant assessment of both the absolute position of the company, and
the relative place in which the company positions versus the rest of competitors, increasing
realism within the business game and strengthening in-company ties.

All material, presentations and software is delivered in English (Spanish and Catalan may be
available).

Assessment:

Final grade is defined by:

1) the achievement of the original business objectives as established by the shareholders'


board,

2) the final Audit as presented by the Company's Executive Committee,

3) the individual score as given by the professors' assessment of the participants' value added.

Incompatibilities:

Participants are expected to follow the management of their simulated companies during the
complete run. Partial participation is not recommended.

Observations:

Coordinator: Prof. Jordi Brunat, Industrial Engineer, MBA, MSc in Research, undergoing
Doctoral studies, Associate Professor of Business Policy Dept. Counting with extensive working
experience including Member of the Executive Committee and Director posts in Multinational
Companies, of automotive industry's manufacturing Groups including Volkswagen and Nissan.
He has had responsibility for Marketing Services, Sales and Exports, of well known brands as
Audi, Nissan, Volkswagen, Skoda, etc. Has held the Credit Manager post for Banco Bilbao
Vizcaya NY Branch and currently is advisor and consultant for several companies and professor
of the Business Policy department at ESADE.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

A team of experienced practitioners and collaborating professors of the Business Policy


department will support Prof. Brunat and hold the different roles in the Business Simulation.

Syllabus:

Business Game Schedule:

Session. 1 Preliminary presentation, delivery of material and Simulation Presentation


Session. 2 Manual and Technical Notes Annex, History of the Company, Scenarios and Decision
Making, group allocation.
Session. 3 First Decision
Session. 4 Second Decision
Session. 5 Third Decision
Session. 6 Corporate Portfolio Analysis (Presentation) and Applying Corporate Portfolio Analysis
Session. 7 Fourth Decision
Session. 8 Fifth Decision
Session. 9 Sixth Decision
Session.10 Corporate Audit

Timetable:

Every Monday from 09/01/12 to 12/03/12


From 15.00 to 18.30 h.

101
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

ESTRATEGIA FINANCIERA A LARGO PLAZO

11M35033

Profesorado:
Jesús Palau Montañana

Número de alumnos: Máximo 40

Objetivos:

Profundizar en los temas de inversión y financiación desarrollados en la fase


anterior. A partir del modelo del C.A.P.M. ya conocido, analizar y examinar los
elementos claves que rigen la estrategia financiera en tres áreas básicas.
Crecimiento interno, crecimiento externo, Financiación y Mercados de Capitales,
Planificación Financiera y Operaciones Especiales. El planteamiento de alguno de
estos temas hará necesario incorporar los elementos básicos de la teoría de
opciones que más afectan a las Finanzas Corporativas tanto desde el punto de vista
de los activos como de los pasivos empresariales.Todo ello desde la perspectiva de
la creación de valor.

Sumario:

Tema 1.
Planificación financiera a largo plazo. Valor y crecimiento.

Tema 2.
Fuentes de financiación. Valoración por componentes. La decisión de
endeudamiento. Estructura financiera óptima y Rating.

Tema 3.
Operaciones de alto apalancamiento.

Tema 4.
Cerrando el Círculo. Integración de Planificación Financiera. Valoración y Estructura
de Financiación.

Tema 5.
El valor estratégico de las inversiones. Teoría de opciones y valoración de
proyectos.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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Metodología:

Teoría, casos prácticos, lecturas y trabajos.

Sistema de evaluación:

Controles parciales 30% de la puntuación total


Evalución final 70% de la puntuación total.

Es necesario que la puntuación recibida en la evaluación final sea superior a 35


sobre 100 puntos para promediar con la puntuación de los controles parciales.

Bibliografía:

- Tom Copeland and Vladimir Antikarov. Real options a practitioner´s guide. Texere
Nueva York 2001

- Mark Grinblatt and Sheridan Titman: Finacial markets and corporate strategy,
2nd edition McGraw Hill 2001

- Brealey y Myers. Principles Of Corporate Finance (Fundamentos de Financiación


empresarial) Ed. Mc Graw-Hill

- Ross, Westerfield and Jordan. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance. Ed. Irwin

- Weston and Brigham. Managerial Finance. Ed. Dryden

- Copeland Keller and Murrain. Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of
Companies.Ed.Wiley

- Xavier Adserá y Pere Viñolas, Principios de Valoración de Empresas. Ed. Deusto.

- DAMODARÁN, Damodarán on Valuation, Wiley, 1994.

Timetable:

Todos los miércoles del 11/01/12 al 14/03/12


De 15:00 h. a 18:30 h.

103
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

11M35026

Faculty:
Lydia Ros Frizón

Number of students: Maximum 30

Pre-requisites:

The core courses of the finance area, so the participant will have a previous
knowledge of basic general and analytical accounting concepts, short-, medium-
and long-term financial analysis and planning, investment selection and company
valuation.

Professor’s Recommendation

The perfect complement is the elective course: "International Finance


Simulation" (worth 1 credit) of a multinational company (Read more in
methodology chapter)

Objectives:

The globalization of markets and company management, and the great


development of derivative markets, demands, every day, young managers with an
intensive knowledge on the opportunities that the new markets and new
instruments offer for a really global management, not only in front of exchange risk
but in front of interest rate risk too.

Summary:

THEME I: THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKET

- A brief history & the basic concepts


- The foreign exchange & the Euromarkets. Spot versus Forward

THEME II: FOREIGN EXCHANGE PREDICTIONS

- Can exchange rates be predicted?


- Theory of purchasing power parity & theory of interest rate parity
- The Fisher effect and the international Fisher effect
- The effective speculation theory: Forward as unbiased predictor of future spot

THEME III: FOREIGN EXCHANGE RISK: CLASSIFYING & QUANTIFYING IT

- Economic risk & Transaction risk

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Electives Full Time MBA
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- Translation risk

THEME IV: TRANSACTION RISK:

Short term "traditional" hedging - forward market versus money market hedge
- Perfect hedge: Forward & Money market hedge
- Reducing risk: Netting, Cross-hedge, Leading and Lagging & Rolling Forward

Short term "new" hedging - an introduction to currency options


- What are options? How the market originated. How it works.
- Currency options hedge versus forward hedge. The premium
- Basic strategies to speculate with options.

Long term hedging - an introduction to currency swaps


- The first swaps: Back to Back loan & Parallel loan.
- What they are and how they work

THEME V: INTEREST RATE RISK: INTERNATIONAL FINANCING

Quantification
- The concept of hedge interest rate
- Calculating explicit costs

Short term "traditional" hedging - forward rate agreements


- Time/interest rate structure :Forward-Forward
- FRA's: what they are and how to use them.

Short term "new" hedging - an introduction to financial futures


- The instrument & the market
- How to use them to hedge & to speculate

Long term hedging - an introduction to interest rate swaps


- Floating versus fixed rates
- The price of swaps using zero coupon bonds.

Methodology:

A good mixed between theory and practice due not only to concepts but to
exercises, real cases, and the analysis of articles on daily news.

The perfect complement is the elective course "International Finance


Simulation" (worth 1 credit) of a multinational company. It will allow the
participant to take decisions to optimize the financial management, using,
in a very practical way, all the instruments he will learn how to use during
the theoretical sessions.

The simulation will be run using figures from real life, so the participant will be
obliged to pay atention to the economic situation and to the movements in
currency markets. The participant could take part on tutorials, managed by

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Term 4 & Term 5

professionals, in a CPD room at ESADE, but they could also use the model in their
own PC.

Assessment:

There will be a continuous evaluation of practices and also a final exam.


The students that will participate in the computer simulation:
International Finance Simulation will be continuously assessed, and their
result could only improve the overall grade of the course.

Bibliography:

- EITEMAN, STONEHILL & MOFFETT, Multinational Business Finance, 11/e ©2007 |


Addison-Wesley | Cloth; 848 pp | ISBN-10: 0321357965 |ISBN-13
9780321357960

- O.GRABBE. International financial markets. 1996 - Prentice-Hall. 3rd. edition

- A.C. SHAPIRO. Multinational Financial Management. 1996 - Prentice-Hall. 5th.


edition.

- IAN H. GIDDY. Global Financial Markets. 1994 - Houghton Mifflin.

- Don M. CHANCE. An Introduction to Derivatives. 1995. The Dryden Press


Harcourt Brace College Publishers. 3rd. edition.

- J. HULL. Futures, Options and other derivatives.1997 (third edition) - Prentice


Hall.

- P. FERNÁNDEZ y J. PALAU. Introducción al mercado de opciones.1990 - BBV.


Interactivos. Expansión.

- M. BORRELL y A. ROA. Introducción a los mercados de futuros.1990 - BBV.


Interactivos. Expansión.

- L. ROS. International Finance Notes. 2011-2012- ESADE.

Timetable:
Every Tuesday from 10/01/2012 to 13/03/2012
From 19:00 h. to 22:00 h.

106
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE SIMULATION

11M35169

Faculty:
Sara Bosch Riera
Lydia Ros Frizón

Number of students: Maximum 30

Pre-requisites:

To be a participant in this course you must be also a participant of the


International Finance course in the same trimester.

Objectives:

Apply the concepts and instruments learned during the International Finance
course to a real situation. That means:

- Acquire adequate knowledge of the financial instruments and markets available


for the Financial Director of a company to carry out the management of cash,
investments and results in the international sphere.

- Acquire the ability to identify and select the appropriate instruments for each
situation.

Summary:

A computer simulation of the financial management of a multinational company in


which participants will make the decisions that allow them to optimize this
management, using for this, in a practical manner, all those instruments learned
during the theoretical sessions.

This simulation will take place in real time, which will oblige participants to be
abreast of the economic situation and of the movement of the main currencies.
Participants will attend group sessions in ESADE's Data Processing Centre,
supervised by a team of lecturers whose professional life comes within this area,
but can also use their own PCs outside the classroom hours for decision-making.

Methodology:

A real time simulation

Assessment:

The computer simulation will be continually assessed.

107
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Timetable:
Every Wednesday from 18/01/12 to 11/03/12
From 19:00 h. to 22:00 h.

108
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INVESTMENT BANKING IN M&A

11M30497

Faculty:

David Cerqueda

David is the Corporate Development Director of Grupo Godó de Comunicación. Previously he


worked for Goldman Sachs as Executive Director within the Investment Banking Division in
London. He started his career at BNP Paribas Corporate Finance in Paris.
Joaquim Lechà
Joaquim is a Director of Atlas Capital Close Brothers. He has provided strategy and financial
advisory services to multinational companies for over 13 years. Corporate clients have included
Ericsson AB, Cespa Industriales (Grupo Ferrovial), ABN Amro Capital, Falck A/S and BNP
Paribas, among others.

Pre-requisites:

Students must have successfully completed their core finance MBA courses: Business Analysis
to Valuation, Accounting 1 & 2, and Finance.
The learning methodology involves the discussion of real business cases, therefore it demands
that students have thoroughly prepared the materials, previous to the session, and have a
proactive attitude towards class participation.

Objectives:

At the end of the course, students regardless of their professional function and responsibility
within a firm, will:
- Have a proper understanding of what an M&A process can achieve and how
- Have the ability to analyse potential acquisitions or disposals and articulate an educated
opinion
- Be able to create value for the firm identifying M&A opportunities
- Avoid potential mistakes by being aware of some of the errors committed by others in
the past
- Be able to contribute creatively in overcoming complexities encountered during the
process
In conclusion, the focus is on how deals are made in the real world, and how managers can
take advantage of M&A in order to achieve the objectives of their companies.

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Content Summary:

1. Introduction to M&A: rationale and types


2. The M&A process; from target selection to closing
3. Value: valuation methodologies for different situations and buyers
4. Price: the negotiation
5. Financing the transaction
6. M&A as a seller; a very different process and perspective
7. Structuring a deal; term sheets, SPA, SHA
8. Lessons from real M&A deals

Methodology:

The course is based on a mixture of lectures and case studies, with greater emphasis put on
the latter. Lectures, complemented by compulsory and optional reading materials, will lay out
the framework, providing the necessary information, financial techniques and tools.
Students will be required to prepare the cases beforehand and actively participate in the class
and group discussions.

Assessment:

Grades will be based on:


- individual class participation, 15%.
- case assignments (to be prepared in groups), 35%.
- the final exam, 50%.

Observations:

The reading of assigned materials prior to each session is expected. Students might be
coldcalled at any time during the course to present their views.
Although case-preparation is a group effort, each individual has to adequately prepare the
materials before meeting in the group.
Class attendance and participation in case discussions is critical to the learning process.
Team-work, communication and presentation skills, as well as computer literacy are taken for
granted.

Bibliography:

• Brealey, Richard A., Myers, Stewart C., Principles of Corporate Finance 7th edition,
McGraw Hill, 2002
• Bruner, Robert F., Applied Mergers & Acquisitions, John Wiley & Sons, 2004.

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• Bruner, Robert F., Deals from Hell – M&A Lessons That Rise Above the Ashes, John
Wiley & Sons, 2005.

Timetable:

Every Monday from 09/01/12 to 12/03/12


From 17:00h to 20:30h.

111
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEMS

11M3517

Faculty:
Josep Bisbe Viñas

Number of students: Maximum 35

Pre-requisites:

The course is considered to be of "general interest" and not necessarily for


"experts". As such, the only prerequisite for the course is completion of the first
year core courses. The course is not "technical" in nature, even though some
numbers must be analyzed. Students must be willing to think conceptually, and to
critically apply and integrate their knowledge from several functional areas.

Objectives:

Management control systems are a major way by which managers in decentralized


firms assure that business goals are effectively implemented. Elements of formal
management control systems include resource allocation, budgeting, performance
measurement, transfer pricing, and evaluation and rewards. This course brings
together the skills of strategic analysis,organizational design and behavior, and
management accounting, as well as functional skills in order to provide an overview
of the concepts, frameworks and tools used by managers to plan and control the
firm´s performance.
The course is appropriate not only for those who expect to be directly in charge of
the design of management control systems, but also for any prospective manager
who will be responsible for strategy implementation and, as a result, will have to
manage others (or be managed) within a certain management control system.

Summary:

Students taking this course will learn to


- assess the relationship between an organization's strategy and its management
control system.
* be aware of the existence of different sets of control systems, ponder the effects
of the different alternatives, and assess the compatibility between these sets.
- determine the most appropriate control structure given its strategy and
organization design.
- identify key success factors for a company's business, and to translate these into
objectives and goals that can be measured and reported to managers.
- evaluate the management control process, i.e. the way that managers work
together to achieve corporate objectives.

* disaggregate the management control process into its key elements (e.g. for

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

financial results control systems, programming, budgeting, measurement and


operations, and reporting and evaluation). Critique these elements, and redesign
them, when necessary, so that they are more effective and efficient in helping an
organization achieve its strategy.

* examine the choice of financial and non-financial performance measures for


evaluating business atrategies and business units success

Methodology:

The course is based on lectures and discussion of case studies. It is expected that
students thoroughly prepare and analyze the pre-assigned readings and cases prior
to class.

Assessment:

Grading will be based on a combination of written case analyses (40%), two


individual quizzes ( 40%) and classroom contribution to discussions (20%).

Syllabus:

* The nature and purposes of Management Control Systems.


* The diversity of management control alternatives: financial results control
systems, non-financial results control systems, action control systems, informal
control systems.
* Financial results control systems: financial responsibility centers (e.g. profit
centers, investment centers,..) and accounting-based financial performance targets
* The issue of transfer pricing
* The management control process
* Budgeting and beyond-budgeting
* Value-based financial results control systems: addressing (some of the) problems
of accounting-based performance measures.
* Measuring non-financial value drivers: Strategic Performance Measurement
Systems.
* Analysis of performance reports and evaluation.
* Controls for differentiated strategies

Bibliography:

- ANTHONY, R.N. & GOVINDARAJAN, V. (2006). Management Control Systems


(12th ed.). McGrawHill.
- KAPLAN, R.S.; NORTON, D.P: (2000). The strategy-focused organization. Harvard
Business School Press.
- MERCHANT. K.A.; VAN DER STEDE, W.A. (2007).Management Control Systems:
Performance Measurement, Evaluation and Incentives (2nd. Ed.) Pearson.

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

- SIMONS, R. (2000). Performance measurement & control systems for


implementing strategy. Prentice-Hall.

Timetable:
Every Tuesday from 10/01/12 to 13/03/12
From 09:00 h. to 12:30 h.

114
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

RISK MANAGEMENT WITH DERIVATIVES

11M30314

Faculty:
Alfredo Ibáñez Rodríguez

Pre-requisites:

Basic knowledge of corporate finance.

Objectives:

The objective of the course is to provide students with a sound knowledge of the
basic derivatives: forwards, futures and options. Each derivative product is
analyzed in deep, its specifications and basics of valuation. The course focus on
how to use each product for risk management, and the risk involved in the
derivatives. An introduction to the structured products in the market will allow
students to understand the wide range of derivatives as investment and hedging
instruments.

Summary:

The course focuses on futures and options as risk management instrument and
investment instruments.

The course starts from the basic definition of Forward contracts and their use for
speculation and hedging. The arbitrage as the instrument for derivatives pricing is
introduced, the key determinants in Forward prices arise as a result. Arbitrage for
the valuation of Stocks and Currency Forward is analyzed in deep as an illustration.

Forward contracts open naturally the way to Futures Market. The Futures market
organization is studied. The real commodities futures market, and the indexes
futures market are used as reference markets. The risk of futures for speculation is
analyzed. The potential use of futures for risk management is studied through
stylized cases. The basis risk and the potential liquidity risk derived from the use of
futures as a risk management instrument are illustrated in the cases.

Options are introduced from the basics: Definition of Calls and Puts, premium
determinants, real organized markets and jargon. Speculation strategies to
maturity are studied with a double purpose: to understand their potential, and to
allow students to develop skills with options flexibility. Option valuation is
introduced through Black and Scholes as an exact pricing and the Call Put Parity as
relative valuation. The flexibility of options as risk management instrument and it
comparison with futures is studied through a case.

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Term 4 & Term 5

The more common Exotic options payoffs are introduced. The course concludes by
analyzing the multiple Structured Products offered in the market.We analyze them
in terms of their derivatives components and their pricing.

Methodology:

Class sessions consist of professor lecture and a small part of practice.


The material for the class is a set of slides for each topic that will guide the
professor's lecture and an exercises collection. Students are encouraged to have
MacDonald book as a reference book for the class. The exercises collection is
distributed by topics. Students are expected to use the collection exercise to
practice outside the class. Homework based in this collection will be graded by the
teacher assistant in a regular basis.
Two cases are planned during the course. The cases will be solved in groups. After
class discussion each group will handle a summary report about the case.
As a support for the lectures the teacher assistant has two tutorials planned for the
total class. They are not mandatory. Under demand more tutorials can be provided.

Assessment:

Individual homework will be assigned during the course, they will be evaluated,
they will account for 20% of the grade.

A midterm exam will be given after the futures topic is completed, it will account
for 30% of the grade.

Cases will be solved in groups. Report on the group conclusions after class
resolution will account for 20% of the grade.

Final exam will account for the rest of the grade, 30%

Syllabus:

1. Forward Contracts
2. Futures Markets
3. Hedging and Speculation with Futures
4. Metallgesellschaft Case
5. Options
6. Speculation with options
7. Railroad Case
8. Option valuation
9. Exotic options
10. Structured Products

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Electives Full Time MBA
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Bibliography:

Banks, Erick. Synthetic and Structured Assets .


John Wiley & Sons. Wiley Finance, 2006. ISBN 10 0-470-01713-9.

Bomfim, Antulio N. Understanding Credit Derivatives and


Related Instruments. Elsevier Academic Press. Academic Press
Advanced Finance Series, 2005. ISBN: 0-12-108265-2.

Darrell, Duffie and Singleton, Kenneth J. Credit Risk, Pricing,Measurement, and


Management. Princeton University Press- Priceton and Oxford, 2003. ISBN 0-691-
09046-7.

Das, Satyajit. Structured Products. Volume 1: Exotic Options; Interest Rates &
Currency. John Willey & Sons. Wiley Finance,third edition, 2006. ISBN-10 0-470-
82166-3.

Hull, John C. Options, Futures and other Derivatives.


Pearson- Prentice Hall, sixth edition, 2006. ISBN 0-13-149908-4.

Hull, John C. Introduction to Futures and Options Markets.


Prentice Hall, third edition, 1998. ISBN 0-13-783317-2.

Kolb, Robert W. Futures, Options & Swaps. Blackwell


Publishers, fourth edition, 2003. ISBN 0-631-23240-0.

McDonald, Robert L. Derivatives Markets . Pearson-Addison,


Wesley, second edition, 2006. ISBN 0-321-28030-X.

Timetable:
Every Thursday from 12/01/12 to 15/03/12
From 09.00 to 12.30

117
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT

MEDIA CONVERGENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND NEW BUSINESS MODELS


11M11091

Faculty:
Santiago Miralles

Objectives:
Who should attend:

Students who work or who plan to work in any of these industries. And also, students who
want to have a deep understanding of the effects of Digital Technology and the Internet as
disruptive forces in any other industry.

Description of the Course:

This Course will analyze in depth the dynamics and the trends of the “Meta-Sector” involving:
Media (Audiovisual), Telecommunications, Consumer Electronics / IT and Internet Industries.
These industries are probably, the most concerned by the Digital & Internet Revolution, by
what we call “Digital Convergence”.

The Course is an excellent opportunity to learn how these Sectors are evolving and blending,
and the strategies that their companies are adopting in order to face such complex challenges.
You will meet excellent speakers, industry experts, who will explain their experience, their
results; their successes and failures in an extremely changing and competitive environment.
The Course includes a field trip to the R&D Labs of a top Telecommunications company.

Finally, we will deal with cases that illustrate not only the effects of Digital Technology and
Convergence, but also how real and well known companies are facing fundamental paradigm
changes.

Summary:

Session 1: Introduction and Presentation of the Subject

Analog / Digital: Fundamentals


Synergies and efficiencies of “Digital”
The Value Chains of this Meta-Industry (the Compass of the subject)
Analog and Digital Value Chains

Session 2: Media Industries


The analysis of the first 2 Sectors involved in Media Convergence

• Audiovisual Content Production and Distribution


• Telecommunications

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

Understanding their:
• Main players
• Value Chain
• Business Parameters
• Evolution
• Common vs. Competition grounds

Session 3: Media Industries


The analysis of the other 3 Sectors involved in Media Convergence:

• Consumer Electronics / IT Industry / Internet

Understanding their:
• Main players
• Value Chain
• Business Parameters
• Evolution
• Common vs. Competition grounds

Session 4: The Catalan Broadcasting Corporation, CCMA

The real case of a Media Group that is transforming itself into a Digital Multiplatform Group

2 Keynote Lectures, by professionals who lead the CCMA’s convergence process

• Technology Session: “Forefront and underlying Technologies involved in Media


Convergence”
• Production Session: “The challenges and results of the transition”

Session 5: Convergence Forces: Telecom Vs. Audiovisual content production & distribution

Insight on what Business and Technology forces drive one Industry towards the other.

Presentation by an industry expert:

Mr. José Antonio Guzmán: Director of Home Services. Orange. Spain.

Session 6: Field Trip to the R&D labs of Telefonica

A unique opportunity to learn about the R+D fields of a global Telecom company.
Where are they investing and why?

Presentation by Oriol Ribera, Senior Executive at Telefonica R&D.

Session 7: The Role of Advertising

An in depth analysis of Advertising Business Models and their new forms.

Keynotes and Panel of two of the best experts in this field:

“Always On”. By Jordi Urbea: CEO, OgilvyOne & Ogilvy Interactive, Barcelona

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Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

“Online TV vs. Traditional TV: reinventing communication with the Internet” . By Alex
Marquina: Internet Commercial Director, CCRTV Interactiva

Session 8: Convergence Forces : Internet Vs. Media

Insight on what Business and Technology Forces drive one Industry towards the other.

Keynote Lecture by a Senior Executive of a Top Internet Company

Keynote Lecture by Senior Executive of a Top Telecommunications Company

Session 9: The Challenges of Digital Convergence: Case 1 & 2

15.00 - 16.30: Case 1: Teamwork Resolution + Plenary Session

16.45 - 18.00: Case 2: Teamwork Resolution + Plenary Session

Session 10: The Challenges of Digital Convergence: Keynote Lecture & Case 3

Case 3: “CCMA: The Digital Challenge”

15.00 - 16.20: Plenary resolution of the Case, by Prof. Drs. Loebbecke and Busquets, co-
authors, and Prof. Miralles:

16.20 - 16.35: Break

16.35 - 17.45: “Media Convergence: Whose game will we play?”. Keynote Lecture (+
Q&A) by Prof.Dr. Claudia Loebbecke.

Chair of Business Administration, Media and Technology Management. UNIVERSITY OF


COLOGNE.

17.45 - 18.00: Closing Speech by Prof.Dr. Xavier Busquets, Chair of Management of


Information Systems. ESADE BUSINESS SCHOOL.

Methodology:

As described, the Course will combine lectures by the Faculty, sessions offered by guest
speakers who are relevant professionals in these industries, and also the analysis and
resolution of Cases showing the challenges experienced by the above mentionned converging
Industries.

Assessment:
Grades will be based on the knowledge acquired by the students, as well as on their assistance
and participation in class. 4 individual works will be assigned: 3 case analysis and resolution,
and 1 paper with specific questions about the visit to Telefónica R&D Labs.

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Electives Full Time MBA
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Bibliography:
A relevant selection of research papers, market reports and articles will be made available to
all students before and during the course, through the Moodle tool of ESADE Business School.

Timetable:
Every Tuesday, from January 10th through March 13th
15:00 to 18:30 hrs.

121
Electives Full Time MBA
Term 4 & Term 5

MOBILE BUSINESS
11M11183

Faculty:

Carlos Del Río

Objectives:
Course description:

El m-business y los negocios asociados que utilizan las tecnologías de movilidad como palanca
para su desarrollo, así como el acceso a las nuevas tecnologías de movilidad son ya una
realidad tecnológica que empieza a ser adoptada por la sociedad, generando nuevos modelos
de negocio y nuevas oportunidades para aquellas empresas y empresarios que sepan
explotarlos.

La asignatura analiza el mercado actual y la dinámica competitiva del m-business,


profundizando en las áreas de i-movilidad, v-commerce, w-business y w-marketing, así como
el alcance de los modelos de negocio y del posicionamiento estratégico de los distintos actores
involucrados en el negocio de movilidad y las oportunidades que se presentan en este nuevo
entorno.

Como complemento, se introducirán los puntos más relevantes que configuran las tecnologías
y aplicaciones actuales y futuras de movilidad, con el fin de disponer de una base tecnológica
que facilite una mejor comprensión de los aspectos intrínsecos del negocio de movilidad.

Objectives:
Los objetivos de la asignatura son principalmente tres:

1. Entender como se configuran los mercados presentes y futuros del negocio de


movilidad, tanto desde la perspectiva del usuario como de las organizaciones.
2. Evaluar los escenarios tecnológicos posibles en este nuevo entorno y su repercusión en
los negocios de Movilidad.

Analizar los modelos de negocio asociados al m-Business, identificando a los agentes


implicados en el mismo, sus diferentes estrategias, así como presentar casos reales de
oportunidades de negocio desarrolladas con éxito.

Methodology:
Las exposiciones teóricas e interactivas se combinarán con el desarrollo de casos prácticos y
reales durante el desarrollo de las clases.

Assessment:
La evaluación de los alumnos se llevará a cabo mediante los siguientes criterios:

D. Trabajo hecho en casa


J. Participación en clase

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El criterio de puntuación será 60%*(D) + 40%*(J).

Performance criteria:
Objetivo 1:

1.1. Capacidad de entendimiento para asimilar como se configuran los mercados en el


entorno de las nuevas tecnologías. [J]

Objetivo 2:

2.1. Capacidad de evaluación de escenarios tecnológicos y de su repercusión en los negocios


de Movilidad. [J]

Objetivo 3:

3.1. Capacidad de análisis e interpretación de los modelos de negocio asociados al m-Business


[J]
3.2. Integración del conjunto de los conocimientos adquiridos [D]

Syllabus:

1. Presente y futuro del negocio del m-business:

• El mercado móvil en España, Europa y resto del mundo


- Mercados, principales cambios y estimaciones
- Cambios sociales, culturales y regulatorios
- Escenarios de desarrollo: Internet móvil, m-commerce y m-business

2. Introducción a las tecnologías Móviles y de Movilidad

• Estado del arte y futuro comunicaciones inalámbricas


- Tecnologías facilitadoras: wireless vs movilidad
- Diferencias respecto de las tecnologías Fijas
- Posibilidades indoor / outdoor: la i-Movilidad
- Los nuevos servicios 3G
- Dispositivos móviles y su evolución
- Aplicaciones y Servicios específicos

3. La perspectiva del Usuario

• Particularidades del w-marketing


- El cliente móvil, perfiles y necesidades
- Nuevos modelos de segmentación
- La movilidad en el marco de una estrategia multicanal
- El proceso de creación de valor en el lanzamiento de nuevos servicios

4. Dinámica competitiva en Movilidad

• Actores y modelos de negocio


- Cadena de valor y posicionamento estratégico
- Dinamizadores del sector:

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• Operadores
- Portales y contenidos
- Bancos
- Distribuidores, agregadores, brokers, etc.

• Configuración de los nuevos negocios :

• Oportunidades y amenazas de la nueva lógica de negocio


- Casos de éxito

Bibliography:
En el transcurso de las sesiones se irán entregando las distintas fuentes de bibliografía que
corresponden con cada tema.

Timetable:
Every Wednesday, from January 11th through March 14th
15:00 to 18:30 hrs.

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OPEN INNOVATION & OPEN BUSINESS MODELS


11M11904

Faculty:
Esteve Almirall & Wim Vanhaverbeke

Objectives:
What do companies as diverse as P&G, Apple, Google, Zynga or Nespresso have in common?
They no longer compete on price or even on productivity, they compete on innovation and they
leverage their ecosystems through the Business Model in order to compete more effectively.

This course will explore this new landscape where companies compete not only with the
innovation generated inside but also with novel proposals generated outside and manage to
take advantage of internal proposals that don’t fit their business model. We will compare
different ways to manage innovation from user innovation to design driven innovation or Living
Labs, and we will situate them in a diversity of scenarios including the public sector, SMEs or
services, finding out which type of innovation management is more appropriate in every
circumstance.

Special attention will be devoted to understanding Business Models, technological platforms


and ecosystems and the role they play in competition. In this area we will cover extensively
the main methodologies for dealing with Business Models: the canvas and Choices &
Consequences, relating them with the present and potential uses of technology. Through class
exercises we will learn how to depict, design and transform open business models presented
either statically or dynamically in competition/cooperation with others.

We look forward to working with you !!!

Methodology:

This is a highly interactive course with in-class group exercises, lots of post-its, in-class and
on-line discussions on current news.

Cases and lectures will also play a major role.


Assessment:

Participation and contributions to class 50%

Group assignments 50%

Bibliography:
Henry Chesbrough
Open Innovation: The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology
Harvard Business School Press , 2003

No company can afford to rely entirely on their own ideas to advance their business anymore,
and no company can restrict their innovations to a single path to market. This book outlines a
new paradigm of open innovation, which can enable companies to create and profit from their
ideas - and others’ ideas - in today’s distributed knowledge environment.

Open Innovation outlines a new environment for R&D, and demonstrates that this new
environment replaces the logic of an earlier era, where innovation was closed off from outside

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ideas and technologies. It calls for a new logic for the R&D function, one that requires R&D
managers to become conversant with business models, and new structures for taking
technology to market. And it requires senior managers in the firm to change the charter of
their R&D organization, to turn it into an effective vehicle to source external knowledge, as
well as an effective generator of knowledge.

Henry Chesbrough
Open Business Models: How to thrive in the new innovation landscape.
Harvard Business School Press, 2006

In this book, Chesbrough demonstrates that because useful knowledge is no longer


concentrated in a few large organizations, business leaders must adopt a new, “open” model of
innovation. Using this model, companies look outside their boundaries for ideas and intellectual
property (IP) they can bring in, as well as license their unutilized home-grown IP to other
organizations. In Open Business Models, Chesbrough takes readers to the next step—
explaining how to make money in an open innovation landscape. He provides a diagnostic
instrument enabling you to assess your company’s current business model and explains how to
overcome common barriers to creating a more open model. He also offers compelling
examples of companies that have developed such models—including Procter & Gamble, IBM,
and Air Products. In addition, Chesbrough introduces a new set of players—“innovation
intermediaries”—who facilitate companies’ access to external technologies. He explores the
impact of stronger IP protection on intermediate markets for innovation and profiles firms
(such as Intellectual Ventures and Qualcomm) that center their business models on innovation
and IP. This vital resource provides a much-needed road map to connect innovation with IP
management, so companies can create and capture value from ideas and technologies
wherever in the world they are found.

Timetable:
Every Thursday, from January 12th through March 15th
09:00 to 12:30 hrs.

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BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE
11M11189

Faculty:

Lluís Soldevila i Vilasís

Objectives:

To provide attendees with the knowledge and skills to carry out successful projects in Business
Intelligence and Management Information Systems.

Summary:

In the area of Enterprise Information Systems, are typically those for computer operating and
management level, but there are still few experiences under the heading of Information
Systems Management. As companies reach a higher level in the use of information and related
technology, there is the possibility to provide management tools for information access control
and monitoring of company policy.
This course aims to present the current state of technology EIS, DSS, OLAP, datawarehouse
and other techniques for extracting and analyzing information, which constitute the backbone
of the Information Systems Management.
The course aims to train students in the possibilities of those technologies to develop a
methodology to tackle a project successfully.

Methodology:

The course combines theory and practice, with the ultimate goal of enabling the student to
develop a business intelligence project.
Top speakers from blue chip companies will join us to explain their actual Business Intelligence
experiences .
Students will prepare articles and cases for further discussion in class.

Evaluation
The evaluation will be:

A. Final exam (35%)


B. Group work (35%)
C. Participation (30%)

Syllabus:

Introduction Management Information Systems.

• Impact of IT

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• Components of Business Intelligene: Datawarehouse, Datamart, OLAP


• Designing the data model
• Business Intelligence and CRM
• Business Intelligene in Finance
• Decision Supporting Systems
• Datamining
• Artificial Intelligence
• Market for Business Intelligence
• Real experiences from top companies
• The intelligence is on the cloud. Business Intelligence 2.0

Timetable:

Every Tuesday, from January 10th through March 13th

19.00 to 22.00 hrs.

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MARKETING DEPARTMENT

BRANDING

11M20295

Faculty:
Oriol Iglesias, PhD

Pre-requisites:

Students need to have previous training on strategic and operational marketing planning.

Objectives:

• Familiarize oneself with the basic concepts and frameworks of reference in the field of
brand management.
• Understand a brand as a portfolio of meanings that need to be managed.
• Comprehend how to develop a brand audit and assess the competitive position of a
brand, as well as determine its brand equity.
• Understand the importance of actively managing the brand identity, brand
communications and the whole brand experience.
• Within the sphere of brand management, and therefore of marketing, develop skills for
analysis and planning; problem definition and resolution; preparation, making and
implementation of decisions; search for and interpretation of important data;
formulation of strategies and working effectively with others.

Methodology:

The course will create an environment based on experiential learning that will help the
students to integrate the pedagogic objectives previously presented. The sessions will combine
the following learning tools:

• Lectures that will provide the basic theoretical framework to approach every topic.
• Additional readings to further develop each of the course topics.
• Case studies that will help the students to discuss in depth each topic and to
understand better in practice the theoretical concepts.
• Guest speakers that will transfer part of their knowledge through their personal
experiences.

Assessment:

• Two case discussions to be developed in groups (40%).


• Final assignment: Brand audit and strategic proposals for a brand (40%).
• Individual participation in class (20%).

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Syllabus:
1.-Introduction to brand management
2.-Brand identity
3.-Brand communications
4.-Brand experience
5.-Brand management along the solution life cycle
6.-Brand audit
7.-Brand growth strategies
8.-Brand innovation
9.-Retail branding
10.-Future challenges in brand management

Bibliography:
The New Strategic Brand Management. Kapferrer, J. N., Kogan Page, 2008 (4th Edition).

Strategic Brand Management: Building, Measuring and Managing Brand Equity. Keller, K. L.,
Pearson-Prentice-Hall, 2008 (3rd Edition).

Timetable:
Every Wednesday, from January 11th through March 14th
09:00 to 12:30 hrs (last session 9.00 to 14.00 hrs)

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CONSUMER-CENTRIC MARKETING

11M20297

Faculty: Mònica Casabayó

Number of students: Maximum 40

Pre-requisites: Fundamentals of Marketing (Marketing 101);

Objectives:

Knowing and understanding consumers is the main common goal in marketing. Understanding
consumer behaviour implies understanding the underlying factors that would lead the
consumer to decide what, where, when and how s/he buys things (Samli, 1998). Moreover,
due to its complexity, understanding consumer behaviour is not an easy goal to achieve. There
are infinite factors which influence and determine their actions.

In addition, a consumer is not only a 30-something Spanish office worker, called Maria, with
three children. A consumer has a particular attitude towards a brand, a high involvement
towards a product category, a past experience with a store, and a consistent value towards
social issues. Therefore, from a company’s point of view, a customer is not an ID; it is an
emotional and dynamic creature.

Consumers are very varied people and they show about as many different buying patterns.
That simple truth is well understood theoretically by those responsible for market research,
product development, pricing, sales and strategy. But they haven’t been getting much help
from a respected market segmentation approach, which, if properly applied, would guide
companies in tailoring their products and services to the groups most likely to purchase them
(Yankelovich and Meer, 2006).

The aims of the seminar are:

• to provide basic knowledge of the consumer behaviour as an individual and in a social


context plus the purchase cycle.

• to introduce the new approaches in marketing research, both the most innovative
qualitative and quantitative techniques and the process to properly apply them to better
understand the XXI century consumers.

• to provide participants with a better understanding of what a Consumer Insight is and


why are so important to grow the business.

Methodology:

Very practical approach: learning by doing. The course will be a mix of teacher lead lectures
with individual exercises and group exercises. A very active role of the participants will be
required.
Real world data and business cases will be discussed at class and prepared in anticipation by

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participants.

Finally by doing this course, attendants will learn how important is to have a point of view
(think!), be able to articulate it and defend it in front of different opinions.

Assessment:
Course evaluation: project team

By the end of the course students should be able to have a clear understanding of:

- Tools overview to know your consumer

- From Consumer Understanding to Consumer Insights

- Connect Consumer Insights to Marketing Strategy

Observations:

This course is highly recommended for those who want to pursue a Marketing career especially
in Consumer Package Goods, Advertising Agency or Research Agency.

It can also be very useful for those who want to work in other functional areas of a company
because of the value added by team working, making decisions and presenting/selling those
decisions to the group.

Syllabus:

• The consumer centric marketing approach

• How do consumers behave?

• What are the main factors which influence their decisions?

• Is it possible to reduce the gap between planned intentions and real behaviours?

• Individual aspects of consumer behavior. Involvement and motivation. Projective


techniques. Means-end analysis and laddering.

• Social and group aspects of consumer behavior. Cross-cultural differences and


implications for marketing research
• Integrated aspects of consumer behavior. The role of consumer insights

• Advanced Consumer Research methods: from ethnographic to artificial intelligence


techniques

• Project Presentations

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Bibliography: Optional readings

1. Hill, D. (2010) Emotionomics, Kogan Page, 264 p.


2. Hair Josep F. et al (2003) Marketing Research, New York: McGraw-Hill
3. Seth, J.N, .Mittal, .B. (2004) Customer Behavior: A managerial perspective, Ohio:
4. Thomson- South Western.
5. Stone, M., Bond, A., Foss, B. (2004). Consumer Insight: How to Use Data and Market
Research to Get Closer to Your Customer, Kogan Page, 288 p. (available in Books24*7
database).
6. Wood, N.T., Solomon, M.R. (2008) Virtual Social Identity and Consumer Behavior, 299
p. (available in Books24*7)
7. Zaltman, G., Zaltman, L.H. (2008) Marketing Metaphoria: What Deep Metaphors Reveal
About The Minds Of Consumers, Harvard Business Press, 256. (available in Books24*7)
8. Andrews, M., Langmaid, R. (2003) Breakthrough Zone: Harnessing Consumer Creativity
for Business Innovation, 2003. (available in Books24*7)
9. The Consistent Consumer: Predicting Future Behavior Through Lasting Values by Ken
Beller, Steve Weiss and Louis Patler Kaplan Professional, 2005 (270 pages)
10. The Rise of the Chinese Consumer: Theory and Evidence by Jonathan Garner John
Wiley & Sons (UK), 2005 (312 pages)
11. Web Systems Design and Online Consumer Behavior, by Yuan Gao (ed) IGI Global,
2005 (330 pages) Citation ISBN: 9781591403272
12. Martin, P. (2007) RenGen: Renaissance Generation: The Rise of the Cultural Consumer-
-and What It Means to Your Business, Adams Media, 277 p. (available in Books24*7
database)
13. Evans, M., Jamal, A., Foxall, G. (2006) Consumer Behavior, Wiley & Sons, 404 p.
14. Berry, J.W., Poortinga, Y.H., Segall, M.H., Dasen, P.R. (2002). Cross-Cultural
Psychology: Research & Applications, Cambridge University Press, 588 p.
15. Ratneshwar, S., Mick, D.G., Huffman, C. (2005). The Why of Consumption, Routledge,
329 p.
16. Firat, A.F., Dholakia (2003) Consuming People, Routledge, 194 p.
17. Singh, N. & Pereira (2005) The Culturally Customized Website, Elsevier, 163 p.
18. Wagner, S. (2003). Understanding Green Consumer Behavior, Routledge, 288 p.
19. Baker, S., Bass, M. (2004). New Consumer Marketing, Wiley & Sons, 204 p. (Available
in Books24*7 database)
20. Zaltman, Gerald. How Customers Think: Essential Insights into the Mind of the
Markets. Boston: Harvard Business School Press (2003).
21. Gladwell, M. (2005) Blink, Back Bay Books, 320 p.
22. Lindstrom, M. (2008) Buy-ology: Truth and lies about why we buy (I would recommend
the whole book, in fact)

Timetable:
Every Tuesday, from January 10th through March 13th
09:00 to 12:30 hrs.

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OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT

APPLYING CREATIVE THINKING TO GENERATE NOVEL SOLUTIONS

11M45052

Faculty:
Enric Segarra Costa

Pre-requisites:

Have an attitude of curiosity, be emphatic and open to collaborate with peers to


cope with unconventional challenges and work very hard. You will have to carry an
agenda, a sketch book, a recorder, a camera or a palm with you 24/7 during the
course to capture all your ideas/dreams.

Objectives:

Learn how to be creative approaching business and management problems as the


creative community approach creative tasks and requests through leveraging
emotional intelligence (heart), abstract intelligence (head) and experiential
intelligence (activating and using all human senses) to turn trade-offs into trade-
ons. The ultimate goal of the program is about making things real - that do not exist
but in your mind.

Summary:

The world of business is no longer characterized by stable and predictable problems


which lend themselves readily to analysis and so a new set of skills is required.
Today to be competitive and survive you have to be more creative than ever.
Therefore, learning how to be creative is one of the great challenges ahead you
(and the rest of us) have - no question! But you might wonder how?!

Learning how creative people look at problems and constraints as challenges not as
enemies -with excitement not with fear as the majority of us do -,is the way and
collaborative integrative thinking (using the formula of what might be instead of
what should be) the lever for achieving that goal.

While the majority of other topics of the MBA have provided you with a full range of
analytical tools, here you will be pushed to think more creatively and see each
problem as an opportunity for experimentation, invention of new alternatives and
self-development.

Methodology:

The course is going to be like a studio and you will be working very hard on a
weekly project basis that once completed will disappear from sight. Each class will

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come with a short lecture on creative stuff which aims at developing your creative
thinking skills. A new challenging assignment to which to apply them will be given
to be worked on between classes either individually or in group (teams will be
formed ad-hoc for a specific task and then disband) that will have to be presented
(using storyboards, video clips, sketches, prototypes or whatever you think will be
helpful to better send the message across) to the rest of the class during the next
session for its critique. The instructor (me) and the other participants will
continuously offer suggestions to individuals (or groups) presenting.

Assessment:

Creativity is such an abstract subject that it is difficult (indeed all- but impossible)
to evaluate it using purely objective criteria. However, as this is part of an MBA and
has to be assessed, I have established 4 criteria to evaluate your progress as
follows:

Group Assignments(5) : 50%

Individual assignments (3) : 30%

360º Peer’s evaluation : 10%

Participation during critique reviews to peers + attitude : 10%

Each group will evaluate the ideas and concepts presented by the other groups
based on their innovativeness (freshness of the idea or concept generated) and
execution (the way those ideas/concepts are presented). Each group will choose the
best, second and third best according to these criteria. The group which is
considered to be the aggregate best will get 25 points, 22 points the second, 20 the
third, 19 points the fourth, 18 points the fifth and so one and so forth.

At the end of the program and as all attendants will have interacted at least once
with every other in the class when having to deal with group assignments, each
participant will evaluate the other class-mates contribution to the class/team’s
output (a kind of 360º assessment).

When individual assignments are required, participants will evaluate the rest of
presenters following same criteria.

This class is structured as a professional environment, therefore arrive on time, do


the work required and get involved in the class.

Your presence in class is absolutely crucial so full attendance is mandatory and


arriving on time is a MUST (1 lateness = 1 absence). If you fail to attend the class
to present any assignment, you will be counted absent for that day. 2 absences =
failure.

Incompatibilities:

If you are of those who don't like others, like to think on your own and don't share

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thoughts and think your ideas are the best in town …better do not enrol! Like to
deal with the unknown without anxiety but instead with excitement and passion?
This is your course.

Observations:

If you plan to enrol on this course expecting to be lectured on "magical" ideation


techniques that shortcuts the tough creative process…better not enrol, otherwise
you will get frustrated.

Syllabus:

Session 1 - Introduction to the program.


Lecture: Leveraging your unexploited Creativity to improve your innovative skills.
Assignment #1 (individual) on what is left of my life.

Session 2 - Assignment #1 presentation (Pecha Kucha).


Lecture: Design Thinking. What is it all about? (part I)
Assignment #2 (group) on solving tough problems.

Session 3 - Assignment #2 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: Design Thinking. What is it all about? (part II)
Assignment #3 (group) on wowing your customers to push sales up.

Session 4 - Assignment #3 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: Prototyping.
Assignment #4 (group) on mocking up working models to help everyone visualize
possible solutions.

Session 5 - Assignment #4 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: The Secret to spark imagination.
Assignment #5 (individual) on hybridization.

Session 6 - Assignment #5 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: Where do the ideas come from?
Assignment #6 (individual) on seeing opportunities where others see nothing (or
just trash)!

Session 7 - Assignment #6 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: Innovation through deconstruction.
Assignment #7 (group) on revaluing companies that once set the pace.

Session 8 - Assignment #7 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Lecture: Ideation techinques.
Assignment #8 (group) on generating ideas to solve a major social and/or
environmental challenge.

Session 9 - Assignment #8 presentation, critique and evaluation.

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Lecture: The art of (creative) thinking.


Assignment #9 (individual) on making meaning and leaving your trace.

Session 10 - Assignment #9 presentation, critique and evaluation.


Closing remarks and farewell.

Bibliography:

- A whole new mind. Why right-brainers will rule the future. Daniel H. Pink. The
Berkley Publishing Group, 2006.
- Change the way you see everything through asset-based thinking. Kathryn D.
Cramer and Hans Wasiak. Running Press Book Publishers, 2006.

-Companies that Thrive! What’s their secret? What’re their strategies? Enric
Segarra, 2010

http://www.bubok.com/libros/195898/COMPANIES-that-Thrive-Whats-their-secret-
Whatre-their-strategies
- Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi. Harper Perennial, 1997.

-Naked Innovation. Uncovering A Shared Approach for Creating Value. Zachary Jean
Paradis. David McGaw. IIT Institute of Design, 2010.
http://trex.id.iit.edu/~zacharyp/Naked_Innovation.html

- Purple Cow: Transform your business by being remarkable. Seth Godin. Portfolio a
member of Penguin Group, 2009.
- The Artist’s way at work: Riding the dragon. Mark Bryan, Julia Cameron and
Catherine A. Allen. William Morrow and Company Inc., 1998.
- The Back of the Napkin. Dan Roam. Penguin Group 2008.
- The Craftsman. Richard Sennett. Yale Univ Press, 2008.
- The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life. Twyla Tharp. Simon & Schuster
Inc., 2003.
- The Dip: A little book that teaches you when to quit (and when to stick). Seth
Godin. Penguin Group Inc. 2007.
- Thinkertoys a handbook of creative-thinking techniques. Ten Speed Press, 1991.

Timetable:

Mondays from 09/01/2011 to 12/03/2011

From 15.00-18.30

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MODELOS CUANTITATIVOS EN OPERACIONES

11M50383

Profesorado: Pere Batallé

Objetivos:

Conocer la existencia de algunas herramientas y técnicas que la Investigación de las


Operaciones ha desarrollado y saber dónde y cuándo utilizarlas.

Desarrollar la capacidad analítica, saber modelizar situaciones organizativas complejas y


aplicar algunas técnicas y herramientas que permitan hallar la mejor solución a problemas de
diseño, planificación y mejora en las operaciones de empresas industriales y de servicios.

Explotar correctamente los resultados obtenidos, como base para la toma de decisiones de
gestión y/o estratégicas.

Resumen:

Aplicación de métodos cuantitativos para modelizar y resolver situaciones organizativas


complejas, al objeto de poder tomar decisiones, basándose en elementos empíricos y reducir
así el margen de incertidumbre que conllevan.

Metodología:

Se combinarán sesiones expositivas, en donde se presentarán los marcos conceptuales y las


herramientas, así como las claves para su utilización en el análisis de situaciones complejas,
con sesiones participativas, en donde los participantes resolverán problemas y casos, con la
correspondiente presentación y discusión de los mismos.

Asimismo, los participantes deberán realizar dos trabajos en equipo de aplicación de las
técnicas expuestas en la asignatura.

Evaluación:

La evaluación de la asignatura se hará en base a los dos trabajos en equipo, realizados y


entregados por los participantes y a su participación en las sesiones.

Programa:

Tema 1. Introducción a la Investigación de las Operaciones.

Historia, definición, características y metodología de la Investigación Operativa.

Tipología de problemas puros: problemas de repartición, secuenciales, colas, stocks,


itinerarios, decisión y competencia, renovación y búsqueda.

Tema 2. Apoyo cuantitativo para la toma de decisiones estratégicas y de gestión.

Problemas típicos de la Dirección de Operaciones: localización de plantas y almacenes,


capacidad de una planta, planificación de la producción, fabricar o subcontratar, diseño de
plantillas, turnos de trabajo, transporte, distribución,….

La programación lineal como herramienta. Modelo lineal, características y componentes.


Resolución del modelo. Algoritmos y resolución mediante el programa WinQsb.

Interpretación económica de las variables reales, de holgura, reduced-cost y shadow-price.

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Análisis de sensibilidad de la solución óptima.

Tema 3. Mejora de la calidad de servicio en fenómenos de espera.

Componentes y características relevantes en una situación de colas. Servicio de


mantenimiento de máquinas en una fábrica, servicio de urgencias en un hospital, cabinas de
peaje en una autopista, pistas de aterrizaje o mostradores de facturación en un aeropuerto,
……

Los procesos estocásticos como herramienta.

Parámetros determinantes de la calidad de servicio.

Diseño óptimo del mecanismo de servicio, minimizando el coste total del sistema.

Modelos de gestión en universos infinito y finito. Resolución con ayuda del programa WinQsb e
interpretación de los resultados.

Bibliography:

Hillier, F.S.; Lieberman, G.J.: Introduction to Operations Research. New York, Mc Graw-Hill

Winston, W.L.: Investigación de Operaciones. Aplicaciones y algoritmos. Thomson

Martin, Q.: Investigación Operativa. Pearson, Prentice Hall

Arreola, J.Y.; Arreola, A.: Programación Lineal. Una introducción a la toma de decisiones
cuantitativa. Thomson.

Martin, Q.; Santos, T.; De Paz, Y.: Investigación Operativa. Problemas y ejercicios resueltos.
Pearson, Prentice Hall.

Timetable:

Miércoles del 11/01/2012 al 14/03/2012

De 9.00h a 18.30h

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SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Profesorado: Salvador Tasqué

Objetivos:

La asignatura está estructurada a partir de los contenidos trabajados sobre el área de Supply
Chain en los cursos obligatorios del Departamento de Operaciones e Innovación en los
programas MBA.

El recorrido de los temas va del enfoque estratégico o macro a un enfoque más operativo o
micro. Del conocimiento a la práctica.

La propuesta de aprendizaje, así tendrá un contenido eminentemente práctico y requerirá de


una participación activa de los participantes en el planteamiento, análisis y propuestas de
solución ante los problemas que se encuentran los responsables del área o aquellos que
interactúen de modo muy directo con esta.

El objetivo último de la asignatura es el aprendizaje, de los participantes, en


desarrollo de programas concretos y propuestas de mejora en el campo del SCM que
demuestren viabilidad tanto desde el plano ejecutivo (implantación) como
financiero.

Metodología:

 La metodología utilizada consiste en una combinación de la exposición de temas en


clase, análisis y discusión de casos en grupo, utilización de videos y lectura crítica de
artículos seleccionados.
 Se tendrá también la posibilidad de participar en un juego de simulación de gestión de
una cadena de suministro.
 Durante las sesiones contaremos con la participación de profesionales de primer nivel
que aportaran su visión práctica y critica en el desarrollo de sus funciones.
 Una de las sesiones tendrá lugar fuera de las instalaciones de Esade, consistente en la
visita al Centro de Distribución Nacional de una de las grandes empresas de gran
consumo, con la participación del operador logístico y el propio fabricante.
 A lo largo de la asignatura se desarrollará un trabajo práctico de empresa, que deberá
ser realizado en grupo (en este caso de libre elección). Se realizará una sesión de
presentación final el último día de la asignatura. A lo largo del curso los participantes se
reunirán con el titular de la asignatura que actuará como tutor en el desarrollo del mismo.

Evaluación:

65% Proyecto SCM

25% Casos desarrollados en grupo y presentación en clase

(es básica la asistencia y la participación en la discusión de los casos)

10% Simulación

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Programa (Sujeto a Cambios):

1. SUPPLY CHAIN STRATEGY AND DESIGN

Introduccion: Objetivos Asignatura: Temario, Casos, Simulación y Proyectos.

Conferencia: Supply Chain Management, Strategy and Design. SC Trade-offs.

Caso Ejemplo: Seven Eleven Co. Japan (Kellogg University)

Lecture: The Triple A Supply Chain. Hau Lee

2. SUPPLY CHAIN AUDIT AND ACTION PLAN

Conferencia: AUDILOG. Carlos Roig.

Proyectos: Envio Briefing Propuesta Proyectos.

Lecture: Ten Guiding Principles for high-impact SCM . HBS.

3. INVENTORY AND SERVICE LEVEL STRATEGY I

Conferencia: Gestión de Inventarios y Servicio en la Cadena de Suminstro (I y II)

Caso 2: HP Deskejet Supply Chain (Standford)

Lecture: Rocket Science Retailing is Almost Here – Are you Ready M.L.Fisher

4. INVENTORY AND SERVICE LEVEL STRATEGY II

Conferencia: Gestión de Inventarios y Servicio en la Cadena de Suminstro (I y II)

Caso 3: Sports Obermeyer (HBS)

Lecture: The Power of Postponment

5. PROCUREMENT STRATEGY & SUPPLY CHAIN CONTRACTS

Conferencia: Procurement as a Strategic Function. Portfolio Analysis.

Caso 4: Blockbuster and Netflix (Kellog)

Simulación: Presentacion Simulación

Lecture: Purshasing Must Become Supply Management. Peter Kraljic

6. SUPPLY CHAIN & LOGISTICS: EXECUTIVE MANANEGEMNT

Conferencia: Dialogos con un VP de Supply Chain. Logistics Management.

Andreu Sanchez, VP de SCM Affinity Petcare

Lecture: Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains. Anath Raman

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7. CIERRE BLOQUE 1: THE SUPPLY CHAIN SIMULATION

Simulacion: The Global Suplply Chain Simulation (HBS)

Fira Barcelona: The Service Chain

Resumen Conceptos Clave Bloque I

Enfoque Proyectos

Lecture: Rapid Fire Fulfillment. Kasra Ferdows

8. DISTRIBUTION STRATEGY & NETWORKS

Conferencia: Estrategias de Distribución. Sourcing and Distribution. Carles Roig

Caso: Ejemplos de Distribucion y Localizacion.

Video Cases: Sistemas de Distribución de El Corte Ingles

Metro Group: use of RFID.

Lecture: Warehousing & Distribution Fundamentals. Esade

9. DISTRIBUTION NETWORK MANAGEMENT. OUTSOURCING

Real Case: Visita Centro Logístico Procter & Gamble y DHL en Mataró

Lecture: I2 Technologies. HBS Case.

10. CLOSING SESSION

Proyectos: Presentación Proyectos de SCM

Close-Up: Key Learnings on SCM ...

Equipo de Profesores

Salvador Tasqué

Ingeniero Industrial Químico por el IQS / Universidad Ramón Llull. Postgrado en Dirección de
la Producción (UPC). Master en Gestión de Empresas Industriales (MGEI) en la Facultad de
Economía del IQS, PDD por el IESE y Dirección Estratégica de Sistemas por laUOC.

Ha desarrollado toda su carrera profesional en Procter & Gamble desde 1992 como Ingeniero
de Proceso, Responsable de Logística, Consultor en TPM y organización, y Responsable de
Operaciones/Supply Chain en España y Supply Chain Leader de P&G en Europa desarrollando
e implantado las estrategias de mejora de Supply Chain y manufactura en todas unidades de
fabricación.

A mediados del 2005 se incorpora a Fira de Barcelona como Director de Operaciones y


Servicios al Cliente y miembro del Comité Ejecutivo de Fira. Bajo su responsabilidad están las
áreas de Compras, Logística y Operaciones (organización de más de 60 eventos al año),

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Infraestructuras (gestión técnica de dos grandes recintos feriales), Sistemas y Tecnologías de


Información y Servicio y Atención al Cliente.

Sus áreas de conocimiento son: Estrategia, Operaciones, TPM/Lean manufacturing, sistemas


organizativos y procesos de mejora, Supply Chain Management / Logística.

Carles Roig

Licenciado en Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales por la UAB. Master en Dirección y


Administración de Empresas por ESADE.

Desarrolla su trayectoria profesional en Escandinavia, Francia, América Latina. Codirector


General de Nedlloyd Districenters. Director Regional de Aitena y Locasa (corporación de
Servicios Logísticos del BBV), Gerente de Schenker y Director General y miembro del Consejo
de Administración de LOGIPOINT ( Dragados SPL).

Combina su actividad docente como profesor de Supply Chain Management, estrategia y


Dirección de Operaciones en el departamento de Dirección de Operaciones e Innovación, la
Dirección de MDOS de ESADE, junto a la profesional como consultor, consejero de empresas.
Ponente en simposios y conferencias nacionales e internacionales. Autor de varios artículos y
publicaciones.

Andreu Sánchez

Ingeniero Industrial por la UPC.

Actualmente es Vicepresidente de Product Supply en Affinity PetCare (Antes Gallina Blanca


Purina).

Anteriormente había desarrollado funciones como Gerente de Compras y Logística en Gallina


Blanca Purina.

Experiencias anteriores en el área de Logística de Benckiser y Royal Brands.

Timetable:

Mondays from 09/01/2011 to 12/03/2011

From 19.00 to 22.00h

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SOCIAL SCIENCES & ECONOMY DEPARTMENT

GEOPOLITICS

11M05208

Faculty:

David Murillo Bonvehí

Angel Saz Carranza.

Number of students: 25 maximum

Objectives:

The objectives of this course are to give business aspirants a solid perspective on the
prevailing international situation and so to be able to:

- Present a general vision of the new arrangement of the international system and its actors,
particularly from 1989 onwards
- Evaluate some of the techno-economical, sociopolitical and cultural consequences that
stem from the above mentioned changes
- Introduce the main attempts to construct new paradigms to understand the driving forces
of the international environment
- Identify key trends in the geopolitical arena, mainly from a European perspective
- Learn to think strategically in the light of these developments

Observations:

This course should be of value to:

- Participants who want to pursue a career in an international environment

- Participants who are good at quantitative analysis but find themselves confused or less
prepared when confronted with intercultural, interpersonal issues

- Students who would like to understand geopolitical thinking and how it has helped to shape
the world, particularly from a European perspective
- Participants who are aware of the issues that this course examines, but would like to
deepen or broaden their understanding of these issues

Course description:

We live in an age of interdependence and increasing globalization of business and markets.


Currencies, goods and services criss-cross frontiers and are sensitive to international events.
Cross-border mergers are becoming frequent. The revolution in technology and
communications has eliminated the inconvenience of distance.

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In such an environment, it is desirable for MBA participants to understand the ramifications of


global events, to learn to analyze the complexities that exist in other parts of the world and to
cope with them if the need arises in the future. This course will endeavor to help participants
to understand prevailing trends in geopolitical arenas, to think more in a global context and to
try to anticipate future developments.

Two main axes will cover this course. The first one will concentrate on constructing a solid
framework for understanding international relations. At this point we will face and try to
answer these questions: What is geopolitics? What is power and legitimacy and what role do
they play in the field of international relations? We will then think and reflect upon the work of
major geopolitical scholars: Is there anything like a grand strategy for international relations?
How are identity, race and religions shaping current geopolitical events? Which are the
predominant powers in today’s world, and where are they leading it? Can we establish or even
predict the appearance and fall of new global leaders?

The course’s second axis revolves around the geopolitics of global governance. Since the
Second World War, international organizations and institutions have proliferated to monitor
and regulate important areas such as security policy, trade, human rights and the
environment. Yet current global changes demand multilateral, effective, more representative
and transparent structures. This second axis, then, focuses on four global issues, their
geopolitics and how they are governed: global governance, international development, regional
European governance, and energy governance. Questions addressed include: What is global
governance? Which are the main actors and institutions of international development? How
does the EU function? And how can the main challenges regarding energy governance be
faced?

Methodology:

Sessions will combine an introductory lecture, a group presentation and a debate on the
readings.

A certain amount of reading will be compulsory for each class. All readings for the course will
be available on the course syllabus. Accordingly some questions (called “threads”) will appear
on the website of the course to help guide the reading.

Evaluation:

The grading for this course will be based on different types of assignments. Each part must be
passed separately:

- Group presentation: 20%


- Individual paper: 20%
- Exam (will take the form of an individual presentation of the final paper): 20%
- Class participation and attendance: 20%
- Online threads on readings or cases: 20%

Plagiarism:

Please read and familiarize yourself with the statement on plagiarism available on ESADE’s
website. If you are still uncertain as to what constitutes plagiarism please do not hesitate to
contact the professor. Plagiarism is a serious academic offense and may lead to failure of the
course.

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Textbooks:

The following works will provide an introduction to the theoretical part of the course:

Agnew, J. 2003. Geopolitics: Re-Visioning World Politics. London: Routledge.

Dodds, K. 2007. Geopolitics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Flint, C. 2006. Introduction to Geopolitics. New York: Routledge.

Lechner, Frank J. and John Boli, eds. 2008. The Globalization Reader, third edition. Malden MA:
Blackwell Publishing.

O’Tuathail, G. and S. Dalby. 1998. The Geopolitics Reader. New York: Routledge Press.

Steger, M. 2009. Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Timetable:

Tuesdays from 10/01/2012 to 13/03/2012

From 15.00 to 18.30h

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THE EUROPEAN UNION: GENESIS AND ISSUES

11M65081

Faculty:

Valentí Llagostera Español

Objectives:

The objective is to present and discuss the role of the European Union as a world
player. The analysis of the economic, political and social background will be done to
understand the evolution, process and perspectives of the European Union
integration process in the frame of today’s context.

The European Union is looking how to fit its economic and political interests taking
into account the enlarged number of members as well as the rapid evolution of the
international agenda. To what extend the European Union is giving the right
answers? What is the European Union standing for?
How the European Union is re setting their objectives?

Summary:

1- The European Union: A work in progress.


With a general updated perspective, the objective is to identify the main
topics concerning the EU. To understand the complexity of the process in
terms of the number of countries involved and the international context.
Where are we?
2- The European Union integration process: From the Treaty of Rome to the
Treaty of Lisbon.
The evolution of the European integration process can be followed through
the treaties that have been agreed by the member’s states. How the
objectives have been changing, as well as the European and international
context. Deepening and widening the European Union. Does it holds?
3- How the European Union is ruled:
The European institutions (European Council, European Commission,
European Parliament, Council Of Ministers, COREPER ...) Who proposes, who
legislates, who decides…How does this fit? Is the EU prepared for the XXI?
4- How the European Union is financed (resources) and which are the
expenditures.
Looking at he European Union budget to understand how and which EU
policies are financed. The contributions of the Member States. Is
sustainable? Does everybody agrees? How the crisis is affecting?
5- The European Union versus the world. EU economic and financial
indicators.
The relative position of the EU in the word: trends and perspectives
The economic and the political perspectives for the EU. Is the EU a global
player?
6- The euro: Birth and crisis.

7- Structural and Cohesion Policies – The European social model.

8- The external relations of the EU

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9- Future trends: Governance of the European Union, Turkey, Relations with the
US and China

Methodology:

1- Each session will begin will a follow up of the daily international press related
with the European Union to point how the European Union fits in the international
agenda.

2- Presentation of the topic to be developed, discussion and conclusions.

All the material presented (slides) will be previously available in the intranet.

3. Readings will be given previous to each class, to be prepared or presented.

Assessment:

Each participant will have to follow on a daily basis the international journals
identifying three topics to be presented (oral presentation).

Each participant will have to prepare a one page essay on a "driving idea"
concerning the European Union to be presented during the course (oral
presentation of a written report).

Class participation will be required.

A final essay during the last day of the course will be done.

Bibliography:

All European institution publications (mainly European Commission, European


Parliament...) are available in the European Documentation Center, which is located
within the ESADE library. During the session a number of documents will be
mentioned and will be available.

www.europa.eu.int European Union site


www.ceps.be European Policy Studies

"A History of Europe"


Norman Davis, Oxford University Press 1996

"Dark Continent"
Mark Mazover, London: Allen Lane, 1998

"The building of the European Union",


John Pinder, Oxford University Press 1998

"Ever closer Union: An introduction to European Integration"


Desmond Dinan, Basignstoke: Macmillan, 1999

Timetable:

From 09/01/2012 to 12/03/2012

From 15.00 to 18.30h

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TIMETABLES

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FULL TIME MBA - Term 4 - Electives 2011/2012
Department Course Start End Day Time Professor
9.00-
International Portfolio Management Sept 19th Sept 30th Mon-Fri Constance Lütolf-Carroll
13.00*
9.00-
Mergers & Acquisitions Oct 5th Dec 21st Wed Santiago Simón
Finance 12.30
9.30-
International Finance Oct 6th Dec 22nd Thu Lydia Ros
13.00
International Finance Simulation Oct 7th Dec 15th Thu 19-22 Lydia Ros
Strategic Sales Management Oct 4th Dec 20th Tue 15-18.30 Jaime Castelló
Marketing Research Oct 4th Dec 20th Tue 9.30-13 Jatinder Jit Singh
Marketing Simulación del Marketing Estratégico Oct 6th Dec 22nd Thu 15-18.30 Josep Mª Rius
Strategic Relations & Key Account Management Oct 4th Dec 20th Tue 15-18.30 * M. Alfaro & V. Noguer
Comunicación de Marketing y Corporativa Oct 3rd Dec 19th Mon 15-18.30 Oroval & Varela
From Innovation to Cash Flows Sept 5th Sept 9th Mon-Fri INT Constance Lütolf-Carroll
Strategic Business Simulation Sept 12th Sept 16th Mon-Fri INT Jordi Brunat
Advanced Strategy: Competing in the New Digital
Sept 19th Sept 23rd Mon-Fri INT Vives & Svejenova
Environment
Strategy Making with CEOs Sept 26th Sept 30th Mon-Fri INT Xavier Mir
Business Policy
Family Business Management Oct 4th Dec 20th Tue 9-12-30* Andrés Gimeno
Leading the Management Consulting Firm Oct 17th Dec 21st Wed 15-18.30* Jay McGonigle
Project Management Oct 3rd Dec 12th Mon 9-12.30 Pablo Vega
Corporate Level Strategy Oct 6th Dec 22nd Thu 9-12.30 Luis Vives
Entrepreneurial Marketing Oct 6th Dec 22nd Thu 15-18.30 Jan Brinckmann
Negotiation and Strategic HR Oct 6th Dec 22nd Thu 15-18.30 Steven Guest
Human Resources
The Transnational Manager Oct 5th Dec 21st Wed 15-18.30 Roger Bell
Social Sciences & Managing Sustainability Oct 5th Dec 21st Wed 9-12.30 Vilanova & Murillo
Economy The European Union: Genesis and Issues Sept 12th Sept23rd Mon-Fri INT Valentí Llagostera
Information
Gestión de la Información Aplicada Finanzas Oct 4th Dec 20th Tue 9-12.30 * Francesc Alcaide
Systems
Agile Supply Chain Sept 19th Sept 23rd Mon-Fri INT Harrison & Sweeney
Creativity and Innovation Sept 26th Sept 30th Mon-Fri INT Juan Ramis
Operations Managing Services Oct 6th Dec 15th Thu 9-12.30 Moreu & Visnjic
From Performance Measurement to Performance
Sept 12th Sept 16th Mon-Fri INT Heras & Franco
Management
*please check schedule details under the course
INT = check intensive schedule in course description
description
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FULL TIME MBA - Term 5 - Electives 2011/2012

Department Course Start End Day Time Professor


Investment Banking in M&A Jan 9th Mar 12th Mon 17-20.30 J. Lechá & D. Cerqueda
Management Control Systems Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 9-12.30 Josep Bisbe
International Finance Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 19-22 Lydia Ros
Finance
Estrategia Financiera a Largo Plazo Jan 11th Mar 14th Wed 15-18.30 Jesús Palau
Risk Management with Derivatives Jan 12th Mar 15th Thu 9-12.30 Alfredo Ibáñez
International Finance Simulation Jan 18th Mar 14th Wed 19-22 Lydia Ros
Branding Jan 11th Mar 14th Wed 9-12.30 Oriol Iglesias
Marketing
Consumer-Centric Marketing Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 9-12.30 Mònica Casabayó
Strategic Business Simulation Jan 9th Mar 12th Mon 15-18.30 Jordi Brunat
Business Collaborative Governance Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 15-18.30 Tamyko Ysa
Policy Leadership, Power and Influence Feb 8th Mar 7th Wed 15-18.30 José Luis Álvarez
Social Entrepreneurship Jan 12th Mar 15th Thu 9-12.30 Alfred Ignasi Vernis
Social Scien. Geopolitics Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 15-18.30 D. Murillo & A. Saez
& Economy The European Union: Genesis and Issues Jan 9th Mar 12th Mon 15-18.30 Valentí Llagostera

Media Convergence, Technology and New Business Models Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 15-18.30 Santiago Miralles
Information
Mobile Business Jan 11th Mar 14th Wed 15-18.30 Carlos del Río
Systems
Open Innovation & Open Business Models Jan 12th Mar 15th Thu 9-12.30 Almirall & Vanhaverbeke
Business Intelligence Jan 10th Mar 13th Tue 19-22 Lluís Soldevila
Modelos Cuantitativos en Operaciones Jan 11th Mar 14th Wed 9-12.30 Pere Batallé
Supply Chain Management Jan 9th Mar 12th Mon 19-22 Salvador Tasqué
Operations
Applying Creative Thinking to Generate Novel Solutions Jan 9th Mar 12th Mon 15-18.30 Enric Segarra

151