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Vinita Daily Journal

Principal:
‘A great
Jan
17 year’ at
2020 VHS
Angela Thomason
Journal Reporter
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Vinita Daily Journal

Page 12 Vinita (Okla.) DAILY JOURNAL, Friday, January 17, 2020

She said they continue to Vinita graduate.


VHS look at ways to improve what Gibson added that the ele- O
they can offer and to get more mentary school sites and mid-
Continued from Page 1 students involved in activities dle school often join them in
“I’m very pleased with it, at the high school. these good causes.
Jan
and I think it’s helping with “Nobody hustles more than She noted that student vol- S
17
our tardy students because we do, and even though there unteers with Student Council ad
now they have to come to are some areas where we and Leadership classes help th
2020
WKH IURQW RIÀFH WR FKHFN LQµ could score a higher grade prepare meals for the Back- lo
Page said Gibson. “We don’t al- with the state, such as not al- pack Child Nutrition program th
A012 low students to let anyone in lowing students to come back on a weekly basis. h
Clip from the inside, as an added to our district who still want “Our kids represent us well,”
resized precaution. Also, with our re- WR ÀQLVK WKHLU KLJK VFKRRO she added. ch
61%
VRXUFH RIÀFHU KRXVHG DW WKH education, we’ll let them try When it comes to helping re
From high school, his presence at because we have to remem- students with life skills, Gib-
A001
the school site is a good pre- ber why we’re here in the son said that students have d
vention measure.” ÀUVWSODFHµVDLG*LEVRQ´6R opportunities to take classes S
Gibson also noted that even we might take a hit on scores, to learn some of the basics, an
though the door buzzers don’t but that student’s education is such as cooking, laundry or p
have video recordings, the more important.” gardening.
school’s video surveillance She said that Vinita High The state’s requirements for w
in those areas does. The door School has a strong sense of preparing students for life af- d
buzzers have a camera that citizenship and volunteerism, ter graduation also have an b
DOORZVWKHRIÀFHSHUVRQQHOWR with both students and facul- online component where stu- sa
see who is at the door. ty. dents can set educational and
On the topic of academic “We have a nice group of life goals. m
performance, Gibson said that kids. They are kind to each One life skill that Gibson b
she wasn’t thrilled with the other and the majority show says they are focusing on with tr
state report card grade for the kindness to others who have students is the basic skill of
high school at C, but put it into special needs or are differ- learning to show up and be on sa
perspective in comparisons ent,” said Gibson. “We aren’t time. th
with 13 surrounding schools perfect, but overall these kids The crackdown on chronic v
and the state averages. are great kids. There is a con- absenteeism is also working,
She said that the numbers VWDQW ÁRZ RI DFWLYLWLHV ZLWK and she reported that they had
were based on academic test organizations, and one of the 97% attendance this past se-
scores from last year’s juniors, things I’m proud of is that mester.
and that her research shows most all events held have a 2IIHULQJ H[HPSWLRQV RQ À-
that Vinita’s scores were third service component that bene- nals for those students who
out of 13 for academics and ÀWVRWKHUVDQGWKHFRPPXQLW\ have at least a C average in
above the state average. in some way.” a class and less than four ab-
The lower score comes from Gibson listed some of those sences has given students an-
post-secondary opportunities examples such as Jeans for other incentive for being pres-
for students. January collecting jeans, ent at school and keeping their
Gibson added that for a sweats and pants for Neigh- grades up.
school district Vinita’s size, bors Helping Neighbors Overall, Gibson said that
students are offered several during spirit weeks. She also students and teachers work
options including concurrent noted the 12 Days of Christ- together to get all students in-
college classes, AP classes mas charitable giving proj- volved in school and to help
and vocational education op- ects, and a Make-a-Wish make Vinita High School a
portunities. IXQGUDLVHU WKDW EHQHÀWHG D place where they want to be.

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Holdenville News

Penn West addition and businesses on East Highway. Th


the

Holdenville School req

Hi
cil
Jan
19 Administration reports Jac

2020 The Holdenville Board of Education January 10 had an additionally exciting


held their regularly scheduled monthly experience when they had to seek shelter
Page meeting on Monday, January 13. Reed due to a tornado warning. Fortunately, the
0001 Elementary Principal Danielle Patterson storms were not as threatening in
Clip began the Administrative Reports, inform- Holdenville.
resized
54%
ing the Board that they began the new year The FFA Pie Auction on Thursday,
with an in-service on January 7 with a January 9 was a huge success, and the huge
behavior specialist to offer advice on how support from the community helped raise
to deal with students and their behaviors. funds needed to support the program.
Reed Elementary has had a lot of drills, There was a local show on Sunday, January
including a fire drill, tornado drill, trigger 12 to kick off the show season, with a num-
drill, and evacuation drill. ber of area events coming up.
Patterson stated that report cards went Richmond noted that it was
out that day, and they have been working Homecoming Week, and there were a lot of
on their middle-of-the-year Dibble bench- events planned around the theme of “Dog
marks, STAR testing as they gear up for Days of Winter,” noting that they
State testing. They also have a staff meet- Wolverines will be taking on the Meeker
ing on Friday morning where the third Bulldogs on Saturday. Richmond com-
grade teachers get together and make sug- mented that she hopes having the game on
gestions for how the lower grade teachers Saturday instead of Friday will be a posi-
could help boost test scored in the upper tive that they can look into in the future.
grades. On Tuesday, January 21 Peoples Jan
Reed Elementary is looking forward Electric will visit with HHS Junior stu-
rig
to a visit from their Great Expectations dents about an opportunity to visit
So
mentor to make observations in the class- Washington D.C. as representatives of
rooms to confirm they are being compliant rural cooperatives across the nation. Re
with their Model School status. There will
be a second visit in February.
On the last week of the month Reed will
Richmond stated in the previous two years
Holdenville students have made it to the
finals, and she is optimistic a Holdenville
C
have a “Color Week,” in which students students will sooner or later earn an oppor-
will be encouraged to wear a different tunity. Co
color each day to help the students that are The girls’ basketball won 3rd in the me
still having trouble with their colors. The Konawa Tournament, which they are very Th
classroom Valentine Parties are scheduled proud of. Two team members, Emmalyn de
for February 14 at 2:00 p.m. Marriott and Carley Tatum, were named to Ok
Holdenville High School Principle the All-Tournament Team. of
Shawn Richmond stated that they, too, Principal Richmond shared a copy of ye
began the new year with professional the track team and weight lifting schedule ev
development. During a High School site and noted that the season will kick off in
meeting the staff discussed the recent Norman on January 24. co
School report cards and the academic On Monday the HHS freshmen took the trib
achievement area where they needed the ACT Aspire test. Richmond explained that tie
most improvement. They also developed a the academic performance at the high er
committee to help develop a game plan to school is based on the results of the Junior Co
make improvements. She added an atten- student’s ACT test scores, so this test helps Co
dance committed was formed a few years the students better prepare for that. pro
ago and had successful results. Holdenville High School will be host-
Principal Richmond next shared that the
student attending the Honor Band at East
Central University in Ada on Friday,
ing a blood drive in the auditorium on
January 28. Last month the Oklahoma P
See School Board, page 2

Wh at’s
at’ s Hap
Happpen
eniing
ng
Property of OPS News Tracker and members of the Oklahoma Press Association.
M
Holdenville News

•School Board •
Continued from Page 1
H
Blood Institute informed HHS that they are the fifth out of
thirty-three schools in the amount of blood they have col- o
lected with their blood drives. G
Jan
Last year HHS had their first reading poetry out loud a
19 event, and Richmond states she was surprised at the b
amount of participation. They will be hosting the second b
2020 annual poetry reading on January 29. e
Looking into early February, Richmond informed the a
Page Board that the Cheer team will be traveling to Dallas on w
February 1 and 2. h
0002 Thomas Middle School Principal Deborah Watters stat- a
Clip ed that the students at Thomas have also been busy with n
resized drills. She thanked Superintendent Randy Patterson and h
46% the teachers that traveled to OU on January 6 to bring back
From chairs for the Thomas building. S
0001 On Thursday Thomas School hosted a family involve- w
ment “Reading Roundup” featuring local authors Judy la
Goodspeed and Rebekah Hartfield and a fun flashlight a
reading in the classrooms. Another family involvement re
event is planned for February 10, when the science and
social studies teachers will present science and STEM It
activities. m
The Jr. High basketball team will be traveling to Stroud re
for a tournament on the week of 28. s
Superintendent Randy Davenport, who is the District 9 T
State Coordinator for the Administrators program, stated G
that, before Christmas break, he had attended a meeting at S
Gordon Cooper Technology Center that included seven
legislators. Hot topics included the compact with the U
tribes, Epic Charter private schools, which are currently p
suing Sate Senator Ron Sharp, and the chronic absen- w
teeism at schools across the state. The legislators are con- m
cerned about school being held accountable for absent stu- F
dents when they really have no control over attendance. ta
Another topic the legislators brought up was the new th
accreditation program the state is beginning. This will be a
four year instead of a one year accreditation program. A
team will visit each school across the state, rotating •
through q quarter of the schools each year. Although they D
are still fine-tuning the program, it is expected to be much fr
more involved. s
The current desk audit of federals still ongoing, and an B
audit sent in December has had parts sent back seeking a
more information on 6 things out of 120.
Davenport stated that there are two trailer loads of fo
chairs that came from OU, and the Booster Club will be b
selling them to raise funds for a trip to D.C. Davenport B
explained the chairs were in the dorm rooms and have C
been replaced with different chairs that don’t require the
n
cleaning these cloth chairs require every year.
Superintendent Davenport stated that architects from
E
Design Architects Plus will be in Holdenville in February
T
to work on the new all purpose building at Reed
Elementary. In March they will begin the process of sell-
ing the bonds that voters recently approved. At this time 3
they expect to award bids some time in July. th
In other business, the Board accepted the resignations a
of Elizabeth Been and Loryn Hamilton. They also B
approved the hiring of: Jessica Hinton, Para; Maddison im
Keeney, Teacher Assistant; Jeanna Woolard, Teacher B
Assistant; and Brownie Harjo, part time maintenance. 7

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Muskogee Phoenix

Jan
19

2020

Page
Legislators file bills that would
A002
Clip
resized
curtail virtual charter practices
52% By David Fritze House Bill 3066, also by all public schools from require students seeking
Oklahoma Watch Kiger, a former educator, spending state funding a full-time virtual edu-
would prohibit charter on marketing or advertis- cation to enroll in a pro-
State lawmakers are schools, including virtual ing except under certain gram through their local
looking to rein in virtual charters, from using any circumstances, such as school district, if offered
charter schools. state funding to purchase for employment oppor- and if “equal in scope and
A number of bills advertising. It also would tunities or school bond content” to a statewide
proposed for the 2020 prohibit virtual school elections. virtual charter school.
legislative session, which students from receiving House Bill 3492, Virtual charter school stu-
begins Feb. 3, would limit compensation or financial by Rep. Chris Sneed, dents enrolled by 2022-23
the flexibility or funding incentives for recruiting R-Muskogee, would pro- would be exempt.
for virtual charter schools other students. Epic spent hibit any public school, Senate Bill 1100 by
in the state. Several more than $2 million on including charter and vir- Sharp would add respon-
proposals seem to target television and newspaper tual schools, from using sibilities to the Statewide
Epic Charter Schools, advertise- state funds Virtual Charter School
the state’s largest virtual ments last on private Board, the state agency
school, which has drawn year; the extracur- tasked with sponsoring
scrutiny for its spending school also ricular ac- all statewide virtual
and enrollment practices rewards tivities for schools. The proposal
and is under investigation students students, would require the board
for alleged fraud. Epic has for re- including to complete an annual re-
denied wrongdoing. ferrals gymnas- view of each school’s state
Thursday was the through its tics, music aid allocations and stu-
deadline to introduce leg- “student lessons dent count, in compliance
islation. learning and ath- with the terms of their
House Bill 3065, by fund,” an letic per- contract and attendance
Rep. Lundy Kiger, R-Po- allocation formance policy, student perfor-
teau, would limit fund- of credit lessons. It mance and other items.
ing per virtual charter than can would also Senate Bill 1541, by
student to $3,500 “from be used on prohibit Sen. Gary Stanislawski,
all public and private technology, virtual R-Tulsa, would rename
sources.” Currently, vir- curriculum and extra-cur- charter schools from giv- the Statewide Virtual
tual schools receive the ricular activities. Epic is ing bonuses to teachers Charter School Board
same weighted amount the only school with such or other school staff for and increase the number
per student as traditional a fund. recruiting teachers or of voting members from
schools, but because they Similarly, Senate Bill students from another five to nine. The proposed
do not receive local reve- 1153 by Ron Sharp, school. name is the Oklahoma
nue, nearly all of it comes R-Shawnee, a former Senate Bill 1097, by J.J. Commission for Digital
from the state. teacher, would prohibit Dossett, D-Sperry, would Learning.

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Clip
Jan 2020 Page resized
19 0001 40%

Seminole Producer

suspect

Digging Deeper into Public School Enrollment


Enrollment in Oklahoma school closures — painful ing “ghost students,” or ing or private school. reported an increase of racial integration—from a
public schools is growing, decisions made by Okla- students who enrolled in Oklahoma is one of 21 more than 200 students. high of 75,000 students in
but it’s not happening in homa City school leaders Epic but received little to states and the District of The number of students the 1960s.
every district. and under consideration by no instruction. The school Columbia that is projected at charters sponsored Schools using a four-day
The latest data from the Tulsa. also spent nearly $2.5 to grow its public school by Oklahoma City Public week calendar are facing
state Education Department Epic Charter Schools million on promoting and enrollment by 5% or more Schools held steady, while an uphill battle to keep that
show public schools’ great- reported staggering student advertising its school this between 2014 and 2026, the number at charters model following a new law
est growth in 2019 occurred growth, leading all other year, according to the Tulsa according to the U.S. sponsored by Tulsa Public requiring an exemption for
in charter schools, while districts in the number of World. Department of Educa- Schools increased by a school to be in session-
enrollment in the state’s new students. Epic’s virtual For the first time, Okla- tion, National Center for almost 300 students. fewer than 165 days.
largest districts, Okla- one-on-one school reported homa public schools Education Statistics. Combined, there are The proposed exemp-
homa City and Tulsa public 17,106 students in 2019 enrolled more than 700,000 Two new charter schools 46,000 students in charter tion requirements – which
schools, declined. and its blended learning students in 2019, continuing opened for 2019: Sover- schools—7,700 more than include average or above
The steady overall school reported 10,962. a steady growth trend for eign Community School in last year (though most of student growth in English
growth, and trends within it, The blended school’s count more than a decade. The Oklahoma City reported that growth was in Epic.) and math for elemen-
reflect how student enroll- includes all Epic students number of students enrolled 39 students and eSchool Charter students still com- tary schools and student
ment underpins many who live in Oklahoma and this year was 703,650 — a Virtual Charter Academy prise a small percentage – achievement, graduation
issues in education: class Tulsa counties, whether 0.7% percent increase over enrolled 44. Those new about 6.5% – of all public and postsecondary oppor-
sizes, teacher shortages they attend the blended 2018, when there were schools offset the two school students in Okla- tunities for middle and
and state funding. learning center or not. 698,586 students. The total schools that closed in homa. high schools – are too
State school funding is Combined, Epic reported number of students is up 2019: Langston Hughes Oklahoma City schools strict, according to a newly
doled out per student, so an over 28,000 students, a 49,000 from a decade ago. Academy charter school this year closed 15 formed advocacy group.
uptick in enrollment gives 32% increase compared to These are students coming in Tulsa and Swink, a schools and reconfigured The districts using a four-
schools funds to improve 2018. The school is under into the public school traditional public school others in a major district day week are nearly all
services and programs and investigation for its enroll- system through population that was annexed by Fort restructuring, in part to small and rural. Combined,
hire teachers. A dip in enroll- ment practices and has growth, family relocation, or Towson. compensate for declining those districts lost more
ment could mean cuts and been accused of enroll- a switch from homeschool- Nearly all charters expe- enrollment. School leaders than 800 students in 2019.
rienced student growth. found they were paying to They were nearly split, with

Trial Begins Against Company The highest

emy of Seminole, which


percent
increase was at The Acad-
maintain many half-empty
buildings.
promised
The
to
district
reinvest
just over half experiencing
an enrollment decline and
just under half adding stu-

in Oklahoma Oil Rig Explosion grew eight-fold from 29 stu-


dents in 2018, its first year,
to 283 in 2019. Le Monde
the savings in smaller
class sizes, music, art
and physical education
dents. However, the two
largest districts using a
shortened week gained stu-
McALESTER, Okla. statements Tuesday that on site had no responsibil- International School, a teachers at elementary dents. Noble Public Schools
(AP) — The wrongful National Oilwell Varco in ities at the time of the fire Norman school also in its schools and science labs grew by 25 students, or less
death trial against a oil- primarily to blame for the and explosion. second year, added 70 stu- at middle schools. than 1%, and Newcastle
field equipment contractor men’s deaths when the rig The families have dents. The district’s enrollment grew by 105 students, or
in connection with a Jan- exploded in Quinton. reached settlements with Dove Schools of Tulsa has been declining since nearly 5%.
uary 2018 explosion and Attorneys for the fami- Red Mountain Operating;

K M St k B V hi l

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