Sei sulla pagina 1di 324

Air

Distribution for
Comfort

David Pich P.E. LEED AP
Director of HVAC Technology
What You Will Learn
• ASHRAE Standards for Comfort & IAQ
• Types of Comfort Cooling Systems
• Fully Mixed
• Partially Mixed
• Fully Stratified
• ASHRAE & AHRI Standards for Testing 
and Sound
Standards TM

• ASHRAE Standard 55
• Thermal Comfort 
• ASHRAE Standard 62.1
• Ventilation for Acceptable IAQ
• ASHRAE Standard 70
• Diffuser Testing
• AHRI 885
• Estimating Sound for Diffuser and Terminal Units
Graphic Comfort Zone (5.2.1.1)
Met Rate 1.0 – 1.3
Data based on ISO 7730
And ASHRAE Std. 55
Upper Recommended Humidity Limit 0.012 humidity ratio

DPT < 62.2 °F

1.0 Clo 0.5 Clo

Met Rate 1.0 – 1.3

70 75 80
Operative Temperature °F
ASHRAE Std. 55 – Occupied Zone
ASHRAE Standard 62.1‐2016
Table 6‐2 Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness Ez
Ceiling supply of cool air 1.0
Ceiling supply of warm air with floor return 1.0
Ceiling supply of warm air >15 °F above space and ceiling return. 0.8

Ceiling supply warm air <15°F above space, T150 within 4.5’ AFF 1.0

Floor supply cool air, ceiling return low velocity (DV) 1.2


Floor supply of cool air with T50 < 4.5’ AFF (UFAD)  1.2
Floor supply of cool air with T50 > 4.5’ AFF (UFAD) 1.0
Floor supply of warm air with ceiling return 0.7
2015 Application
Chapter 57
Fully Stratified Partially Mixed Fully Mixed

Displacement Under Floor Air Distribution G.R.D.


Fully Mixed Air Distribution
Partially Mixed Air Distribution
Fully Stratified Air Distribution

Return
Diffuser Testing
• Diffusers tested per 
ASHRAE Standard 70
Sound Tests
• Diffusers and grilles
• Supply sound
• Return/exhaust sound
Sound Path Estimation
• AHRI  Standard 885 provides 
sound path and attenuation 
values for
• Lined duct
• Ceiling materials
• Elbows
• Flex duct
• Etc
Sound Path Estimation

C
SOUND POWER Lw
C =Casing Radiated
and Induction Inlet

D =Discharge Sound

O O =Outlet Generated Sound


Sound Power vs Sound Pressure
• Sound power is the total sound energy 
produced 
• Sound pressure is the sound level that results 
after some sound energy is lost to the 
environment
• If 80 dB is produced but only 70 dB is 
measured, the difference is a 10 dB room 
effect or attenuation
The Decibel (dB)
•The decibel(dB) is measured 
against a frequency and averaged 
into octave bands

Octave Band Designations


Center Frequency 63 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000
Band Designation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Both tones are equally loud
NC Chart
OCTAVE BAND LEVEL _ dB RE 0.0002 MICROBAR
80

70 NC-70

60
NC-60

50
NC-50

40
NC-40

30
NC-30
APPROXIMATE
20 THRESHOLD
OF HUMAN NC-20
HEARING
10
63 125 250 500 1K 2K 4K 8K
MID - FREQUENCY, HZ
For High Frequencies
• 1 dB not noticeable

• 3 dB just perceptible

• 5 dB noticeable

• 10 dB  twice as loud

• 20 dB  four times as loud
NC Chart
OCTAVE BAND LEVEL _ dB RE 0.0002 MICROBAR
80

70 NC-70

60
NC-60

50
NC-50

40
NC-40

30
NC-30
APPROXIMATE
20 THRESHOLD
OF HUMAN NC-20
HEARING
10
63 125 250 500 1K 2K 4K 8K
MID - FREQUENCY, HZ
For Low Frequencies
• 3 dB        noticeable

• 5 dB  twice as loud

• 10 dB  four times as loud
NC Plot 90

NC rating given is NC-45


80 since this is highest point
tangent to an NC curve
NC-70
70

NC-60
60

Octave Band Level


50 NC-50
dB RE 0.0002 Microbar

40
NC-40

30
NC-30

20
Approximate threshold
NC-20
of human hearing
10

63 125 250 500 1K 2K 4K 8K

MID - FREQUENCY, HZ
Decibel Addition
To add two decibel values:

80 dB
+ 74 dB
Decibel Addition
To add two decibel values:

80 dB
+ 74 dB
154 dB (Incorrect)
Decibel Addition
3
To add two decibel values:
Correction To Be Added To

2.5 80 dB
Higher Value (dB)

- 74 dB
2
= 6 dB
1.5 Difference in Values: 6 dB
1 From Chart: Add 1.0 dB
to higher Value
0.5 80 dB
0 + 1 dB
0 2 4 6 8 10
Difference In Decibels Between Two
Values Being Added (dB)
81 dB (Correct)
Source Multiplication

Equation for sound power changes = 10logn
1 Fan on vs. 2 Fans on n=2 Add 3 dB
1 Fan on vs. 4 Fans on n=4 Add 6 dB
1 Fan on vs. 10 Fans on n=10 Add 10 dB
1 Fan on vs. 100 Fans on n=100 Add 20 dB
50 Fans on vs. 100 Fans on n=2 Add 3 dB
Proximity To Sound Sources
• Would you really expect to hear 100 fans running 
at the same time?
• Properly selected diffusers shouldn’t be heard 
from more than 10 feet away
• Although there may be multiple diffusers in a 
space, it’s unlikely that more than one or two are 
within 10 feet of an occupant
• We would only expect to be able to hear a 10 
foot section of continuous linear diffuser from 
any single location
Catalog Diffuser NC Values
• Diffuser NC values are based on a 10 dB 
room effect deduction in each octave 
band
• Typical medium office with 8‐10 ft
high lay‐in ceiling, commercial 
carpet, sheetrock walls, and some 
office furniture
• 10 dB is a reasonable room effect 
deduction for the critical octave 
bands
• Critical octave bands are 4th (500 Hz), 
5th (1000 Hz), and 6th (2000 Hz)
Typical NC Levels
• Conference Rooms < NC30
• Private offices < NC35
• Open offices = NC40 
• Hallways, utility rooms, rest rooms < NC45
• NC should match purpose of room
• Difficult to achieve less than NC30
• Select diffusers for NC20‐25 (or less)
Sound Effects
RP‐1335 No Damper With OBD
Standard 70 0 1 ‐ 5
3 de 0 ‐ 1 5 ‐ 8
1.5 de 2 ‐ 4 7 ‐ 12
0 de 6 ‐ 9 5 ‐ 10
Diffuser Installation
• Locate balancing dampers at 
branch takeoff
• Keep flexible duct bends as 
gentle as possible
• Flex duct is a great attenuator 
of upstream noise sources
• Keep duct velocities as low as 
possible
• But over‐sizing can result in 
higher thermal loss
Unexpected Results
• Higher radiated sound 
levels
• No ceiling
• Exposed ductwork
• Bounded ceiling plenums
• Reduced plenum height
Unexpected Results
• Higher discharge sound levels
• Unlined ductwork
• Terminal units close‐coupled to diffusers
• No flex duct
• Smaller rooms
NC Plots 90

80

Octave Band Level_ dB RE 0.0002 Microbar


70
NC-70

60
NC-60

50
NC-50

40
NC-40

30
NC-30

20
NC-20
10
Approximate threshold
of human hearing
Air Diffusion
Performance Index
ADPI & Comfort
• Air Diffusion Performance Index
• Statistically related the space conditions of local or transverse 
temperatures and velocities to occupants’ thermal comfort
• ADPI >= 80 is considered acceptable
• Effective draft temperature 
• = (tx‐tc) – 0.07(Vx‐30)
• % of points where ‐3<= <= +2 = ADPI
• Velocity below 70 fpm
ADPI
• The grey area 
represents 
‐3<= <= +2
• You can vary 
temperature 
or velocity to 
maintain comfort
• 15 fpm = 1 °F
Characteristic Room Length

Area Conditioned By Diffuser


ADPI Selection Range

40
(1 cfm/Sq.Ft.)
ADPI Selection Illustration

Point A

ADPI Min 80 ADPI Min


Max
0.6 1.2

20x20 Room
400 cfm = 1 cfm/sq ft
Characteristic Length = 10
Therefore, look for T50 = 12 feet at 400 cfm (Max VAV)
Check Turndown point at .6 T50/L (Min VAV)
Set constant volume systems at Point A.

T50/L
Recommended
ADPI Ranges for Outlets
Outlet T50/L Range Calculated T50 & L Data

Sidewall Grilles L 10 15 20 25 30
1.3-2.0 T50 13-20 20-30 26-40 33-50 39-60
Ceiling Diffusers L 5 10 15 20 25
Round Pattern
TMR, TMRA, TMS
0.6-1.2 T50 3-6 6-12 9-18 12-24 15-30
Ceiling Diffusers L 5 10 15 20 25
Cross Pattern
PSS, TDC, 250
1.0-2.0 T50 5-10 10-20 15-30 20-40 25-50
Slot Diffusers L 5 10 15 20 25
ML, TBD, LL1, LL2 0.5-3.3 T50 3-18 5-33 9-50 10-66 15-83
Light Troffer L 4 6 8 10 12
Diffusers
LTT, LPT
1.0-5.0 T50 4-20 6-30 8-40 10-50 12-60
Sill & Floor Grilles L 5 10 15 20 25
All Types 0.7-1.7 T50 4-9 7-17 11-26 14-34 18-13
Plaque Diffuser‐ ADPI

Model OMNI
Perforated Diffuser ‐ ADPI

Model PSS
Questions?
Air Distribution
Applications
David Pich P.E. LEED AP
Director of HVAC Technology
What You Will Learn
• Types of Comfort Cooling Systems
• Fully Mixed Cooling
• Perimeter Applications (Overhead)
• Fixed Deflection
• Auto‐Changeover
Fully Mixed Air Distribution
Air Patterns &
Cooling Jet
Performance
Air Flow Patterns
• Radial Pattern
• Shorter throw
• More induction
• Not Recommended
for heating
Radial Pattern Diffusers
Air Flow Patterns
• Directional Pattern
• Longer throw
• Increased drop
Directional Pattern Diffusers
Thermal Image –
Directional Flow

4-way pattern, 4 separate jets, longer throws


High Induction Outlet
• Nozzles for Rapid Mixing 

55
Thermal Image –
High Induction

Modified circular pattern with several distinct air jets


Why is 150 FPM Significant?
• Temperature 
Independent
Isovel • Throw same for 
Heat and Cool.
• Used by Standard 
62.1 heating 
selection 
procedure
How Do We Convert
Isothermal Data?

• Then 100 FPM
How Do We Convert
Isothermal Data?

• And then 50 FPM
Mapping Throw
Mapping Throw
Cooling
Throw Relationships
• Some general rules of thumb
• Isothermal
150 FPM  =   150 FPM cooling or heating
100 FPM  =   50 FPM cooling ‐ free jet
100 FPM  =   100 FPM cooling with walls
Open Ceiling Designs
• What happens when you 
have an open ceiling 
design?

Internal Coanda Pocket


Ceiling Independent
Below Ceiling
Open Plan Office

• If the diffuser is mounted on an


exposed duct, the throw values are
70% of those listed in the tables.
Ceiling Dependent
Below Ceiling
Ceiling Obstructions

Angle between kicker and the 
obstruction should be less than 15o or 
the jet will drop excessively
Colliding Air Streams
• What happens when air streams collide?
Locating the Return Intake
• Return Intake ‐ return  • Even natural convection 
intake affects only the  currents will overcome 
air motion within its  the draw of the intake
immediate vicinity
Temperature Differential
and Short Circuiting
Short Circuit
Vo = 1000 fpm
= 15%

Vx = 150 FPM t = 150/1000*20

Temp. Diff.
t = 20ºF
= 3 ºF
Duct Mounted Supply Grilles
• Duct Mounting
• Velocity & Pressure
Effects of Cooling

5
300 cfm

600 fpm

27
Throw vs. Drop with
20° Cooling
Distance Upward Spread Throw Drop
To Ceiling Projection Distance Distance

Fig. 10 2’‐4’ +20° 0° 27’ 3’


Below
Fig. 11 No +20° 0° 23’ 4’
Ceiling
Fig. 12 1’ 0° 0° 27’ 5’
Below
Fig.13 No 0° 0° 24’ 7’
Ceiling
Fig. 14 1.5’ 0° 45° 19’ 2’
Below
Fig. 15 No 0° 45° 13’ 3’
Ceiling
Linear Slot Performance
• What about Performance of Linear slots?
• Table is based on one active length
• Maximum length of 10’ continuous airflow
• Maximum length of 10’ sound

Length, Ft. 2 4 6 8 10
Throw Correction 0.72 0 1.25 1.42 1.70
NC Correction ‐3 0 +2 +3 +5
Open Bay
Cafeteria
Transit Center
Retail Spaces
Book Store
Large Atriums
Arenas & Churches
Work Out Facility
Perimeter Applications
• Vertical Projection
• Sills & Soffits
• Perimeter Applications
ASHRAE Standard 62.1‐2016
Table 6‐2 Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness Ez
Ceiling supply of cool air 1.0
Ceiling supply of warm air with floor return 1.0
Ceiling supply of warm air >15 °F above space and ceiling return. 0.8

Ceiling supply warm air <15°F above space, T150 within 4.5’ AFF 1.0

Floor supply cool air, ceiling return low velocity (DV) 1.2


Floor supply of cool air with T50 < 4.5’ AFF (UFAD)  1.2
Floor supply of cool air with T50 > 4.5’ AFF (UFAD) 1.0
Floor supply of warm air with ceiling return 0.7
Estimating Downward Projection
• Chart provides 
vertical throw at 
50 fpm for 
heating and 
23 40
cooling with the  28
same diffuser 1000 fpm

• Typically, cfm and 
jet velocity are 
known

1000 cfm +10 -20 0


Sills & Soffits
• Soffits cause air to turn 
up prematurely 
• Aim air under the soffit 
to hit the glass or cold wall

• Sills deflect cold air 
into the room
• Sill height sets the 
stratification 
layer height
Rolling a Room
• Only for closed offices
• High air flow outlets are necessary 
(high induction is required)
• Select T50 at 1.5 times the length 
of the room plus the height
• Must not be obstructions in 
the path of the air stream
• Must be a complete wall 
(no cubicle‐type walls)
Typical Solution
• 50/50 throw pattern is 
the best compromise for 
both heating and cooling
• Half of the air is always 
directed in the wrong 
direction
• T150 to 4.5’ AFF
• Max Δt = 15 °F
• ASHRAE Standard 62.1
Auto Changeover
Diffuser Solution
Diffuser

Cooling

Window
Air flow does not pause in
intermittent pattern to cause
sustained drafts pop action
of air flow pattern.

Sill
Heating
Actuating Between
Cooling and Heating
Auto Changeover vs. Fixed Pattern
Heating Mode
Improved Room Temperature Response
Fixed Air Pattern vs. Changing Air Pattern

100% Vertical Heating

Shaded area represents


Energy/Comfort Improvements

Heating Air Flow divided 50% - 50%


Comfort Economics
• ASHRAE Journal, June 2008  
Comfort Air Distribution
• The ASHRAE 2013 Fundamentals 
handbook, Chapter 20, 2016 Systems & 
Equipment and 2015 Applications 
handbook Chapter 57 provides guidance 
on diffuser selection.
• Select throw at Max. & Min. to meet ADPI 
guidelines.
• It cost less for install a good design than to 
replace a bad design.
Questions?
Terminal Units
David Pich P.E. LEED AP
Director of HVAC Technology
What you will learn
Types and Applications Standards and Certification
• Single duct • ASHRAE 130
• Dual duct • AHRI 880
• Exhaust • AHRI 885
• Bypass • AHRI 410
• Series fan‐powered • NEC
• Parallel fan‐powered • UL
• ETL 
What you will learn
Features and Options Sizing and Selecting
• Inlet sensors • Inlet ducts
• Dampers • Fans
• Liners • Electric coils
• Coils • Hot water coils
• Controls
• Motors
• Filters 
What you will learn (cont.)
Installation
• Hanging methods
• Orientation
• Electrical
• Inlet conditions
• Discharge ductwork
Terminal Units – Types
and Applications
Single duct VAV
• Most common type
• Cold primary air (55°F) from AHU
• Serves interior spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 
62.1)
• Modulates between design cooling 
(cfm) and minimum ventilation (cfm) 
to maintain room temperature 
setpoint using pressure independent 
control
Single duct CAV
• Same unit as single duct VAV, but 
controls are set to a single airflow 
rate (cfm) and no room sensor is 
required
• Receives conditioned air from an 
AHU or ventilation air from a DOAS
• Provides critical environment ACR’s 
(per ASHRAE 170) and/or provides 
ventilation (per ASHRAE 62.1)
• Maintains constant airflow (cfm) 
through pressure independent 
control
Single duct VAV with heat
• Same unit as single duct VAV but 
controls a radiant panel or baseboard 
heater
• Cold primary air (55°F) from AHU
• Serves perimeter spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 62.1)
• Modulates between design cooling 
(cfm) and minimum ventilation (cfm) 
to maintain room temperature 
setpoint using pressure independent 
control
Single duct VAV with reheat
• Same unit as single duct VAV but 
includes either an electric or
hydronic heating coil
• Cold primary air (55°F) from AHU
• Serves perimeter spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 
62.1)
• Modulates between design cooling 
(cfm) and minimum ventilation 
(cfm) to maintain room 
temperature setpoint using 
pressure independent control and 
activates heat as necessary
Single duct CAV with reheat
• Same unit as single duct VAV with 
reheat, but controls are set to a 
single airflow rate (cfm) 
• Room sensor only controls heater
• Cold primary air (55°F) from an AHU 
• Provides critical environment ACR’s 
(per ASHRAE 170) and/or provides 
ventilation (per ASHRAE 62.1)
• Maintains constant airflow (cfm) 
through pressure independent 
control but changes the air 
temperature to maintain room 
temperature setpoint
Single duct VAV with
autochangeover
• Same unit as single duct VAV but 
includes inlet‐mounted temperature 
sensor
• Cold (55°F) and hot (90°F) primary air 
from AHU
• Serves interior and perimeter spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 62.1)
• Modulates between design maximum 
(cfm) and minimum ventilation (cfm) to 
maintain room temperature setpoint
using pressure independent control
Bypass
• Also called ‘dump boxes’
• Used with CAV air handlers
• Responds to thermostat call for 
more/less airflow
• Unwanted airflow gets directed to 
return
• Obsolete
Exhaust terminals
• Requires different unit configuration to 
keep pressure drop low
• Typically works in tandem with a CAV 
with reheat unit
• Serves critical environment spaces that 
require pressurization (per ASHRAE 
170)
• Positive room pressure creates 
protective environment
• Negative room pressure creates 
airborne infectious isolation (AII) room
• Can either control room pressure 
directly or by offset from supply 
volume
Exhaust terminals
• Don’t use standard single duct VAV
• Contractors get confused
• They get installed backwards
• Inlet sensor facing wrong direction
• Inlet sensor downstream from 
damper
• It’s a mess!
Dual duct terminals
• Different designs for different mixing requirements

Non‐Mixing Standard Mixing High Mixing


Mixing ratios
• Standard mixing ratio = 1:10
• For every 10°F of ∆T between hot and cold supply temperatures, 
there will be less than 1°F of variation across the discharge duct 
at a point 4 ft downstream

• High mixing ratio = 1:20
• For every 20°F of ∆T between hot and cold supply temperatures, 
there will be less than 1°F of variation across the discharge duct 
at a point 4 ft downstream
Dual duct VAV (non‐mixing)
• Least common type, rarely used
• Cold (55°F) and hot (90°F) primary air  
from AHU
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 
62.1)
• No simultaneous heating/cooling
• Modulates between design 
heating/cooling (cfm) and minimum 
ventilation (cfm) to maintain room 
temperature setpoint using pressure 
independent control
Dual duct VAV (mixing)
• Most common type
• Cold (55°F) and hot (90°F) primary air 
from AHU
• Serves interior or exterior spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 
62.1)
• High comfort, high operating cost
• Centralized equipment
• Modulates between design 
heating/cooling (cfm) and minimum 
ventilation (cfm) to maintain room 
temperature setpoint using pressure 
independent control
Dual duct CAV
• Very common type
• Cold (55°F) and hot (90°F) primary air 
from AHU
• Serves critical environment spaces
• Provides ventilation (per ASHRAE 62.1 
and ASHRAE 170)
• Modulates between design cooling 
(cfm) and minimum ventilation (cfm) 
to maintain room temperature 
setpoint using pressure independent 
control
Fan‐powered terminals
• Series fan‐powered

• Parallel fan‐powered
Series fan‐powered
• Most common type in tall office 
buildings
• Can provide constant air motion
• Near constant sound levels
• Cold (55°F) air from AHU
• Pulls free heat from ceiling return 
plenum
• Additional heat (electric or hydronic) 
at discharge
• Can be ducted to return air grille 
(healthcare applications)
• Very low inlet pressure requirements
• Can run unit fan to maintain night 
setback temps without AHU
• Dynamic fan sequences can track 
room loads
Series fan‐powered
• Advantages
• Improved room air motion 
due to constant air changes
• Constant sound level
• Reduced inlet pressure 
requirement
• Low noise options

• Disadvantages
• Fan runs continuously
• Fan must handle design 
cooling airflow
Parallel fan‐powered
• Most common type in smaller 
buildings and warmer climates
• Fan is off during cooling mode
• Receives cold (55°F) air from AHU
• Fan energizes for heating mode
• Pulls free heat from ceiling return 
plenum
• Additional heat (electric or 
hydronic) at discharge, hydronic 
usually on induction port
• Higher inlet pressure 
requirements
• Can run unit fan to maintain 
night setback temps without AHU
Parallel fan‐powered
• Advantages
• Fan handles heating design 
airflow only
• Fan only runs during heating
• Very quiet during cooling

• Disadvantages
• Modulating sound level
• Varying airflow on diffusers
• Air leakage 
Series vs. Parallel
• Which fan‐powered unit is more 
energy efficient?
• ASHRAE RP‐1292
• Looked at the entire HVAC system 
and building operation
• Parallel efficiency reduced due to 
primary air leakage
• Roughly equal when properly sized 
and applied
• Only looked at PSC motors
• Consortium report
• New project to look at ECM units
• Series with ECM was a clear winner
Terminal Units –
Standards and
Certification
Randy Zimmerman   |   Chief Engineer
ASHRAE 130
• Laboratory Methods of Testing Air Terminal Units
• Air pressure drop
• Pressure independence
• Casing leakage
• Damper leakage
• Flow sensor
• Temperature mixing
• Condensation
• Fan curves
• Radiated sound
• Discharge sound
• Exhaust sound
Sound Tests
• VAV terminals
• Radiated sound
• Discharge sound
For Low Frequencies
• 3 dB        noticeable

• 5 dB  twice as loud

• 10 dB  four times as loud
Both tones are equally loud
NC Plot 90

NC rating given is NC-45


80 since this is highest point
tangent to an NC curve
NC-70
70

NC-60
60

Octave Band Level


50 NC-50
dB RE 0.0002 Microbar

40
NC-40

30
NC-30

20
Approximate threshold
NC-20
of human hearing
10

63 125 250 500 1K 2K 4K 8K

MID - FREQUENCY, HZ
AHRI 885
• Procedure for Estimating Occupied 
Space Sound Levels in the 
Application of Air Terminals and 
Air Outlets
• Radiated sound path 
• Discharge sound path
• Appendix E provides standard 
attenuation values to be used 
when presenting NC values in 
catalogs
Sound Path Estimation
• AHRI  Standard 885 provides 
sound path and attenuation 
values for
• Lined duct
• Ceiling materials
• Elbows
• Flex duct
• Etc
Catalog Radiated NC Values
• Terminal unit radiated NC 
values based on standard 
assumptions from AHRI 885 
Appendix E
• 3 ft deep ceiling plenum 
with unbounded sides
• 5/8” thick, 20 lb/ft3, mineral 
fiber lay‐in ceiling
Sound Path Estimation

C
SOUND POWER Lw
C =Casing Radiated
and Induction Inlet

D =Discharge Sound

O O =Outlet Generated Sound


AHRI 880
• Performance Rating of Air 
Terminals
• How to present catalog data tested 
in accordance with ASHRAE 130
• Pressure drop
• Air capacity
• Radiated sound power
• Discharge sound power
• Power consumption
• Provides rating points for the 
Directory of Certified Performance
Performance Rating
• Terminal unit performance 
rated per AHRI Standard 
880
• Now includes new end 
reflection loss (ERL) 
correction that must be 
applied to discharge 
sound levels
What is end reflection?
• Occurs when sound source is ducted to room
• Noise reflected back to source
• Not captured in reverb room testing
• Deducted when estimating NC (??????)
• Can be calculated based on duct dimensions

Sound
ERL Room
Source
Typical NC Levels
• Conference Rooms < NC30
• Private offices < NC35
• Open offices = NC40 
• Hallways, utility rooms, rest rooms < NC45
• NC should match purpose of room
• Difficult to achieve less than NC30
• Select diffusers for NC20‐25 (or less)
Attenuators
• Single duct
• Equivalent to lined ductwork
• Dual duct
• Provides temperature mixing, but little 
sound attenuation
• Fan powered
• Lined elbow or “boot” may provide 2dB 
attenuation by removing line of sight to 
motor
• Carefully engineered attenuators can 
provide additional sound reductions
Silencers
• Must be tested with terminal 
unit
• Don’t assume that silencer will provide 
published sound reduction
• A silencer could actually increase 
noise!
• Silencers are tested to a 
different standard
• Silencers work when applied as 
intended
• They perform differently when close 
coupled
Liners
• Softer and thicker liners 
tend to absorb sound
• Lower discharge sound
• Harder or more dense 
liners tend to block or 
reflect sound
• Lower radiated sound
• Higher discharge sound
• Lining effects on fan‐
powered products can 
be hard to predict
Performance certification
• AHRI maintains Directory of Certified 
Product Performance
• Voluntary program
• Manufacturers submit performance at the 
certified rating point
• Annual random samples are tested 
independently
• Failures result in mandatory re‐rating and 
additional testing
• This program keeps manufacturers honest
• But shouldn’t be used to compare most 
products
• Rating points are not always best operating 
points
Safety agency listing
• National Electrical Code (NEC) requires UL 
or ETL listings on all electrical appliances
• UL Standard 1995 covers fan‐powered 
HVAC equipment
• Fan‐powered terminal units
• UL Standard 1996 covers non‐fan electric 
duct heaters
• Single duct terminals with electric heat
• UL Standard 429 covers electrically‐
controlled valves
• Single and dual duct boxes with electronic 
controls
Safety agency listing
• Terminal unit products are typically ETL‐listed
• Less costly and more flexible than working with 
UL
• Faster turnaround for custom designs
• A safety agency listing covers
• Designed in accordance with all applicable UL 
safety standards
• Manufactured using all approved electrical 
components and assembly methods
• Manufactured in a controlled factory 
environment subject to random audit by agency
• Safety tested using approved methods and 
equipment prior to shipping
Safety agency listing
• Things you can do at the jobsite that 
won’t void the safety listing
• Connect approved supply circuit
• Install low voltage controls
• Change out defective parts with 
properly rated replacement parts
• Make minor wiring changes that don’t 
affect electrical ratings
Safety agency listing
• Things you shouldn’t do that will 
void the safety listing
• Connect a supply circuit that 
doesn’t match label requirements
• Install unapproved high voltage 
electrical parts inside the unit
• Change motor/heater voltage, 
motor HP, or heater KW
• Make wiring changes that affect the 
electrical characteristics
Terminal Units –
Features and Options
Randy Zimmerman   |   Chief Engineer
Inlet sensors
• Pitot tube
• Linear Annubar
• Modified Annubar
• Cross‐type
Pitot tube
• Single point sensor
• Measures true velocity pressure 
(no amplification)
• Total pressure port (front), TP
• Static pressure ports (side), SP
• Velocity pressure, VP = TP – SP
• Kfpm = 4005
• Velocity (fpm) = K x VP0.5
Linear annubar
• Multi‐point sensor, linear
• Measures amplified velocity pressure 
• Total pressure ports (front), TP
• Depressed static pressure ports (rear), SP
• Amplified velocity pressure, VP = TP – SP
• Kfpm = 2650
• Velocity (fpm) = K x VP0.5
Modified annubar
• Multi‐point sensor, shaped
• Measures amplified velocity pressure 
• Total pressure ports (front), TP
• Depressed static pressure ports (rear), SP
• Amplified velocity pressure, VP = TP – SP
• Kfpm = 2650
• Velocity (fpm) = K x VP0.5
Cross‐type
• Multi‐point, center‐averaging sensor
• Measures amplified velocity pressure 
• Total pressure ports (front), TP
• Depressed static pressure ports (rear), SP
• Amplified velocity pressure, VP = TP – SP
• Kfpm = 2500
• Velocity (fpm) = K x VP0.5
Dampers
• Round dampers
• Low leakage
• One moving part
• Less chance of failure

• Opposed blade dampers
• Leakage at side and blade seals
• Spot‐welded linkages
• Worn pivot points
Liners
• Traditional liners
• Soft fiberglass
• Rigid fiberglass
• Solid dual wall
• Perforated dual wall
• Innovative liners
• Engineered polymer foam
• Natural fiber
Traditional liners
• Soft fiberglass
• Called dual density or matte‐faced 
fiberglass
• 0.5” or 1.0” thick
• R‐value = 1.9 or 3.9
• Rigid fiberglass
• Called ductboard with scrim‐reinforced 
foil face
• Installed with galvanized Z‐brackets
• 1.0” thick
• R‐value = 4.3
Traditional liners
• Solid dual wall
• 22g galvanized steel over 1.0” thick fiberglass
• R‐value = 3.9
• Perforated dual wall
• 22g perforated galvanized steel over 1.0” thick soft or rigid 
fiberglass
• R‐value = 3.9
• Very costly, creates uncleanable surface
Innovative liners
• Engineered polymer foam insulation
• Called EPFI
• 0.5” or 1.0” thick
• R‐value = 2.0 or 4.0
• Cannot absorb moisture
• Has anti‐microbial agent throughout
• Must be mechanically‐fastened
Innovative liners
• Natural fiber
• Recycled cotton or denim
• Matte‐faced or foil‐faced
• 0.5” or 1.0” thick
• R‐value = 2.0 or 4.0
• Flame‐retardant
• Has anti‐microbial agent 
throughout
Liner standards
• Numerous standards out there
• ASTM C1071 ‘Std Spec for Fibrous Glass Duct 
Lining Insulation’
• ASTM C1104 ‘Std Test Method for Determining the 
Water Vapor Sorption of Unfaced Mineral Fiber 
Insulation’
• ASTM C1338 ‘Std Test Method for Determining the 
Fungi Resistance of Insulation Materials and 
Facings’
• ASTM E84 ‘Std Test Method for Surface Burning 
Characteristics of Building Materials’
• NFPA 90A ‘Std for the Installation of Air 
Conditioning and Ventilating Systems’
• NFPA 90B ‘Std for the Installation of Warm Air 
Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
Liner standards
• Lots of confusion because
• Some standards are material specific
• Some standards are only method of test
• Some standards are referenced in other 
standards
• UL 181 ‘Standard for Factory‐Made Air 
Ducts and Air Connectors’
• Covers everything that manufacturers can use
• References all appropriate test methods
• All materials intended for use as duct or 
equipment lining must meet this standard
LEED and Liners
• Exposed lining materials must comply with 
UL 181 with regard to resistance to air 
erosion and mold growth
• LEED requires the air distribution system 
to comply with ASHRAE 62.1
• Per ASHRAE 62.1, exposed lining 
materials must meet UL 181 with regard 
to resistance to air erosion and mold 
growth
• Every duct lining material should meet 
UL 181 
LEED and Liners
• Is meeting LEED requirements all 
we care about?
• Just because you can put 
exposed fiberglass into a LEED 
Platinum building doesn’t mean 
you should
• Liners such as engineered 
polymer foam and recycled 
natural fiber should provide 
improved indoor air quality 
with little if any added cost
Electric coils
• Staged
• 1, 2, or 3‐stages
• Magnetic contactors for each stage
• Equal stages
• SCR
• Heater control board
• Solid‐state relays (SSR’s)
• Elements arranged as a 1‐stage heater
• Pulsed on/off
• Safety devices
• Airflow switch (ΔP = 0.05 in wg) 
• 115°F auto reset thermal cutouts (per element)
• 160°F manual reset thermal cutout (per heater)
Hot water coils
• Typical construction
• 22g galvanized, uninsulated casing
• 0.0045 rippled aluminum fins
• 10 fins‐per‐inch (FPI) spacing
• 0.5” OD copper circuit tubes with 0.016” tube 
wall
• 1‐row and 2‐row coils are crossflow‐circuited
• 3‐row and 4‐row coils are counterflow‐
circuited
• Leak tested to 450 psi
• Performance rated per AHRI Standard 410
• 200°F maximum water temperature
• 360 psi maximum working pressure
• 1800 psi bursting pressure
Hot water coils
• Options
• Stainless steel, uninsulated casing
• Insulated covers
• Copper fins
• 12 fins‐per‐inch (FPI) spacing
• Circuit tubes with 0.025” tube wall
• 500 psi/2500 psi
• Circuit tubes with 0.035” tube wall
• 850 psi/4250 psi
• NPT fittings
• Vents and drains
Water coil problems
• Water connection
• Water coils should always be supplied at the lowest 
connection
• Prevents air from being trapped in coil circuits
• Low water flow
• Should be at least in the top half of transitional flow
• Coefficient of heat transfer is reduced in the lower 
half
• Minimum gpm is based on Reynolds number
• Affected by altitude, temperature, glycol, etc
• Poorly supported supply lines and water 
hammering
• Can result in stress fractures on header connections
Controls
• Pneumatic
• Electric
• Analog electronic
• Digital electronic
Pneumatic
• Found in existing buildings
• Pressure dependent
• Thermostat and damper actuator
• No controller
• No flow limit settings
• Pressure Independent
• Thermostat, controller, inlet sensor, damper actuator
• Piping and additional components can be complicated
• Powered by compressed air
• 20 psi
• Air system must be clean and dry
• Prevents contamination of controls
Electric
• Rarely used anymore
• Pressure dependent
• Thermostat and damper actuator
• No controller
• No flow limit settings
• Powered by low voltage
• 24 VAC
Analog electronic
• Found in small buildings or tenant 
spaces
• Pressure independent
• Thermostat, controller, inlet 
sensor, damper actuator
• Additional wiring, relays, and 
components can get complicated
• Powered by low voltage
• 24 VAC
• No communication capability, no 
networking
Digital electronic
• Found in most new construction
• Pressure independent
• Room sensor, controller/actuator, 
inlet sensor
• PID control algorithms
• Powered by low voltage
• 24 VAC
• Networked with BMS/BAS
• Communication protocol
• BACnet
• Echelon (Lonmark)
• Proprietary
Fan motors
• Permanent split capacitor (PSC) motors
• Sleeve bearings
• Speed range: 600‐1075 rpm
• Efficiency: 20‐60%
• Service life: 10‐12 years
• Electronically commutated motors (ECMs)
• Ball bearings
• AC/DC rectifier
• Programmable
• Speed range: 300‐1200 rpm
• Efficiency 70‐80%
• Service life: 20‐30 years
Speed controls
• PSC motors use SCR speed controls
• Silicon controlled rectifier (i.e. dimmer 
switch)
• Chops and distorts ac sinewave power
• Good for trimming, not chopping speed
• ECMs use PWM speed controls
• Pulse width modulated signal
• 0‐20 VDC pulses to control module
• Manual adjust models available
• Remote control models available
• Accepts 0‐10 VDC speed control signal
• Allows dynamic fan sequencing
Optional filters
• Optional filters are inexpensive 
disposable type
• Intended to be fitted during construction 
only
• Adequate to prevent dust contamination 
of motor and blower
• Most terminal units are operated without 
filters
• Hot water coils do not collect dust like 
condensing coils
• Accessibility of terminal units is a problem
• Terminal units should require zero 
maintenance
• Performance data never includes filters
Optional filters
• If filtering of return is necessary 
or desired
• Use filter grilles in the ceiling
• Provides easy access
• Allows for larger filters in less
costly standard sizes
MERV‐rated filters
• MERV‐rated filters are available
• Most terminal units were never designed 
to use MERV‐rated filters
• Will likely reduce the maximum fan 
capacity
• Could create problems
• Sometimes design changes necessary
• Angled filter racks can enlarge filter area
Low profile
• Low profile terminal units were 
originally developed for the 
Washington, DC market
• High real estate cost
• Building height restrictions
• 12” ceiling plenums
• Product can be no more than 10.5” 
tall
• Low profile results in
• Lower airflow capacities
• Higher pressure drops
• Higher sound levels
• Also used in retrofit applications 
where space is tight
Low temperature
• Some systems are designed to 
operate with low temp air
• Typically use ice storage
• Supply temperatures as low as 38°F
• Lower air volumes and smaller 
ductwork
• Special terminal units
• Heavier liners for higher R‐value
• Thermally‐isolated inlet collars
• Standard single duct VAV boxes with 
0.5” lining can handle
• 40°F supply air
• 80°F plenum air
• 60% RH
Low temperature
• Recommendations for low temperature 
buildings
• Order terminal units with 1.0” thick 
liners (R‐value = 3.9‐4.3)
• Use a ceiling plenum return
• Protects ductwork from stagnant air
• Do a ‘soft start’ and gradually drop the 
supply temperature
• Allows the building to dry out
• Design the building to operate under 
positive pressure
• Prevents outdoor air infiltration
• Low temperature buildings are typically 
dry by nature, so condensation is not a 
major problem
Underfloor
• Underfloor terminals are usually 
fan‐powered units designed to 
boost airflow to spaces in UFAD 
systems
• Must fit between floor pedestals
• Must be serviceable from above
• Should be designed for zero 
maintenance
Terminal Units –
Selection and Sizing
Randy Zimmerman   |   Chief Engineer
Inlet selection
• Inlets should be selected carefully for
• Low noise levels
• Low pressure drop
• Accurate flow control
• VAV inlets should be selected for
• Maximum inlet velocity as close to 2000 fpm as possible
• Allows an 85% turndown with no loss of control accuracy
• CAV inlets allow much more flexibility
• Maximum inlet range of 1000‐2000 fpm
Operating pressures
• Inlet static pressure
• Most VAV systems operate at 1.0‐1.5 in wg
• Systems with series fan‐powered could be as low as 0.5 in wg
• Downstream static pressure
• Ductwork, take‐offs, balancing dampers, flex duct, and diffusers
• Most selections assume 0.25 in wg
• Minimum pressure requirement
• Min ΔPs across box with damper wide open including any coils
• Inlet SP > Min ΔPs + Downstream SP
Fan selection
PSC Fan Curve ECM Fan Curve
Fan selection
• Fan selection depends on the type of 
motor
• Most selections are made with 0.25 
in wg downstream
• Actual conditions are often 0.10 in wg
or less Selected
• Selecting PSC units near the minimum  Actual
curve could easily put the fan outside 
its recommended operating range
Fan selection
• PSC fan motors should be selected 
in the top 25% of range
• Allows motor to run cooler and 
more efficiently
• Oversized motors running at low 
speed create rumbly noise
Fan selection
• ECMs should be selected in the 
lower 50% of range
• Oddly enough they run more 
quietly and efficiently at low 
speed
Electric coil selection
• Terminal units are generally limited to a current draw 
of 48A
• UL 1995 and 1996 require subdivided circuitry and 
additional fusing to exceed 48A
• Voltages and phases must increase as KW’s increase
• Fan motor current must also be included
• Power frequency (Hz) does not affect electric coils
• Only affects inductive loads, not resistive loads
• Limit discharge temperature
• UL – Maximum discharge temperature = 120°F
• ASHRAE ‐ Overhead heating < 15°F above desired 
room temperature
• Don’t exceed 100°F to prevent intermittent operation 
and overheating of elements
Electric coil selection
• Be careful with small KW requirements
• Element wire gets smaller as KW gets 
smaller and voltage/phase increases
• Small heaters should 
• Be lowest voltage, single phase, and 
single stage (or SCR)
• Staged heat – on/off
• How many stages?
• SCR heat – modulating
• Input signal?
• Discharge air temperature sensor?
Heat vs. reheat
• Sensible heating
• MBH = 1.08 x cfm x (LAT – EAT)/1000
• Heating is more efficient than reheating
• Supply air must be brought up to room 
temperature before heating can begin
• Desired room temp = 72°F
• Supply air = 55°F
• Heating design airflow = 800 cfm
• MBH (reheat) = 1.08 x 800 x (72‐55)/1000 = 14.6
• LAT should not exceed 90°F for good thermal 
comfort
• MBH (heating) = 1.08 x 800 x (90‐72)/1000 = 15.6
• In this example it takes 30.2 MBH at the coil to 
provide 15.6 MBH to the room
Heat vs. reheat
• Fan‐powered terminals
• Pull warm return air from 
ceiling return plenums or filter 
grilles
• Return air is warmer than room 
air
• Free heat (minus fan energy)
• Can switch on independently 
(no AHU) to maintain night 
setback temperatures 
Hot water coil selection
Too much information Really need to know
• Entering water  • Entering water
• Entering air  • Entering air
• Leaving water  • Airflow 
• Leaving air  • Capacity or Leaving air 
• Capacity 
• Water flow – Max
• Airflow 
• Air pressure drop – Max
• Water flow 
• Air pressure drop  • Water pressure drop – Max
• Water pressure drop  • Leaving water – Min
Hot water coil selection
• Hot water coil selection shouldn’t be that hard
• Select a coil that meets or exceeds the desired 
capacity or leaving air temp with exceeding 
the maximum water flow
• How many rows should I select?
• Coils are generally available in 1, 2, 3, or 4‐rows
• Everyone avoids 3‐row and 4‐row coils
• Select a 1‐row or 2‐row coil
• If the selection software says your water flow 
is too low
• You need to reduce the coil rows
• If you are already selecting a 1‐row coil, you 
didn’t really want much heat anyway
• Don’t forget about 12‐FPI coils
Terminal Units –
Installation
Randy Zimmerman   |   Chief Engineer
Hanging terminal units
• Optional OEM hanger brackets
• Typically have 0.50” round or slotted 
hole
• Intended for use with hanger rods
• Hanger straps
• Strips of galvanized steel
• Run down the sides of unit, fastened 
with screws
• Trapeze hanger
• Angled or square tubular steel
• Used with hanger rods
• Run under units
• Not ideal – can limit accessibility
Hanging terminal units
• What about spring isolation hangers?
• Not required to achieve catalog 
performance
• All hanging methods must meet local code 
requirements
• Can provide extra protection from 
vibration (especially on fan‐powered units)
Can I hang a box upside down?
• That depends
• Single duct without coil = YES, no problem
• Single duct with hot water coil = YES, supply to lowest connection
• Single duct with electric coil = YES, labels with be upside down
• Exhaust terminals = YES, no problem
• Dual duct = YES, no problem
• Series fan‐powered = YES, but access doors may be on top only
• Parallel fan‐powered = YES, but backdraft damper may require 
modification and access doors may be on top only. 
• Retrofit terminals = YES, no problem
Can I turn a box on its side?
• That depends
• Single duct without coil = YES, no problem
• Single duct with hot water coil = NO, coil circuits will trap air
• Single duct with electric coil = YES, airflow switch must be moved
• Exhaust terminals = YES, no problem
• Dual duct = YES, no problem
• Series fan‐powered = YES, no problem unless it has a water coil
• Parallel fan‐powered = NO, backdraft damper won’t close 
• Retrofit terminals = YES, no problem
Can a box discharge up/down?
• That depends
• Single duct without coil = YES, no problem
• Single duct with hot water coil = NO, coil circuits will trap air
• Single duct with electric coil = YES, no problem
• Exhaust terminals = YES, no problem
• Dual duct = YES, no problem
• Series fan‐powered = YES, no problem unless it has a water coil
• Parallel fan‐powered = NO, backdraft damper won’t close 
• Retrofit terminals = YES, no problem
Picture time
Picture time
Electrical installation
• Supply circuit at a minimum must meet 
current NEC requirements
• Wire type and gauge
• Circuit breaker type and size
• Local code may have additional 
requirements for safety
• Must follow electrical data label on all 
installed equipment
Electrical ratings
• Motor full load amps (FLA)
• Motor nameplate or ‘as tested’
• Heater full load amps (FLA)
• Single‐phase, i = w/v
• Three‐phase, i = w/(v x 1.73)
• Unit full load amps (FLA)
• Unit (FLA) = motor #1 (FLA) + motor #2 (FLA) + heater (FLA)
• Minimum circuit ampacity (MCA)
• MCA = 1.25 x [motor #1 (FLA) + motor #2 (FLA) + heater (FLA)]
• Maximum overcurrent protection (MOP)
• MOP = 2.25 x motor #1 (FLA) + [motor #2 (FLA) + heater (FLA)]
Electrical ratings
• Minimum circuit ampacity (MCA)
• Defines minimum supply circuit size
• All supply circuit component ratings > MCA
• Maximum overcurrent protection (MOP)
• Prevents oversized circuit breakers
• MOP > MCA
• MOP > 15A
• Standard circuit breaker sizes
• 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60A
• 15A rarely used in commercial construction
• 15A MOP units can be supplied with 20A breakers
• Breakers can go up one size so long as < 600A
Electrical ratings
• Optional fuses and fused disconnect 
switches
• Do not affect unit electrical ratings
• Same calculations as units without
• May or may not meet local disconnect 
switch requirements
• Supply circuit overcurrent protection is 
always external
• Connection lugs will not accommodate 
oversized wire
Electrical ratings
• Three‐phase power
• 3‐wire or 4‐wire?
• 4‐wire is the current standard
• 3‐wire found in older cities, some 
rural areas, and automobile 
assembly plants (?)
• 3‐wire = L1, L2, L3 (three hot legs)
• 4‐wire = L1, L2, L3, N (three hot 
legs and neutral)
• Neutral is an unbroken ground 
path to the breaker panel
• Delta = 208V or 480V, 3‐wire
• Wye = 480V, 3‐wire or 4‐wire
Inlet conditions
• SMACNA recommends a minimum of 3‐4 equivalent duct 
diameters of straight approach
• Not always possible
• Cross‐type sensors can reduce inaccuracy
• Bulkhead transitions are better than tapered transitions
Discharge ductwork
• Discharge ductwork isn’t a critical concern
• No more than 1000 fpm
• Best to have some straight duct before an elbow
• Don’t put flex duct directly on unit discharge
• Best to have at least 4’ of lined duct before the first diffuser take‐
off, especially on fan‐powered units
Questions?
Displacement Ventilation

David Pich P.E. LEED AP
Director of HVAC Technology

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation Systems

• Comfort & Contaminates

• Basic Concepts & System Benefits

• Outlet Types and Air Patterns

• Example Space Layouts

• Displacement & LEED

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
ASHRAE Handbook –
2015 Application Ch. 57
Fully Stratified Fully Mixed

Displacement G.R.D.

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Thermal Comfort
• ASHRAE Standard 55 – Thermal Environmental 
Conditions for Human Occupancy
• Maximum ∆t Ankle to Neck = 5.4°F (3.0°)
• Avoid drafts by keeping ∆tse < 36°F (18°C)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Fully Mixed Air Distribution
• Cooling Supply Air 48‐58 °F (8.9 ‐ 14.4 °C); 
Heating 85‐90 °F (29.4 – 32.2 °C)

• High Velocity Supply Outside Occupied Zone

• Minimizes Temp. Variations in Space

• Uniform Contaminate Concentration

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Fully Mixed Air Distribution

Mixed Air Distribution Mixed Contaminates

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Fully Stratified Air Distribution
• Cool Air Supply Only  60°F ‐ 68°F (16°C ‐ 20°C )

• Air is Supplied Horizontally across the Floor at 
Low Velocity < 70 fpm (0.36 m/s)

• Temperature Stratification from Floor to 
Ceiling (Return)

• Contaminate Concentration reduced in 
Occupied Zone
© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Fully Stratified Air Distribution

Fully Stratified Fully Stratified


Air Distribution Contaminates
© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Adjacent Zone

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation

Basic Concepts
&
System Benefits

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Basic System Concepts

• Low Energy
• ( < 0.04 Ps) (10Pa)

• Air Change Effectiveness
• (Std. 62.1, Ez = 1.2)

• Quiet Operation
• (< 25 NC)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Cooling
Displacement Stratification
Low Energy
• Higher Equipment Efficiency
• Uses warmer supply air
• 65 F (18 C) compared with 55 F (13 C)
• Energy consumption is often reduced by 
raising discharge temperatures
• Extended Economizer Cycle

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
HVAC System Benefits
• Heat sources outside the 
stratification layer are not 
considered in airflow calculations
• Lighting load is designed as “equipment load”, but 
not as “space load”

• Effects cooling load capacity, but not air distribution 
capacity

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Low Energy
• Lower horsepower fans
• 0.04 in. pressure (10 Pa) is required for proper 
diffuser performance

• Results in lower horsepower fans required = Fan 
Energy Savings

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Improved Ventilation
• ASHRAE Standard 62.1 ‐ Ventilation 
for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality
• Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness, Ez
• Overhead Cooling System = 1.0
• Displacement Ventilation = 1.2
• 16.7% Less Fresh Air Required

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Return Air
• Outlet located 
at ceiling level

• Allows heat from ceiling 
lights to be returned 
before it is able to mix 
with occupied zone

• Reduced supply volume 
means higher return 
temperatures

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Humidity
• A potential problem with warmer supply air 
temperatures is higher humidity

• Supply system must reduce relative humidity to less 
than 60% to meet IAQ concerns
• Condenser water reheat, run‐around coils, or face & bypass

• Use of a separate system to dry outside air or the 
use of desiccant dehumidification
• If 55oF (13oC) supply air is used for dehumidification, 
return air can be mixed with supply air to achieve 65oF 
(18oC) air

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Temperature Gradient

• Ceiling Height 
9’(2.75m)‐14’(4.25m)

• 50% Rule is applied

• 62°F – 72°F – 82°F


10°F ‐ 10°F
REHVA Guide

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Temperature Gradient

• Ceiling Height 
> 14’ (4.25m)  
33% Rule 
• 64°F ‐ 72°F ‐ 86°F,
8°F ‐ 14°F

REHVA Guide
(Displacement ventilation, REHVA)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Application Examples
• Good applications
• Room height > 9.0 ft (2.75m)
• Open Plan Offices
• Meeting Rooms
• Casinos
• Restaurants
• Theaters, & Auditoriums
• Schools & Universities

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Application Examples
Best Applications = Big Spaces

• Room height > 9.0 ft
• Open Plan Offices
• Atriums and Lobbies
• Restaurants and Casinos
• Theaters and Auditoriums
• Classrooms and Meeting Rooms
• Airports and Train Stations
• Museums and Public Spaces

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation
• Advantages

• Smaller cooling power for desired room       
temperature in the occupied area

• Improved air quality in occupied area

• Longer periods of free cooling

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Application Examples

• Poor Applications
• Room height < 9 ft
• Surplus heat is the main 
problem – not air quality
• Contaminants are heavier 
than air (chloramine)
• In combination with mixing systems

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation
• Disadvantages
• Risk of draft due to placement of the diffusers
• Wall mounted devices often occupy large wall areas

• Stratified air becomes uncomfortable when  cooling load 
exceeds ~30 Btu/hr/ft2 (0.095/kW/m2)

• Cannot heat with displacement ventilation

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Perimeter Heating
• Perimeter heating can not be accomplished with 
traditional displacement ventilation 

• Separate system required in most applications:
• UFAD perimeter system
• Perimeter fan powered systems
• Ducting of hot or reheated air
• Baseboard Radiation
• Radiant panels
• Dual Chamber Diffuser

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Dual Chamber Diffuser
Dual chamber plenum

 Displacement cooling
 Mixed-air heating
 Actuated diverter (24V)

Displacement diffuser – cooling

Linear diffuser – heating

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Low Level Mixed Heating
Applications – Classroom
• The Willard School – Near Boston, MA 
• Built in accordance with California  K12 specifications. 
• Each class room has 2 DV units, +/‐ 3° F thermostat and CO2 sensor
• Dedicated OAH, Radiant Ceiling 
• (68) DVIR Units  
• W 60” x H 24”

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
DV – Heating and Cooling Mode

www.titus‐hvac.com
Heating Mode Cooling Mode 31
Typical Classroom Zone
• Perimeter Zone
• Heating

• Internal Zone
• High Concentration of CO2
• 20 CFM per Student – Mixing System
• 12.5 CFM per Student – DV System
• Sensible and Latent Cooling Load

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Design Principles
• Induction Nozzles ‐ CB

• Stratified Air Discharge – DV

• Integral Heat Transfer Coils

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
TAO – Section View

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Cooling mode operation
Return Air
100%
Exhausted

Supply Airflow
(70 to 71 ºF)

Primary Airflow
(55 to 58ºF) Room Air
(75ºF)

Chilled Water

Supply Airflow
(62 to 63ºF)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Video ‐ Cooling

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Heating mode operation
Exhausted

Optional Heat
Recovery
Supply Airflow
(85to 92ºF)

Room Air
Primary Airflow
(70 to 72ºF)
(62 to 66ºF)

Supply Airflow
(67 to 70ºF)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Heating Video

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Cooling
Only

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Combining with
GEOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS

Utilize the Ground “Earth” for “Free” sensible cooling.


45 to 55 Ground Temperature

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved

40
© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved 41
Patient Room w/ Displacement
• Single Bed Rooms Only

• ACH 
• 6 total/2 outdoor
• Total ACH volume: floor to 6ft

• Stipulations for use
• Room exhaust 
• Toilet transfer grille

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Patient Room w/ Displacement

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation

Types of Outlets
&
Distribution Patterns

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Discharge Air Patterns

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers

Standard adjacent 
zone from factory

Modified 
adjacent zone 
after adjusting 
pattern 
controllers to 
change pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Rectangular

• Mounts in wall
• 1–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers

Rectangular

• Mounts in wall
• 1–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Rectangular

• Rectangular 
• In wall, flush 
or floor mount

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Rectangular 3‐Way

• Rectangular 
• Flush to wall or floor mount
• 3–way pattern 

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Rectangular ‐ Curved Face
• Flush or floor mount
• 3–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Rectangular 
“Stair Riser”

• Steps, Stair Risers 
applications 
• Great for auditoriums, 
concert, arena’s, 
and lecture halls

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers

Circular
• Column or floor mount
• 360º discharge

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Semi‐Circular 180º
• Sidewall or column 
applications
• 180º pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
U – shaped

• Semi‐circular w straight 
sides
• 3–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Corner/Flat Face

• Corner mount 
applications
• 2–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Diffusers
Corner w/ 
Curved Face

• Corner mount 
applications
• 2–way pattern

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement Ventilation

EXAMPLE 
Space 
Layouts

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Private Perimeter Office

Perimeter Wall

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Open Plan Interior Office

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Interior Break Room
61

Round
Outlets

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Perimeter Conference Room
Outside Wall

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Elementary School Classroom

Perimeter Wall

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
ASHRAE Standards
for LEED
• ASHRAE 62.1
• IEQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum IAQ Performance
• IEQ Credit 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring
• IEQ Credit 2: Increased Ventilation
• IEQ Credit 6.2: Controllability of Systems: Thermal 
Comfort (for naturally ventilated spaces)

• ASHRAE Standard 55
• IEQ Credit 6.2: Controllability of Systems: Thermal 
Comfort
• IEQ Credit 7.1: Thermal Comfort: Design
• IEQ Credit 7.2: Thermal Comfort: Verification

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Displacement
Ventilation & LEED

• Minimum Energy Performance:  EAp2
• Optimize Energy Performance: EAc1  
• Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance: IEQ p1
• Increased Ventilation: IEQc2  
• Thermal Comfort Design: IEQc7.1  

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Publications
• HVAC Applications Handbook, Chapter 57 (ASHRAE, 2015)
• Fundamentals Handbook, Chapter 20 (ASHRAE, 2009)
• System Performance Evaluation and Guidelines 
for Displacement Ventilation (ASHRAE, 2003)
• Displacement Ventilation in Non‐Industrial Premises (REHVA, 2002)

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Questions?

© Copyright Titus 2016 | All rights reserved
Underfloor Air Distribution

David Pich P.E. LEED AP
Director of HVAC Technology

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Raised access floors
 Originally used in computer rooms

 Widely used in open plan offices


since 1995

 House power voice and data


cabling

 Benefits of RAF systems


• Easy access to cabling
• Eliminates power poles in space
• Simplifies service reconfiguration

 Issues with RAF systems
• Cost ($9 to $12/ft2 cost add)
• Reduced floor to ceiling height
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Room air distribution

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Mixed air systems
TSHG
CFM =
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)

75ºF
Local temperature

TROOM ≈ TRETURN
TSHG
CFM =

Elevation
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)
75ºF

Occupied
Zone

75ºF

Local Temperature

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Mixed air systems
Per ASHRAE 62.1-2013 VEZ = 1.2

CRETURN - CSUPPLY
VEFF = ≤ 1
CROOM - CSUPPLY

Local temperature
CROOM ≈ CRETURN
TSHG
CFM =

Elevation
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)

Occupied
Zone

Local CO2 Concentration

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Room air distribution

Totally
Stratified Fully
Systems Mixed
Systems

Displacement Dilution
Ventilation Ventilation

 Overhead delivery
 55°F supply air
 High entrainment

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Thermal displacement systems
Displacement Conditioning

Heat Source

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Thermal displacement systems
TSHG
CFM =
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)
82ºF

82ºF
TFLOOR ≤ TROOM ≤ TCEILING

Elevation
77ºF 77ºF

Occupied
1.1 m Zone
64ºF 73ºF 64ºF 73ºF

Local temperature

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Thermal displacement systems
Per ASHRAE 62.1-2013 VEZ = 1.2
CRETURN -CSUPPLY
VEZ =
C1.1 - CSUPPLY
82ºF

CFLOOR ≤ CROOM ≤
CCETURN

Elevation
77ºF

Occupied
1.1 m Zone
64ºF 73ºF

CO2 Concentration

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD systems
TSHG
CFM =
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)

81ºF
Stagnant Zone TFLOOR ≤ TROOM ≤ TCEILING

Stratified Zone

Elevation
75ºF

T50 T50

Mixed
Occupied
Zone Zone

63ºF

Local temperature

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD systems
Per ASHRAE 62.1-2013 VEZ = 1.2
CRETURN -CSUPPLY
VEZ =
C1.1 - CSUPPLY

Stagnant Zone CFLOOR ≤ CROOM ≤


CCETURN

Stratified Zone

Elevation
T50 T50

Mixed
Occupied
Zone Zone

CO2 Concentration

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD systems

“UFAD” and “displacement” are not 
interchangeable terms
Totally Fully
Stratified Mixed
Systems Systems

Displacement Dilution
Ventilation UFAD Systems Ventilation

ASHRAE Standard 62.1‐2010 (addendum a) awards a zone ventilation effectiveness of 1.2 to 
UFAD outlets whose throw to 50 FPM does not exceed 4.5 feet

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD systems
TSHG
CFM =
1.08 x (TRETURN – TSUPPLY)

Stagnant Zone 77ºF

T50 Stratified Zone T50

Mixed

Elevation
Zone 75ºF

Occupied
Zone

63ºF

Local temperature

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


ASHRAE UFAD Design Tool
300 ft2 interior zone, 12 Btu/h-ft2

Requires 198
CFM (3 swirl
diffusers)

Requires 250 Additional 52 CFM


CFM (2 square (26% more)
diffusers)

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD systems

Per ASHRAE 62.1-2013 VEZ = 1.0

Stratified Zone CROOM ≈ CRETURN


T50 T50

Elevation
Mixed
Zone
Occupied
Zone

Local CO2 Concentration

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Drivers behind UFAD systems
 Compliment to RAF system
• Flexibility extends to HVAC services
• Economic justification

 Improved workplace environment
• Enhanced contaminant removal
• Individual thermal comfort control

 Sustainable technology

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Key advantages of UFAD systems
 Energy and operational advantages
• UFAD systems with low projection outlets allow heat from sources above the occupied zone to 
escape naturally 
• UFAD systems extend the flexibility of the RAF platform to mechanical services

 Thermal comfort
• Thermal comfort is a “state of mind”, thermostats represent a “statistical population”
• UFAD outlets allow occupants to adjust airflow rates according to their individual preference!
• The “placebo” effect”

 Health and productivity improvements
• Improved IEQ
• Increased productivity
• (2% increase = $10/ft2‐yr)

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD system design
Floor cavity as a supply air 
plenum
• Pressurization
• Heat transfer
Outlet selection and 
performance

Zone temperature control 

Plenum control strategies

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


ASHRAE Underfloor Air Design Guide

• Contribution by industry experts
• Architects and consulting engineers
• Research institutions
• Owners representatives, including the GSA
• Equipment and raised floor manufacturers
• Building commissioning agents
• Specific guidance
• Room air distribution with UFAD systems
• Plenum design and construction (includes leakage prevention)
• Installation and commissioning
• System design and operation
• Code compliance and life safety

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Plenum thermal decay
 Supply air passing over the slab is 
heated by the return air below

 Design Guide suggests air 
temperature rises of up to 8˚F in 
UFAD plenum

 Warmer perimeter area supply air 
temperatures result in lower ΔT 
thus require more supply air

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Temperature control and zoning

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Sensible cooling with passive beams

Perimeter Zone

Reduction of overall UFAD system airflow rate by 50% or more

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐R Access Floor Diffuser
• High induction air flow pattern
• Occupant adjustable damper
• Actuated version available
• Typical design point is 80‐100 cfm
• Throw between 4‐5 ft.
• Low NC
• Standard and UL listed 
fire rated versions

www.GreenSpec.com

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐R Access Floor Diffuser
• 1 diffuser per cubicle
• EQ Credit 6.2 ‐ 1 Point
• Individual comfort control

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐R Installation
• Spring clip compression fit
• Pre‐assembled 
• Pressing directly into floor

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAFR Actuated Option

• 24 VAC Electric Actuator
• RJ12 connections
• Plug and play installation

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐R Interconnect Diagram

JCI TEC
3000
Series
Controller

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Perimeter Heating
• Perimeter heating cannot be accomplished with the same 
system as the interior cooling system

• Separate system is required:
• Perimeter fan powered systems
• Ducting of hot or reheated air
• Hydronic systems
• Radiant panels

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Perimeter Loads
• UFAD systems are typically modular, but the function of 
handling perimeter loads isn’t modular

• Do not want to break the stratification layer

• Create a diffuser plume that:
• Handles high thermal loads
• 225 cfm per 4' length at 0.07" w.c.
• Engages occupied zone, not stratified ceiling layer 
• Saves cooling energy
• Avoids occupant complaints from air rolling back, dumping into interior space

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Typical Perimeter Installation
• Low horsepower fan powered terminal unit ducted to 
rectangular floor diffuser plenums

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐V, TAF‐D, TAF‐HC Plenums
• Rectangular diffuser and plenums 
for various applications
• TAF‐V – VAV Plenum
• TAF‐D – Plenum with inlet for ducting www.GreenSpec.com

• TAF‐HC – heating / cooling VAV plenum

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐V, TAF‐D, TAF‐HC Plenums
• Plenum sizes vary
• 8” x 16”
• 10” x 10”
• 12” x 12”

• Cores are available in multi‐piece
• 2‐way or 4 way blow

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD Fan Powered Terminals
• Modular ‐ designed to fit between floor 
pedestals
• Series fan powered terminal & Booster fan

• Available with ultra high efficiency ECM motors
• Helps contribute to LEED EA Credit 1 ‐ Optimize Energy 
Performance 

• Hot water and electric reheat
• Using Lynergy Comfort Controls heater with optional discharge 
temperature sensor can help meet 
ASHRAE 62 recommendation for 15o T 
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
LHK – Series Fan Terminal
• Used in perimeter and conference rooms 
• Any room with varying loads

• Primary supply 
air damper 
• Supply pulls from the floor
• AeroCrossTM flow sensor
• Option for two dampers

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


PFC ‐ Booster Box
• Designed for use with ECM to modulate 
the fan based on perimeter temperature 
conditions
• 30% fan at 70°F and 100% at 75°F 
• Can provide reduced airflow to allow for simultaneous 
cooling and heating per ASHRAE 90.1

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Underfloor TAF‐L System

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐L‐V (Cooling Section)
• TAF‐L‐V
• Linear diffuser 4’ length
• Variable linear bar diffuser
• 24V damper actuator

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


Transverse
TransverseApertures
Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Transverse Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Transverse Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Transverse Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Transverse Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
Multi-deflection Bar Grille

Transverse Apertures
© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
TAF‐L Demo Video

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐L‐W & TAF‐L‐E
• Fin tube perimeter heat system
• Self contained heating
• No simultaneous cooling and reheat
• Per ASHRAE 90.1
• 3000+ BTUH per 4 ft. plenum

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐L‐W & TAF‐L‐E

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


TAF‐L‐E SMOKE VIDEO

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


UFAD Controls
• Interior Zones (CAV)

• Plenum pressure is maintained by adjusting fan 
capacity at the air handler
• Occupants can make minor changes which are viewed as 
setup adjustments and not operating adjustment

• Perimeter Zones (VAV)

• Typically experience perimeter load changes more 
than interior
• Automatic VAV control is preferred for perimeter zones

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved
TAF‐G Access Floor Diffuser
• Through‐the‐floor  cabling
• Phone/data/power

• Grommet for small cabling

© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved


© Copyright Titus 2017 | All rights reserved