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MATERIAL
SELF
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People have a core set


of behaviour,
attitudes, beliefs, and
values that constitute
their selves.
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WILLIAM JAMES

BODY HOUSE

“Man’s self is the sum


total of all that he can call
his” REPUTATIO
CLOTHES
N
FAMILY
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If the grew, their owners


felt triumphant. If they
faded, people felt a part of
themselves was dying.

(Trentman,2016)
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Do our possessions
define us?
WHY?
WHY NOT?
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Curtis (2017)-cash can have bearing one’s


belief regarding the way a person views
himself/herself
The following are evidences behind the idea that money
truly can change people:

A. SOCIAL AND BUSINESS VALUE

 Social value
By recognizing a task’s social value a person sees it as a
worthy investment of time and a part of his/her social duty,
and he/she is usually happy to help out.
 Money
When money is offered as the motivation, however, people
then sat thinking less of the social aspect and more about
the business value
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The following are evidences behind the idea that money


truly can change people:

B. Self Sufficiency and Service


 Money-conscious individuals are more self-
sufficient than their peers, particularly when
money is made the focus.

When given a very difficult and even impossible


task, with instructions that help was available, it
was the money-related group that seems the most
intent on getting the job done alone
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The following are evidences behind the idea that money


truly can change people:

C. Self-view
Class essentialism – the idea that differences between
classes are based upon identity and genetics, rather than
circumstance.

Rich people -wealth was part of genes and identity, that


they were entitled to wealth based upon their personal
circumstances and actions.
“ life is fair and people mostly get what they
deserve”
Poor people - anyone can be rich and anyone can be poor.
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The following are evidences behind the idea that money


truly can change people:

D. Ethics

 Those who perceive themselves to be in a


higher class were most likely to engage in
unethical behaviour, particularly when a symbol
of wealth is introduced e.g. cutting off a
pedestrian when in a luxury car.

Self-maximization
“what’s in it for me?” attitude
They actively work toward the most benefit for
themselves.
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The following are evidences behind the idea that money


truly can change people:

E. Addiction
Many addictions begin because a person
gets a positive response from a certain type
of behaviour.

Behavioral or process addiction


a compulsive not motivated by dependency
on an addictive substance, but rather by the
process that leads to a seemingly positive
outcome.
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SHAPING THE WAY WE SEE OURSELVES: The Roles of Consumer Culture on Our
Sense of Self and Identity Lifted from Understanding the Self
by Villafuerte, S., Quilope, A., Tunac, R. and Borja, E. (2018)

POSSESSIONS AND THE EXTENDED SELF

If possessions are viewed


as part of the self, it Examples:
follows that an • mental hospitals
• prisons
unintentional loss of
• concentration camps
possessions should be • military training camps
regarded as loss or
lessening of self
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POSSESSIONS AND THE EXTENDED SELF

When possessions are lost due to theft or casualty.

 Handbag snatching can produce not only a financial


but also emotional, long term effects on victims.

 Losing photographs of loved ones that are often


carried in a purse may cause victims sense of
security impaired

 Those who lost possessions to a natural disasters


went through a process of grief similar to that of
losing a loved one.
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Research findings(Dinisman,2017)

✖ It may cause the victims’ sense of security impaired


✖ They tend to distrust and feel suspicious towards
other people
✖ Develop a fear in walking in public
✖ Victims describe possession as having high
sentimental value and being much more than
functional.
✖ They feel the loss as a threat to their self- identity,
which strong negative emotional reactions
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SPECIAL CASES OF EXTENDED SELF

1. Collections (I shop, therefore, I am)


a. The cultivation of a collection is a purposeful self-defining act.

b. Many collectors who are inhibited and uncomfortable in social


Let’s start with the first set of slides
interaction, surround themselves with favoured objects upon
which they project human-like qualities. They practically talk to
these objects; they find comfort in being with them and regard
them as friends (Goldberg & Lewis, 1978).

c. Collections may be seen as transition objects or security


blankets for adults.
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SPECIAL CASES OF EXTENDED SELF

2. Pets

a. Pets are regarded as family members


b. It is significant that we name our pets, feed them,
sleep and play with them, and mourn their death
c. In some cases,Let’sthestart
mourning that comes with the
with the first set of slides
death of the pet is similar to the loss of a home or the
loss of a limb
d. Pets are so instrumental to self-identity that they are
often useful as transition objects (surrogate parents)
for children and as surrogate children for adults.
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3. Body parts

In psychoanalytic terms, such self extension is called


cathexis.
- It involves the charging of an object, activity, or
idea with emotional energy by the individual.
- The women generally tend to cathect body
parts to a greater degree than men and that
such cathexis reflects self -acceptance.
- When a body part is more highly cathected,
there is greater use of grooming products to
care for this part of the body.
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MATERIALISM

o a tendency to consider Cycle of work


material possessions and spend
and physical comfort as
“work more
more important than to buy
spiritual values more”
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VARIOUS WAY TO APPRECIATE OUR OWN UNIQUENESS AND
BE GENUINELY JOYOUS ABOUT IT.
Lifted from Understanding the Self: Developing Life Skills by Magalona, E., Sadsad, E., and Cruz, E (2018)

1. Learn to share your blessings no matter how simple it


is.
2. Improve your self-esteem and self-worth by engaging
in worthwhile activities.
3. Learn to communicate and relate with people around
you.
4. Take time to appreciate the beauty of life and God’s
creations.
5. Be grateful to those who compliment you by returning
the favour.
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VARIOUS WAY TO APPRECIATE OUR OWN UNIQUENESS AND
BE GENUINELY JOYOUS ABOUT IT.
Lifted from Understanding the Self: Developing Life Skills by Magalona, E., Sadsad, E., and Cruz, E (2018)

6. Focus on your strengths and not on your flaws.


7. Stop projecting on media accounts about what you
have and others do not.
8. Learn to let go of things that are not significantly
needed,
9. Develop a mantra to counter the negativities entering
your thoughts.
10.Stop brewing on negativities and on hurtful past.
Focus on the future and what you can do to be
productive and happy.