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GLOBAL

HEALTH & SAFETY


DOCUMENTS
2015
HEALTH & SAFETY

Health&Safety.Corporate@snclavalin.com
Objectives
HEALTH AND SAFETY
OBJECTIVES
2014
2015
2015 HEALTH & SAFETY OBJECTIVES

Objectives
LEADING INDICATORS
1) Behavior Intervention Program (BIP)
ƒ Objective: To proactively target behaviors / conditions through documented safety observations and interventions.
Target: 1 BIP card completed per 1,000 hours worked; Measure = Number of BIP cards completed / Hours worked.
2) Self-Audits
ƒ Objective: To evaluate (>12,000 hrs) alignment to the Global Health & Safety Management System. Target: 1 Self-
audit uploaded to the HSES database monthly (doc # 6852.2.1); Measure = Number of self-audits uploaded / Number
of projects.
3) Imminent Dangers
ƒ Objective: Increase recognition and prevention activities prior to incidents occurring. Target: 1 Imminent Danger
reported per 5,000 monthly hours worked (form # 6853.3.1); Measure = Number of imminent dangers reported /
Hours worked.
4) Lessons Learned
ƒ Objective: Widely communicate lessons learned throughout the entire organization. Target: 1 Lessons Learned
report completed and uploaded to the H&S Knowledge Network site per Business Unit monthly; Measure = Total
number of lessons learned reports uploaded.
5) Incident Investigations
ƒ Objective: Ensure incidents are investigated to prevent reoccurrence. Target: All recordable incidents and all
incidents classified as high potential (HiPo) to be investigated using Incident Cause Analysis Method (ICAM);
Measure = Number of completed investigations (uploaded to database) / Number of recordable and HiPo incidents.
6) Driver Safety Training
ƒ Objective: Ensure all employees who drive company vehicles or more than 400kms per year while being ‘at work’,
complete drivers training. Target: To have all affected employees complete the AlertDriving Training modules (or
equivalent); Measure = Total number of employees who complete the training.
7) StepBack Training
ƒ Objective: Ensure all employees can use StepBack to see and effectively control hazards at home and at work.
Target: To have each applicable employee complete the StepBack e-learning module; Measure = Total number of
employees who have completed the StepBack e-learning module.
8) StepBack Cards Completed
ƒ Objective: Monitor the effective use of our company’s proven hazard assessment process. Target: 1 Team
StepBack card completed per day and/or task; Measure = Total number of completed Team StepBack cards.
9) Contractor Pre-Mobilization
ƒ Objective: To clearly communicate SNC-Lavalin’s safety expectations to all our contractors and business partners
prior to work commencing. Target: 1 checklist completed and uploaded for each contractor; Measure = Total number
of pre-mobilization checklists (and associated meetings) completed per site.
10) Site Safety Visits
ƒ Objective: Demonstrate visible safety leadership. Target: Have each Operational Committee member conduct two
site safety visits; Measure = Completion and reporting to the GHS group of two site safety visits within the 2015
calendar year.

LAGGING INDICATORS
The goal for SNC-Lavalin is zero recordable incidents
The target for Total Recordable Incident Frequency (TRIF) is 0.25
The target for Lost Time Incident Frequency (LTIF) is 0.06

6833.1-EN-2015
Requirements
HEALTH AND SAFETY
NUMERICAL
HEALTH AND SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS
HIGHLIGHTS
2015
2014
2015 Global Health and Safety NUMERICAL REQUIREMENTS

GLOBAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (GHSMS)

New Acquisition Evaluation and Assessments Meetings


New acquisitions have 12 months Every project with over Weekly Toolbox Meeting on sites
to comply with the GHSMS 12,000 annual worked hours
Weekly coordination / construction
must complete and submit
meeting on sites
a monthly self-audit
Deviation and Variance Meetings with 3 or more people

Requirements
A deviation or variance request to begin with a safety moment
Incident Reporting and
is needed for each clause that a
Investigation Joint Health and Safety
BU or project cannot implement
Committee meetings
24 hours to report any recordable recommended for sites
2015 Objectives incident to the CEO (with more than 20 employees) —
72 hours to conduct a BU it may also be a legal requirement
There are 10 leading and
2 lagging indicators conference call after a
HIPO incident Emergency Preparedness
Risk Assessment / Legal and 14 days to conduct an ICAM and Response
investigation on HIPO and/or
Other Requirements 1 current emergency response
recordable incidents
plan for every project and office
StepBack 2 meters for 2 minutes
1 lessons learned report per location
to identify, assess and evaluate
incident that has application
all hazards Periodic drills / simulations
throughout the organization
testing evacuation and response
1 Risk Register per project —
capabilities
reviewed at least every 3 months
Competence, Training and
1 Legal Register per project — Awareness Management Review
reviewed annually
Every applicable employee shall Periodic management reviews
1 Job Safety Analysis (JSA) for complete the 8 CRCP e-learning of the GHSMS shall be conducted
each planned work activity modules. Contractors on site and documented
1 StepBack Risk Evaluation form (> 30 days) should also
completed for every task complete them

5x5 is the standard risk matrix Every applicable employee


for JSAs and StepBack should complete the StepBack
e-learning module
30 days maximum for safe work
permits validity 8 hour Safety Leadership
Training for project managers,
construction managers,
Performance Measurement BU managers, and executives
and Monitoring
4 hour Risk Competency Training
Safety data must be reported in for frontline supervisors and
the HSES database by the 10th managers
of each month
1 safety orientation for every new
2 safety perception surveys employee, contractor, and visitor
conducted per project annually

For further information please consult the SNC-Lavalin Global Health and Safety Management System
(6801-Rev.4) and Critical Risk Control Protocols (6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8).
6817.1-EN-Rev.1
2015 Global Health and Safety NUMERICAL REQUIREMENTS

CRITICAL RISK CONTROL PROTOCOLS (CRCP)

Vehicles Working at Heights Con’t Lifting Operations Con’t


Driving 4 hours or 400 km 100
00%% tie
tie-
e off
o fo
or all wor
o k done
o e above
above
oe Using multiple cranes or spreader
(250 miles) requires a journey 1.8 m (6’) bars is considered a critical lift
management
ge
emen
mentt plan
pla
lan an
and
nd driv
d
drivers
rii 22.2 kkN
22.2 N (5,0
(5,000
00 lbf
lbf)) mini
minimum
mum fafall
ll ≥30 km/h (18 mph) wind speed
training
g anch hor stren
t gthth requirem
i entt or limit for any man-basket operations
Ensure e re
rest
estt bre
b
breaks
akk ev
aks every
ery
ery 2 times the maximum expected
Requirements

≥40 km/h (25 mph) wind speed


1 – 2 hours of driving arrest
arr esting
ing fo
force
rce
requires an approved engineered
Always wear seatbelts when in a Document inspection every 6 months lift plan
moving vehicle of fall protection equipment
50 km/h (30 mph) maximum wind
Cell phone use is prohibited while Climbing g above 6 m (2
( 0’)) requi
q res speed limit for lifting operations
driving; including use of hands-free a life-line or a cage
Inspect and
nd doc
nd docume
document
ument
ume nt lif
li
lifting
i and
Speed limits must be obeyed Maintain 3 points of contact rigging equipment
uipment
nt every
eve y 6 months
on ladders
Hazardous Materials Confined Spaces
4-to-1 ratio from ladders to
MSDS’ older
lder tha
thann 3 ye
yyears
ars are A permit iss req
requir
required
uir
ired
ir ed to
t eenter
the gr
g ound
considerre
red to
red to be expirred
ed any confined
ned spa
space
ce that
tha
at has
Extend extension ladders a hazardous characteristics
All hazarrdou
d s mate
dou teria
te
erials
ls must
minimum of 1 m (3 1/
1/4’) above
be labelled for storage, 19.5 – 23.0% is the acceptable
the landing
transport and use range for O2 content
Floor openings
gss of
of 30 cm (1’) or
Equipment Safeguarding Conduct gas testing on all permit
greater to be protected
prot
rotect
ecte
ecte with a cover
required confined spaces
Colour coded quarterly
1 person using an EWP: a dedicated
inspection
tion
nooff all
all tools,
to ls,
too Excavations
spotter must maintain continuous
cords and equipmenmen
ent
en Access/egress required every
visual and audible contact
All grinders
nders sh
shall
al be
all b operated
opera 6 m (20’)
2 persons using an EWP: a spotter
using 2 hand
nds at all tim
times 1.2 – 1.8 m (4 – 6’) cut back
must be within proximity
3 mm (1/8
(1/8”)
1/8”)
”) distance
di b
between and/or shoring required
106 cm (42”) minimum height
grinding wheel and the tool rest ≥1.8 m (6’) excavations require
for top rails
6 mm
mm (1/4
(1/4
1/4”)) gri
grindi
nding
ndi ng whe
wheel
el barricadiing
53 cm (21”) minimum height for
exposure with a tongue or >6 m (20’)
0’)) e
excavations
xcavat
xc
xcavaa ion
on
ns rrequire
e
mid rails
a movable guard engineerring approv
rov
oval
ov
9 cm (3.5”) minimum height
De-Energization for toe boards Spoil piles
ess must
mus
m ust b
beea
att lea
least
e
Ensure zero
ero energy
energy st
state
stat
a before 1 m (3 1/4’) from the edge
A scaffold shall be capable of of anyy excavation
workin
wor king
g on equi
quipme
qu pment
entt o
or sys
system
tem
supporting its own weight and
Only 1 key per lock at least 4 times the maximum Hard (>144 kPa) soil to be sloped to
intended load at lea
least
st a 30°
30 ang
angle
le fro
from
m the
the ver
vertic
tical
al
Working at Heights
Cracked (48 – 144 kPa) soil to be
11.8
8 m (6’
(6’)) or abov
bove,
e, fa
fa
all
ll prottecti
tion Lifting Operations sloped at a 45° angle from 1.5 m
is required too per
pe
perform
e for
fo m work Annual certification
ficatio
ion on
io o all (5’) above the base
cranes is req
quired
d
1 m (3
( 1//4’)) sa
safet
fetyy faccctor
t is used
d to
t Soft (<48
Soft (<48 kP
kPa)
a) soi
soill to
to be
be slop
sloped
ed
calculate falll clearance
cle
l aranc distances 80 tons or over
verr 80
80%% ccapacity to at least a 45° angle from the
is considered
d a cr
criti
critical
itiica
itica
ca lift vertical
>1.2 m (4’) excavations require
Global Health and Safety Management System safe
safe work
work pe
permi
rmitt
(6801-Rev.4) and Critical Risk Control Protocols (6845
5.1.1-EN-Rev.8). 6817.1-EN-Rev.1
HEALTH AND SAFETY

Highlights
HIGHLIGHTS
2015
Health & Safety Highlights
“Without health, safety and environment we do not have the right to be
in business or to dream of the future – simply ‘adequate’ performance is
not sufficient to achieve our destiny.” Robert Card
President and CEO

2 StepBack Risk Evaluation


The SNC-Lavalin StepBack Risk Evaluation tool is used to accomplish
three main objectives:
 Identify hazards
 Estimate risk levels
 Establish controls
The StepBack tool is provided to all personnel to prompt them to step back
2 metres for 2 minutes at the commencement of a new day, new work
assignment, and/or when conditions have changed. It is a visual reminder
to ensure all personnel are cued to the risks in their tasks and assignments.
A specific e-learning module is available
to all employees to train them in
identifying and controlling hazards at
home and at work.
 The team StepBack card is designed
to ensure all hazards are formally
1 Project Risk Register
documented, corresponding risk
levels established, and associated
controls identified.
At the start of each of our projects, a phased risk register is developed to
identify all the hazards and associated risk levels. We utilize specialized  The personal StepBack card is intended to be a visual reminder and
software that allows us to integrate the project schedule with the Risk utilized while specific tasks are in progress.
Register. This ensures a dynamic reporting process and a ‘risk aware’
management team during all project phases. 3

Highlights
Training
The Stature Tool is a secure web-based application used for a rigorous and
systematic examination of almost any activity, location, or operational Safety Leadership Program
system to: A 8-hour session designed specifically for supervisors, managers and company
 Identify hazards executives. The course goes through four core areas:
 Safety Beliefs
 Explore potential
outcomes  Creating a Safety Culture
 Safety Applications at SNC-Lavalin
 Assess the exposure to
 Non-negotiable Expectations of all our People
hazards, the consequence
of the potential outcome, Risk Competency Program
and the probability of this The intent of this program is to train all SNC-Lavalin employees and selected
potential outcome occurring subcontractors to systematically focus on behaviors, risk perceptions, and risk
 Calculate the Risk Level management skills. Frontline supervision and management personnel
(5x5x5) attend this 4-hour session which includes:
 An introduction to risk awareness, estimation and mitigation.
 Elaborate action plans to
eliminate or mitigate risks  Positive reinforcement and practical exercises.
ensuring the risks remain  SNC-Lavalin’s StepBack approach to hazard identification and
in a ‘managed and controlled’ state risk evaluation.

 Conduct regular reviews of the status Implementation of proper risk management techniques lead to direct benefits,
of the risk inventory and the effectiveness such as the ability to:
of mitigation measures  Identify hazards
 Maintain historical data and provide  Assess risks associated with all hazards
proven templates  Identify conditions and pressures on people to accept risk
 Understand risk compensating behavior
The training is outcome driven, which helps to identify risk-taking behavior  Leadership
whether at project sites or in specific engineering and design activities.  Systems
 Behavior
4 Critical Risk Control Protocols  Culture
EYE ON RISK
PROCESSES &
PROCEDURES

The Eye-On-Risk review differs from a traditional


2015

A review of our past significant incidents has identified a series of consistent


audit in that a ‘what if ’ approach is used with
critical risks to our employees and contractors. These risks require the
an analytical and qualitative focus. Experts from
development of sound protocols to help mitigate the hazards associated
different disciplines are brought together as a team
with these activities. to conduct the review in an effort to examine the
The protocols cover eight key areas that we have identified as having high project through a variety of lenses and share expertise across disciplines in
risk potential that require consistent rigour on all projects both globally the process. While the review is flexible, defined protocols exist to verify the
and locally executed: systems strengths, opportunities, gaps, and threats. The eventual outcome
 Vehicles is the evolution from safety management to seamless risk competency.
 Hazardous Materials
 Equipment Safeguarding 7 Learning Organization
 De-Energization
CRITICAL RISK

 Working at Heights CONTROL PROTOCOLS


2015 We instil a ‘learning organization’ culture, whereby we share lessons learned,
 Lifting Operations take appropriate measures, and then report back to track the ‘live’
application of what has been learned.
 Confined Space
 Excavations A ‘learning organization’ is one that
remains open to applying all it can
Each protocol has a corresponding audit section to ensure that we can from its successes AND its failures.
accurately measure adherence to these high risk areas. The compliance There are many opportunities to
audit forms the basis of our gap analysis, which is conducted around the apply lessons learned from previous
world on every project and operation. incidents in order to ensure a culture
of continuous improvement is sustained.
Eight interactive e-Learning modules on the requirements of the Critical Risk
These lessons learned are shared via a knowledge network, distributed and
Control Protocols are also available so as to raise awareness of these throughout
reviewed at the work face. It is part of our leading indicators to ensure all
the entire organization. The modules are available in multiple languages.
business units generate and share their learning’s.
For serious incidents, an electronic process is initiated by the CEO to all
5 Safety Perception Survey Senior Management Committee members. They are required to read the
lessons learned report and they are prompted to detail why it does not apply
To assess the overall morale and risk tolerance of our project teams (at the or demonstrate compliance with the lessons learned contained in the report
office or in the field) SNC-Lavalin conducts Safety Perception Surveys. for their projects and/or operations. The gathered data is then reported back
Highlights

The safety culture of any organization is the product of individual and group to the CEO. This process is designed to close the loop on serious incidents
values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and patterns of behavior. and ensure they are not repeated.
The survey consists of eight main sections, namely perceptions of:
 Organizational commitment 8 Positive Incentive Program
 Supervisory support
 Safety systems In order to ensure that all employees are Positive
Incentive
 Team factors engaged and committed to the highest level NAME: BADGE #

 Management behavior of safety, SNC-Lavalin has deployed a unique CONTRACTOR/COMPANY:

GIVEN BY: DATE:

Positive Incentive Program.


GIVEN FOR

Exceptional StepBack Imminent Danger Report Identified Hazard

 Management systems
Demonstrated Vehicle Safety Near Miss Report Consistent PPE Compliance
Thoughtful Safety Suggestion Proper Height Safety Other

Reason

This program is designed to encourage positive


 Job factors 6861.6.2-EN-Rev.3

interactions and immediate feedback. The system


 Individual factors focuses on rewarding proactive risk management
behavior in order to improve our safety culture. The Positive Incentive
These are designed to ensure that organizational changes and improvements
Program combines the best of behavior based safety programs and
are based on the realities of risks, culture, and evolving performance trends.
traditional reward types.
Experience tells us, that for any incentive program to be effective and
6 Eye-On-Risk Safety Reviews reinforce behavior, it must meet three criteria:
 Desirable Reward schemes are attractive for the project’s labour
To verify the safety management systems’ continued suitability and effectiveness, demographic
corporate audits of safety systems (at defined intervals) as well as ‘Eye-On-Risk’  Attainable Possible for any and all workers to achieve a reward
Safety Reviews are conducted. This process helps management to zero in on  Associating It must be immediately tied to the specific behavior
aspects of a project that have the potential to affect its safety performance. identified
The objective of the Eye-On-Risk review is to engage management, supervisors,
and front-line workers in entire project site safety. The Eye-On- Risk has The process has proven to be very effective regardless of locale, labour relations,
4 major areas of focus: or language barrier.
6813.1-EN-Rev.6

When was the last time You saved someone’s Life?


GLOBAL
HEALTH AND SAFETY
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
2015

RCP
C MS
WE CARE...

about the health and safety of our employees,


of those who work under our care, and of the
people our projects serve.

W inning the hearts and minds


of our people for safety requires each person to become a safety leader. These are
leaders who inspire, motivate and transform others to excel in safety.

E mphasis on safety and quality on projects


which involves the integration of safety into all core business activities, the
distribution of responsibility and accountability for safety to all employees at all
levels and the adoption of peer-driven safety review processes.

C ompetence of the organization and people


in indentifying and managing risk requires a systematic focus on behaviours, risk
perceptions and skills. Risk is inseparable from opportunity and reward and is to
be managed competently at all levels of the organization.

A nalysis of performance
while respecting lessons learned from previous experience, our focus is on
sustaining a proactive safety culture. This includes processes like root cause
analysis, positive incentive programs, safety leadership training, etc…

R isk transformation
ensures that the overall management of safety is risk-based, systematic and
responsive to the dynamic nature of hazards and risks. We must stay vigilant and
support processes which effectively assess all of our projects, business activities,
and operations.

E ngineering innovation for safety


reduces risks in project design, infrastructure, construction, and operations.
It includes processes of quality management, lessons learned, e-technology,
MS

innovation, and benchmarking against best practices.


Global Health and Safety Management System

Revision History

Revision Date Description Prepared by Approved by

nd Global Health &


0 December 22 , 2010 Original Issue T. Van Wieren
Safety

th Global Health &


1 November 7 , 2011 Full Document Review for 2012 T. Van Wieren
Safety

st Global Health &


2 January 1 , 2013 Full Document Review for 2013 T. Van Wieren
Safety

st Global Health &


3 January 1 , 2014 Full Document Review for 2014 T. Van Wieren
Safety

st Global Health &


4 January 1 , 2015 Full Document Review for 2015 T. Van Wieren
Safety

Caution: Uncontrolled Copy


Valid only at time of retrieval from network source directory.
User should verify that the revision number is the most current.

MS

6801-EN-Rev.4 Last printed 2014-12-16 10:45:00 AM Page 1 of 41


Global Health and Safety Management System

Table of Contents
1.0 SCOPE (6810) ________________________________________________________________________3
1.1 INTRODUCTION_______________________________________________________________________________ 3
1.2 APPLICATION_________________________________________________________________________________ 3
1.3 REFERENCES _________________________________________________________________________________ 4
1.4 HOW TO USE THIS DOCUMENT __________________________________________________________________ 4
1.5 DEVIATION AND VARIANCE _____________________________________________________________________ 5
1.6 TERMS AND DEFINITIONS _______________________________________________________________________ 5
1.7 NUMERICAL REQUIREMENTS ____________________________________________________________________ 7

2.0 POLICY (6820) _______________________________________________________________________7


2.1 WE CARE VALUE STATEMENT ___________________________________________________________________ 7
2.2 GLOBAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY _____________________________________________________________ 7

3.0 PLAN (6830) _________________________________________________________________________8


3.1 HAZARD IDENTIFICATION, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND DETERMINING CONTROLS ____________________________ 8
3.2 LEGAL AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS _____________________________________________________________ 13
3.3 OBJECTIVES AND PLANNING ___________________________________________________________________ 13

4.0 DO (6840) _________________________________________________________________________ 14


4.1 ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUTHORITY ________________________________________ 14
4.2 COMPETENCE, TRAINING, AND AWARENESS ______________________________________________________ 19
4.3 MEETINGS AND COMMUNICATION ______________________________________________________________ 21
4.4 DOCUMENT AND DATA CONTROL _______________________________________________________________ 22
4.5 OPERATIONAL CONTROL ______________________________________________________________________ 25
4.6 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE _____________________________________________________ 29

5.0 CHECK (6850) ______________________________________________________________________ 31


5.1 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MONITORING ________________________________________________ 31
5.2 EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENTS _______________________________________________________________ 32
5.3 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION, NONCONFORMITY, CORRECTIVE ACTION, AND PREVENTIVE ACTION ____________ 34

6.0 ACT (6860) ________________________________________________________________________ 38


6.1 MANAGEMENT REVIEW _______________________________________________________________________ 38
6.2 VISIBLE SAFETY LEADERSHIP ___________________________________________________________________ 39
MS

6.3 LEARNING ORGANIZATION _____________________________________________________________________ 39


6.4 POSITIVE INCENTIVE PROGRAM_________________________________________________________________ 40
6.5 BLUE RULES _________________________________________________________________________________ 41

6801-EN-Rev.4 Last printed 2014-12-16 10:45:00 AM Page 2 of 41


Global Health and Safety Management System

1.0 SCOPE (6810)


1.1 INTRODUCTION

Health and Safety (H&S) presents significant risks to SNC-Lavalin – both to specific sectors and to the
entire organization. To address these risks, SNC-Lavalin has developed a Global Health and Safety
Management System (GHSMS), whereby all Groups and Business Units (BU) are required to meet the
same standards. Policies, strategies, standard operating procedures (SOP), internal controls,
performance indicators and targets, along with technical systems and tools, are developed centrally to
help manage risk and improve H&S performance. This system supports individual Groups and BUs, as
well as the organization as a whole, to achieve their performance objectives.
This GHSMS is the foundation for all our H&S management processes. It is the governing corporate
document that outlines expectations for all SNC-Lavalin Groups and BUs in order to support a “One
Company” approach to H&S.
SNC-Lavalin expects business partners, such as associate companies or joint ventures where we do
not have Prime Contractor responsibility, as well as principal contractors, and suppliers with whom we
have substantial involvement, to conform to equivalent H&S management standards. SNC-Lavalin will
inform business partners of these SOPs, protocols and policies, and work with them where appropriate
to support their adoption of practices consistent with our own.
SNC-Lavalin’s goal is to achieve and maintain H&S excellence by incorporating strategies, policies, and
standard operating procedures that promote the H&S of our personnel, contractors, and the general
public throughout all our business activities.

1.2 APPLICATION

All SNC-Lavalin Groups and BUs, their managed sites, and office locations shall implement or
demonstrate compliance to the GHSMS. Compliance to the GHSMS is mandatory. The GHSMS will
oversee Contractors’ H&S plans, programs and all related policies and procedures, and will take
precedence in case of conflict.
The GHSMS shall be applied as a whole, not limited to individual sections. BU-specific H&S
Management Systems are not recommended since the GHSMS is applicable to all disciplines including
Engineering, Construction, Procurement, Human Resources, and Finance, etc.
If a BU determines that the GHSMS overlooks an important part of its scope, the BU has the
responsibility to report it to the Global Health and Safety (GHS) team. The team will then assess a
potential update of the GHSMS during its annual review period.
The GHSMS also applies to:
ƒ Project Development
ƒ Conceptual and Scoping Studies
ƒ Prefeasibility Studies
ƒ Feasibility Studies
ƒ Execution and Construction
MS

ƒ Commissioning and Decommissioning


ƒ Operations and Maintenance

6801-EN-Rev.4 Last printed 2014-12-16 10:45:00 AM Page 3 of 41


Global Health and Safety Management System

ƒ All contractors’ activities undertaken on SNC-Lavalin controlled sites


Prior to the acquisition of a controlling interest in any business activity, H&S due diligence must be
exercised by conducting an H&S risk assessment of the relevant H&S elements.
Newly acquired entities shall conform to the GHSMS by performing an integration gap analysis, in
conjunction with GHS. This shall form the development and implementation of an action plan to close
any gap within a 12-month period

1.3 REFERENCES

The GHSMS is designed on the principles of continuous improvement and adopts the methodology of
Plan, Do, Check, and Act. The structure of the management system follows the layout of the
international standard OHSAS 18001 and is compliant to this standard in all areas.
The management system is divided into fourteen elements. Each element sets out to achieve a
specific objective that enables SNC-Lavalin to best identify and manage all H&S opportunities and
threats. Many of the elements are inter-related. The management system is further underpinned by key
safety highlights which support all fourteen elements.

The GHSMS document provides a high-level summary; further details can be found in the referenced
documents.
6813.1 HEALTH AND S AFETY HIGHLIGHTS (EN, FR, SP)

1.4 HOW TO USE THIS DOCUMENT


MS

All GHS standards are available on the SNC-Lavalin H&S Knowledge Network (HSKN) site
(http://km.snclavalin.com/hskn).

6801-EN-Rev.4 Last printed 2014-12-16 10:45:00 AM Page 4 of 41


Global Health and Safety Management System

Throughout the GHSMS, references are made to supporting SNC-Lavalin documents. These
documents contain mandatory requirements and are available on the HSKN site.
Modifications to this document are made annually to ensure it is up to date. If using a printed copy of
this GHSMS, always check with the online source to ensure the version you are using is the most
current one.

1.5 DEVIATION AND VARIANCE

After reviewing the scope of the GHSMS, a BU may identify specific clauses that it will not implement
as part of its activities. If this is the case, the BU shall submit a deviation request. A deviation request
is a documented report that justifies why the GHSMS’ clause(s), other mandated standard(s), or
requirement(s) are not applicable to the BU.
Where a BU recognizes it cannot currently conform to an element or clause of the GHSMS or the H&S
SOPs, it may submit a variance request. A variance request is an action plan that either puts in place
temporary controls to treat the risk resulting from the noncompliance until such time as engineering or
procurement issues can be resolved; or it details the process that the division/department is
undertaking to reach compliance within a specific timeframe.
BUs may submit deviation or variance request(s) against whole standards, individual clauses or single
scope requirements. The process must be completed annually and incorporated into the management
review of the GHSMS to determine if it is still relevant to the BUs scope.
The deviation and variance request must be signed off by the BU H&S VP/Director, the Division
General Manager (GM), the BU President/EVP/MD, the Group President and then approved by the
Senior Vice President, GHS.
ƒ For example, a project is unable to use StepBack due to an entrenched sub-contractor program
which meets all the aspects of StepBack. A deviation request can be used to demonstrate that the
sub-contractor is compliant with all of the elements of the SNC-Lavalin StepBack Risk Evaluation.
6815.1 DEVIATION AND V ARIANCE REQUEST (EN, FR, SP)

1.6 TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

ALARP As low as reasonably practicable


AR Arabic
BIP Behavior Intervention Program
BU Business Unit (Mining & Metallurgy, Oil & Gas, Environment & Water,
Infrastructure Construction, Infrastructure Engineering, Operations &
Maintenance, Infrastructure and Concession Investments, Transmission &
Distribution, Hydro, Nuclear, Thermal)
CH Chinese
CRCP Critical Risk Control Protocols
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DIVISION Subdivisions within a Business Unit (i.e. in the Mining & Metallurgy Business Unit,
the following are divisions: Sulphur and Emissions Solutions, M&M Middle East
and Africa, M&M Asia-Pacific, etc.)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

EN English
ERP Emergency Response Plan
EVP Executive Vice President
EXCOM Executive Committee – consisting of the President and CEO, Group Presidents,
and Executive Vice-Presidents of Corporate Functions and Global Operations
FR French
GHS Global Health and Safety
GHSMS Global Health and Safety Management System
GM General Manager
GROUP SNC-Lavalin’s 3 Groups: Resources, Environment and Water – Infrastructure –
Power. Each group is composed of BUs.
HSKN Health and Safety Knowledge Network
H&S Health and Safety
IMS Integrated Management Systems
JSA Job Safety Analysis
KPI Key Performance Indicators
MD Managing Director
OH&S Occupational Health and Safety
OHSAS Occupation Health and Safety Assessment Series
OPCOM Operational Committee – consisting of the President and CEO, Group Presidents,
all Executive Vice-Presidents and Heads of Regions
OSHA US Occupational Safety and Health Administration
PO Portuguese
PL Polish
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
Prime Contractor Party or designate with primary responsibility whether legislative or contractual for
H&S
Project/Operation A contracted (scope of work) endeavour which has a beginning and end, defined
resources, and is undertaken to create a unique product or service.
Project/operation are used interchangeable throughout the GHSMS and related
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documents.
RM Romanian

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Shall A process that must be performed


Should A process that is strongly recommended
SOP Standard Operating Procedure
SP Spanish
SR Serbian
Stature Preferred risk register tool
SVP Senior Vice President
VP Vice President
For SNC-Lavalin H&S Indicators see Section 5.1.1.

1.7 NUMERICAL REQUIREMENTS

Key numerical requirements contained in the GHSMS have been summarized in a quick reference 2-
page document. This document is built as a checklist in order to allow every BU/Division/Site to assess
basic compliance to key GHSMS requirements. This document shall be used to ensure that all new and
existing employees and contractors are aware of SNC-Lavalin H&S requirements.
6817.1 N UMERICAL REQUIREMENTS (EN, FR, SP)

2.0 POLICY (6820)


2.1 WE CARE VALUE STATEMENT

The WE CARE Value Statement sets the tone for the entire organization for how we perform on a daily
basis in everything we do as a company. It underpins that our chief concern is caring for the H&S of all
stakeholders that our projects serve.
WE CARE V ALUE S TATEMENT (EN, FR, SP, PO)

2.2 GLOBAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

The GHS Policy is an expression of SNC-Lavalin’s senior management’s commitment to providing a


safe and healthy work environment for all our personnel, contractors, and clients throughout all our
activities. It is signed by our President and CEO, and updated annually. The GHS Policy must be used
by every BU. Development of a Group/BU/Division/Site-specific policy is not recommended. Should
such a need arise; a deviation request must be submitted.
6822.1 GLOBAL HEALTH AND S AFETY POLICY (EN, FR, SP, PO)
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3.0 PLAN (6830)


3.1 HAZARD IDENTIFICATION, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND DETERMINING CONTROLS

SNC-Lavalin’s H&S management approach is risk-based, systematic, and responsive to change. This
is accomplished by having BUs perform comprehensive risk assessments to ensure all hazards are
identified, assessed, and evaluated to effectively eliminate and/or control risk levels.
At a minimum:
ƒ All work environments containing hazards shall be assessed.
ƒ The corporate risk assessment tools shall be utilized and associated documentation shall be
retained.
ƒ Risk assessments shall be performed regularly and in a timely manner by qualified personnel and
with sufficient management representation.
ƒ Risk assessments shall be conducted whenever changes occur to the scope of work, equipment or
materials used, or in the organization of the work team (i.e. new shift). At a minimum, risk
assessments shall be conducted at the following stages:
 Early stages of new projects and studies
 Detailed design of current projects
 Critical decision points in current projects
 Both routine and non-routine operations
 Following modifications
 Supplier site inspections
 Travel
ƒ Risk assessments shall be reviewed at specified intervals with management involvement.
ƒ Following the risk assessment, corrective measures shall be taken to ensure that hazards are
appropriately evaluated and controlled to levels as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP).
ƒ A follow-up of the risk assessment action items shall be performed to ensure corrective measures
are effective and sustainable.
SNC-Lavalin has developed a corporate Risk Matrix. The Risk Matrix is based on three components,
which are used to assess site-related risks: severity of the consequences (C), probability of
occurrence (P) and exposure to the hazard (E). Exposure is only modified for the Risk Register
calculations. Training shall be provided on each component.
ƒ Each component varies on a scale of five levels.
ƒ The severity factor is assessed based on the potential consequences without taking into account
the safeguards. Its five levels are: First Aid, Medical Aid, Modified Work, Lost Time and Fatality.
ƒ The probability factor is assessed based on the probability of occurrence of the scenario assuming
that basic (common) administrative controls are in place as part of normal business (i.e. generic
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procedures, employee training, etc.). Its five levels are: Almost impossible, Conceivable, Possible,
Has Happened and Almost Certain.

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ƒ The exposure factor is assessed based on the duration of exposure to the hazard during the whole
execution of the activity being considered. For the JSA and the StepBack Risk Evaluation
processes, exposure is considered as Continuous. Its five levels are: Yearly, Monthly, Weekly,
Daily, and Continuous.
ƒ Weight factors are associated to each component and the Risk Level equals the product of the
three components. The Risk Level varies on a scale of four levels (Low, Medium, High and
Extreme).
ƒ Example of the Risk Matrix when Exposure is continuous (as used by JSAs and the StepBack Risk
Evaluation Program):

3.1.1 PROJECT RISK REGISTER

An active risk register should be maintained during each phase of a project’s lifecycle to catalogue the
significant risks and their control methods. Those who best understand the risks should participate in
facilitated meetings to prepare a ranked list of the current and anticipated risks.
The risk register allows proper resource allocation to manage the risks. At the beginning of the project
or operations, only high level risks are identified and prioritized to coincide with the project schedule. As
the project or operation advances, more specific risks are identified and detailed controls are
implemented to manage them. The preferred risk register tool is the corporately supported Stature.
It is expected that all SNC-Lavalin projects (with a minimum of twelve thousand expected annual
worked hours) shall have a risk register in place. The risk register shall be reviewed at a minimum of
three month intervals and be updated more frequently based on audit and inspection findings,
corrective actions from incident investigations, and pre-mitigated risk levels.
The risk register shall:
ƒ Be developed and updated for all projects, operations and offices.
ƒ Be initiated, facilitated, populated and managed by the H&S representative.
ƒ Be compiled by multi-disciplinary teams.
ƒ Have pre- and post-mitigation risk calculations.
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ƒ Identify risk owners and define action items with specific timeframes.
ƒ Be accessible by all stakeholders.
6831.1.1 RISK REGISTER TRAINING (EN, FR, PO, SP)

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3.1.2 JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS (JSA)

The Job Safety Analysis (JSA) is a comprehensive hazard assessment process intended to establish
standard safeguards and specific methods for the work. A JSA shall be conducted in advance for work
activities identified in the Project Risk Register, as well as other planned or repeated activities.
Moreover, SNC-Lavalin employees shall prepare JSAs prior to visiting non-controlled sites such as
clients’ or suppliers’ facilities.
For example, a JSA would be required for:
ƒ Repetitive Job: Construction of 25 guideway foundations; unloading materials from flat deck trucks.
ƒ Single Complex Job: A single crane lift using multiple cranes; installing a section of elevated form
work.
JSA for routine activities are developed by BUs and posted as templates on the HSKN to be used as
reference documents.
6831.2.1 JOB S AFETY ANALYSIS SOP (EN, FR, SP)
6831.2.2 JOB S AFETY ANALYSIS W ORK SHEET (EN, FR, SP)
6831.2.3 JOB S AFETY ANALYSIS ROUTINE ACTIVITIES T EMPLATE (EN, FR)

3.1.3 STEPBACK RISK EVALUATION

The SNC-Lavalin StepBack Risk Evaluation process is a field-level risk assessment tool. SNC-Lavalin
utilizes the StepBack Risk Evaluation tool to identify hazards and the appropriate controls in a
consistent and systematic manner. It prompts all SNC-Lavalin personnel and contractors to step back
2 meters and take 2 minutes at the commencement of a new day, new work assignment and/or when
conditions have changed to think critically about their working environment.
All projects and offices are required to use the StepBack Risk Evaluation process. There are two (2)
types of StepBack Risk Evaluation processes – Team and Personal.
Access to the e-learning module is provided on the corporate Learning Management System, which is
supported by Global Human Resources. The StepBack e-learning module is a mandatory course for all
applicable employees, as determined by each BU.
6831.3.1 S TEPB ACK RISK EVALUATION SOP (EN, FR)
6831.3.2 S TEPB ACK POSTER (EN, FR)
6831.3.3 S TEPB ACK T RAINING (EN, FR, SP)

3.1.3.1 TEAM STEPBACK


Work teams or individuals shall participate in a Team StepBack at the start of each day, new task
and/or when the scope of work or hazard conditions have changed. The Team StepBack is a
documented discussion of the hazards, associated controls, and subsequent risk levels associated with
the planned work for that day/shift. The activities of every team member, as well as the activities of
anyone else within the same area, shall be identified, documented, and adequately controlled with a
record retained.
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Completed Team StepBack cards are submitted to the site H&S team on a weekly basis. They will be
used by the site H&S team to identify the top potential unsafe behaviors and conditions, which will be
discussed during the weekly site coordination meetings with the local management team.

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6831.3.1.1 T EAM STEPB ACK C ARD (AR, CH, EN, FR, PL, PO, SP, RM, SR)

3.1.3.2 PERSONAL STEPBACK


Personnel shall ensure their own safety and that of their colleagues by using the Personal StepBack
process prior to commencing any task or activity. This process provides situational awareness that
assists personnel in staying alert, keeping their mind on their tasks, and knowing how changes affect
them and others.
The Personal StepBack card is a visual reminder to ensure all staff members are fully cued to the
hazards in their tasks and the associated risk levels.
A Personal StepBack card is provided to each employee, or small team of employees executing the
same activities at the same location and time, depending on the job to be performed, to prompt them to
analyze the work hazards, identify the risk levels continuously and assess the job at the
commencement of a new day, a new work assignment and/or if the conditions of work have changed.

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6831.3.2.1 PERSONAL S TEPB ACK C ARD (AR, CH, EN, FR, PL, PO, SP, SR)

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3.1.4 HAZARD ELIMINATION AND CONTROL

The hierarchy of controls is the preferred order to mitigate hazards and control risk levels:
Elimination: Complete removal of a hazard.
Elimination
Substitution: Replacing the material or
process with a less hazardous one.
Substitution
Separation: Isolate the hazard (i.e. guarding or
enclosing it).
Engineering: Designs or modifications to Separation
reduce the exposure to the hazard.
Administrative: Limit exposure to hazardous Engineering
conditions or energies by procedural means
(i.e. timing of work, policies, signage, and work
practices). Administrative

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Last PPE


line of defense: hazards are still present and
PPE is used to reduce the potential for harm.

A number of these options may be considered and applied individually or in combination to ensure that
exposure to hazards is ALARP. If a hazard cannot be eliminated or mitigated effectively, all personnel
involved shall be informed of the hazard and the necessary precautions to be taken to avoid any
unwanted outcome or associated incident.

3.1.5 MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE

Management of Change is the process of ensuring strict control and communication of changes to
project specifications, standards, procedures, controlled design documents, materials, equipment,
execution plans, or commercial contracts. As a minimum the following elements will be addressed:
ƒ Control change consistently with regulatory requirements.
ƒ Ensure that all aspects of change are properly registered, documented, tracked, and communicated
to the project team in a concise and controlled manner.
ƒ Ensure a change is not proposed or implemented unless there is a basis around improving safety,
operability, maintainability, legal, or environmental/regulatory/community, and to document the
same.
ƒ Assign appropriate levels of approval for changes.
An H&S risk assessment shall be performed prior to implementing any change to ensure that it does
not introduce risks to people, property and surroundings. This exercise must take into consideration
both planned and unplanned changes, as well as sudden or gradual changes.
All areas of potential change must be considered:
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ƒ Equipment, processes and lay-out


ƒ Operation and maintenance procedures

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ƒ Design, construction, repair and maintenance


ƒ Materials used and inherent properties
ƒ Organizational structure and responsibilities
ƒ Personnel training or competency requirements
ƒ Personnel changes
Management of Change shall be documented during regular updates of the Risk Register, JSA and
StepBack.

3.2 LEGAL AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS

There is an expectation that the BUs must be able to demonstrate knowledge of and compliance with
all applicable Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) requirements, regulations, and laws in their
respective jurisdictions and geographical areas.
As appropriate, each BU shall ensure that:
ƒ Legal and other requirements are met by all projects, operations, and offices in cooperation with the
Legal Department.
ƒ H&S programs are maintained through an ongoing review for amendments, additions, and other
changes.
ƒ An H&S Register of Legal and Other Requirements is maintained at all office and project locations
to identify H&S requirements for their location and demonstrate compliance to them. This
information shall be communicated to all relevant personnel and other parties, as applicable.
ƒ The H&S Register of Legal and Other Requirements shall be reviewed at a minimum annually or
when changes are made in the applicable jurisdictions.
ƒ Applicable legal and other requirements related to risk assessment and implementation of
necessary controls shall be taken into account. Two-way communication between the H&S
Register of Legal and Other Requirements and the Risk Register shall be clearly demonstrated.
6832.1 LEGAL REGISTER TEMPLATE (EN, FR. SP)
6832.2 LEGAL REGISTER EXAMPLE (EN, FR, SP)

3.3 OBJECTIVES AND PLANNING

H&S is an integral part of the strategic planning process. GHS establishes, implements, and maintains
annual objectives to ensure consistency with the GHS policy commitments, continual improvement of
H&S performance, as well as the effectiveness of the GHSMS. These annual objectives are proposed
by GHS to the Operational Committee (OPCOM) for review and approval.
These objectives consider legal, H&S hazards, elevated risk levels, technology, as well as financial,
operational and business requirements. Progress towards achieving established objectives and targets
is monitored by GHS and reported to the OPCOM on a monthly basis.
BUs shall comply with the specific objectives and targets set annually by the GHS group. Additionally,
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each BU may track its progress towards additional performance indicators based upon their specific
needs.
6833.1 2015 HEALTH & S AFETY OBJECTIVES (EN, FR, SP)

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4.0 DO (6840)
4.1 ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUTHORITY

Responsibility for successful implementation of the GHSMS on controlled sites rests with site line
management – executives, managers and supervisors. The same applies to Contractors assigned to
undertake work activities on controlled sites. Therefore, both SNC-Lavalin and its Contractors have
responsibilities and are accountable for the implementation of the GHSMS activities and H&S
operational duties.
Corporately, the H&S approach and targets are communicated from the OPCOM, through to the
Groups/BUs, and then to the site management. The following organizational structure illustrates how
reporting occurs and the existing interface between Groups/BUs and Corporate.

4.1.1 PRESIDENT AND CEO

ƒ Takes ultimate accountability for all H&S aspects (i.e. We Care Value Statement).
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ƒ Reviews all recordable incidents within 24 hours of occurrence.


ƒ Periodically attends the HSSE Committee meeting of the Board of Directors.

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ƒ Communicates lessons learned throughout the organization.


ƒ Signs the GHS policy annually.

4.1.2 EXECUTIVE AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT (GROUP PRESIDENTS, BU


PRESIDENTS/EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENTS/MANAGING DIRECTORS AND
DIVISION GENERAL MANAGERS)

ƒ Gives formal endorsement of the GHSMS within their entity.


ƒ Reviews organizational H&S performance and provides clear direction for their Group, BUs and
Divisions.
ƒ Demonstrates visible safety leadership daily, in offices, operations, and project sites.
ƒ Escalates communication of all recordable incidents within 24 hours of occurrence to the President
and CEO.

4.1.3 SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, GHS

ƒ Establishes and approves the GHSMS policies and standards to be enacted.


ƒ Reports H&S performance metrics to the OPCOM and to the HSSE Committee of the Board of
Directors as official records to demonstrate H&S compliance and to continually improve safety
performance
ƒ Annually evaluates the effectiveness of H&S policies, standards, and protocols. Provides input and
recommendations for improvements or changes.
ƒ Communicates industry best practices and lessons learned.
ƒ Designs training materials that have broad application throughout the organization.
ƒ Ensures Global H&S Audits and Eye-On-Risk Safety Reviews are conducted at projects as
required.
ƒ Maintains a central H&S database for reporting and storing data associated with leading and
lagging indicators.
ƒ Benchmarks leading and lagging indicator targets against competitors and clients.

4.1.4 BU H&S VP/DIRECTORS

ƒ Reports to his respective EVP and respects the dotted line relationship to the SVP, GHS for
centralized one company H&S processes and standards.
ƒ Ensures all SNC-Lavalin project sites are fully compliant with client requirements, current corporate
standards and regulations, and laws governing the jurisdiction in which the project or site is located.
ƒ Oversees the implementation of the GHSMS at the BU level, supporting the One Company
approach.
ƒ Ensures all managers and personnel are provided the appropriate H&S training and instructions
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relevant to their tasks and duties. Whenever applicable, testing results shall be saved as official
records to demonstrate training compliance.
ƒ Ensures all external and internal stakeholders are promptly informed of all H&S related issues (i.e.
regulations, progress, compliance, violations, etc.) affecting their BU.

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4.1.5 PROJECT MANAGERS

The Project Manager provides H&S guidance to line managers, H&S personnel and contractors in the
application of the provisions of the GHSMS. The Project Manager is the senior SNC-Lavalin
representative in H&S meetings with the client. He provides the implementation and training resources
necessary to deploy the GHSMS on site and ensures that related requirements are communicated and
applied throughout the project organization.
As part of his responsibilities, the Project Manager shall also:
ƒ Facilitate site implementation of the GHSMS, with emphasis on the risk management process.
ƒ Conduct weekly H&S observations on site.
ƒ Ensure sufficient H&S resource allocation.
ƒ Ensure training requirements are fulfilled.
ƒ Attend H&S meetings, and ensure correctives actions are implemented.
ƒ Establish interface with governing regulatory authorities and provide briefing on the GHSMS
requirements for the site.
ƒ Participate in incident investigations and ensures implementation of corrective actions following a
serious incidents or a fatality.
ƒ Arrange regular contractor H&S reviews.
ƒ Review and discuss corporate compliance audit findings and incident investigation reports.
ƒ Ensure that unsafe behaviors and hazardous conditions are identified and followed-up during the
weekly site coordination meeting.

4.1.6 CONSTRUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGERS

ƒ Participates in and adheres to GHSMS requirements for site activities.


ƒ Is accountable for ongoing development and implementation of the GHSMS on site.
ƒ Ensures that all contractors working on site have committed, in writing, to implementing and
respecting the site H&S requirements.
ƒ Ensures that every contractor or its subcontractors (at their expense) completes all measures
required for the implementation of the GHSMS on site. If a contractor does not comply with the
requirements of the GHSMS, SNC-Lavalin, after giving a warning to the contractor and after the
warning has not been addressed by the contractor, could have the required H&S works executed,
at the contractor’s expense.
ƒ Reviews JSAs, inspections and incident reports and ensures actions are closed out in the agreed-
upon timeframe.
ƒ Ensures that a site specific H&S orientation training session addressing the GHSMS requirements
is developed and given to all employees arriving at the site.
ƒ Monitors the effectiveness of the orientation and training programs.
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ƒ Ensures the coordination of various activities in order to report and eliminate imminent dangers that
could result from the interaction of several subcontractors.

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ƒ Ensures that contractors develop and submit to SNC-Lavalin a remedial plan when the number of
non-compliances, warnings, incidents or hazardous situations increases.
ƒ Attends H&S meetings, and implements decisions.
ƒ Receives, analyzes and verifies the implementation of specifications and plans of temporary works
to be approved by a competent person.
ƒ Reviews quality of contractor H&S activities and provides meaningful feedback.
ƒ Participates in emergency response activities.
ƒ Is actively involved in the corporate compliance audits conducted by GHS.

4.1.7 DIVISIONAL H&S LEADS

ƒ Develops site-specific H&S documentation and provides support to project management.


ƒ Maintains knowledge of current governing regulations, codes and practices, and informs the Project
Manager whenever revisions to the site-specific H&S documentation are required.
ƒ Ensures GHSMS implementation throughout all phases of the project.
ƒ Selects internal and external H&S dedicated resources in cooperation with BU H&S VP/Director
and GHS.

4.1.8 SITE H&S MANAGERS

Site H&S Managers report to the Divisional H&S Lead (discipline adherence responsibility) and to the
Project Manager (project performance responsibility). The Site H&S Manager is in charge of
implementing and administering the GHSMS at the work and camp site(s) (when applicable). The Site
H&S Manager provides the Construction/Operations Manager with guidance and advice to achieve the
site’s H&S goals.
The specific functions of Site H&S Manager are as follows:
ƒ Implements and monitors site compliance to the GHSMS.
ƒ Approves contractors’ site-specific H&S programs.
ƒ Provides documentation and support to SNC-Lavalin managers and supervisors on site.
ƒ Interfaces with client representatives to ensure that ongoing input to the H&S processes are
incorporated and that satisfaction with the results is achieved.
ƒ Maintains current, daily knowledge of all active areas, records and reports as per H&S
requirements.
ƒ Ensures that contractors attend H&S training and have competent resources.
ƒ Assists the Construction/Operations Manager in follow-up of corrective actions.
ƒ Ensures the necessary supply, maintenance, operation, and availability of safety, medical and
firefighting equipment.
ƒ Leads site H&S inspections with SNC-Lavalin managers.
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ƒ Informs the Joint H&S Committee and contractors of any modification or update to the H&S
Program.

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ƒ Participates in JSAs as requested and maintains records.


ƒ Issues disciplinary measures when required, interrupts work if necessary and notifies the contractor
accordingly.
ƒ Conducts incident investigations and follow-ups on corrective actions.
ƒ Ensures communication with the contractors’ H&S officers.
ƒ Informs Construction/Site Manager of H&S issues to ensure compliance with contractual
obligations.
ƒ Leads Joint H&S Committee meetings.
ƒ Participates in meetings in which H&S topics are discussed.
ƒ Communicates H&S issues/initiatives using posters, notices, etc.
ƒ Assists Contract Administrators with contractors’ end-of-contract H&S evaluations.

4.1.9 SNC-LAVALIN EMPLOYEE

Every SNC-Lavalin employee has the following responsibilities:


ƒ Care about their own safety and that of their colleagues by complying with all applicable
requirements.
ƒ Be on guard at all times to prevent against H&S risks, or putting others who might be working
nearby at risk of injury.
ƒ Use available PPE and protection devices when required.
ƒ Report any unsafe conditions and near misses to immediate supervisor.
ƒ Maintain their work area in a clean and uncluttered manner.
ƒ Comply with hazard indications and signs.
ƒ Refuse to undertake a task if they do not know the risks associated with it and/or for which they
forecast unsafe conditions.
ƒ Refuse to operate equipment without proper training.
ƒ Be familiar with the WE CARE Value Statement, the GHS Policy and as well as the GHSMS
objectives, requirements and standards.
ƒ Be familiar with all H&S information provided to them through posters, information bulletins and
other means.
ƒ Request explanations from their immediate superior on measures and/or H&S directives, when
necessary.
ƒ Participate in training and meetings and sign attendance records, as required.
ƒ Prepare a JSA prior to visiting a non-controlled site such as clients’ or suppliers’ facilities.
ƒ Utilize the Personal StepBack cards whenever necessary.
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ƒ Be familiar with the 14 Blue Rules and strictly adhere to them.

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4.2 COMPETENCE, TRAINING, AND AWARENESS

SNC-Lavalin’s approach to H&S training and competency is to promote continuous improvement and
reward innovation. SNC-Lavalin leadership believes in safety as a core value and encourages its
personnel to work as champions of safety. BUs shall ensure that their personnel are competent to
perform their jobs. In the absence of full competency, sufficient supervision shall be in place.
A competent person is a person who:
ƒ Is qualified, because of knowledge, training and experience, to organize the work and its
performance;
ƒ Is fit for the job to be performed;
ƒ Is familiar with the regulation applicable to the work performed; and
ƒ Has knowledge of any potential or actual H&S hazards in the workplace.
To ensure success:
ƒ Those who authorize work (supervisors and managers) shall ensure that all personnel are
competent (have the necessary training, qualifications, and experience) for their assigned tasks. At
an individual level, safety competence is defined by:
 Managers – Ability to lead people and ensure appropriate resources for training are
established.
 Supervisors – Possessing strong people skills to correct and reward positive behavior and
reinforce compliance while ensuring adequacy of training.
 All Personnel – Look and see the hazards; assess the risks; take appropriate action while
conducting work activities.
ƒ No one shall work without first receiving the appropriate H&S orientation, training and other
instructions. The training program should include at a minimum:
 Identification of employee training and development needs.
 Employee induction/orientation requirements.
 Development, delivery, and maintenance of applicable training resources.
 A thorough training documentation and tracking process (i.e. training matrix).
ƒ All personnel at a jobsite shall be constantly aware of the hazards and their controls, the location
and distance of the hazards in relation to their location, and maintain a situational awareness of
their work environment. The goal is that all training reinforces these skills.
ƒ Prior to mobilizing on site, contractors must present the list of employees they will mobilize and the
proof of trade certificate for each employee to ensure that they are qualified to perform the work at
the site.
ƒ A Corporate Training Matrix has been established in collaboration with Corporate Human
Resources. It addresses training requirements for every SNC-Lavalin employee based on their job
function. It also outlines key requirements for contractors working under our care and control.
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6842.1 S AVE A LIFE STICKER (EN, FR)


6842.2 W E C ARE BOOKMARK (EN, FR)
6842.3 CORPORATE HR/H&S T RAINING M ATRIX (EN, FR)

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6842.4 T RAINING CERTIFICATE T EMPLATE (EN, FR, SP)

4.2.1 SAFETY LEADERSHIP TRAINING (8 HOURS)

The Safety Leadership Training program is a mandatory requirement for all leaders in the organization.
All project managers, construction managers, BU managers, and executives throughout SNC-Lavalin
shall complete the Safety Leadership Training program that was endorsed by the OPCOM members in
July 2010. This can be further delivered throughout the organization at the discretion of the BUs.
Trainers must attend two full sessions to become certified facilitators.
6842.1.1 S AFETY LEADERSHIP T RAINING P ACKAGE (EN, FR, SP)
6842.1.2 RISKOMETRIC PERSONALITY C ARDS (EN, FR, SP)

4.2.2 RISK COMPETENCY TRAINING (4 HOURS)

The Risk Competency Training program is intended for all frontline supervisors and managers within
SNC-Lavalin to help identify behaviors and risks and to improve risk management skills. The training
session shall be customized for each project, office, and/or operation using the Corporate Risk
Competency Program.
6842.2.1 RISK COMPETENCY T RAINING P ACKAGE (EN, FR, SP)

4.2.3 ORIENTATION

A global orientation program shall be used as the starting point for office/project inductions. Specific
information for the particular office or project shall be added as required. It is a mandatory requirement
that all employees, contractors, and visitors receive an orientation prior to commencing work on behalf
of SNC-Lavalin. The orientation shall include at a minimum SNC-Lavalin safety standards, contractor
and subcontractor responsibilities, health monitoring, applicable legislation, and any other training
requirements. All are encouraged to share orientation programs on the HSKN.
6842.3.1 S AFETY AND SUCCESS ORIENTATION VIDEO (EN, FR)
6842.3.2 HSE INDUCTION H ARDHAT STICKER (EN, FR, SP)
6842.3.3 GORILLA H ARDHAT S TICKER (EN, FR)
6842.3.4 GLOBAL H&S ORIENTATION FOR NEW EMPLOYEES (EN, FR)

4.2.4 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH AND SAFETY (1.5 HOURS)

This training package is designed to introduce basic safety fundamentals to our employees. It
introduces basic safety concepts and allows each participant to engage with the facilitator.
6842.4.1 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH & S AFETY (EN, FR)

4.2.5 DRIVER SAFETY TRAINING

It is mandatory that all employees who drive company vehicles or more than 400km per year in a non-
company vehicle while being ‘at work’, complete driver’s training.
MS

Such applicable employees need to complete the appropriate modules from AlertDriving, the
recommended third party training provider (or equivalent), prior to using a vehicle under the above
mentioned conditions for the first time of the year and refresh this training every year.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.3 MEETINGS AND COMMUNICATION

SNC-Lavalin encourages all personnel and managers to engage in discussions and dialog that promote
recognition and understanding of hazards and risk levels. Safety meetings should also be about
appropriate mitigation, behaviors, and responses for every project, operation and office.

4.3.1 HEALTH AND SAFETY MEETINGS

Information related to H&S issues shall be communicated to all appropriate groups and personnel in a
prompt and effective manner.
ƒ The following examples of H&S meetings shall occur at all SNC-Lavalin controlled sites:
 Toolbox meetings: to be held weekly to discuss H&S topics with employees.
 Construction/Operations Coordination meetings: to be held weekly to review all H&S related
matters and in preparation of activities for the following week. During this meeting, H&S issues
are the first topic on the agenda and require active participation from attendees
(Construction/Operations manager, site H&S Manager, and contractors representatives when
necessary).
 During this meeting, the site management team will also assess the contractors’ monthly
performance against the projects Key Performance Indicators (KPI).
ƒ H&S meetings shall be documented and saved as official records for a minimum of three years.
ƒ Discussion and resolution of employee safety issues and concerns shall be performed to reinforce
the teamwork, commitment, and participation required to achieve H&S performance objectives and
to continually improve the H&S program.
ƒ Safety meetings in smaller offices and projects may be incorporated and added into the minutes of
other existing meetings, as appropriate.
ƒ Meetings with three or more people in attendance should begin with a safety moment.
6843.1.1 HEALTH AND S AFETY M EETING M INUTES T EMPLATE (EN, FR)

4.3.2 JOINT HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

It is recommended for SNC-Lavalin and its contractor(s) (with more than 20 employees) to form a Joint
H&S Committee (JHSC). It may also be required by legislation when the total workforce equals a
specific number.
The functions of the JHSC will be as follows:
ƒ To review significant incidents and/or incident trends and develop and recommend appropriate
controls and interventions.
ƒ Establish measurable key proactive performance indicators for H&S progress.
ƒ Review progress towards achieving proactive performance indicators.
ƒ Review and improve where required the levels of communication and participation in H&S programs
by all personnel.
MS

ƒ Review and analyze future proposed work activities to determine potential areas of risk and advise
on suitable corrective actions/interventions.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

ƒ Review project’s health and hygiene requirements and standards and recommend appropriate
controls where necessary.
ƒ Review and analyze sources of pollution and waste and identify appropriate efforts to eliminate or
reduce them. Initiate special awareness programs as required.
ƒ Analyze effectiveness of reporting and recording systems and make recommendations for
improvement where required.
ƒ Review effectiveness of training, education and orientation programs and recommend appropriate
actions for improvement.
ƒ Recommend programs aimed at stimulating and maintaining interest in workplace H&S
management systems.
Minutes from each meeting shall be circulated to committee members and a copy posted on site notice
boards for general information. A summary shall be issued for discussion at Toolbox meetings as
necessary. Minutes will include an attachment detailing recommended corrective actions, completion
dates for corrective actions and persons responsible for completion of corrective actions.
On project sites where the size of the workforce or legislation does not require the establishment of an
H&S Committee, the contractors and/or SNC-Lavalin shall formally communicate H&S related matters
to its workforce in the Toolbox meetings. It is expected that records be retained and corrective actions
be communicated to the affected workforce.
An office H&S committee shall be established with appropriate employee representation. The office
H&S committee shall meet not less than once every three months.
For office H&S committee requirements, refer to section 4.5.2.5 Office Safety.

4.3.3 HEALTH AND SAFETY MILESTONES

It is recognized that milestones in H&S are important and should be acknowledged (i.e. 2,000,000
hours worked without a lost time incident). These types of communications shall not be distributed prior
to the completion of a project. The message should be about vulnerability and always staying vigilant
in everything we do each day. Our experience is that pre-mature congratulatory messages send the
wrong meaning and can actually encourage complacency.

4.4 DOCUMENT AND DATA CONTROL

The BU and project/operation safety programs shall be maintained by SNC-Lavalin document control
protocols to ensure:
ƒ Relevant personnel have access to the most recent and approved versions.
ƒ No unauthorized modifications or deletions to relevant documents and records occur.
ƒ Relevant records are stored to demonstrate compliance to the requirements of the BU and
project/operation safety programs, legislation, and clients.
ƒ Relevant records are retained in accordance with established retention periods (see Appendices
3.4 Retention Schedule Index of the SNC-Lavalin Records Management Handbook
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http://eww.snclavalin.com/cws_archives/procedures/Retention_Schedule_1999.pdf#search=%22rec
ords%22).
ƒ Information relating to applicable laws and regulations, licenses, permits, codes, standards, and
practices are documented, kept current, and accessible.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

ƒ Only those having authorization can create, modify, or delete relevant documents.
ƒ The approved review process is followed for all relevant documents. The process shall include the
consideration of any possible effects the change(s) may have on:
 Other parts of the document being reviewed;
 The effectiveness and suitability of other safety programs;
 Service and product quality and compliance with defined requirements;
 Other stakeholders;
 Compliance with internal/external company requirements.
ƒ Obsolescence control for documents to be removed from use when obsolete or superseded.
ƒ Document revision is controlled in the same manner and follows a similar process as document
creation.
ƒ Quality and consistency in documentation, style, appearance, and language is maintained for all
H&S documents.

4.4.1 H&S DOCUMENT NUMBERING

SNC-Lavalin has designated the 6800 series to identify Health, Safety & Environment. The 68XX is
consistent with the OHSAS 18001 system structure as laid out within this document. This system
allows for an unlimited number of sub-headings and documents by adding in decimal places to expand
the category.
All H&S documents shall utilize this unique identification numbering system consisting of five groups:
(1) a two number prefix, (2) single number for the document category, (3) single number for the section,
(4) subsection number followed next corresponding numerical digit separated by decimal spaces, (5)
two letters for the document language.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

EXAMPLE 1 (EXISTING DOCUMENT):

6845.2.1.1-EN CRCP Banner


Series Prefix = 68
Document category = 684 (DO)
Section = 6845 (4.5 Operational Control)
Subsection = 6845.1.1.1 (subsection 4.5.1.1 CRCP Banner + decimal and next
available numerical digit)
Language = EN (English)
EXAMPLE 2 (EXISTING PROCEDURE)
6831.2.1-EN Job Safety Analysis Standard
Series Prefix = 68
Document category = 683 (PLAN)
Section = 6831 (3.1 Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment, and Determining
Controls)
Subsection = 6831.2.1 (3.1.2 Job Safety Analysis Standard + decimal and next
available numerical digit)
Language = EN (English)

EXAMPLE 3 (TO ADD-IN BU MANAGEMENT REVIEW PROCEDURE)

6861.1-EN BU Management Review Procedure


Series Prefix = 68
Document category = 686 (ACT)
Section = 6861 (6.1 Management Review)
Subsection = 6861.1 (6.1.1 BU Management Review Procedure)
Language = EN (English)
FOOTER:
All documents in the management system require this footer information:
6801-EN-Rev.1 Last printed 2014-12-16 10:45:00 AM Page 24 of 41

REVISION HISTORY INDEX:


All documents in the management system require this revision history index:

Revision Date Description Prepared by Approved by


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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.5 OPERATIONAL CONTROL

4.5.1 CRITICAL RISK CONTROL PROTOCOLS

All personnel shall comply with the Critical Risk Control Protocols (CRCP). These non-negotiable
practices are designed to mitigate or eliminate eight high risk hazards areas that have historically
resulted in fatalities and significant events.
The CRCPs establish minimum performance expectations and shall be fully implemented at all SNC-
Lavalin controlled sites and operations. The eight critical risk areas are:
1. Vehicles
2. Hazardous Materials
3. Equipment Safeguarding
4. De-Energization
5. Working at Heights
6. Lifting Operations
7. Confined Space
8. Excavations
The CRCPs are reviewed annually to ensure they accurately reflect the high risk hazard areas for the
organization. These are non-negotiable practices built-on lessons learned experience and industry
best practices.
6845.1.1 CRITICAL RISK C ONTROL PROTOCOLS (EN, FR, SP)
6845.1.2 VEHICLES AND M OBILE EQUIPMENT INSPECTION STICKERS (EN, FR, SP)
6845.1.3 W ORKING AT HEIGHT VISIBLE REMINDER (EN, FR, SP)
6845.1.4 INSPECTION VERIFICATION S TICKERS (EN, FR, SP)
6845.1.5 H AZARDOUS M ATERIALS S TICKERS (EN, FR)
6845.1.6 VEHICLE STICKERS (EN, FR, SP)

4.5.1.1 CRCP BANNER


The poster highlighting the key controls from the CRCPs shall be displayed in a prominent location on
all SNC-Lavalin controlled project/operation sites.

MS

6845.1.1.1 CRCP B ANNER (AR, CH, EN, FR, PL, SP, CR)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.5.1.2 CRCP E-LEARNING


8 distinct e-Learning modules are available to raise awareness on the requirements of the CRCPs.
Completion of the CRCP e-learning modules is mandatory for all applicable SNC-Lavalin site-based
employees, as determined by each BU.
It is strongly recommended that contractor personnel who work at SNC-Lavalin controlled sites for
periods exceeding 30 business days take the CRCP e-learning program.
It is also recommended that SNC-Lavalin office-based employees (corporate function employees and
BU employees based at home offices) complete the CRCP e-Learning program to become acquainted
with these essential corporate requirements.
Access to the e-learning modules is provided on the corporate Learning Management System.
6845.1.2.1 CRCP E-LEARNING (EN, FR, SP, PO)

4.5.2 CORPORATE HEALTH & SAFETY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

These standards provide minimum requirements and should be used in conjunction with the Critical
Risk Control Protocols and BU safety programs.
4.5.2.1 CONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT
SNC-Lavalin, as a project prime/principal contractor, shall have robust systems to ensure all
contractors are fulfilling their respective OH&S responsibilities from initiation to completion. The project
management system shall include provisions for:
ƒ Contractor Selection Process
ƒ Contractor Classification
ƒ Contractor Assessment
ƒ Contractor Pre-Mobilization
ƒ Contractor Roles and Responsibilities
ƒ Contractor Non-Compliance and Disciplinary Actions
In cooperation with Global Procurement, the GPS Tools software suite can be installed to extract
contractors’ data from the Global Procurement System.
6845.2.1.1 CONTRACTOR M ANAGEMENT SOP (EN, FR)
6845.2.1.2 CONTRACTOR P RE-SELECTION FORM (EN, FR)
6845.2.1.3 CONTRACTOR P RE-M OBILIZATION FORM (EN, FR)

4.5.2.2 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT


This standard provides minimum requirements for use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during
specific work conditions where other controls (hierarchy of controls) do not provide adequate protection
from hazards. If these minimum requirements cannot be achieved, submit a deviation or variance
request (refer to Section 1.5). It is the expectation that all BUs will utilize a documented risk-based
process to determine PPE requirements.
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6845.2.2.1 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT SOP (EN, FR)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.5.2.3 MODIFIED WORK


A modified work program should be utilized at all global locations to rehabilitate employees following a
work-related injury, illness, or adverse health effect.
6845.2.3.1 M ODIFIED W ORK SOP (EN, FR)
6845.2.3.2 LETTER TO PHYSICIAN (EN, FR)
6845.2.3.3 LETTER TO EMPLOYEE (EN, FR)
6845.2.3.4 RETURN TO W ORK CHECKLIST (EN, FR)

4.5.2.4 FIT FOR WORK


Every employee has the right to a safe and reliable workplace. SNC-Lavalin is committed to ensuring
no one creates a risk to themselves, others, and/or to physical equipment.
Fit for Work encompasses managing elements of personal well-being that can affect work performance
and safety. This includes fatigue, stress, and impairment due to prescription and non-prescription
drugs, alcohol and the person’s emotional state.
6845.2.4.1 FIT FOR W ORK SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.5 OFFICE SAFETY


There are many potential occupational health and safety hazards in offices. However, when workplaces
follow appropriate office safety requirements, many of these hazards can be controlled. These are
specific requirements which all SNC-Lavalin offices must adhere to.
6845.2.5.1 OFFICE S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)
6845.2.5.2 OFFICE INSPECTION FORM (EN, FR)

4.5.2.6 BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PROGRAM (BIP)


Behavior Interventions give leaders the opportunity to demonstrate their personal commitment to H&S,
recognize, support and reward appropriate behavior, raise awareness of H&S issues and encourage
better ways to do work.
6845.2.6.1 BIP SOP (EN, FR)
6845.2.6.2 BIP OBSERVATION C ARDS (EN, FR)
6845.2.6.3 BIP T RAINING COURSE (EN, FR)
6845.2.6.4 BIP M ONTHLY T RACKING SHEET (EN, FR)

4.5.2.7 SAFE WORK PERMIT


The Safe Work Permit ensures that proper consideration is given to workplace hazards and that
necessary controls to mitigate the hazards and reduce risks are implemented prior to commencing
work.
6845.2.7.1 S AFE W ORK PERMIT SOP (EN, FR)
6845.2.7.2 AUTHORIZED P ERMIT T O W ORK ISSUERS (EN, FR)
6845.2.7.3 S AFE W ORK PERMIT FORM (EN, FR)

4.5.2.8 CAMP SAFETY


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Acceptable standards in living facilities managed by SNC-Lavalin shall be provided in order to avoid
H&S hazards, as well as to maintain a good level of morale.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

SNC-Lavalin employees, contractors and visitors shall be protected against diseases and/or illness
resulting from: humidity; water supply and standards; cold; spread of fungus; proliferation of insects or
rodents; or food poisoning.
6845.2.8.1 C AMP S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.9 TRAFFIC CONTROL


SNC-Lavalin controlled projects must ensure that effective traffic control is provided and used
whenever traffic could be hazardous to an employee or to the public affected by the project or site.
6845.2.9.1 T RAFFIC CONTROL SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.10 COMMISSIONING
Project and site commissioning shall be effectively coordinated and planned to ensure that SNC-Lavalin
employees and contractor do not encounter undue risk from uncontrolled energy releases while
commissioning equipment and/or systems.
6845.2.10.1 COMMISSIONING SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.11 FIRE PREVENTION


This standard provides the minimum requirements for fire prevention and protection of project sites,
offices and facilities where the company conducts business.
6845.2.11.1 FIRE PREVENTION SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.12 GROUND DISTURBANCE


This standard aims to eliminate the risk of fatalities and reducing the potential for injuries and incidents
when working around buried utilities while conducting ground disturbance activities.
6845.2.12.1 GROUND DISTURBANCE SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.13 HEALTH SURVEILLANCE


This standard aims to ensure that our employees and those who work under our care are appropriately
monitored in the case of exposure to specific physical, chemical, or biological agents.
6845.2.13.1 HEALTH SURVEILLANCE SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.14 WORKING ALONE SAFETY


This standard aims to control the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents arising from hazards associated
with working alone or in isolation.
6845.2.14.1 W ORKING ALONE S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.15 DIVING OPERATIONS


This standard provides the requirements for diving operations at SNC-Lavalin projects and all
associated worksites.
6845.2.15.1 DIVING OPERATIONS SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.16 AIRPORT OPERATIONS SAFETY (DRAFT)


This s provides the requirements for managing OH&S at airports whose operations are managed by
SNC-Lavalin.
MS

6845.2.16.1 AIRPORT OPERATIONS S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.5.2.17 BUSINESS TRAVEL


This standard is jointly managed by GHS and Global Security. It provides SNC-Lavalin business
travellers with information on corporate tools and requirements applicable to each step of their trip
(pre/during/post) to help them control risks related to health conditions, personal safety practices and
security conditions while travelling for the interest of SNC-Lavalin.
6845.2.17.1 BUSINESS T RAVEL SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.18 HEALTH AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-CONTROLLED SITES


This standard provides every employee with minimum requirements while visiting operational sites
where H&S conditions are not controlled by SNC-Lavalin. For instance, such sites can be business
partners’ construction sites or manufacturing facilities operated by SNC-Lavalin’s clients or suppliers.
6845.2.18.1 HEALTH AND S AFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-CONTROLLED SITES SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.19 WILDLIFE SAFETY


The purpose of this standard is to minimize the risk of incidents arising from encountering wildlife.
6845.2.19.1 W ILDLIFE S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.20 RAILWAY OPERATIONS SAFETY (DRAFT)


6845.2.20.1 R AILWAY OPERATIONS S AFETY SOP (EN, FR)

4.5.2.21 SAFETY IN DESIGN (DRAFT)


6845.2.21.1 S AFETY IN DESIGN SOP (EN, FR)

4.6 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

In the event of an emergency or security threat, all BUs and sites shall be adequately prepared to react
in an efficient and effective manner protecting people, the community, the environment, client’s assets,
and company’s assets. All offices and projects must have a comprehensive, current emergency
response plan (ERP). At a minimum it shall mandate:
ƒ Emergency response role assignments.
ƒ Periodic emergency response training in accordance with applicable requirements.
ƒ Periodic drills/simulations testing evacuation and response.
ƒ An adequate number of trained emergency wardens and first aiders on-site during all working
hours.
ƒ Appropriate first aid and other emergency response equipment on-site, in good working order, and
regularly inspected, maintained, and replaced, as necessary.
ƒ Incident investigations done in a timely manner, and effectively communicated to all affected
parties, including management, the local H&S department, and regulatory and law enforcement
bodies, as appropriate.
ƒ Preventative inspections to proactively identify hazards and their controls.
6846.1 EMERGENCY CONTACT POSTER (EN, FR, SP)
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6846.2 SITE EMERGENCY CALL S TICKER (EN, FR, SP)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

4.6.1 EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE

All controlled sites must have the appropriate first aid equipment and provisions to provide the minimum
acceptable level of emergency medical response care and equipment necessary.
6846.1.1 EMERGENCY M EDICAL RESPONSE SOP (EN, FR)
6846.1.2 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN T EMPLATE (EN, FR)
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Global Health and Safety Management System

5.0 CHECK (6850)


5.1 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MONITORING

5.1.1 HEALTH AND SAFETY INDICATOR DEFINITIONS FOR CORPORATE MONTHLY


TRACKING

The SNC-Lavalin H&S indicators are meant to define which work related events are tracked in an effort
to promote a safety culture (leading indicators) and report work related safety incidents (lagging
indicators).
It is understood that these definitions may not always match the reporting definitions used by the safety
regulators in particular areas. It is recognized that in some cases, a project needs to keep two sets of
numbers, one for local regulatory reporting and one to meet corporate reporting standards.
The objective is to collect safety statistics using common metrics for all BUs so that the numbers can be
readily trended, tracked, and compared.

Fatality
Recordable
Incidents All
Injuries
Lost Time

Modified Work

All Incidents
(High / Low Potential)
Medical Aid

First Aid

Near Miss

Imminent Danger (Unsafe Condition or Behavior)

6851.1.1 HEALTH AND S AFETY INDICATORS (EN, FR)


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Global Health and Safety Management System

5.1.2 H&S STATISTICS DATABASE

All office and project H&S statistics shall be entered on a monthly basis into the Health, Safety &
Environment Statistics (HSES) database within the first ten days of the month. All SNC-Lavalin
employees with a company login have access to the database (https://hses.snclavalin.com).
Since the HSES database is the required tool used to monitor performance, its calibration and
maintenance shall be conducted in compliance with applicable procedures and requirements defined by
Global Information Technology (GIT). GIT is the sole entity responsible for calibration and maintenance
of the HSES database.

6851.2.1 HSES D ATABASE – USER M ANUAL (EN, FR)

5.1.3 SAFETY PERCEPTION SURVEY

To help project management gauge the prevalent safety attitude of their project personnel a minimum
of two perception surveys should be conducted annually.
There are two types of perception surveys:
1. Formal (organization sample)
2. Informal (e-survey)
These are designed to ensure that organizational changes and improvements are based on the realities
of risk, culture and performance trends. Our culture is a fundamental element and influences SNC-
Lavalin performance at every level. Our managers and leaders need to know the mindset of their
teams with respect to H&S.
There are many tools used to confidentially deliver the survey and tally the results. Please contact the
GHS team for further information.
6851.3.1 S AFETY PERCEPTION SURVEY S AMPLE QUESTIONS (EN, FR)

5.2 EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENTS

SNC-Lavalin’s audit program contributes to the company’s objective for continual improvement in H&S
performance by evaluating compliance with H&S requirements and standards.
An audit schedule is established by the SVP, GHS at the beginning of the year. Frequent updates
during the year are made to the audit program in order to reflect changes in the scope of activities (i.e.
new projects/operations) and timelines
MS

There are two types of assessments at the corporate level:


1. Eye-On-Risk Safety Review
2. Corporate Health and Safety Audit – minimum passing score of 90%

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Global Health and Safety Management System

5.2.1 EYE-ON-RISK SAFETY REVIEW

To verify the continued suitability and effectiveness of the projects/operations safety programs, periodic
management reviews such as Eye-On-Risk Safety Reviews should be conducted. This process helps
management identify issues that have the potential to affect safety, which are then mitigated or
prioritized.
The Eye-On-Risk Safety Review provides both a qualitative and quantitative assessment of leadership,
behavior, culture and systems. It is designed to help recognize hazards and take steps to manage the
risk. The objective of the Eye-On-Risk Safety Review is to engage management and front-line staff in
project site safety.
The Eye-On-Risk process is designed for projects with an established safety culture, and consistent
high scores on the Corporate H&S Audit Tool. In collaboration with the senior BU H&S representative
the SVP, GHS will conduct or sanction Eye-On-Risk Safety Reviews as required. These are conducted
to further enhance safety culture.
6852.1.1 E YE-ON-RISK PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES (EN, FR)

5.2.2 CORPORATE HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT TOOL

The Corporate H&S Audit Tool shall be used both as a self-evaluation audit and a corporate validation
of compliance to SNC-Lavalin standards and best practices. To validate all sites’ adherence to the
GHSMS, the GHS team will perform corporate audits.
The audit selection criteria include, but are not limited to:
ƒ Reporting of leading indicators
ƒ Number of project hours recorded – high volumes are considered
ƒ Number of incidents reported – high volumes are considered
ƒ Disconcerting incident trends
ƒ Score reported by the site during their monthly self-audits
ƒ Specific EVP and Client requests
ƒ Location – proximity of sites in the same region
ƒ Previous Corporate H&S Audit score below 90%
Upon completion of the audit, the report is sent to the BU and site leadership team; site scores are
reported to the OPCOM on a monthly basis and the reports uploaded to the HSES database.
Should audits or reviews raise concerns each BU President/EVP/MD will be expected to hold their
teams accountable to meet expectations and improve conditions.
BU H&S VP/Directors are encouraged to participate in the self-audits of their sites on a quarterly basis.
BU-led audits are considered as self-audits and will be reported as such in the HSES database.
6852.2.1 2015 CORPORATE HEALTH AND S AFETY AUDIT T OOL (EN, FR, SP)
6852.2.2 CORPORATE HEALTH AND S AFETY AUDIT T OOL T RAINING (EN, FR)
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6852.2.3 CORPORATE HEALTH AND S AFETY AUDIT AGENDA (EN, FR)

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5.2.3 SAFETY VISIT/INSPECTION

To record formal visits to our projects, operations and offices and to initiate follow-up activities it is
recommended that the Safety Visit/Inspection form be used. When corporate representatives make a
visit or conduct a non-audit inspection, this form will be used to document all agreed upon items.
Each OPCOM member is required to conduct two (2) site safety visits per calendar year and document
them using the Safety Visit/Inspection form.
6852.3.1 S AFETY VISIT/INSPECTION FORM (EN, FR)

5.2.4 SITE INSPECTION PROGRAM

Every site shall implement a documented inspection program, stating different inspection tiers and
frequency, and responsible job functions. Corrective action plans shall be issued for each inspection in
case of nonconformities or substandard acts and conditions. Active participation will be mandatory
from all personnel, especially site management representatives.
Personnel who have relevant experience with the work being performed or being planned at the time of
the visit, shall conduct inspections. Management representatives should be familiar with the nature of
the work to be carried out and the potential associated hazards.

5.3 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION, NONCONFORMITY, CORRECTIVE ACTION, AND


PREVENTIVE ACTION

It is expected that all incidents be reported and investigated utilizing the SNC-Lavalin Incident
Investigation SOP and Form(s). For recordable and/or high potential incidents, root cause(s) must be
established using the Incident Cause Analysis Methodology (ICAM), as detailed in the SNC-Lavalin
Incident Investigation SOP. The final incident investigation report must be submitted to the line
management and the BU H&S VP/Director and uploaded into the SNC-Lavalin HSES database within
14 days.
Nonconformities, corrective and preventive actions are managed at the BU level. It is expected that
BUs conduct a risk evaluation of all corrective and preventive actions prior to implementation.
A template has been developed to help BUs achieve a comprehensive and effective assessment,. It
enables BUs to summarize and follow-up on corrective and preventive actions.
All recordable incidents must be reported to the President and CEO within 24 hours of occurrence.
Upon incident occurrence, project line management shall notify the BU President/EVP/MD and BU H&S
VP/Director. The BU President/EVP/MD must immediately inform via email the President and CEO,
Group President, EVP, IMS, and SVP, GHS.
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Global Health and Safety Management System

Incident Occurs

BU EVP to report
Recordable Non-Recordable
incident to CEO (Fatality, Lost Time, Modified
(within 24 hours of incident (First Aid, Near Miss)
Work, Medical Aid)
occurrence)

High Potential Low Potential

BU Conference Call Reported in the HSES


(within 72 hours of Database
(10th day of the following
incident occurance) month)

Entered in the HSE


Statistics Database

Upload completed
Incident Investigation to
HSES Database
(within 14 days)

6853.1 NONCONFORMITY REGISTER (EN, FR, SP)


6853.2 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION SOP (EN, FR, PO)
6853.3 INCIDENT NOTIFICATION FORM (EN, FR, PO, SP)
6853.4 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORTING FORM (EN, FR, PO, SP)
6853.5 ICAM CHART T EMPLATE (EN, FR, PO, SP)
6853.6 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION T RAINING (EN, FR)
6853.6.1 ICAM C ASE STUDY (EN, FR)

5.3.1 INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING OF INCIDENTS CLASSIFIED HIGH POTENTIAL

All incidents should be fully investigated (using ICAM) to establish causation and identify corrective
measures. The occurrence of incidents classified as high potential (HiPo) (be they a near miss, first aid,
medical aid, modified work, lost time, or fatality) are regarded as a heightened warning of systemic
and/or other organizational failures and shall be acted upon promptly with a proper investigation (see
6853.2).
5.3.1.1 BUSINESS UNIT CONFERENCE CALL
For all HiPo incidents, a BU specific conference call must be scheduled within 72 hours to discuss the
incident and ensure the immediate and corrective actions identified in the incident notification form are
approved by the BU EVP, BU H&S VP/Director, Project H&S Manager, and others as appropriate. A
record of this call shall be retained and made available upon request.

5.3.2 SERIOUS INCIDENT COMMUNICATION PROCESS

Definition:
ƒ
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Fatality; or
ƒ Permanent disabling injury (i.e. loss of an eye, loss of a limb, paraplegia, etc.); or
ƒ Several persons injured in a single event.

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Global Health and Safety Management System

When a serious incident occurs at one of SNC-Lavalin’s controlled worksites, the following
communication process shall be followed to inform SNC-Lavalin Management and personnel:
In the event of a Serious Incident and once the emergency response issues have been taken care of,
the Project Manager shall inform the BU President/EVP/MD, BU H&S VP/Director, and the Division
GM. The persons with the best knowledge of the incident shall then complete the Incident Notification
Form (6853.3) and submit it to the SVP, GHS who will then circulate it to Global Corporate
Communications (GCC), as per the procedure for the preparation and distribution of a Express News.
The Express News will be distributed within 24 hours to all employees with an SNC-Lavalin email
address.
A formal one page bulletin shall be drafted under the BU EVP’s signature and:
ƒ Be prepared and distributed within 24 hours of the incident.
ƒ For a Fatality, be distributed under the signature of the Group President to all SNC-Lavalin
employees through Express News
ƒ For all other Serious Incidents, distributed under the signature of the Group President to the SNC-
Lavalin Management Committee.
ƒ Contain only known, verifiable facts about the incident (no assumptions or attachment of blame).
ƒ Take into account the need to ensure the privacy for the employee(s) involved.
ƒ Include the victim’s name if the next of kin have been properly notified.
The President and CEO will provide the information to the SNC-Lavalin Board of Directors, as required.
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Global Health and Safety Management System

5.3.3 IMMINENT DANGER

An Imminent Danger is any unsafe condition or unsafe behavior (no energy release) where no incident
occurred, but the possibility existed. These occurrences are to be immediately corrected and promptly
reported as a leading indicator in the HSES Database (section 5.1.2).
Although not mandated, a formal investigation of Imminent Dangers (unsafe behavior/unsafe
conditions) is encouraged. This allows for proactive identification of improvement areas before they
become significant and turn into actual incidents.
Since imminent dangers are not actual incidents, High/Low potential classification shall not be applied
to them.
Refer to 6851.1.1 H&S Indicators for further information and examples.
6853.3.1 IMMINENT D ANGER FORM (EN, FR, PO, SP)

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Global Health and Safety Management System

6.0 ACT (6860)


6.1 MANAGEMENT REVIEW

Periodic management reviews of the GHSMS shall be conducted in order to ensure the continued
suitability, adequacy and effectiveness of the GHSMS and to make adjustments accordingly. Other
items to be reviewed are the analysis of risk and performance, examination of the safety culture,
leadership, safety systems, leading indicators, and incident data.
Types of management reviews:
ƒ BU monthly reporting of statistics and review meeting;
ƒ EXCOM and OPCOM meetings, Montreal Head Office;
ƒ Quarterly HSSE Committee, Board of Directors meetings;
ƒ Annual document review of the GHSMS – December.
During these management reviews, an assessment of opportunities for improvement and change is
performed. Outputs of these management reviews are consistent with SNC-Lavalin’s commitment to
continuous improvement and will include any decisions and actions related to possible changes.
Relevant outputs of the management reviews are subsequently made available for communication and
consultation.

6.1.1 RESOURCE ALLOCATION REVIEW

SNC-Lavalin management shall conduct an annual allocation review of H&S related resources.
Adjustments are made when necessary to ensure adequacy and appropriateness with regards to the
implementation of new initiatives and/or maintenance of ongoing program components. This will
coincide with the reviews mentioned in section 6.1.

6.1.2 AUDIT REVIEW

SNC-Lavalin management shall review audit results (internal or external) in a timely fashion. Scoring
and audit results shall be posted in the HSES database and presented as a leading indicator in the
monthly OPCOM report. Timelines for completion of audit recommendations are dependent on both the
associated risk and nature of the recommendation.
Ninety (90) days after every Global H&S audit, the Lead Auditor sends a notification to the Site
Leadership Team, requesting an update on the corrective and preventive actions implemented to close
the nonconformities identified. Audit recommendations should be reviewed and changes implemented
before a subsequent audit is conducted.

6.1.3 MONTHLY REVIEW

The strengths, weaknesses, and suitability of the BUs H&S initiatives shall be reviewed on a monthly
basis. The status of investigations, corrective measures, and preventive actions are reviewed and any
significant issues identified during risk assessments and regulatory developments are also to be
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discussed.
Performance is measured using:

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ƒ An evaluation of leading and lagging indicators with respect to industry standards, targets, historical
data, client requirements, etc.
ƒ An evaluation of both internal and external audits, inspection reports, and disciplinary reports to
ensure the BUs H&S initiatives validity.
ƒ Reviews of the overall assessment process to ensure adequacy, suitability, and effectiveness in
managing risk.

6.2 VISIBLE SAFETY LEADERSHIP

SNC-Lavalin management shall conduct frequent site visits to clearly demonstrate their personal
commitment to promoting a positive safety culture and to reinforce appropriate behaviors. Visiting
managers should also be informed of this initiative and be encouraged to participate fully to ensure
maximum impact.

6862.1 VISIBLE S AFETY LEADERSHIP C ARD (EN, FR, SP, PO)

6.3 LEARNING ORGANIZATION

SNC-Lavalin’s H&S objective is to foster a ‘learning organization’ culture, where lessons learned are
shared, appropriate measures taken, and reports sent back to track the ‘live’ application of what has
been learned.

6.3.1 LESSONS LEARNED

For every incident classified as high potential and where the lessons learned have general application
throughout the organization, a lessons learned report shall be issued by the impacted BU.
Furthermore, the EVP, IMS and/or the SVP, GHS may request lessons learned reports for specific low
potential incidents that have general application throughout the organization.
A lessons learned repository is available on the HSKN. All lessons learned reports shall be uploaded by
the BUs to this repository. External lessons learned reports (i.e. for incidents having occurred on
external operations) can also be uploaded to the HSKN if they are relevant to the SNC-Lavalin’s scope
of activities. The repository is accessible to all SNC-Lavalin employees. Senior Management
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Committee members are strongly encouraged to review lessons learned reports that are uploaded to
the repository and to actively share them within their BUs and divisions.
For serious incidents, an electronic process is initiated by the President and CEO to all Senior
Management Committee members. They are required to read the lessons learned report and they are

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Global Health and Safety Management System

prompted to detail why it does not apply or demonstrate compliance with the lessons learned contained
in the report. The gathered data is then reported back to the President and CEO. This process is
designed to close the loop on serious incidents and ensure they are not repeated.
6863.1.1 LESSONS LEARNED REPORT (EN, FR, SP)

6.4 POSITIVE INCENTIVE PROGRAM

At SNC-Lavalin, we have merged the benefits of a behavior based observation program and a safety
reward program to create our own Positive Incentive Program.
In order to ensure that all employees are engaged and committed to the highest level of safety, SNC-
Lavalin shall deploy this unique Positive Incentive Program on all SNC-Lavalin controlled sites.
This strategy is designed to include all employees, including senior management, and encourage
positive interactions and immediate feedback. This system focuses on rewarding proactive risk
management behavior in order to improve outputs.
Experience shows any incentive program becomes effective and reinforces behavior when it meets
three criteria:
Desirable Reward schemes are attractive for the target demographic
Attainable Possible for anyone to achieve a reward
Associating Must be immediately tied to the identified behavior

The intention is to reward efforts not results. The positive incentive program empowers all stakeholders
to reinforce desired actions in a tangible way.
6864.1 POSITIVE INCENTIVE PROGRAM SOP (EN, FR)
6864.2 POSITIVE INCENTIVE C ARD (EN, FR, PO, SP)
6864.3 POSITIVE INCENTIVE C ALCULATOR (BUDGET) (EN, FR)
6864.4 POSITIVE INCENTIVE T RACKING D ATABASE (EN, FR)
6864.5 POSITIVE INCENTIVE PROGRAM T RAINING (EN, FR)
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6.5 BLUE RULES

SNC-Lavalin has adopted 14 Blue Rules. These rules shall be followed by all employees and
contractors’ employees (on controlled sites) and are non-negotiable. A ‘’just culture‘’ approach shall be
adopted in order to determine the accountability of unsafe acts committed against the Blue Rules; as a
result, disciplinary actions could be enforced.
The Blue Rules are classified under two groups: seven ‘Always’ behaviors and seven ‘Never’
behaviors.
ALWAYS
ƒ Conduct a StepBack prior to starting work
ƒ Use fall protection when working above 1.8 m (6’)
ƒ Wear a seatbelt when in any moving vehicle
ƒ Use a spotter / flag person as required
ƒ Verify isolation of all energy sources
ƒ Comply with the scaffold color tag system
ƒ Hold the handrail when using stairs
NEVER
ƒ Work from a ladder without maintaining 3 points of contact
ƒ Drive above speed limits or while using a mobile phone
ƒ Work under the effects of drugs or alcohol
ƒ Modify, remove or override any machine guards
ƒ Commence work without wearing required PPE
ƒ Enter an excavation, confined space or exclusion zone without authorization
ƒ Walk under a suspended load
6865.1 BLUE RULES (EN, FR, SP, PO)

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HEALTH & SAFETY

Health&Safety.Corporate@snclavalin.com
Indicators
HEALTH AND SAFETY
INDICATORS
2015
Health and Safety Indicators

Indicators
Revision History

Revision Date Description Prepared by Approved by

Global Health &


0 March 1st, 2007 Original issue C. Price
Safety

December 12th, Global Health &


1 Entire document updated T. Van Wieren
2010 Safety

Global Health &


2 January 1st, 2012 At work definition added T. Van Wieren
Safety

Global Health &


3 January 1st, 2013 Definitions, format updated T. Van Wieren
Safety

Global Health &


4 January 1st, 2014 Entire document updated T. Van Wieren
Safety

Global Health &


5 January 1st, 2015 Entire document updated T. Van Wieren
Safety

Caution: Un-Controlled Copy


Valid only at time of retrieval from network source directory.
User should verify that the revision number is the most current.

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Health and Safety Indicators
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Table of Contents

1.0 OVERVIEW 3
2.0 COUNTING HOURS 3
2.1 SNC-Lavalin Employees – Home Office 3
2.2 SNC-Lavalin Employees – Field 3
2.3 Contractor 3
2.4 SNC-Lavalin controlled / Non-controlled Sites 3
2.5 At Work 4
2.6 Not At Work 5
2.7 Hours Worked 5
3.0 LEADING INDICATORS 6
3.1 Behavior Intervention Program 6
3.2 Self Audits 6
3.3 Imminent Dangers 6
3.4 Lessons Learned 7
3.5 Incident Investigations 7
3.6 Driver Safety Training 7
3.7 StepBack Training 7
3.8 StepBack Cards Completed 7
3.9 Contractor Pre-Mobilization 8
4.0 LAGGING INDICATORS 8
4.1 Near Miss (NM) 9
4.2 First Aid (FA) 9
4.3 Medical Aid (MA) 10
4.4 Modified Work (MW) 10
4.5 Modified Work Days (MWD) 10
4.6 Lost Time (LT) 10
4.7 Lost Time Days (LTD) 10
4.8 Fatality (F) 11
4.9 Reportable and Non Reportable Incidents 11
5.0 FREQUENCY CALCULATIONS 12

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1.0 OVERVIEW

Why we do this The Health and Safety (H&S) indicators are meant to accurately and
consistently track incidents (lagging) and proactive (leading) efforts.
Two sets of The leading indicators are current best practices and the lagging indicators
numbers generally follow the United States Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) regulations. The objective is to collect safety data
using common metrics for all Business Units.
It is understood that these definitions may not always match the reporting
definitions used by the regulators in particular jurisdictions. In some cases, a
site may need to keep two sets of numbers, one for local regulatory reporting
and one to meet the SNC-Lavalin corporate reporting standards.
This document applies to all SNC-Lavalin controlled sites, employees and sub-
contractors

2.0 COUNTING HOURS


2.1 SNC-LAVALIN EMPLOYEES – HOME OFFICE
Home office hours All direct hire SNC-Lavalin personnel who work in offices which are not
physically located at a project or operating site.
Employees working in a home office must always be reported against that
home office. Hours worked and incidents recorded for work done in the home
office for a project should be entered against the home office, not the project.

2.2 SNC-LAVALIN EMPLOYEES – FIELD


Field hours Count/record all direct hire SNC-Lavalin employees who work at controlled or
non-controlled sites including the offices at these sites.

2.3 CONTRACTOR
All non SNC-Lavalin An individual who is neither a client nor a direct hire SNC-Lavalin employee
labor is counted as but who is on an SNC-Lavalin controlled site (including home offices) for
contractor business reasons should be included under the contractor category. This
includes consultants, inspectors, subcontractors, suppliers (only counted when
on an SNC-Lavalin controlled site), and third party visitors.

2.4 SNC-LAVALIN CONTROLLED / NON-CONTROLLED SITES


Controlled site The decision to include contractor hours and incidents into our corporate
reporting is dependent on the definition of an SNC-Lavalin site. SNC-Lavalin
has, owing to the diverse nature and locations of it business, varying forms of
contractual arrangements with its clients, JVs and/or consortium partners and
subcontractors. In the case where SNC-Lavalin is prime (principal) contractor
utilizing the SNC-Lavalin GHSMS, the site is considered as a controlled site.

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Non-controlled site A site is generally considered to be a non-controlled SNC-Lavalin site if:


ƒ The project/operation is a Joint Venture where SNC-Lavalin has less than
50% participation.
ƒ The project/operation is a Joint Venture where SNC-Lavalin has 50% or
greater participation in the Prime Contractor partnership, however, safety
management for the project is performed using the Partner’s programs and
processes.
ƒ The division of responsibilities is such that SNC-Lavalin does not control
the workforces and work processes. For example, SNC-Lavalin does the
design and engineering while the JV partner hires the contractors and
controls the construction/build activities.

2.5 AT WORK
Work-related As only work-related incidents and events are tracked, the definition of an
employee or contractor being “at work” is critical to collecting indicators on a
common basis. This “at work” definition does not cover all situations. If a
situation is not covered, refer to United States Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) regulations for guidance.

At work An individual is deemed to be ‘at work’ while they conduct their duties in
the workplace during paid regular or overtime hours.

Business travel Employees or contractors engaged in work activities "in the interest of the
employer" and traveling in company vehicles, rental vehicles, contractor
vehicles, airplanes, helicopters, etc., on company business are considered to
be ‘at work.’ This includes persons who are traveling from home to the
workplace for call out purposes and persons traveling for business purposes to
a location other than their normal work location.
Other examples of such activities include travel to/from customer locations,
conducting job assignments (externally), and entertaining or being entertained
to transact, discuss, or promote business (work-related entertainment at the
sole discretion of SNC-Lavalin Inc).

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2.6 NOT AT WORK
Not work-related The employee or contractor is NOT recorded at work in the following
situations:
Normal commute ƒ Traveling from place of abode to the workplace for a normal shift whether
in commercial transport, personal, company or rental vehicle.
ƒ Workers being transported to the work site, unpaid
ƒ Traveling from home to the project site on a fly-in fly-out basis on a normal
rotation.
After hours ƒ When living in project camps, hotels, or other semi-permanent residences
(home away from home).
ƒ En-route from the camp/hotel to the work site.
ƒ En-route from the work site to the camp/hotel.
ƒ Time spent outside of working hours undertaking recreational activities,
(i.e. eating meals, etc.) in the camp, hotel or other off-site locations.
Volunteer time ƒ Company sponsored events, workers not paid.
Off-site work ƒ This applies to workers not normally working on our controlled site.
ƒ An example of an incident not counted would be, a delivery truck driver,
not normally working on our controlled site, is moving materials for the
purposes of SNC-Lavalin, and has a roll over incident on a public highway.
Non-work activities ƒ When an employee takes a detour from a reasonably direct route of travel
for personal reasons or participates in activities not directed by their
supervisor that could impact their behavior (i.e. consumes alcohol).

2.7 HOURS WORKED


Counted hours The number of hours that a company employee or contractor is performing
his/her work-related duties. This is the number of hours reported to payroll for
regular time and overtime and applies to all employees (supervisory,
professional, production, service, etc.) whether full-time or part-time.
Always record incidents for employees and contractors for whom worked
hours are counted.

No multiple on For the sake of safety reporting, ensure that each overtime hour is counted as
overtime hours only one hour, not as an overtime multiple.
When possible do not include vacation, holiday, sick leave, or any other off-
duty time even if it is paid.
Estimated hours All reasonable effort shall be made to collect and report accurate numbers
although sometimes contractor hours may have to be estimated. When hours
worked are estimated to meet reporting deadlines, report the actual numbers
within 30 days.

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3.0 LEADING INDICATORS

Proactive measures Leading indicators are a measure of proactive safety activities, behaviors, and
accomplishments. They help increase management involvement, and promote
active participation while facilitating opportunities for continuous improvement.

3.1 BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PROGRAM


Safety Leaders at all levels within the organization proactively demonstrate their
communication commitment to H&S through documented actions and targeted
communications. Behavior Interventions give leaders the opportunity to
demonstrate their personal commitment to H&S, recognize, support and
reward appropriate behavior, raise awareness of H&S issues and encourage
better ways to do work.
The measure is one behavior intervention reported per 1,000 worked hours in
the HSES Database

3.2 SELF AUDITS


Internal check All sites and operations are to evaluate their alignment to the GHSMS using
the 6852.2.1 Corporate Health and Safety Audit Tool for projects with over
12,000 expected annual work hours. Once this initial audit has been
conducted, it must be reviewed and updated monthly.
The measure is the score entered as a percentage in the HSES Database.

3.3 IMMINENT DANGERS


Unsafe Condition or Any unsafe condition or unsafe behavior (no energy release) where no
Behavior incident occurred, but the potential existed. These occurrences are to be
immediately corrected and promptly reported. The intention is to promote a
culture where every hazard and unsafe act is proactively identified and
corrected.
The measure is one imminent danger reported per 5,000 worked hours in the
HSES Database.
Examples of imminent dangers:
ƒ An employee is observed working on a building roof (15 meters) with their
harness not attached to a proper anchor point. It is pointed out and the
behavior is corrected immediately.
ƒ A supervisor finds an unauthorized employee working inside a vessel.
There was no StepBack conducted or confined space entry permit for the
task and the employee did not have a watch person outside the vessel.
The employee is instructed to stop work immediately; the site reviews its
confined space procedures and conducts refresher training.

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3.4 LESSONS LEARNED
Avoiding repeat For every incident classified as high potential and where the lessons learned
incidents has general application throughout the organization, a lesson learned report
shall be issued by the BU.
The measure is uploading one lessons learned report per BU monthly to the
H&S Knowledge Network.

3.5 INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS


Root Cause A formal investigation is conducted to determine the circumstances behind an
Analysis (ICAM) incident and actions to prevent reoccurrence.
Incident Cause Analysis Method (ICAM) must be used to investigate all
recordable incidents and all incidents classified as high potential (HiPo). An
ICAM Chart must be developed using the ICAM Chart Template (6853.5) and
attached to the final Incident Investigation Report (6853.4). The final report
must be uploaded to the HSES Database.
The measure is the total number of completed incident investigations for
recordable and HiPo incidents uploaded to the HSES Database.

3.6 DRIVER SAFETY TRAINING


Safe driving All employees who drive company vehicles or more than 400km per year in a
non-company vehicle while being ‘at work’ must complete the AlertDriving or
equivalent drivers training.
The measure is the total number of employees who have completed the
AlertDriving or equivalent training entered into the HSES Database.

3.7 STEPBACK TRAINING


Look and see the All employees to be trained to see and effectively control hazards at home and
hazards at work by using the SNC-Lavalin StepBack Risk Evaluation Tool.
The measure is the total number of employees who have completed the
StepBack eLearning module entered into the HSES Database.

3.8 STEPBACK CARDS COMPLETED


Documented hazard Work teams or individuals shall participate in a Team StepBack at the start of
discussion each day, new task or when the scope of work or hazard conditions have
changed. The activities of every team member, as well as the activities of
anyone else within the same area, must be identified, documented, and
adequately controlled with a record retained.
The measure is the total number of completed Team StepBack cards entered
into the HSES Database.

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3.9 CONTRACTOR PRE-MOBILIZATION


Pre-mobilization Implement robust systems to ensure all contractors understand and fulfill their
respective OH&S responsibilities from contract initiation to completion.
This will be measured by verifying that all contractor forms (6845.2.1.2 and
6845.2.1.3) are completed and uploaded in the HSES Database and/or that
sections 9 (and 20 when applicable) are adequately completed in the Global
Procurement System (GPS) and uploaded to the HSES Database.

Imminent Danger vs. Incident


(Leading Indicator) (Lagging Indicator)

Imminent Danger Incident


(no energy release) (energy release)

Situation corrected Low Potential High Potential

Business Unit
Entered in the HSE Entered in the HSE Lessons Learned
Conference Call
Statistics Database Statistics Database (optional)
(within 72 hours)

Entered in the HSE


Statistics Database

Complete Investigation
and upload to HSE
Statistics Database

4.0 LAGGING INDICATORS

Incident definition An unplanned energy release which results in an injury or damage. All
incidents (energy release) are classified as lagging indicators and then further
ranked as high or low potential events.
Incident
ƒ High Potential (HiPo)
classification
i Any incident that was or had the potential to cause a serious injury or
worse if the circumstances would have been slightly different (i.e. a fall
from height that resulted in a worker being suspended from his/her fall
protection lanyard).
ƒ Low Potential (LoPo)
i All incidents that do not meet the criteria for high potential (i.e. a worker
trips on his/her shoelace and stumbles in an office hallway).

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4.1 NEAR MISS (NM)
Incident with no Any unplanned event (energy release) that did not result in an injury. These
injury would include property damage incidents with potential for an injury.
Two examples of a near miss incident are:
ƒ Tool drops from height into normal work area with no injury.
ƒ Collapse of an excavation with no injury.

4.2 FIRST AID (FA)


Minor injury A First Aid incident is a minor occupational injury, which after a single first aid
treatment and subsequent observation allows the worker to return to normal
duties on the same day or at the start of the next scheduled shift.

Skin treatment Examples of treatments for First Aid injuries are:


ƒ Cleaning, flushing, or soaking wounds on the surface of the skin.
ƒ Using hot or cold therapy such as cold compresses or hot pads.
ƒ Using wound coverings such as bandages, band aids, gauze pads, etc. or
using butterfly bandages or steri-strips (wound closing devices such as
sutures or staples are considered medical treatments).
Supports ƒ Using any non-rigid means of support such as elastic bandages, wraps, or
non-rigid back belts (devices with rigid stays or other systems designed to
immobilize parts of the body are considered medical treatments).
ƒ Using temporary immobilization devices while transporting an injured
person including splints, slings, neck collars, backboards, etc.
ƒ Using finger guards.
ƒ Using eye patches.
Object removal ƒ Removing foreign bodies from the eye using only irrigation or a cotton
swab.
ƒ Removing splinters or foreign material from areas other than the eye by
irrigation, tweezers, cotton swabs, or other simple means.
Medication ƒ Having a doctor prescribe medication for a work related injury on a one-
time basis as a precautionary measure that does not require a follow up
visit to the doctor (i.e. one time prescription for pain relief).
ƒ Using non-prescription medication.
ƒ Administering tetanus immunizations (other immunizations such as
Hepatitis B vaccine are considered medical treatments).
Other ƒ Using massages (physical therapy or chiropractic treatments are
considered medical treatments).
ƒ Drinking fluids for the relief of heat stress.

6851.1.1-EN-Rev.5 Last printed 2014-12-19 8:54:00 AM Page 9 of 12


Health and Safety Indicators
Indicators

4.3 MEDICAL AID (MA)


Medical intervention A Medical Aid incident is any occupational injury requiring medical intervention
by a doctor (or equivalent) on or off site that allows the worker to return to
normal duties on the same day or at the start of the next scheduled shift.

Criteria If an employee is sent to a doctor as a precaution and the doctor determines


the injury fits any of the following descriptions:
ƒ Medical treatment was required beyond a First Aid (section 4.2).
ƒ The procedure(s) provided by the doctor were not diagnostic only.
ƒ The doctor determines the injury was work-related and was not a pre-
existing condition.

4.4 MODIFIED WORK (MW)


Able to work A Modified Work incident is an occupational injury requiring the worker to
abstain from their regular duties as assigned by a medical professional. The
worker is still capable of going to work and performing some other value
added (alternate and / or restricted) duties.

4.5 MODIFIED WORK DAYS (MWD)


Alternate / The number the days where a worker abstains from their regular duties and
Restricted duties performs alternate duties because of a Modified Work Incident. Only days the
employee would have normally worked are counted.
180 days max If a single incident involved both days away from work and days of restricted
work activity, days of modified work activity or days away from work are not
counted once the total of either or the combination of both reaches 180
calendar days.

4.6 LOST TIME (LT)


Unable to work Any occupational injury incident that results in at least one full day absent from
work following the day of incident (this does not include time traveling off site
for injury diagnosis or treatment).

4.7 LOST TIME DAYS (LTD)


Count of days The number of full days where a worker is absent from work because of a Lost
Time Incident (only days the employee would have normally worked are to be
counted).

180 days max If a single incident involved both days away from work and days of restricted
work activity, days of restricted work activity or days away from work are not
counted once the total of either or the combination of both reaches 180
calendar days.

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Health and Safety Indicators

Indicators
4.8 FATALITY (F)
Death Any work related incident which results in death. There are 0 days attributable
to Lost Time Days category as a result of a fatality.

4.9 REPORTABLE AND NON REPORTABLE INCIDENTS


What to report Reportable incidents include “Acute” injuries:
ƒ A physical wound such as a cut, fracture, amputation, burn, etc.
ƒ A respiratory condition caused by chemical, dust, or gas or fume
inhalation.
ƒ Poisoning from a chemical (i.e. carbon monoxide, insecticide sprays).
ƒ Physical effects such as frostbite, heat stroke, etc.
ƒ Effects from radiation such as welding flash, sun burn, etc.
ƒ An injury caused by workplace violence/horseplay
ƒ Outbreak of a tropical disease in site camps (i.e. malaria, typhoid,
infectious hepatitis)
What NOT to report NON reportable incidents include “Chronic” injuries:
ƒ Dust diseases of the lungs such as silicosis, asbestosis etc.
ƒ Disorders associated with repeated trauma such as noise-induced hearing
loss, bursitis, white finger, carpal tunnel syndrome, etc.
ƒ Long term effects of chemical or metal exposure such solvents, mercury,
lead, etc.
ƒ Other illnesses that may be related to the work environment such as
isolated cases of tropical diseases (i.e. malaria, typhoid, infectious
hepatitis), tumours, cancers, kidney diseases, etc.
ƒ An aggravation of a pre-existing condition by an occupational incident
would not be considered work related.
Count only once An incident should never be counted twice. For example if a MA becomes an
LT, it is removed from the MA category permanently.

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Health and Safety Indicators
Indicators

5.0 FREQUENCY CALCULATIONS


The North American standard for safety frequencies is to multiply the number of incidents by
200,000 (the approximate base number of hours worked by 100 full-time employees for one
year). The product is then divided by the hours worked.
(MA + MW + LT + F) x 200,000
Total Recordable Incident Frequency (TRIF) =
Hours Worked

LT x 200,000
Lost Time Incident Frequency (LTIF) =
Hours Worked

LTD x 200,000
Lost Time Severity Rate (LTSR) =
Hours Worked

MW x 200,000
Modified Work Frequency (MWF) =
Hours Worked

MA x 200,000
Medical Aid Frequency (MAF) =
Hours Worked

# of High Potential Incidents X 200,000


High Potential Incident Frequency (HPIF) =
Hours Worked

Fatality
Recordable
Incidents All
Injuries
Lost Time

Modified Work

All Incidents
(High / Low Potential)
Medical Aid

First Aid

Near Miss

Imminent Danger (Unsafe Condition or Behavior)

6851.1.1-EN-Rev.5 Last printed 2014-12-19 8:54:00 AM Page 12 of 12


C r i t i ca l R i s k C on t r ol P r ot oc ol s
WE CARE about the health and safety of our employees, of those who work under our care, and of the people our projects serve. A review of our past significant incidents
has identified a number of critical risks that required the development of sound, non-negotiable practices. Below is a summary of the 8 key areas focused upon in our
Critical Risk Control Protocols (CRCP). The protocols establish minimum performance expectations to manage these potential risks at all SNC-Lavalin controlled sites.
It is essential to consider each protocol carefully when conducting your StepBack Risk Evaluation.
If you are unable to meet any of the following requirements, speak to your direct supervisor immediately.

Vehicles Equipment Safeguarding Working at Heights Confined Space


• Wear your seatbelt when in a moving vehicle • Select and install guards appropriate to the hazard • Always use specified fall protection • Obtain a safe work permit prior to
when working above 1.8 meters (6’) entering any confined space
• Never use a mobile phone (hands-free or • Do not modify, remove or override any guards
hand-held) or exceed speed limits, while driving • Ensure an emergency rescue plan • Conduct gas tests as required
• Wear safety glasses, goggles, and face
is in place for rapid retrieval
• Do not drive or work under the effects protection to protect against flying particles • Identify and control all energy sources involved
of drugs or alcohol • Have a trained spotter or other controls when
• Ensure adequate guarding is in place • Test and be familiar with rescue
working from an elevated work platform
• Inspect your vehicles prior to use procedures and equipment
• Inspect all tools prior to use
• Ensure you are trained in the proper
• Use a spotter when there is poor visibility, • Have a qualified watch person continually
use of fall protection systems
operating in tight areas or interacting monitoring entry and egress
with the public • Comply with the colour coded
scaffold tag access system

Hazardous Materials De-Energization Lifting Operations Excavations


• Identify all critical activities • Verify full isolation and positive • Do not walk under any suspended load • Work deeper than 1.2 meters (4’)
involving hazardous materials protection of all energy sources requires a safe work permit and
• Have only designated persons involved
barricading or covering
• Ensure you have been trained for all • Never allow more than one key per lock in lifting operations
activities related to hazardous materials and use proper lockout boxes • Assess the soil conditions and classify soil types
• Maintain all cranes and lifting equipment
• Label all hazardous material containers • Tag all isolation points fitted with in a serviceable condition • Stabilize soil through cut backs,
clearly and consistently Personal Locking Devices shoring or a combination of both
• Barricade effectively to ensure all personnel
• Confirm up-to-date MSDS’ are readily • Confirm you are trained and approved are protected during lifting operations • Keep all spoil piles at least 1 meter back
available at the point of use and storage before conducting any isolation from the edge of any excavation
• Consider safe clearance distance when lifting
• Only smoke in designated areas • Document all energy isolation measures over work areas or near power lines

For the complete CRCP requirements and tools, speak to your local SNC-Lavalin safety representative.
6845.1.1.1-EN-Rev.5
CRCP
CRITICAL RISK
CONTROL PROTOCOLS
2015
WE CARE...

about the health and safety of our employees,


of those who work under our care, and of the
people our projects serve.

W inning the hearts and minds


of our people for safety requires each person to become a safety leader. These are
leaders who inspire, motivate and transform others to excel in safety.

E mphasis on safety and quality on projects


which involves the integration of safety into all core business activities, the
CRCP

distribution of responsibility and accountability for safety to all employees at all


levels and the adoption of peer-driven safety review processes.

C ompetence of the organization and people


in indentifying and managing risk requires a systematic focus on behaviours, risk
perceptions and skills. Risk is inseparable from opportunity and reward and is to be
managed competently at all levels of the organization.

A nalysis of performance
while respecting lessons learned from previous experience, our focus is on
sustaining a proactive safety culture. This includes processes like root cause
analysis, positive incentive programs, safety leadership training, etc…

R isk transformation
ensures that the overall management of safety is risk-based, systematic and
responsive to the dynamic nature of hazards and risks. We must stay vigilant and
support processes which effectively assess all of our projects, business activities,
and operations.

E ngineering innovation for safety


reduces risks in project design, infrastructure, construction, and operations.
It includes processes of quality management, lessons learned, e-technology,
innovation, and benchmarking against best practices.
Critical Risk Control Protocols

REVISION HISTORY

Prepared Approved
Revision Date Description
by by
Global Health
0 January 2006 Draft T. Horton
& Safety
Global Health
1 June 2006 Initial release T. Horton
& Safety

CRCP
Global Health
2 November 2009 Checklists added C. Price
& Safety
Protocol 7 – Excavations Global Health
3 December 2010 C. Price
added & Safety
Global Health
4 March 2011 Checklists updated T. Van Wieren
& Safety
Full document review – Global Health
5 January 2012 T. Van Wieren
Protocol 8 added & Safety

Full document review – Global Health


6 January 2013 T. Van Wieren
Information mapping style & Safety

Full document review –


Global Health
7 January 2014 assignment of Protocols T. Van Wieren
& Safety
to BUs
Full document review –
Global Health
8 January 2015 Crane Operations limits T. Van Wieren
& Safety
modified

Caution: Un-Controlled Copy


Valid only at time of retrieval from network source directory.
User should verify that the revision number is the most current.
Critical Risk Control Protocols

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

PROTOCOL 1 – VEHICLES 4

PROTOCOL 2 – HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 12

PROTOCOL 3 – EQUIPMENT SAFEGUARDING 18

PROTOCOL 4 – DE-ENERGIZATION 24

PROTOCOL 5 – WORKING AT HEIGHTS 28


CRCP

PROTOCOL 6 – LIFTING OPERATIONS 38

PROTOCOL 7 – CONFINED SPACE 44

PROTOCOL 8 – EXCAVATIONS 52

DEFINITIONS 57

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 1 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

INTRODUCTION Consequently, beyond simple compliance


with each mandatory Protocol, SNC-Lavalin
PURPOSE recognizes that appropriate (and documented)
risk management principles are also required.
The Critical Risk Control Protocols provide the The objective is to identify, control and reduce
controls deemed necessary to prevent fatalities, the likelihood of incidents through investigation,
serious incidents and injuries arising from the assessment and understanding of hazards
most common hazards and associated risk associated with all our activities.
levels encountered by our business activities.
Refer to the GHSMS (6801) under section 3.1 for
SCOPE additional information.

These protocols apply to all SNC-Lavalin HIERARCHY OF CONTROLS

CRCP
controlled sites and activities, and to all
SNC-Lavalin employees, contractors and visitors The preferred order to mitigate hazards and
when involved in these controlled activities. control risk levels is:

The mandatory requirements of these protocols 1. Elimination: Remove the hazard completely.
are listed as “shall”. Best practices and additional
controls are listed as “should”. 2. Substitution: Replace the material or
process with a less hazardous one.
You must read and use these Protocols in
conjunction with SNC-Lavalin’s Global Health 3. Separation: Isolate the hazard (i.e. guarding
and Safety Management System (GHSMS) and or enclosing it).
associated standards.
4. Engineering: Design or modify activities to
LEGAL FRAMEWORK reduce the exposure to the hazard.

SNC-Lavalin operates a diverse range of 5. Administrative: Implement procedures to


businesses in different countries and cultures limit exposure to hazardous conditions or
around the world, all with varying legal energies (i.e. timing of work, policies, signage
frameworks. When applying procedures and and work practices).
practices to meet the needs of these Protocols,
you must comply with the relevant legislation. 6. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):
If client or local legislation requires controls Hazards are still present; PPE only reduces
that are more stringent, it is SNC-Lavalin’s the potential for harm. It is your last line
policy to comply with them fully. of defense.

RISK MANAGEMENT Consider a number of these options and apply


individually, or in combination.
These Protocols do not provide coverage of all risk
areas. Other risk areas may exist and should be Be aware that changing conditions can influence
addressed through our risk management processes. the nature of hazards and extent of the risk level.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

MONITOR AND MEASURE GHSMS


Monitor and measure the control effectiveness Read and use these Protocols in conjunction
as part of the risk management process for all with the GHSMS and its associated standards.
SNC-Lavalin controlled sites. This is accomplished The GHSMS as shown below is hierarchical,
globally using the Health, Safety and Environment where any company safety documents
Statistics (HSES) Database for capturing and and systems must meet and support the
analyzing safety data. requirements at each level.

DEVIATION AND VARIANCE E-LEARNING


If for any reason a site is unable to meet the Eight distinct e-Learning modules are also
requirements of these protocols, it is required available to raise awareness of the requirements
CRCP

they use the Deviation and Variance process in of the Critical Risk Control Protocols.
the SNC-Lavalin GHSMS. Access the e-learning modules on the Health
and Safety Knowledge Network (HSKN).
The 8 modules are available in English, French,
Spanish and Portuguese.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

1.0 PROTOCOL 1 – VEHICLES

1.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents from the use of
vehicles and mobile equipment.

Scope This protocol applies to all self-propelled vehicles and mobile equipment.
This protocol does not apply to employees’ personal vehicles.

Incident causes Vehicles and Mobile Equipment have been involved in a significant
proportion of our total incidents. The root causes and contributing
factors have included:

CRCP
Q Inappropriate speed for conditions.
Q Improper vehicle condition (tires, brakes, etc).
Q Driver fatigue, distraction and / or lack of experience.
Q Lack of vehicle stability.
Q Alcohol and / or illegal drug impairment.
Q Reduced visibility.
Q Failure to effectively separate people from vehicular hazards.

1.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S legislation and local vehicle traffic laws
and by-laws.

Hazard assessment Include Vehicles and Mobile Equipment activities in the project risk register.
If the Vehicles and Mobile Equipment activities identified in the risk
register requires further detailed evaluation (i.e. repetitive task or a
single complex task), conduct a Job Safety Analysis (JSA).
Conduct a walk around to ensure safe movement of all vehicles and
mobile equipment prior to use.

Vehicle selection Select vehicles based on a documented risk assessment. Take into account:
Q Tasks to be carried out.
Q Vehicle suitability for job.
Q Environment to be operated in.
Q Roll over and crash worthiness ratings.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Light vehicle Ensure that all light vehicles have:


Q SNC-Lavalin mandatory vehicle stickers displayed in all vehicles

6845.1.6-EN-Rev.0

(6845.1.6 Vehicle Sticker)


CRCP

Q Seatbelts installed and worn by all occupants.


Q Loads secured and not exceeding manufactures limits.
Q First-aid kit available and suitable for road emergencies.
Q Emergency roadside triangles or beacons (three of either).
Q Driver frontal and passenger airbag (side impact where possible).
Q Whip flag and strobe light(s) where required.
Q Roll over protection where the risk of roll over is high.
Q Seating which is not side mounted.
Q Safety helmets to be worn by riders of motorcycles, bicycles, quads,
UTVs, etc. regardless of location.
Q Fully functioning head and tail lights.

Mobile heavy Ensure that mobile heavy equipment has:


equipment Q Seatbelts installed and worn by all occupants.
Q Roll over protection where the risk of roll over is high.
Q Operator cage protection (unless the risk of falling objects is low).
Q A suitably mounted portable fire extinguisher.
Q Lights for safe operation (front, side and rear).
Q A functioning horn and an audible back-up alarm.
Q Whip flag and strobe light(s) where required.
Q Isolation point (see Protocol 4 – De-Energization) that can accept
a personal lock.
Q Wheel chocks available and utilized.
Q Communication devices (can be portable).

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Dump trucks Ensure all dump truck wheels are located on firm level ground prior to
dumping load.
If personnel are necessary in the area, they shall be located in such a position
which gives the truck operator a clear view of their location at all times.
Personnel are prohibited from standing near the rear or the sides of a
truck which is being dumped.
Stuck or frozen soils shall be removed from dump truck beds prior to
dumping to prevent tipping.
All trucks regardless of whether they are provided by contractors or
third parties are subject to the requirements of this protocol.

Vehicle operations Before exiting a vehicle, set the parking brake and turn the ignition off.

CRCP
When applicable, chock the wheels when parking on an incline or turn the
wheels into a berm or other obstruction.
Lower the vehicle hydraulics (blade / forks / bucket) to the ground prior
to leaving the vehicle.
Use running lights (low beam headlamps) at all times when the vehicle
is in use.
Do not exceed posted speed limits.

Inspection and Maintain all vehicles in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.


maintenance Ensure that a formal and auditable preventive maintenance programs is
in place.
Inspect vehicles at the start of each shift; complete a pre-shift checklist,
and a walk around inspection form. Keep the checklist in the vehicle for
that shift.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

#Ref: MEI-
Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Inspection
Vehicle Identification
License Plate or VIN Number:
License Expiration:
Insurance Expiration:

Vehicle Type: Crane Forklift Heavy Truck

Loader Passenger Bus Excavator


Vehicles
Other:
Registration
This equipment has met the minimum requirements for site access.
Expiration of the following documents will consider this equipment
non-operational for site use. Proof of current documents shall be submitted
and a new sticker will be provided.

Registration Expiration:
Inspector: Date:
CRCP

6845.1.2-EN-Rev.0

(6845.1.2 Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Inspection Stickers)

Conduct a mechanical inspection prior to acceptance (admittance to site).


Forward a copy of the inspection to the appropriate SNC-Lavalin
personnel. Complete an inspection sticker and affix it to the vehicle.

Isolate all potential energy (mechanical, hydraulic, etc.) when servicing


vehicles. Immediately tag and lock defective vehicles out of service.

Fit for work Do not drive or work under the effects of drugs or alcohol. Implement a
fit-for-work policy, incorporating defined action/limit levels for drugs
(including prescribed medication), alcohol and programs for managing
driver fatigue. Refer to 6845.2.4.1 Fit for Work SOP for corporate
guidelines and requirements.

Mobile phones Never use mobile phones (hands-free or hand-held) while driving.
This requirement is irrespective of location, seniority or work activity.

Journey Develop a journey management plan when driving:


management Q More than 400 km (250 miles) or 4 hours a day.

Q In areas that pose safety and security risks due to political or


social instability.
Q In unpopulated areas with limited communication infrastructure.
Q In areas where conditions make the travel more hazardous such as:
X Extensive travel on unpaved or unmaintained roadways;
XHigh levels of wildlife interaction potential;

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

XMountainous areas; and


  XExtreme weather conditions.
See section 1.3 for more information.

Traffic If potential traffic hazards are identified, implement a site-based traffic


management management plan including the following:
Q Reverse parking requirement.
Q Trained Traffic Control Person(s) (flag person and / or spotter) when
large vehicles are backing up on a site, when any vehicle is backing up
into a congested area or when any possibility of interaction with the
public exists.

CRCP
Q Clear and safe paths of travel (direction) for equipment, vehicles and
pedestrians.
Q Posted and communicated speed limits.
Q Use of light vehicles in hazardous areas.
Q Establishing a clear communication protocol (2-way radios acceptable
on radio controlled roads).
Q Installing and maintaining traffic control signs.
Q Barriers required from heavy mobile equipment and pedestrians.
Q Review and document possible pedestrian interactions, road design and
layouts including entrance and exit points, intersections and other potential
points of interaction between vehicles and other mobile equipment.
Q For further information refer to 6845.3.9.1 Traffic Control Standard.

Interacting with Ensure that all vehicles that interact with Heavy Equipment:
heavy equipment Q Have an effective means of communication (i.e. radios, lights, horns, etc.).
Q Have flashing or revolving lights installed, reflective tape and a high-
visibility vertical flag.
Q Are moved with the assistance of a flag person (spotter) for vehicles
with poor visibility, oversized loads, and / or operating in tight areas.

Training and Only qualified personnel who have received the SNC-Lavalin prescribed
competency driver safety training can operate vehicles and mobile equipment.

Implement a permit or certification system to ensure drivers / operators


are competent to operate vehicles in their intended environment.

Include site road safety and vehicle hazards in all employee, contractor
and visitor orientations.

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 8 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Ensure that drivers have a valid and appropriate level driver’s license
prior to operating vehicles / equipment offsite. Ensure vehicle operators
have their license on their person at all times.

Develop a training matrix to identify minimum licensing, courses and


experience requirements for all operators and drivers.

1.3 RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

Journey The Journey Management Plan could include:


management plan Q Provisions for new or changes in travel activities.
Q Provisions for changes in the environment and road conditions.
CRCP

Q Means to identify risk levels associated with the number of journeys,


routes, intersections, etc.
Q Requirements for survival or emergency equipment suitable for the
operating environment (i.e. winter survival kits for extreme cold
environments).
Q Detailed instructions in the event of an emergency (i.e. collision or
break down).
Q Provisions to manage driver fatigue.
Q A check-in schedule when driving long distances or in remote areas
alone. Ensure that the contact person knows how to respond if a
problem develops.
Q Requirements for rest breaks at a minimum every 1-2 hours.

Equipment Do not modify any vehicle / mobile equipment. If modifications are made,
modification have approved engineering documents (and / or OEM approval) for all
modifications including attachments. Changes and modifications may
include the following:
Q Modifications made to the overall vehicle body structure or design.
Q Modifications made to the original manufacturer required or suggested
type of tires or wheels, suspension system, and mechanical system.
Q Modifications that may alter the vehicle’s centre of gravity.
Q Modifications that may affect the vehicle or attachment load
carrying capacity.
Tires Install tires specifically designed for the hazardous road conditions,
including tires designated for winter driving during the season when
snow and / or ice is expected.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Rentals In instances where employees must use short-term rental vehicles,


make all efforts to comply with these protocols. Where it is not possible
to comply (i.e. winter tires), use alternate controls (i.e. rental of four-wheel-
drive vehicles, additional training, daytime driving, hired car service, etc).

Training and Training should include:


competency Q Specific road / project / operation site rules.
Q Vehicle familiarization (vehicles handling, dynamics, blind spots and
features).
Q Loading and cargo restraining rules.
Q Education and awareness of driving and travel risks which may be
encountered.

CRCP
Q Emergency collision and breakdown procedures (i.e. tire changing).
Q Performing pre-operational checks.

Positive incentive Where suitable, use the SNC-Lavalin Positive Incentive Program to
program reinforce safe driving practices (i.e. observance of speed limits, use of
seatbelts, no use of cell phones, etc).

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Critical Risk Control Protocols
CRCP

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

2.0 PROTOCOL 2 – HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

2.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose Communicate and address all potential chemical hazards effectively.


Proper awareness will prevent fatalities, injuries and incidents from the
improper storage, handling, production, transport, recycling and disposal
of hazardous materials.

Scope This protocol applies to hazardous materials that, in one or more of their
forms (solid, liquid or gas) possess:
Q Physical Hazards

CRCP
Q Health Hazards
Q Environmental Hazards
Risks related to these hazards arise due to loss of control / containment
and improper or incompatible use during normal activities such as
storage, handling, production, transport, recycling and disposal.

This protocol does not cover handling of radioactive or infectious materials.

Incident causes Hazardous materials have been involved in previous incidents. The root
causes and contributing factors have included:
Q Poor understanding of chemical properties and reactions.
Q Improper handling and storage.
Q Insufficient containment systems.

2.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S, Environment, Explosives and Transportation


legislation, standards and industry codes of practice when involved in
hazardous materials operations.

Safety in design Consider product and process reformulation / redesign where technically
feasible, to eliminate or reduce potential exposure for personnel to
hazardous materials.

Review the design of a facility or process, permanent or temporary, which


transports, produces, stores, uses or disposes of hazardous materials.
Update as-built design drawings (i.e. process and instrumentation
diagrams, process flow diagrams, layout drawings, isometrics, etc.) in
light of these reviews.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Hazard Include Hazardous Material Management activities in the risk register.


assessment
Consider the following:
Q Use of alternatives to current hazardous materials
Q Risk associated with the hazardous materials.
Q Selection criteria and lifecycle analysis for all hazardous materials,
including the means of disposal.
Q Performance requirements (reliabilities and capacities) of specific
equipment and systems included in these controls.

Hazardous Designate a Hazardous Materials Management position at sites where


materials hazardous materials are processed, stored and handled, to:
CRCP

management Q Identify all critical activities involving hazardous material.


Q Assess the properties of hazardous materials on site.
Q Authorize the introduction, use and disposal of hazardous materials
on site including empty containers.
Q Maintain the sites Hazardous Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
inventory and provide copies when required.
Q Develop JSAs and implement any required controls.
Q Ensure that required Personal Protective Equipment is provided.
Q Ensure that StepBack Risk Evaluations are conducted prior to all
work activities involving hazardous materials taking place.
Q Document training related to selection, transportation, storage,
handling, and use and disposal of incompatible hazardous substances.
Q Ensure that all relevant design documents and drawings associated
with this protocol are up-to-date, controlled and available.
Q All tankage and dispensing equipment shall have incorporated
grounding and bonding systems.
Q Only allow smoking in designated areas.

MSDS Ensure that MSDS’ from the supplier of the hazardous material are provided
and are readily available to all personnel (employees, contractors and other
affected parties such as first aiders and medical personnel) involved in the
transportation, storage, handling, use and disposal of hazardous materials
in the language(s) commonly used at the site.

Ensure MSDS’ are readily available at the point of use and storage locations.
Also ensure that they are not more than 3 years old or they are considered
to be expired.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Labeling Place labels on all storage vessels, containers and tanks, as per appropriate
local or applicable standards (WHMIS, TDG, HazCom and / or DOT).

Mark piping containing hazardous substances so that the contents and


direction of flow is clear.

Storage Minimize the inventory of hazardous materials to only necessary amounts.


Secure and control access to areas where hazardous materials are stored.
Ensure there is a site register for all hazardous materials which includes:
Q Name
Q Identifier (HAZCHEM/UN/CAS code)

CRCP
Q MSDS
Q Maximum inventory
Q Storage requirements and precautions
Q Location and physical properties of all materials
Q Disposal methods
Protect hazardous materials containers from physical damage due to
extreme temperatures, moisture, corrosive mist / vapors, and vehicles.
Consider ready access for firefighting and emergency response personnel.
Ensure adequate segregation of incompatible materials when stored in close
proximity (i.e. oxidizer should not be stored near any flammable solvents)

Transporting Implement procedures for transporting hazardous materials. Complete


a manifest and supporting documentation necessary to transport them.
Supplier or workplace labels are different than transportation labels and
may not be used for this purpose.

Emergency Implement a documented emergency response plan when the risk level
response from hazardous material is high or extreme. Review, revise and test the
plan at least annually. Include external support services such as local
ambulance, spill cleanup and fire suppression.
Consider the following:
IN THE EVENT OF A
MEDICAL OR FIRE
Q Means of escape in an emergency. EMERGENCY CALL

RADIO USERS CHANNEL


Q Emergency response teams appropriate to
the risk. 1 State your NAME
2 NATURE of Emergency (fire, medical, spill, risk, other)

Theoretical and practical training of personnel.


3 NUMBER of people involved
Q 4 LOCATION advise landmarks, signs
5 Stand by in a safe location to assist

Q Appropriate number and location of muster Remember:


Contact your Supervisor ASAP

and assembly areas. 6846.1-EN-Rev.0

(6846.1 Emergency
Contact Poster)

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Q Emergency response equipment for spillage containment, fires,


explosions.
Q Recovery procedure and disposal of hazardous materials.

Q Installation of eye wash equipment appropriate to the type and


volume of chemical hazards. Bottle stations can be used or, where 60
second or longer (flushing) flow rates are called for in the site MSDS
sheets, hard lined eye-wash stations may be installed.

Short and long- Exposure to Hazardous materials may present health risks. Monitor short
term exposure and long-term exposure of personnel to hazardous materials, including the
potential for immediate, long-term harm and the potential for Immediately
Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) situations.
CRCP

If there is a potential to exceed the occupational exposure limit of a


hazardous substance, a safe work permit shall be used and the following
actions considered to prevent over exposure:
Q Replacement of the material or process with a less hazardous option.
Q Process and equipment isolation.
Q Engineering controls such as ventilation, barriers, and exhaust fans.
Q Proper decontamination of land, facilities, and equipment.
Q Use of the correct personal protective equipment.

Training and To ensure workers have the information they need to protect themselves
competency and their worksites from hazardous materials, they must understand the MSDS
and label formats and how this information should be used in job planning.
Implement a competency based training program that addresses:
Q The format of the MSDS;
 Q Hazard materials label information;
 Q The general transportation, storage, handling, use and disposal of,
and emergency response procedures for hazardous materials.
Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience.
This will serve as a visual tool for readily assessing compliance to
this protocol.

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Monitoring Document:
Q A procedure for hand-over between shifts that records any relevant
information / changes in operating status.
Q Worker training records.
Q Evaluations conducted for the introduction of new chemicals.
Q All industrial hygiene monitoring records.

2.3 RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

Safety in design Conduct a documented risk assessment such as a HAZOP or HAZID study
for the safe venting, drainage and containment of hazardous materials.

CRCP
Conduct a dispersion model for toxic gas releases and ensure it is
available for all credible scenarios. Determine the exclusion zones and
adequate containment area.
Consider the use of automated project control systems to eliminate
the need for operator intervention and maintain operation within the
required parameters.

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CRCP

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3.0 PROTOCOL 3 – EQUIPMENT SAFEGUARDING

3.1 OVERVIEW
Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents arising from
human interaction with moving parts of machines and equipment.

Scope This protocol applies to the safeguarding of people from mobile machines,
equipment, power tools, moving equipment, high-pressure equipment,
electrical equipment, stored energy, and objects projected from moving
parts.

Incident causes Inadequate and inappropriate safeguarding of equipment are a source of


many incidents classified as high potential. The root causes and contributing

CRCP
factors of these types of incidents include:
Q Absent, inadequate or ineffective guarding in place.
Q Working alongside unguarded moving parts.
Q Lack of risk assessment or JSA to identify guarding needs.
Q Strike by objects projected from moving equipment.
Q Overridden guarding interlocks on equipment.

3.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S legislation, standards and industry codes of
practice when involved in equipment safeguarding operations.

Safety in design Design and construct equipment safeguards to comply with applicable
local legislation, CSA standards, codes of practice and relevant recognized
leading industry practices and considering maintainability and operability.
Consider all energy sources and ensure that the design eliminates the
need for guarding where practicable. Select safeguarding where other
potential mitigation measures do not adequately protect personnel.

Machine guarding Ensure the integrity of equipment safeguarding prior to allowing


personnel into any area. Identify safeguarding hazards and where
safeguarding or interlock systems are required.
Provide one or more methods of machine guarding to protect personnel
from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing pinch
points, rotating parts, flying objects and sparks.
Guard belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums, fly wheels,
chains, or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of equipment,
when exposed, represent a hazard to personnel.

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Safeguarding Select and install guards appropriate to the hazard and risk level. Monitor
and control access to equipment (barricade or physically limit access to
the area) if safeguarding and interlock systems are insufficient to protect
people
Inspection Inspect all tools, equipment (including fall protection) and electrical
cords prior to use. They shall all be formally inspected on a quarterly
basis by a qualified person and tagged or color coded.

Contractor: January-February-March
Color Code
Contract: April-May-June

Inspector: July-August-September
CRCP

Date: October-November-December

Contractor: January-February-March
Color Code
Contract: April-May-June

Inspector: July-August-September

Date: October-November-December

Contractor: January-February-March
Color Code
Contract: April-May-June

Inspector: July-August-September

Date: October-November-December

Contractor: January-February-March
Color Code
6845.2.1.4-EN-Rev.0

Contract: April-May-June

Inspector: July-August-September

Date: October-November-December

(6845.1.4 Inspection Verification Stickers)

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Selection The following table illustrates the advantages and limitations for
different types of guards (in order of preference):

Advantages Limitations

Fixed Guards Provides maximum protection and May interfere with visibility
protects even during repetitive operations.
Requires minimum maintenance Can be limited to specific operations

Can be fabricated (on-site) to suit many Machine adjustment and repair


applications often require its removal, thereby
necessitating other means of
protection for maintenance personnel

CRCP
(see Protocol 4 – De-Energization)

Interlocks Shuts off or disengages power and Requires careful adjustment and
prevents starting of machine when maintenance
guard is open

Allows access to machine for removing May be easy to disengage


jams without time-consuming removal or override
of fixed guards

Adjustable guards Provides a barrier, which may be adjusted Does not provide maximum
to facilitate a variety of operations protection
Can be constructed to suit many specific May require frequent maintenance and/
applications. or adjustment
Can be adjusted to admit varying sizing The operator can make the guard
ineffective

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Maintenance and repairs Only remove guards for maintenance and repair after the equipment
has been isolated, locked out and tested in accordance with
Protocol 4 – De-Energization.

For the purposes of troubleshooting, testing and commissioning,


implement a JSA where the temporary removal of safeguards is
necessary on operating equipment. Replace guards prior to returning
the equipment back into service.

Modifications Do not modify or alter any guards except through the application of
a risk-based change management process and, if applicable, obtain
approval by a professional engineer and / or the original manufacturer.
CRCP

Tools Install fail-to-safe / deadman switches on all manually operated


rotating equipment (i.e. saws, lathes, drill presses, etc.).

Ensure that powered tools such as circular saws, chain saws, and
percussion tools without positive accessory holding means, are equipped
with a constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the
pressure is released. Never override any safety switches or devices.

Grinders Ensure all the guards are in place and secured before using any
grinder. Fasten pedestal and bench grinders securely before use.

All grinders shall be equipped with a secondary handle and shall be


operated using two hands at all times.

Check that the grinding disc fits properly to the spindle when mounting.
If it is loose, replace immediately. Also ensure the rated RPM of the
grinding disc matches or exceeds the grinders RPM rating.

Grinding guard Adjust tool rests to within 3 mm (1/8") of wheels. Never adjust the
rest while the wheel is in motion.

Maintain 6 mm (1/4") wheel exposure with a tongue guard or a


movable guard.

Work rest height should be on the horizontal centre line of the


machine spindle / centre.

Personal Provide the necessary PPE to protect workers using hand and power
Protective tools and those who are exposed to the hazard of falling, flying,
Equipment (PPE) abrasive, and splashing objects, or exposed to harmful dusts, fumes,
mists, vapors, or gases.

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Wear safety glasses, goggles, and face protection to protect against


flying particles and materials. Ensure impact resistant eye protection is
always used. Gloves shall be worn at all times unless manual dexterity
needs dictate otherwise. This must be reflected in the completed JSA
and / or StepBack for the specific task. Aprons, metatarsal safety boots,
and respiratory protection may also be required.

Training and Only competent persons shall work with high-energy moving and
competency rotating parts.

Implement competency-based training that addresses the following:


Q Specific controls and associated risk levels.
Emergency management and incident response procedures.

CRCP
Q

Q Where to access further information.

Train relevant personnel involved in the design, purchase, construction,


operation and maintenance of equipment. At minimum, train all people
likely to be exposed to high-energy moving and rotating parts.

Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience.


This will serve as a visual tool for readily assessing compliance to
this protocol.

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CRCP

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4.0 PROTOCOL 4 – DE-ENERGIZATION

4.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate or minimize the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents


arising from uncontrolled release of energy.

Scope This protocol applies to the isolation of all energy sources (electrical,
mechanical, hydraulic, chemical, gravitational, pneumatic, kinetic, stored
energy, etc.).

Incident causes Failing to properly isolate energy has created immediately dangerous
situations. The common factors have included:

CRCP
Q Failure to identify or recognize a source of potential (stored) energy.
Q Inadequate training or competence.
Q Inadequate lock-out/tag-out out systems.
Q Complacency of workers who routinely need to lock-out equipment.
Q Isolation of the wrong equipment or energy source.

4.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S legislation, standards and industry codes of
practice when involved in de-energization, isolation, lock-out and tagging.
Electrical work may only be performed by competent persons.

De-Energization Do not perform work on any equipment or system until establishing that it
is in a zero energy state (ZES), unless involved in commissioning or
troubleshooting under a safe work permit process or JSA with established
alternate controls. If it is not possible to establish a ZES on electrical
systems, then follow the working live requirements of CSA Z462.

Site specific Define roles and responsibilities for electrical, mechanical, or process
procedure isolation by documenting a site-specific de-energization, isolation,
lock-out and tagging procedure. Apply the procedure to all activities on
site, including contractor activities (i.e. construction, commissioning,
operation, maintenance, return to service, emergency, modification or
demolition of equipment).

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Specific procedures should determine the appropriate isolation method


for any activity, either by way of a full description for specific cases, or by
demonstrating the process to achieve the appropriate level of isolation in
new activities. This procedure shall include, but not be limited to:
Q JSA’s, checklists, tagging requirements and the Safe Work
Permit Standard.
Q A positive registration process for people working on isolated equipment
(personal tag, log sheet, etc.).
Q Changed requirements associated with the duration of the isolation
and tasks, or when tasks take longer than planned to complete.
Q Energy sources to be isolated (hazardous materials, mechanical,
electrical, etc.).
CRCP

Q The physical state of the energy sources such as their phase (liquid,
solid, vapor, etc.) and other characteristics (i.e. pressure, temperature,
voltage, etc.).
Q Controls required for the duration of the activity (temporary changes,
emergency procedures, personal protective equipment, etc.).
Q The requirements for formal contact with representatives in charge
of each facility area affected, and the process for granting written
authorization to proceed.
Q Transfer of isolations between shifts, different workgroups and / or
operations and maintenance.
Q Define actions for routine and non-routine isolations (i.e. maintenance
activities for construction equipment).
Q Define actions for software or electronic overrides.
Q Use of group and / or multiple isolations.
Q Testing and positioning during maintenance and set-up.
Q Documented lock removal process established and followed. This may
only be conducted by an authorized person.

Regularly review and audit the site-specific procedure to capture any


previously unidentified changes and revised when necessary.

Special Develop a JSA to mitigate hazards in special circumstances where any


circumstances one of the following is not achievable:
Q A zero energy state.
Q A test / try of isolation is not possible.
Q Use of a locking device is not feasible.

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Obtain multiple levels of sign off (at least two) in such cases.

Isolation Clearly label isolation points to identify the circuit or system over which
they have direct control. These labels shall be applied following a process of
pre-isolation identification using isolation lists, load verification, and marked
drawings, among others. (Where permanently applied, these labels shall be
physically verified prior to the isolation).

Document test procedures prior to relying on an isolation to supply a safe


working environment. Verify isolation integrity including, but not limited
to, the following principles:
Q Identification of all energy sources or hazardous materials directly
and indirectly associated with the work to be performed.

CRCP
Q Confirmation of those systems requiring isolation.
Q Notification of affected employees.
Q Isolating the confirmed energy or hazardous material sources;
Q Application of lock and tag.
Q Trying / testing of all systems and isolations to confirm ZES before
commencing work.

Lock-out Provide positive protection by means of isolation and by using locking


devices or the establishment of a physical barrier or separation.
Provide a permanent or a temporarily fitted locking device for all separations
or physical barriers.
Personal locking devices shall:
Q Be uniquely keyed.
Q Not be combination locks.
Q Not have a master key.
Q Be kept under the exclusive control of the lock owner.
Recommended practice is to have a picture of the lock owner displayed on


the lock.
Do not transfer keys to another person for lock removal.
Provide lockout boxes, stations or equivalent where required.

Lock removal process This process shall be used to remove the lock of a worker who is
confirmed to be not on site when the machinery or equipment must be
restarted prior to their return. These key points may only be implemented
by a Designated Lockout Supervisor (DLS).

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Below are the minimum elements to be included in any lock




removal process:
Q Documented attempts to contact the worker (time, date, type of
communication, etc.)
Q The DLS must inspect the work area to verify the lock-out status and
work progress on the machinery or equipment.
Q Remove the lock. The DLS must ensure that lock-out integrity is
maintained at all times.
Q The DLS will then assure that the work is completed in order to close
the lock-out procedure.
Q The DLS and the worker must discuss the status of the work with the
CRCP

lock owner prior to returning to the work location.

Tagging Tag all isolation points fitted with personal locking devices. Ensure the
isolation tags have identified:
Q The isolation point and includes the name of the person locking out.
Q The reason for the isolation.
Q The date and time when the tag was applied.
Prevent inadvertent operation by ensuring that isolation tags are
highly visible.

Purchasing Give due consideration to meeting the requirements of this protocol


when purchasing, designing, and contracting equipment.

Training A competency based training system and field assessment shall be in


place to approve personnel before they conduct isolation processes.

Recommended It is important that non-conductive tools are used around all ‘live’
Practices electrical equipment.

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter’s (GFCI) should be used on circuits that


workers are interfacing with.

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5.0 PROTOCOL 5 – WORKING AT HEIGHTS

5.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents from


working at heights.

Scope This protocol applies anytime workers are exposed to a fall from an
elevation of 1.8 meters (6') or greater. Such potential exposures include
climbing, transitioning, stationary work, or any exposure to a fall from a
surface not protected by proper guardrails, or some other approved fall
protection (prevention, restraint or arrest) device.

CRCP
Fall Restraint

Fall Arrest Fall Protection

Fall Prevention
n

At no time shall a worker be exposed to an unprotected elevation of


1.8 meters (6') or more without effective fall protection in place. This
distance is measured from the walking or working surface supporting
the worker to the next level onto which they may fall or, where any fall
from a lesser height involves an unusual or increased risk of injury.

The use of handrails is mandatory when ascending or descending any staircase.

Incident causes Falls from heights have contributed to a significant portion of our
incidents. The causes and contributing factors have included:
Q Lack of guards or barricades on floor and wall openings, edges,
excavations walkways and stairwells.
Q Incorrect set-up of ladders, elevated work platforms and scaffolds.
Q Lack of planning and hazard assessment.
Q Failing to wear or properly attach a harness.
Q Incorrect use of a harness.
Q Lack of or insufficient training.

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5.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S legislation, standards and industry codes
of practice.

Height requirements Implement fall protection planning where there is potential to fall more
than 1.8 meters (6'). Stickers can be placed at 1.8 meters (6') as a
visual reminder to workers.

1.8 meters / 6 feet


CRCP

6845.2.3-EN-Rev.0

(6845.1.3 Working at Height Visible Reminder)

Hazard assessment Include working at heights activities in the risk register.

If the working at height activities identified in the risk register require


further detailed evaluation (i.e. repetitive task or single complex task),
conduct a Job Safety Analysis (JSA).

Always consider elimination as the preferred methods of control.


Undertaking part or all of a task from the ground can eliminate or
significantly reduce the exposure to falling.

If the hazard of falling cannot be eliminated, implement engineering


controls prior to implementing the use of fall arrest equipment. The use of
fixed guardrails, wall construction, control zones and floor coverings will
prevent workers from accessing an open edge and being exposed to a fall.

Conduct a StepBack evaluation before working at heights and understand


all associated hazards. Consider the following:
Q Total Fall Clearance Required = Lanyard length + Deceleration
distance (shock absorber) + Height to workers back D-ring + Safety
factor of 1 meter (3.3').

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CRCP
(Total Fall Clearance diagram)

 Q Potential of falling objects.


Q Selection of appropriate barricading and / or demarcation.
Q Rescue systems and equipment.
Q Inclement weather and other environmental conditions (i.e. wind, snow,
ice). This can double the peak arresting forces.

Using personal Implement a JSA for the correct use of personal fall protection equipment
fall arrest including:
equipment
Q Equipment selection and use.
Q Equipment Inspection.
Q Anchor and tie off points.
Q Training and competency of personnel.
Q Disposal of defective equipment (i.e. equipment that was subject to a load).
A personal fall arrest system includes a full body harness, an anchor
point, and a connecting device. Only use synthetic fiber harnesses. Always
use a shock-absorber or fall restrictor (i.e. self-retracting life-line or
lanyard) in all fall arrest systems unless the use of such a device would
cause the workers fall distance and danger to be increased during a fall.
The maximum acceptable free fall distance is 1.8 meters (6’).

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Use all fall protection equipment with the relevant approved design
standards and follow all manufacturers’ specifications.
The use of body belts are prohibited with the exception of specialized tasks,
such as pole-climbing when belts are worn by specially trained workers.

Self-retracting Use a self-retracting lifeline instead of a lanyard when worker mobility


life-line and fall arrest is required. Use the self-retracting life-line (SRL) in
accordance with manufacturer specifications. This allows for maximum
mobility and reduces potential fall distance significantly.

Lanyards Attach all lanyards to a secure anchor point, preferably located overhead.
Only use synthetic fiber lanyards. Due to the negative effect on working
capacity, never hook lanyards back onto themselves.
CRCP

Anchor points Plan and clearly identify anchor points when designing fall protection
systems. Anchor requirements include:
Q Strength – capable of supporting 22.2 kN (5,000 lbs) or 2 times
the maximum expected arresting force. Anchor points should be
independent of the work platform, guardrail system or surface /
structures supporting employees.
Q Location – anchor points should be located overhead to minimize
free fall distance. Minimum height policy for most lanyard anchorage
is shoulder level and overhead for retractable (SRL) and rope grab
lifelines. When anchorage is below shoulder level, attempts should be
made to shorten lanyards and increase shock absorbing capability.
Q Sufficient fall clearance – calculate the total fall distance to ensure
anchorage height is sufficient to prevent lower level contact. Also, ensure
lateral movement from fixed anchorage does not create a swing
fall hazard.
Where it is not practical to install dedicated anchor points, identify a
suitable anchor point through a risk assessment process and ensure each
point is approved by a competent person.

Lifelines Design and have approved all installed lifelines by a professional engineer.
Identify with a weatherproof tag, the maximum design weight, number of
persons rating and the inspection date.

100% Tie-Off 100% tie-off must be accomplished for all work done at height. Where the
work method requires persons to detach and re-attach fall arrest
equipment at height, use two self-retracting life-lines (or a y-shaped with
two hooks) to ensure that at least one connection point is maintained at
all times (100% tie-off).

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Fall protection Ensure a competent and authorized person inspects and documents all
equipment fall protection and rescue equipment, once every six months. An equipment
inspection list and tagging system shall be in place to indicate compliance.
Visually inspect all fall protection equipment daily and / or prior to use.
Destroy immediately any defective fall protection equipment or any
equipment that has been subjected to any loading. If not immediately
feasible, remove from service and tag “DO NOT USE”.

Rescue planning Prepare an emergency rescue plan for the rapid retrieval of personnel
in the event of a fall from height. Response time is critical to avoid
suspension trauma.

Floor openings Floor openings are defined as a 0.3 meters (12") or greater gap in its least

CRCP
dimension. Prevent related falls by protecting all floor and roof openings
with a cover capable of supporting at least twice the weight of workers,
equipment and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any one
time. Covers shall be secured to prevent inadvertent displacement by
clearing the underside, tying the cover to grating or other means to
prevent displacement. Adequately identify that there is a floor opening
beneath the cover. If unable to do so, fully barricade the fall hazard area
with a proper guardrail and restrict access.

Stairway floor Prevent falls by protecting all stairway floor openings with a railing. The railing
openings must protect all open sides except the stairway entrance. Use a hinged
cover and a removable railing where traffic across an infrequently used
stairway floor opening prevents the installation of a fixed railing.

Falling objects Prevent tools, materials and other objects from falling from height through
the use of toe boards, screens, hole covers (greater than 5 centimeters or
(2”)), tool tethers, equipment hoisting bags, canopy structures, etc.

Working alone Ensure no person works alone when working at heights. Ensure there are
other personnel in the vicinity that can be alerted in case of an emergency.

Aerial / Elevated Select the proper EWP for the job so that workers are not required
Work Platforms to stand on the mid or top rails of the platform. Obey the requirements
(EWP) (both legislated and manufacturer) for use of all types of EWPs.

Non-integrated work platforms (man-baskets) are acceptable provided


they are adequately secured, certified and engineered to safely conduct
the specific tasks at height.

Ensure a copy of the EWP operating manual is available with the EWP for
use by the operator.

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Use a harness and lanyard attached to the designated anchor point.


Fall restraint is required therefore always use the shortest lanyard
possible to contain the worker in the basket.

Inspecting an Ensure appropriate warning devices, labels and stickers are in place.
EWP
Conduct a documented inspection prior to the use of a EWP. Do not use if
any deficiency that affects the safe operation of the equipment is identified.

Barricading an Set up a safe perimeter (barricading) around the equipment while in use.
EWP These perimeters or exclusion zones help to protect EWP operators and
ground staff.

Moving an EWP Before moving the EWP know and understand manufacturer’s restrictions
CRCP

regarding travel. Restrictions may cover:


Q Position of stabilizers and / or outriggers.
Q Position of extendible axles.
Q Platform position (including extension).
Q Traversing or elevating on grades or slopes.
An EWP should not be driven while extended. Travel only in the full-down,
stowed position for maximum stability and drive at the slowest speed. Ensure
the operator has a clear view of the travel direction and an understanding of
the ground conditions (i.e. recently excavated, soft, wet, etc.)
Prior to movement, the operator in an EWP should notify all those in the
immediate vicinity.
Properly, identify trapping as a potential hazard (the potential to be caught
between an object and the basket or controls of the EWP). Ensure that all
personnel are aware of the hazard and how to avoid it. It is recommended
to use the lowest speed for the boom lift motion or operation and to install
and utilize internal handholds. Also, meta-tarsal protection boots shall not
be used with floor mounted dead-man switches.

Spotter When working from an EWP, ensure that a trained spotter is able to lower
the platform in the event of an emergency. If the below is not possible,
ensure the equivalent engineered control(s) are in place (i.e. automated
proximity warning systems, anti-crush devices, etc.)
Q With one person using an EWP, spotters must maintain continuous
visual and audible contact with the worker in the EWP.
Q With two persons using an EWP, a spotter must be within proximity
to ensure visible and audible contact with workers in the EWP.

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Suspended work Obey the requirements of the relevant approved design standards for all
baskets forms of suspended workbaskets.
Operate cranes and hoists for suspended workbaskets at appropriate
load capacities and in a safe manner.
Wear a correctly fitted harness attached by a lanyard to a suitable
independent anchor point (separate from the attachment point of the
basket) when working in suspended baskets.

Ladders Select the appropriate ladder for the task 1Meter

(i.e. non-metallic ladder when working near


electrical equipment). h = height to point of
support
I = overhang distance

Visually inspect ladders for defects and proper h


4 to 1 Ratio

CRCP
setup prior to use
Place ladders on firm and level surface.
Do not climb ladders while carrying tools I h/4

or equipment.
The following rules apply*:
Q Ladders are not work platforms and shall not be used as such
Q Always maintain 3-points of contact when on a ladder
* Except for restricted conditions for stepladders (A-Frame) described below
When ascending or descending a ladder, 3-points of contact are considered
acceptable fall protection for fall exposures of less than 6 meters (20').
Always face the ladder directly when moving up or down.

Vertical and Use vertical and extension ladders for access and egress
extension ladders only, not as work platforms.
Extend extension ladders a minimum of 1 meter above the
landing / step-off area when using.
Tie extension ladders at the top and bottom to secure them in
place. If unable to do so, a second person must stabilize
the ladder while it is being secured.
Maintain a 4-to-1 ratio between the extension ladder and
the ground when in use and remain between the side-rails at all times.
Vertical ladders where the climb above the lower level or where a single
length is greater than 6 meters (20') workers shall be protected by:
Q A ladder safety device such as a self-retracting life-line or a rope grab
system; or
Q Each section is provided with a cage and landing platforms provided
at maximum intervals of 6 meters (20').

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Stepladders Stepladders (A-Frame) shall only be used as work


platforms when other options are not available for short-
duration and limited-complexity tasks where sideways
forces (i.e. large cable pulling, drilling, etc.) are not required.
Always fully open stepladders. Ensure hinges fully lock
into place prior to use. Do not use stepladders folded and
leaning against a vertical surface.
Use a fall-arrest system if work is performed while
standing on a stepladder and the possible fall distance is
more than 1.8 meters (6'), working with the feet above
the 5th ladder rung generally requires fall protection.

Scaffolds All scaffolds shall be designed by a competent person and shall be erected,
CRCP

loaded, and used in accordance with the design and manufacturer's


engineered specifications.

Scaffolds shall be erected, altered, moved, or dismantled by trained


scaffold erectors and under the supervision of competent persons.

A scaffold shall be capable of supporting:


Q Four times the maximum intended load without overturning.
 Q Three times the maximum intended load without causing the failure
of any component.
 Q Two times the maximum intended load without exceeding the
maximum allowable unit stresses for the materials of which it is made.
All scaffold work platforms should have complete guardrails installed
consisting of a mid and top rail and toe boards installed.

Top rail height shall be 1.06 meters (42') plus or minus 0.1 meters (4”).

Mid-rails shall be:


Q Installed between the top edge of the guardrail system and the
walking/working level at least 0.53 meters (1.75') high
Q Installed at a location midway between the top edge of the guardrail
system and the walking or working level
Q Used with intermediate vertical members between posts not more
than 0.5 meters (1.6') apart.

Toe boards shall:


Q Be erected along the edge of the overhead walking/working surface
Q Be a minimum of 9 centimeters (>3.5") in vertical height

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Q Be solid or have openings not more than 2.5 centimeters (1").


Q Not have more than a 2.5 centimeter (1”) gap between them and the
adjacent walking surface.

Where tools, material, and / or equipment are piled higher than the top
edge of a toe board, paneling or screening shall be erected from the
walking / working surface to the top of the guardrail systems top or mid-
rail for a distance sufficient to protect employees below.
Use a scaffold tag access / inspection system as follows:
Q Green: Suitable – fall arrest system is not required.
Q Yellow: Under construction – fall arrest system is required.

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Q Red: Do not use.

Use lifting bags / buckets when possible to transport materials


between elevations.
Have stamped engineered drawings with working load limits available at
the worksite during installation.
Any scaffolding where the working surface / platform is above 1.8 m (6')
shall be secured to a fixed structure and / or have outriggers deployed to
prevent tipping. Pin together all scaffold sections to prevent separation.
Use appropriate grade of scaffolding planks or platforms. These should
be clearly marked and legible.
Maintain clearance limits when erecting scaffolding near electrical lines,
or exposed electrical services. Ground the scaffolds when there is a
possibility of electrical contact or electromagnetic induction.
Protect scaffolds from contact with vehicles or equipment (i.e. temporary
concrete barriers).
Remove from service any scaffold that has been subjected to a sudden
drop, has been electrically energized, or shows signs of structural or
mechanical damage or wear until re-certified by a professional engineer.
Training and All persons who work at heights must have received training in the proper
Competency application of fall protection systems including the use and wearing of
fall protection equipment. Refresh training annually.
All persons who work on scaffolds must have received training on
scaffolding hazards. Ensure that all persons who erect, dismantle or
inspect scaffolds are competent and certified.
Ensure that all persons operating elevated work platforms are competent
to operate the specific equipment they are using.

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Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience. This will serve as a visual tool for
readily assessing compliance to this protocol.

5.3 RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

Equipment When it is not practicable to work from the ground or to fully install a fall
prevention system, use personal fall arrest or restraint equipment.

Include anti-suspension trauma straps for use of fall arrest harnesses.


These can significantly reduce life threatening impacts, post fall.

Inspection Visually inspect all safety harnesses, lanyards attachment slings and
fall protection devices before use. Conduct a thorough and documented
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inspection of equipment every 6 months. Keep a documented record of all


inspections completed. Label and remove from service any material which
is worn or defective in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Consider wind loading forces when assessing the scaffold setup,


dismantling, relocating and securing it in place.

Personally owned Personally owned fall protection is not preferred for use; however, under
fall protection special circumstances it will be considered, at the discretion of SNC-Lavalin.
equipment All personally owned fall protection equipment, if approved for usage,
must follow the same requirements as defined herein and subject to the
same inspection schedule.

Access Provide fall protection mechanisms where operators need to gain


access to places at height on large mobile machinery. Access may be
required for regularly unloading trucks, cleaning windscreens, changing
filters, etc. Where handrails cannot be installed, then travel restraint,
fall arrest equipment, or other solutions shall be implemented.

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6.0 PROTOCOL 6 – LIFTING OPERATIONS

6.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents


from lifting operations.

Scope This protocol applies wherever lifting operations are undertaken.


It includes lifts involving SNC-Lavalin owned, hired or contracted cranes
such as mobile, crawler, tower, derrick, portal and pedestal-type, vehicle
loading cranes, electric overhead traveling cranes, and monorail cranes.
This protocol also applies to lifting accessories including slings, chains,
wire ropes, shackles, padeyes, containers, baskets, tuggers, winches,

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man-riding winches and baskets.

Incident causes A significant portion of fatal and high potential incidents have occurred
in the course of lifting and crane operations. The root causes and
contributing factors have included:
Q Lack of job planning and hazard assessment.
Q Incorrect selection of cranes and lifting equipment for the task.
Q Inadequate inspection, maintenance, tagging and storage of lifting
equipment and accessories.
Q Lack of training in correct use of lifting equipment and accessories.
Q Inadequate inspection, maintenance, tagging and storage of lifting
equipment and accessories.
Q Poor recognition of unsafe conditions, including environmental conditions.
Q Operation of cranes and lifting equipment with safety and warning
devices overridden, inoperable or illegible.

6.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all manufacturers’ standard safety features and the intent and
requirements of the relevant approved CSA design standard. In countries
where the requirements of the relevant national standard exceed the
requirements of the CSA standard, the national standard shall apply.

Lift planning Only suitably qualified, certified and competent person(s) shall be involved
in the planning, supervision and implementation of the lifting operations.
Clearly define these roles and responsibilities on site.
Assess the risk associated with all lifting, crane maintenance, assembly
activities and environmental conditions in the project risk register.

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Detailed lifting plans are required during the following operations:


Q When the arcs (radius’) of operation of two or more cranes can
overlap; or
Q Lifting operations in the proximity of live electrical conductors.

Critical lifts Obtain an engineered lift plan prior to any critical lift. A critical lift
includes at least one of the following:
Q Any lift over 80 tons.
Q Any lift which involves personnel in a man-basket.
Q Any single lift using multiple cranes (i.e. 2 chain blocks, hoists, jib cranes)
Q Lifts over operating facilities / equipment.
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Q Lifts where the equipment exceeds 80% of its rated capacity.


Q Lifts involving special equipment or rigging (i.e. multi-level rigging, the
use of more than 3 spreader bars, cargo nets etc.).
Conduct a pre-lift meeting prior to such critical lifts to ensure that all
personnel understand how to conduct the lift safely.

Mobilization Implement a formal, documented selection and acceptance process for


all new and modified lifting equipment. Take into account the crane’s
various safety features prior to commencement of work.
Ensure that cranes and hoists are designed, constructed, erected,
disassembled, inspected, maintained and operated in accordance with the
manufacturers’ specifications or professional engineer’s specifications,
in addition to the intent and requirements of the appropriate CSA standards.
Have the certificate of conformity readily available at all times in the
crane unit.

Operating manuals Make available the manufacturers crane and lifting equipment operating
manuals and load charts. Where the crane and lifting equipment operator
is not conversant with the language of these, ensure that the operators
can understand the operating manuals and load charts.

Wind Do not conduct lifting operations when the wind speed exceeds:
 Q 30 km/h (18 mph) – Man-basket operations;
 Q 40 km/h (25 mph) – Requires an approved engineered lift plan;
 Q 50 km/h (30 mph) – Maximum wind speed lifting limit.

Any lifting conducted outside of these ranges must be conducted with


the signed consent of the project manager and may never exceed
manufacturer's specifications. .

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Maintenance, Implement a preventive maintenance program to ensure that all cranes,


inspections and lifting equipment and accessories are maintained in a serviceable condition.
certification
Ensure that all cranes and lifting equipment are inspected, tested
(including non-destructive testing as required by the intent and requirements
of the applicable CSA standard) and have an annual certification
(as stated by prevailing legislation and / or CSA standards) prior to being
operated and / or after any repair and / or modification.

Identify all cranes lifting equipment and accessories subject to periodic


inspection with a unique identity code or number. Ensure that cranes
or hoists with interchangeable rigging equipment have appropriate
identification details.

CRCP
Items of lifting equipment that are subject to wear and frequent
replacement (i.e. slings, shackles, padeyes, shipping and handling baskets)
or used to transport equipment to and from sites, shall be color coded to
confirm compliance with certification and inspection requirements.

Have a documented register of all lifting equipment and applicable


accessories that is readily available at all times in the lifting unit.

Have periodic equipment inspections conducted by a competent inspector


(i.e. six monthly) unless regulations in the local area require more
frequent inspections.

Ensure the inspection and maintenance records are current and available.
Implement a process to remove equipment from service if required and
maintain a log of such events.

Conduct the appropriate calibrations of load weighing devices and


moment indicators required by the manufacturer.

Confirm that mobile crane / boom truck tire type, condition and inflation
is in accordance with manufacturer's specifications.

Use a checklist for pre- and post-operational inspections.

Modifications Ensure that a professional engineer certifies any modifications carried


out on crane, hoist equipment and / or rigging, including modification and
operation for cranes on floating supports.

Any modification to cranes and lifting equipment are subject to


the original equipment manufacturer's approval and / or to a Change
Management process.

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Load capacity Ensure that all mobile cranes or boom trucks have appropriate load
weight indicators and boom angle indicators. Never exceed the rated
loading capacity of the equipment. Ensure the load charts are located on
the equipment.

The safe working load (SWL) or working load limit (WLL) shall be clearly
identified and marked on all cranes, lifting accessories and relevant
lifting equipment and shall not be exceeded.

Properly reduce load-rating capacity when slings are used at angles or


when operating on water.

Load cells, moment indicators, and external rated capacity lighting shall
CRCP

be available in accordance with the table below.

Crane Type Load Moment Load Cell External Rated


Indicator Capacity Lighting
Mobile Rough Terrain Shall Shall Shall
Mobile Truck Mounted Shall Shall Shall
Crawler Shall Shall Shall
Pedestal and Tower Shall Shall Should
Electric Overhead Travelling Not Applicable Should Should
Mobile Pick and Carry >10 Tons Should Should Should
Vehicle Loading Crane Should Should Should
Portal Not Applicable Should Should

Crane operators Crane operators shall:


Q Possess valid certification as stipulated by prevailing legislation.
Q Know the actual or estimated weight of every lift (including
attachments) prior to commencement.
Q Ensure sufficient time to familiarize themselves with the relevant
aspects of the crane prior to conducting a lift or during hand-over
from one operator to another.
Q Ensure unhindered communications and directions can be received
from a rigger or lift supervisor.
Q Visually inspect lifting equipment to confirm it is fit for purpose prior
to operation.
Q Ensure the required physical and load rating inspections of hardware,
slings, wire rope slings, hooks, alloy chain slings, synthetic webbing
slings, metal mesh slings and below the hook lifting devices prior to
lifting loads and maintain a log of such inspections.
Q Never leave a suspended load unattended.

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Barricading Barricade effectively (exclusion zones) and use warning signs or other
means to ensure protection of personnel during lifting operations.
When cranes are left unattended, place them in wind vane mode.
Clearance Always consider safe clearance distance when lifting near or over unprotected
equipment or services. This also applies to limits of approach for power lines;
generally, a minimum of 5 meters of separation shall be maintained.

Crane cabins Ensure that crane cabins are air-conditioned or heated in accordance
with environmental conditions.
Confirm proper railings and steps to ensure there is a safe means of
access to and from the cabin of the crane.

Ground conditions Ensure that ground conditions are adequate for the combined crane and

CRCP
load weights. Always level the crane before extending the boom laterally
or carrying loads. Determine whether there are any underground
chambers, voids, or pipes which may not be able to support the weight of
the crane and loads.

Suspended loads Eliminate the need to work under suspended loads. Warn workers of
upcoming lifts, barricade lift areas and avoid suspended loads from
passing over workers.

Outriggers Carry out all lifting activities (with the exception of pick and carry
operations) with outriggers fully deployed and locked.

Isolation Confirm that cranes have a physical locking system that disables and
isolates its free-fall capability.

For all electrical and powered cranes, have power supply isolation points
capable of being positively locked as well as an emergency shut-off
installed, tested and operational.

Rigging Ensure the following requirements:


Q Never exceed the rigging or rigging assembly loads capacity including
rigging design factors for rigging components and safe detachment
of loads.
Q Never ride a load, slinging, hook or other rigging device.
Q Fit all crane hooks with a positive locking safety latch.
Q Use taglines for load positioning only
Q Never use taglines to move the load
Q Protect slings from sharp edges with softeners while in use.
Q Consider safe travel with loads.

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Q Store hardware, slings and hooks in a manner to prevent inadvertent


damage and exposure to the elements.
Q No side loading of crane booms.
Communications Crane operators and riggers shall be able to communicate in a common
language and use agreed upon crane signals.

Lifting of Ensure the crane is suitable and approved for lifting personnel
personnel (i.e. anti two-block devices and boom angle indicators).
Only lift personnel with cranes using certified workbaskets or cages.
Ensure all fall protection protocols are implemented. Do not connect fall
protection equipment to the active crane hook.
CRCP

Prior to lifting any personnel, conduct a documented load test.

Training and A competency based training program for crane operators, riggers,
competency lift supervisors and other lift personnel shall be in place.
Ensure appropriate crane, hoists and rigging awareness training for
people likely to come into contact with loads being lifted, including
what the risks are, what the controls are, emergency management and
incident response procedures.
Implement a fit-for-work policy, incorporating defined action levels for
drugs and alcohol use and a fatigue management plan.
Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience.
This will serve as a visual tool for readily assessing compliance to
this protocol.
Riggers shall also receive specific training and achieve certifications
where appropriate.

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7.0 PROTOCOL 7 – CONFINED SPACE

7.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities, injuries and incidents arising from
entering or working in confined spaces.

Scope This protocol applies to all confined spaces, which meet the SNC-Lavalin
or prevailing legislated definitions for a confined space. Furthermore, these
protocols apply to any space which may become confined as a result of
work activities, conditions and / or location. As soon as it becomes apparent
that a space or area is becoming a confined space, this protocol shall be
applied.

CRCP
For the purpose of this protocol a confined space is defined as an
enclosed or partially enclosed work space that:
Q Is not intended or designed for continuous human occupancy.
Q Has a limited or restricted means of access or egress.
Q Is large enough to be entered by a person.

A confined space can further be classified as either permit required or


non-permit required.

A permit required confined space is an area that has one or more of


the following:
Q Has or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere.
Q A material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant.
Q An internal configuration that might cause an entrant to be trapped.

A non-permit confined space does not contain nor has the potential to
contain, any hazards capable of causing death or serious harm.

Incident causes Confined spaces can potentially lead to life threatening situations. The
most frequent root causes and contributing factors for confined space
incidents have included failure to:
Q Identify the confined space.
Q Prevent unauthorized entry.
Q Carry out appropriate and sufficient air monitoring / gas testing.
Q Wear appropriate respiratory protection.
Q Properly wear and / or maintain breathing apparatus.

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Q Have/use/wear appropriate emergency rescue gear (lifeline, harness,


emergency extraction equipment, etc).
Q Appoint a qualified watch person.
Q Have a qualified rescue team able to respond.

7.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all applicable OH&S legislation, standards and industry codes of
practice when involved in confined space entry operations. Confirm the
applicable requirements of the prevailing OH&S legislation, regulations,
codes and standards are understood and followed by persons assessing,
controlling and entering a confined space. Refer to local Occupational
Health and Safety legislation for definitions from prevailing legislation.
CRCP

Site specific Ensure that SNC-Lavalin or the contractor responsible for the confined
procedure space, documents a site-specific procedure that meets the prevailing local
legislative requirements and is compliant with these protocols. An annual
review of this specific procedure by a qualified person must be conducted.
The procedures shall include, but are not limited to the following:
Q Confined space risk assessment.
  XClearroles and responsibilities for entry workers, attendant, rescue
and supervisor personnel.
XQualifications of persons performing confined space risk assessments,

rescue, procedure development and permit approval.


Q Equipment, system, and personnel required for entry.
XEffective means of communication available between the persons
entering / working in the confined space and the watch person.
Q Emergency response procedures, equipment and personnel to conduct
rescue based on the risk levels and work activities.
X Rescue equipment and team required for entry.
Q Inspection and certification (by a competent and qualified engineer)
of any false works, supports or aids used to establish and / or maintain
the integrity of the space.
  X Any temporary mechanical ventilation systems.

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Hazard Include confined space entry considerations into the risk register.
assessment and
Complete a safe work permit for all confined space entries.
permit to work
Evaluate and document the following:
Q All hazards and their corresponding risk levels before implementing
controls (i.e. air monitoring, noise, illumination, temperature, biological,
vermin, engulfment potential, etc.).
Q Other factors, which might alter the risk levels within the confined
space, (i.e. wind, dust, gases, distances, etc.).
Q The work activities to be performed within the confined space.

Re-assess the safe work permit if the following conditions have changed:

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Q The scope of work or conditions within the confined space changes.
Q The air quality readings unexpectedly change during the work and
approach actionable levels.
Q The air monitoring (gas testing) shows that air quality is unexpectedly
changing during the work and approaching actionable levels.
Q Equipment to be used to ventilate the space, including the calculations
to determine the appropriate air exchange rates and equipment capabilities.
Q Authorized entrants, eligible attendants and individuals authorized to
be entry supervisors.
Q Type and quantity of gas detection equipment (consider calibration
of units).
Q Frequency of testing within the confined space.
Q Test results, test persons name and signature, time and date.
Q PPE and respiratory protection equipment to be used within the
confined space.
A permit signed by the entry supervisor, must be posted at all entrances
or otherwise made available to entrants before they enter any confined
space. The entry supervisor must close entry permits when an assignment
is completed.

Isolation and Control all energy sources within the confined space that could result in
lock-out undue risk from an existing energized state, start-up or unexpected
(CRCP 4) energy release in accordance with Protocol 4 – De-Energization and
prevailing legislation.

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Signage Identify all confined spaces with fixed signage erected at the entry
points denoting that a permit is required prior to entry.

Gas testing and For all permit required confined spaces, conduct appropriate gas testing
Monitoring and continuous air monitoring for hazards, chemicals and conditions.

Calibrate and maintain gas testing equipment appropriate to the task in


accordance with manufacturer and legislative requirements.

Identify the types and frequency of the gas testing (pre-entry and ongoing).

The air monitoring shall include, but is not necessarily limited to,
confirming that:
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Q The percentage of oxygen content is above 19.5% and below 23.0%.


Q Lower explosive limits for flammable vapors are below legislated
permissible limits.
Q Levels of other harmful naturally occurring or man-made compounds
are maintained below legislated permissible exposure limits (H2S,
CO, Methane, VOC’s etc.).

PPE Ensure that all required PPE including Respiratory Protection Equipment
(if required) complies with internationally recognized standards
such as NIOSH, CSA, manufacturer's specifications and prevailing
legislative requirements.
As applicable, carry out any respiratory protection equipment selection
and fit test procedures including functional tests and training.

Emergency Have emergency response plans and procedures ready for immediate
response implementation prior to commencement of confined space operations.
The emergency response plan shall include but not be limited to the following:
Q The types of emergencies, which may arise, based on the risk assessments.
Q The means of notification and communication of an emergency,
including the personnel to be contacted in case of an emergency.
Q The means of initiating a rapid evacuation of all entrants within the
confined space.
Q Written plans for the rapid retrieval of personnel in the event of
an emergency. At minimum, this will include specific information
on the methods of rescue and equipment requirements (i.e. hauling
equipment, overhead anchors, tripod system, reserve equipment,
medical equipment, additional PPE, etc).
Q The names and contact information for the emergency response
crews, first aid attendants and other first responders.

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Q The numbers and positioning of the emergency response personnel must


be appropriate based on the hazards / risks inside the confined space.
Q The training and competency requirements for the emergency
response personnel.
Where the local emergency response agency personnel (Fire, Ambulance,
Police) are expected to be part of the emergency rescue plans, contact
these agencies and confirm their participation in the rescue efforts. Bring
the local emergency response agencies to the site and show them the
locations of the confined spaces and any barriers to rescue.
Conduct emergency management and incident response drills.

Training and Train all employees, contractors, consultants and visitors who will or may

CRCP
competency be required to enter a confined space. The Confined Space Procedure
Training shall include at a minimum:
Q The roles and responsibilities of the Entry Supervisor, Entrants,
Watch Person and the Emergency Rescue personnel.
Q How to identify and grant permission to enter the space (no one shall
enter a space without a safe work permit and the knowledge and
consent of the Entry Supervisor).
Q The hazards, risks and controls measures for the confined space.
Q Pre-entry gas-testing and permissible exposure limits.
Q The means of ventilation for the space and the actions, which must be
taken in the event of a failure of the ventilation systems.
Q The scheduled check-in procedures with the watch person.
Q What to do in case of an emergency, including first aid, emergency
extraction and rescue procedures.
Q The general and specific PPE requirements, including respirator fit
testing requirements and restrictions (i.e. must be clean shaven).
Q A competency based test to confirm the understanding of the
entrants and watch persons.
Q Process to verify that only competent workers enter and conduct
emergency rescue activities in a confined space.

Keep on file all competency based tests by SNC-Lavalin or the contractor


who is responsible for the confined space.
Refresh training (at least annually) for long duration work and / or where
changes to conditions within the confined spaces increase risk.

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All personnel who perform emergency response must receive specific


training, which includes identification of the confined spaces and the
specific response actions for affecting rescue. Include practice exercises
as part of the training program.
Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience. This
will serve as a visual tool for readily assessing compliance to this protocol.

Non-permit A space may be classified as a non-permit confined space under the


required confined following conditions:
space
If a permit required confined space poses no actual or potential
atmospheric hazards and if all hazards within the space are eliminated
without entry into the space, the permit required confined space may be
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reclassified as a non-permit required confined space for as long as the


non-atmospheric hazards remain eliminated.
If it is necessary to enter the permit required confined space to eliminate
hazards, such entry shall be performed under a safe work permit. If testing
and inspection during that entry demonstrate that the hazards within the
permit required confined space have been eliminated, the permit required
confined space may be reclassified as a non-permit required confined
space for as long as the hazards remain eliminated.
NOTE: Control of atmospheric hazards through forced air ventilation
does not constitute elimination of the hazards.
The basis for determining that all hazards in a permit required confined
space have been eliminated shall be documented. The document shall
contain the date, the location of the space, and the signature of the
person making the determination. Communicate to each person entering
the space the reasons for the declassification.
If hazards arise within a space that has been declassified to a non-permit
required confined space, all entrants in the space shall exit the space.
The confined space shall then be re-evaluated to determine whether it
must be reclassified as a permit space.

Safe Work Permit Minimum permit requirements include the:


(confined space)
Q Length of time for which the permit is valid.
Q Name(s) of the worker(s) that will enter the confined space.
Q Name(s) of the watch person and / or supervisor.
Q Location of the confined space.
Q Work that is to be done in the confined space.

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Q Date and time of entry into the confined space and the anticipated
time of exit.
Q Details of any gas testing conducted – type of instrument used with
serial number, when, where, results, date monitoring equipment was
last calibrated. Ideally, calibration would be done just before each use.
Q Use of mechanical ventilation and other protective equipment needed
and any other precautions that will be followed.
Q Process required for clear communication between the entrants and
the watch person.
Q Protective equipment and emergency equipment to be used by
any person who takes part in a rescue or responds to emergency
situations in the confined space.

CRCP
Q Signatures from the appropriate workers, watch person and supervisor.

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8.0 PROTOCOL 8 – EXCAVATIONS

8.1 OVERVIEW

Purpose To eliminate the risk of fatalities and reduce the potential for injuries and
incidents when working in and around excavations and trenches.

Scope This protocol applies when creating and / or working in and around
excavations and trenches.

Incident causes Excavations and trenches can lead to hazardous situations. The most
frequent root causes and contributing factors for incidents involving
excavations and trenches have included:

CRCP
Q Failure to identify the location(s) of buried utilities.
Q Failure to properly cut back or shore walls, resulting in collapse and
entrapment.
Q Equipment operating too close to the edge of an excavation or trench.
Q Spoils piles left too close to the edge, resulting in collapse and entrapment.
Q Falls into the excavation from unprotected edges.
Q Inadequate means of egress.
Q Failure to monitor hazardous atmospheres

8.2 REQUIREMENTS

Legislation Obey all prevailing legislated requirements, applicable OH&S legislation,


standards and industry codes of practice when creating and / or working
in and around excavations and trenches.

Depth requirements A professional engineer shall certify any excavation and / or shoring
system that falls outside of the requirements of this protocol.

Depth / Length Requirement

0.0 - 1.2 m No cut back, shoring or barricading required.


1.2 - 1.8 m Cut back and / or shoring required.
1.8 – 6.0 m Perimeter protected to prevent falls into the
excavation. See Protocol 5 – Working at Heights.
> 6.0 m Assessed and approved by a Professional Engineer (in
addition to the above).

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 52 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Risk assessment Include excavation work in the risk register.


Document a JSA before the commencement of excavation work and any
time that the scope of work changes. Document and consider the following:
Q Identification of underground utilities and planned methodology for
exposure (daylighting).
Q Identification of overhead utilities and protective measures.
Q Equipment requirements and means of access / egress.
Q Cut back and / or shoring system details.
Q Spoils removal and stockpile methods, including placement locations.
Q Personnel access and egress routes and associated ladders and / or stairs.
CRCP

Q Influence of weather on the condition of the excavation (i.e.


deteriorating face or cut back, accumulation of water etc.).
Q Evaluation of potential air quality and hazardous materials issues
within the excavation (i.e. accumulation of equipment fumes,
petrochemical and / or groundwater contamination, biological hazards,
etc.).
Q Surface and groundwater locations.
Q Proximity and physical conditions of adjacent structures and
vehicular traffic.

Excavation Develop, implement and review annually written excavation procedures.


procedures Document and address the following:
Q Daily inspection of excavations and trenches (or as conditions change).
Q Flagging, marking, safeguards or other appropriate and effective
means to ensure that personnel are made aware of the excavation.
Q Accumulation of water may pose a hazard to personnel required to
enter an excavation or trench. De-watering or alternate controls
must be in place prior to entry.
Q Use of spotter personnel whenever mechanical excavation work
comes within 1 meter of a buried utility. Manually excavate or
hydrovac within 1 meter of the underground utility until it is
adequately exposed (daylighted).
Q Barricading is required to protect personnel exposed to unprotected
excavations greater than 1.2 meters (4’) deep and over 6 meters (20’)
in length.
Q Every excavation shall have a safe means of access / egress located
every 6 meters (20’),
Q Emergency response and incident management.

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 53 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Safe work Use a safe work permit for all excavations deeper than 1.2 meters (4').
permit
Ensure that locates and as-built drawings are readily available for review
by equipment operators and spotter personnel.

Ensure that all personnel involved in excavating and exposing underground


utilities review and sign the safe work permit before commencing work.

Lifting Perform all lifting operations (i.e. placement of shoring cage in excavation,
operations lowering of rebar, pipes, etc. into the excavation / trench) in accordance
with Protocol 6 – Lifting Operations.

Barricading Protect or cover any excavation or trench, which crosses a site or public

CRCP
roadway or sidewalk with barricades and / or plates. Design and approve
barricades and / or plates for their use (i.e. load consideration for vehicle
and / or pedestrian traffic).

Spoil piles Keep all spoil piles at least 1 meter (3.3') from the edge of any excavation.

Underground Identify and protect from damage all underground utilities within the
utilities excavation or trench area. Release of energy in accordance with
Protocol 4 – De-Energization.
Ensure that only appropriately competent persons act as spotters to
guide equipment operators near underground utilities.

Soil Assess soil conditions and classify soil types as applicable. Stabilize soil
classification, through cut backs, shoring or a combination of both.
cut back and
shoring Inspect to ensure that shoring systems are appropriate to soil conditions
and work activities. Follow the design and construction plans for all
excavations. When using shotcrete walls as the principle method of shoring,
cure time must be respected to ensure sufficient strength is developed
before workers enter the vicinity.

Ensure that an engineered plan is developed for any excavation next to or


adjacent to an existing structure.

See the charts below for cut back guidelines.

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 54 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Type of Soil Compressive Cut back diagram


Strength
(kPa)

A: hard and compact 144 <


the walls are sloped to within
1.5 meters of the bottom of
the excavation at an angle of Spoil
not less than 30 degrees Pile
from the vertical
CRCP

B: Likely to crack or 48 – 144


crumble
the walls are sloped to within
1.5 meters of the bottom of
the excavation at an angle of Spoil
not less than 45 degrees Pile
from the vertical

C: Soft, sandy or loose < 48


the walls are sloped from
the bottom of the excavation
at an angle of not less than
45 degrees from the vertical

D: Any soil type n/a Trench Box


(preferred method)

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 55 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Excavation Depth Cutback Distance


Soil type Angle (º)
up to (m) (m)

3 A – Hard 30 1.5m @ 30 º = 2.6

B – Cracks 45 1.5m @ 45 º = 1.5

C – Sandy 45 3.0m @ 45 º = 3.0

5
A – Hard 30 3.5m @ 30 º = 6.0

B – Cracks 45 3.5m @ 45 º = 3.5

C – Sandy 45 5.0m @ 45 º = 5.0

CRCP
Training and Communicate the requirements of this protocol to all employees,
competency contractors, consultants and visitors who will or may be required to
create, enter or work in an excavation or trench.
Ensure proper training and instruction is provided to all personnel
involved in excavating and working in an excavation, including:
Q Identification of the risks
Q Identification of the controls / safeguards
Q Emergency response and incident management and where to get
additional information.
Develop a training matrix to identify required courses and experience.
This will serve as a visual tool for readily assessing compliance to
this protocol.

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 56 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

DEFINITIONS
The definitions provided herein are not a full and complete description of the subject topics.
Persons must check the prevailing legislation to confirm whether additional definitions exist and are
applicable in the place of work.

ALARP As Low As Reasonably Practicable.

Barricading A physical barrier that prevents inadvertent access to an area (i.e. handrails,
access doors and gates or similar installations, temporary or permanent).
Barrier tape does not qualify as barricading. Considered fall prevention.

Competent person A person who by way of training, experience and certification is


CRCP

knowledgeable of applicable standards and is capable of identifying


workplace hazards relating to the specific operation.

Confined space An enclosed or partially enclosed work space. Can be further classified
as either permit or non-permit required.

Crane A mechanical structure used for lifting.

CSA Canadian Standards Association

Cut back Means the process of, sloping or benching an excavation to prevent wall
collapse, slippage or shelling.

Demarcation Any method that indicates an area is used for a specific purpose or
that access is restricted. Examples are barrier tape, painted lines on
floor surfaces, portable signs denoting drop zones or no access past
a specific point.

DOT Department of Transportation

Excavation Means any man-made cut, cavity, trench, or depression in the earth’s
surface formed by earth removal.

Fall arrest Means the use of multiple, approved safety equipment components such
as body harnesses, lanyards, deceleration devices, drop lines, horizontal
and / or vertical lifelines and anchorages, interconnected and rigged, as
to safety stop a fall.

Fall prevention Any measures taken to avoid the potential of a fall (i.e. supplementary
guard rails, floor hole covers, vertical form work landings, etc.)

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Fall protection Means the design and use of a system that minimizes exposure when
an elevated fall hazard is present. This may require more than one fall
protection system or a combination of prevention, restraint and / or arrest.

Fall restraint Means an approved device and any necessary components that function
together to prevent a person from approaching an unguarded edge. Also
known as travel restraint.

Group isolation Is achieved when there is a single common isolation point that isolates
more than one unit of equipment.

HAZCHEM HAZardous CHEMical

CRCP
HazCom Hazard Communication (USA Hazardous Materials)

HAZID HAZard Identification

HAZMAT HAZardous MATerials

HAZOP HAZard and OPerability stud

Heavy equipment Includes vehicles such as bull dozers, rock trucks, excavators, graders, etc.

Inertia reel Also known as a self-retracting lanyard or fall-arrest block, is a


mechanical device that arrests a fall by locking onto a drop line and at
the same time allows freedom of movement.

Isolation or System Is a tag applied to an isolation point by the person who is responsible to
Tag ensure isolation requirements for the task have been met and is a tag
that when applied prohibits all use, operation or start-up of equipment.

JSA Job Safety Analysis which is part of the SNC-Lavalin risk management
process.

Lanyard (fixed) A line used as part of a lanyard assembly to connect a harness to an


anchorage point or a static line in situations where there is risk of a fall.

Lift plan Refers to a document which sets out lift calculations, and which is
stamped by a registered professional engineer or equivalent.

Lifting accessories Any device which is used or designed to be used directly or indirectly
to connect a load to a crane and which does not form part of a load,
(i.e. wire rope slings, chain slings, synthetic fiber slings, hooks and
fittings, swivels, shackles, eye bolts, rigging screws, wedge sockets,
plate clamps and lifting beams).

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Critical Risk Control Protocols

Lifting equipment Refers to tools, tuggers, and pieces of equipment used for lifting weight.

Lifting operation Any operation using a crane and lifting equipment that involves the
raising and lowering of a load, including the suspension of a load.

Light vehicles Includes vehicles such as passenger cars, four wheel drives (including
all wheel drives (AWDs), sports utility vehicles (SUVs), cargo vans, pick-
ups (utilities), mini buses, etc.).

Long-term isolation Is an isolation in place for more than one shift period.

Mobile equipment Includes vehicles such as bobcats, front end loaders, forklifts, dump
trucks, tractor trailers, packers, etc.
CRCP

MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet.

Multiple isolation Is a single isolation point that is locked and / or tagged by more than
one person.

OH&S Occupational Health and Safety

Personal locking Is one that is provided to an individual for the purpose of their own
device protection. It is not to be used by others, and can only be removed by
the lock owner. A lock removal procedure mist be in place to address
exceptional circumstances.

Personal tag Is a tag personally applied by the individual prior to commencing work on
isolated equipment. The individual who placed the personal danger tag on
the isolated piece of equipment is the only person who can remove the
tag. The only exception for removal of the tag is according to the site lock
removal procedure.

Project risk register Refer to the GHSMS (6801) under section 3.1 Hazard Identification, Risk
Assessment and Determining Controls.

Purged space Is one where contaminants inside a confined space are displaced with air
to achieve acceptable atmospheric levels.

Safe work permit A document completed for activities involving confined space, hotwork,
excavations or electrical work. It must be completed and approved prior
to the work commencing.

Shoring Means a pre-fabricated or hand built structure installed into the


excavation to prevent collapse of the excavation walls.

Short-term isolation Is an isolation in place for one shift period or less.

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 59 of 60


Critical Risk Control Protocols

Shotcrete Means the process of installing anchors, ties and mats onto a vertical
face of an excavation and then applying concrete to create a solid face.

Spoil piles Is the stored material removed from an excavation.

Suspension trauma Is the effect that can occur when a person’s legs are immobile in an
upright posture for a prolonged period, after an arrested fall with a
fall-arrest system. The person is suspended and caught in an upright,
vertical position and the harness straps cause pressure on the leg veins.
The blood flow to the heart is reduced, resulting in fainting, restriction
of movement or loss of consciousness. This may lead to renal failure and
eventually death, depending on a person’s susceptibility. The condition

CRCP
may be worsened by heat and dehydration.

TDG Transportation of dangerous goods

Trench box An engineered device used to hold the vertical sides of an excavation
from collapsing.

Ventilated space Is one:


Q Where there is continuous provision of fresh air into the confined space
by mechanical means to maintain acceptable atmospheric levels.
Q Where contaminants are removed continually for the entire duration
that work is being performed in the confined space.

WHMIS Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System

Zero Energy State No stored or possible release of energy in the system.


(ZES)

6845.1.1-EN-Rev.8 2015-01-01 Page 60 of 60


HEALTH & SAFETY

Health&Safety.Corporate@snclavalin.com
CORPORATE HEALTH

Audit
AND SAFETY AUDIT

MS
2015
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit

Business Unit:

Project Location (City and Country):

Project Name:

Project Number:

Project/Site Manager:

Lead Auditor:

Audit Team Members:

Audit Date:

Immediate Action(s) Required 0

FINAL AUDIT SCORE Action(s) Required 0

Best Practices 0

Imminent Danger Issues: 0

MET / NOT MET 90% STANDARD Repeating Issues: 0

Audit Limitations: Audits represent a point in time or a “snapshot”. The conclusion of this report reflects any limitation encountered and the comments are supported by the
evidence at the time of the audit. The auditor(s) may have reviewed or viewed only a representative sample and thus professional judgments expressed by the auditor(s) are limited

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 1 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit

FINAL
SCORE AT RISK SET STANDARD OUTCOME and PRIORITY
SCORE

MINIMUM Immediate
MAXIMUM Repeating Imminent Best No Action Action
SECTION NAME Score FINAL SCORE STANDARD MET / NOT MET Action
POSSIBLE Issues Danger Practice Required Required
(90%) Required

1. Vehicles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2. Hazardous Materials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Equipment Safeguarding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4. De-Energization 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Working at Heights 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Lifting Operations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7. Confined Space 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
8. Excavations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
9. Risk Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
10. Health and Safety Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11. Site Conditions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
12. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
13. Fire Prevention and Hot Work 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
14. Non-Routine Operations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15. Emergency Response 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16. Training 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTALS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

AUDIT SCORING LEGEND DEFINITIONS


N/A - Not relevant to this audit Repeating Issues: Multiple instances of non-compliance
Not Done (0%) - Not compliant with the issue.
Major Improvement Required (33%) - Compliance checked, but frequent lapses
Minor Improvement Required (66%) - Compliance checked, but occasional lapses occur Imminent Danger: Any unsafe condition or unsafe
Compliant (100%) - Full compliance, no more reasonable actions would be expected behaviour (no energy release) where no
Best Practice (100%) - Full compliance, best in class practices in place incident occurred, but the possibility
existed.

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 2 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit

Section Audit Score (%)

1. Vehicles
100%
16. Training 2. Hazardous Materials

80%
15. Emergency Response 3. Equipment Safeguarding
60%

14. Non-Routine Operations 40% 4. De-Energization

20%

13. Fire Prevention and Hot Work 0% 5. Working at Heights

12. Personal Protective Equipment The inspection forms are comprehensive enough given the nature6.ofLifting
the site Operations
(PPE)

11. Site Conditions 7. Confined Space

10. Health and Safety Management 8. Excavations


9. Risk Management

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 3 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit

AUDIT SCORE AND MAXIMUM POSSIBLE


1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 4 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit

SECTION AUDIT SCORE (%)


100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 5 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 1. Vehicles D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General

1. 1 Suitable seats with seat belts are installed and in good working condition x Not Applicable N/A

1. 2 Seatbelts are used by all drivers and operators x Not Applicable N/A

1. 3 Cell phones (including hands-free) are not used while vehicles / equipment are in use x x Not Applicable N/A
Drivers have a valid and appropriate level driver’s license and have their license on their
1. 4 x x Not Applicable N/A
person at all times
Tires specifically designed for the hazardous road conditions, including tires designated for
1. 5 x x Not Applicable N/A
winter driving during the season when snow and/or ice is expected are installed
Hydraulics are lowered / parking brake is set and the machine is turned off when operators
1. 6 x Not Applicable N/A
leave their vehicle
A journey management plan is developed and implemented in areas that pose safety and
1. 7 x x Not Applicable N/A
security risks or the journey is more than 400 km or 4 hours a day
Light Vehicles

1. 8 All loads are secured properly x Not Applicable N/A


All company vehicles have a sticker on the dash reiterating no cell phones, obey speed
1. 9 x Not Applicable N/A
limits, use seat belts and mandatory drivers training.
All vehicles are equipped with appropriate safety equipment (including first aid kit and
1. 10 x Not Applicable N/A
roadside triangles / beacons / extinguishers)
Mobile and Heavy Equipment
Only qualified personnel or those in training (under direct supervision) are permitted to
1. 11 x x Not Applicable N/A
operate heavy and mobile equipment
1. 12 Wheel chocks used for rubber tired mobile equipment x Not Applicable N/A

1. 13 Horns and audible back-up alarms are operational x Not Applicable N/A

1. 14 A portable fire extinguisher is avilable and suitable mounted x Not Applicable N/A

1. 15 Operator cage protection in place (unless the risk of falling objects is low). x Not Applicable N/A

1. 16 Roll over protection is available where there is a risk of roll over x Not Applicable N/A

1. 17 Whip flag and strobe lights are used where required or when on client or operating sites x Not Applicable N/A

Inspection and Maintenance


Heavy equipment is subject to a comprehensive inspection prior to acceptance and use on
1. 18 x Not Applicable N/A
site with documentation on file
1. 19 Inspections are completed as per the inspection program x Not Applicable N/A

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2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 1. Vehicles D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Site Road Conditions


1. 20 Site roads are maintained in good condition x Not Applicable N/A

1. 21 Site road speed limits are posted and observed x Not Applicable N/A

1. 22 Roads are protected by berms and/or guard rails as required x Not Applicable N/A

1. 23 Loads are dumped from firm and level ground x Not Applicable N/A
Traffic Management

Site has a documented traffic control plan (including speed limits, access, communication,
1. 24 x x Not Applicable N/A
parking and barriers from vehicles, heavy and mobile equipment, and pedestrians)

1. 25 Traffic control plan is followed by all personnel x Not Applicable N/A

1. 26 Clear and safe paths of travel for equipment are provided for vehicles and pedestrians x x Not Applicable N/A

1. 27 A competent traffic control person is available to control movement on/off site x x Not Applicable N/A

1. 28 Traffic control persons are positioned in a safe location. x x Not Applicable N/A

1. 29 Adequate signage is in place, correct to standards and visible x Not Applicable N/A
Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 7 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK SCORE RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 2. Hazardous Materials D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
2. 1 A site registry exists for all hazardous materials x Not Applicable N/A
MSDS for controlled products are available in the language commonly used at site and are
2. 2 x x Not Applicable N/A
updated every 3 years
Workers using controlled products have access to the MSDS and are familiar with the
2. 3 x x Not Applicable N/A
required controls
Labels are in place for all storage vessels, containers and tanks as per the local or
2. 4 x Not Applicable N/A
applicable standards (e.g. WHMIS, TDG, HazCom and/or DOT)
Storage and Process Facilities
2. 5 Provisions are in place for safe venting, drainage and containment x Not Applicable N/A

2. 6 Piping containing hazardous materials are marked x Not Applicable N/A

2. 7 A dispersion model is available for possible toxic gas release x Not Applicable N/A

2. 8 Access controls to storage and use areas are in place and appropriate x Not Applicable N/A

Occupational Exposure
Monitoring of short and long term exposure of personnel to hazardous materials, as
2. 9 x Not Applicable N/A
neccesary
2. 10 Critical activities involving hazardous materials are identified x Not Applicable N/A

Emergencies and Disposal


2. 11 There is a processes in place for transporting hazardous materials x x Not Applicable N/A
Chemical resistant clothing worn by employees meets the level of protection specified in the
2. 12 x x Not Applicable N/A
MSDS and/or work permit

2. 13 Secondary containment is used for storage of hazardous materials (i.e. 110% capacity) x x Not Applicable N/A

2. 14 Emergency eye wash and shower is provided near hazardous material storage x Not Applicable N/A

2. 15 Hazardous waste that is generated and stored on site is identified x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 8 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK SCORE RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 3. Equipment Safeguarding D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
3. 1 Machine guards are in place and functional to prevent contact with moving parts x Not Applicable N/A

3. 2 All moving parts (gears, sprockets, pulleys, flywheels, belts and chains) are guarded x Not Applicable N/A

3. 3 No evidence exists to indicate guards have been modified or tempered with x Not Applicable N/A

3. 4 Guards removed for maintenance only after equipment has been properly de-energized x Not Applicable N/A

Fail-to-safe (deadman) switches installed on all manually operated equipment (i.e. saws,
3. 5 x Not Applicable N/A
lathes, drills, etc.)
Tools
3. 6 Improvised or home made tools are prohibited and none were observed x Not Applicable N/A

3. 7 All power tools are formally inspected on a quarterly basis and tagged properly x x Not Applicable N/A

3. 8 All tools are visually inspected prior to use and defective ones tagged out of service x x Not Applicable N/A

3. 9 All grinders are equipped with a secondary handle and are operated using two hands x Not Applicable N/A

3. 10 Discs on grinders are compatible with the OEM maximum revolutions per minute (RPMs) x Not Applicable N/A

Electrical Safety
Electrical equipment is marked with the amount of voltage and appropriate electrical hazard
3. 11 x Not Applicable N/A
warning
3. 12 Access to live high voltage equipment is restricted to authorized personnel x Not Applicable N/A

3. 13 GFCI electrical outlets and panels are labelled and tested x Not Applicable N/A
Electrical cords are inspected (by qualified person), approved for the type of usage and are
3. 14 x x Not Applicable N/A
free of damage
Working spaces and walkways are kept clear of tripping hazards (i.e. electrical cords are
3. 15 x Not Applicable N/A
elevated over passage ways)

3. 16 All temporary electrical receptacles, junction boxes, and panels are electrically grounded x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 9 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK SCORE RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 4. De-Energization D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General Energy Control


Site specific procedures (including roles and responsibilities) have been developed,
4. 1 x Not Applicable N/A
documented, and implemented for the control of hazardous energy

Site specific procedures include provision for type of energy sources to be isolated, control
4. 2 x Not Applicable N/A
required for the activity, communication, group lockout and authorization of personnel

4. 3 Site specific procedures include provision for one or more shift changeovers x x Not Applicable N/A

4. 4 Isolation is achieved by the use of locking devices, physical barriers or separation x x Not Applicable N/A

4. 5 Personal locks are uniquely keyed (i.e. are not a combination lock) x Not Applicable N/A

4. 6 Personal locks don’t have a master key x x Not Applicable N/A

4. 7 Each personal lock has only one key kept under the sole control of the lock owner x x Not Applicable N/A

4. 8 There is a compliant Lock Removal Process in place x x Not Applicable N/A

4. 9 Isolation points are clearly labelled to identify the circuit or system they directly control x Not Applicable N/A

4. 10 Lockout boxes and stations are available where required x Not Applicable N/A

4. 11 All designated isolation points fitted with personal locking devices are tagged x Not Applicable N/A

4. 12 The tagging system includes the name and picture of the worker x Not Applicable N/A

4. 13 Reason for isolation as well as date and time is clearly identified on the tag x Not Applicable N/A

4. 14 Tags are highly visible to prevent inadvertent operation x Not Applicable N/A
Zero energy state (ZES) is achieved (and tested) prior to commencing the required repair or
4. 15 x x x Not Applicable N/A
maintenance activity unless involved in commissioning and troubleshooting
If live electrical work is being performed, the requirements of CSA Z462 or equivalent are
4. 16 x x x Not Applicable N/A
followed
Multiple levels of sign off (at least two) are obtained where a zero energy state, a test/try of
4. 17 x x x Not Applicable N/A
isolation, or use of a locking device is not possible
Commissioning and Start Up
There is a project commissioning and start-up plan with clear responsibilities and actions
4. 18 x x Not Applicable N/A
including commissioning safety requirements
The commissioning and start-up plan defines division of responsibility between construction,
4. 19 x x Not Applicable N/A
commissioning personnel, and the client
There is clear communication between construction, commissioning and the client to ensure
4. 20 x x Not Applicable N/A
lockout program is effective

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 10 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK SCORE RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 5. Working at Heights D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
Fall arrest is the last option used for safely working at heights, all other options have been
5. 1 x x Not Applicable N/A
properly considered (i.e. guardrails, elevated platform and scaffolds)
Workers wear appropriate fall protection equipment where required and know appropriate
5. 2 x x Not Applicable N/A
anchorage points for each task performed at heights over 1.8 m (6')
5. 3 100% tie-off implemented at all times (one connection point maintained at all times) x Not Applicable N/A

5. 4 Free-fall distance has been considered x x Not Applicable N/A


Lanyards are made of synthetic fibre and have a shock-absorbing feature to limit the
5. 5 x Not Applicable N/A
arresting forces while respecting free-fall distances
Anchor points have been approved by a competent person and meet the requirement of
5. 6 x x Not Applicable N/A
22.2kN (5000lbf) or 2 X maximum arresting force
Anchorage points for body harnesses are located at shoulder height and overhead for self-
5. 7 x Not Applicable N/A
retracting lifelines where possible
Self-retracting lifelines are used instead of a lanyard when worker mobility and fall protection
5. 8 x Not Applicable N/A
is required.
All fall protection and rescue equipment is inspected by a competent and authorized person
5. 9 x x Not Applicable N/A
quarterly with an accompanying equipment list and tagging system
5. 10 All fall protection equipment is visually inspected prior to use x x Not Applicable N/A
Floor openings with a 30 cm (12') or greater gap in its least dimension, are fully barricaded or
5. 11 x Not Applicable N/A
are protected with a secured cover and labelled
Workers use personal travel restraint equipment when working within 1.8 m (6') of an
5. 12 x Not Applicable N/A
opening or unguarded edge
5. 13 Personnel below are protected from falling materials (i.e. tools, bolts, etc.) x Not Applicable N/A

5. 14 Exclusion zones (red tape, barricades, etc.) for all overhead work are adequate x Not Applicable N/A

5. 15 Stairway floor openings have railings that protect all open sides x Not Applicable N/A

5. 16 Handrails are always utilized by workers x Not Applicable N/A

5. 17 If a "Permit to Work" system is in place, it is followed when working at heights x Not Applicable N/A
There is a process for unloading transport trucks that complies with the 1.8 m (6')
5. 18 x x Not Applicable N/A
requirement
Access instructions are provided where operators need to gain access to places at height
5. 19 x Not Applicable N/A
when unloading transport trucks
Lifelines
5. 20 All horizontal lifelines have approved engineered drawings available for review x Not Applicable N/A

5. 21 Lifelines have been installed as per the approved drawings x Not Applicable N/A
Lifelines have a weatherproof tag detailing the maximum design weight, number of persons
5. 22 x Not Applicable N/A
rating and the last inspection date
Rescue Planning
5. 23 A rescue plan for fallen workers has been developed x x Not Applicable N/A

5. 24 The rescue plan has been tested x x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 11 of 36

Audit
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Audit Finding
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Ref. 5. Working at Heights D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

5. 25 The rescue plan has been well communicated x x Not Applicable N/A

5. 26 No person works alone when working at heights x x Not Applicable N/A


Elevated Work Platforms (EWP)
Proper platforms are selected so that workers are not required to stand on the middle or top
5. 27 x Not Applicable N/A
rails
The appropriate warning devices, labels and stickers are in place; operating manual is
5. 28 x Not Applicable N/A
available with the EWP for the use of the operator
5. 29 Inspections are documented prior to using any EWP x Not Applicable N/A
With one person using an EWP, spotters must maintain continuous visual and audible
5. 30 x Not Applicable N/A
contact with the worker in the EWP (exception if equipped with engineered controls)
With two persons using an EWP, a spotter is within proximity to ensure visual and audible
5. 31 x Not Applicable N/A
contact with workers in EWP (exception if equipped with engineered controls)
5. 32 A safe perimeter (barricading) around the equipment is set-up while in use x Not Applicable N/A
When mobile, EWP is in the full-down, stowed position and slowest speed with the operator
5. 33 x Not Applicable N/A
having a clear view of the travel direction and a spotter is utilized
Ladders
The appropriate ladder is selected for the task (i.e. non-metallic ladder when working near
5. 34 x Not Applicable N/A
electrical equipment)
5. 35 Ladders are not work platforms and are not used as such x Not Applicable N/A

5. 36 Workers always maintain 3-points of contact when using a ladder x Not Applicable N/A

A fall-arrest system is used if work is performed while standing on a ladder and the possible
5. 37 x Not Applicable N/A
fall distance is more than 1.8 meters and the worker cannot maintain 3-point contact

5. 38 Ladders are placed on firm and level surfaces x Not Applicable N/A

5. 39 Step-ladders are fully open with hinges locked in place, prior to use x Not Applicable N/A

5. 40 Extension ladders are extended a minimum of 1 metre above the landing/step-off area x Not Applicable N/A

5. 41 Extension-ladders are tied at the top and bottom when in use x Not Applicable N/A

5. 42 A 4-to-1 ratio is maintained between the extension ladder and the ground x Not Applicable N/A
Scaffolds
Scaffolds are secured to a fixed structure or employ outriggers to prevent tipping; all scaffold
5. 43 x x Not Applicable N/A
sections are pinned together to prevent separation
5. 44 Stamped engineered drawings with working load limits are available x Not Applicable N/A
Scaffolds are erected, altered, moved, or dismantled by trained scaffold erectors under the
5. 45 x x x Not Applicable N/A
supervision of competent persons
Scaffold work platforms are completely decked between the uprights and/or guardrail
5. 46 x x Not Applicable N/A
supports
Scaffolds are equipped with top rails at 106 cm (42”), mid rails at 53 cm (21”), and toe
5. 47 x Not Applicable N/A
boards at 9 cm (3.5”) minimum heights

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 12 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Audit Finding
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Ref. 5. Working at Heights D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Where tools/items are piled higher than the top edge of a toe board, panelling or screening
5. 48 x Not Applicable N/A
are installed from the walking/working surface to the top rail
5. 49 A scaffold inspection tag access system is in place using green, yellow and red tags x Not Applicable N/A
Scaffolds are designed by a Qualified Person or manufacturer and are erected, loaded, and
5. 50 x Not Applicable N/A
used in accordance properly
5. 51 Clearance limits are maintained when scaffolding is required near electrical lines x Not Applicable N/A
Scaffolds are protected from contact with vehicles or equipment (i.e. temporary concrete
5. 52 x Not Applicable N/A
barriers)

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 13 of 36

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Ref. 6. Lifting Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Lifting Operations
Only qualified, certified and competent person(s) are involved in the planning, supervision and
6. 1 x x x Not Applicable N/A
implementation of lifting operations

There is a documented lift plan in place for critical lifting operations (over 80% capacity, two
6. 2 x x Not Applicable N/A
cranes are used, use of man-basket, lift over 80 tons, lift over operating facilities, etc.)

6. 3 A pre-lift meeting is conducted prior to any critical lifts x x x Not Applicable N/A
A documented selection and acceptance process is in place for all lifting equipment when
6. 4 x Not Applicable N/A
arriving on site and when modified (certificate of conformity)
6. 5 The certificate of conformity is readily available at all times in the crane unit x Not Applicable N/A

The manufacturer’s lifting equipment operating manuals and load charts are readily available
6. 6 x Not Applicable N/A
to the operator; explanation is provided when not in the operators native language

Reliable wind speed data is available and lifting operations are not conducted when the wind
6. 7 x x Not Applicable N/A
speed exceeds CRCP # 6 limits
Lifting equipment has an annual certification of inspection and testing (as stated by prevailing
6. 8 x Not Applicable N/A
legislation and/or CSA standards)
Lifting equipment subject to wear (i.e. slings, shackles, pad eyes, etc) are inspected and
6. 9 x x Not Applicable N/A
colour coded to visually confirm compliance

A documented register of all lifting equipment and applicable accessories is readily available
6. 10 x Not Applicable N/A
at all times on the lifting unit with appropriate inspections, calibrations and certifications

Modifications to lifting equipment have been certified by a professional engineer and are
6. 11 x x x Not Applicable N/A
subject to the original equipment manufacturers approval

The safe working load (SWL) or working load limit (WLL) is clearly identified and marked on
6. 12 x Not Applicable N/A
all cranes, lifting accessories and relevant lifting equipment and shall not be exceeded

There is evidence the crane Load Moment Indicator (LMI) computer is properly calibrated and
6. 13 x x x Not Applicable N/A
set up for the lift configuration (number of slings, etc.)
Operators know the actual or estimated weight of every lift (including attachments) prior to
6. 14 x x Not Applicable N/A
commencement of any lift
Prior to lifting loads, the physical and load rating inspections of slings, hooks and other below
6. 15 x Not Applicable N/A
the hook lifting devices is logged
6. 16 Suspended loads are never left unattended x Not Applicable N/A

6. 17 Passing suspended loads over workers never happens x Not Applicable N/A
Personnel protection during lifting operations is maintained by effective barricading (exclusion
6. 18 x Not Applicable N/A
zones) and use of warning signs (includes swing radius of the crane)
All lifting activities (except for pick and carry operations) are performed with outriggers fully
6. 19 x Not Applicable N/A
deployed and locked
Cranes have a physical locking system that disables and isolates its free-fall capability (only
6. 20 x Not Applicable N/A
powered lowering mode used)
6. 21 Taglines are utilized x Not Applicable N/A

6. 22 All crane hooks are equipped with a positive locking safety latch x Not Applicable N/A
Minimum clearance from overhead or underground utilities are observed; alternatively, utilities
6. 23 x x Not Applicable N/A
are isolated/de-energized as required
6. 24 Slings are protected from sharp edges with softeners while in use x x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 14 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Audit Finding
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Ref. 6. Lifting Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Suspended Baskets
6. 25 Suspended work baskets are certified annually as safe and utilized for personnel x Not Applicable N/A

6. 26 A load test has been performed that establishes a safety factor of 2 times for the work basket x Not Applicable N/A

6. 27 Suspended manbaskets are never used when wind speeds exceed 30k/h (18mph) x x Not Applicable N/A

6. 28 Suspended manbaskets are labelled with the maximum weight capacity & number of persons x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 15 of 36

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2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


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Audit Finding
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Ref. 7. Confined Space D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
All confined spaces have signage at the entry points stating that a permit is required prior to
7. 1 x Not Applicable N/A
entry
7. 2 Site specific procedures have been developed for all confined space entries x Not Applicable N/A

7. 3 Confined spaces are classified as either being a permit required or a non-permit required x Not Applicable N/A

Hazard Assessment
A Safe Work Permit (document number 6845.2.7.3) is completed for all confined space
7. 4 x x Not Applicable N/A
entries requiring a permit

All hazards and their risk levels have been evaluated before implementing controls (i.e. air
7. 5 x x Not Applicable N/A
quality, noise, illumination, temperature, chemical, biological, engulfment potential, etc.)

Air Testing and Monitoring


Air testing equipment is appropriate and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer and
7. 9 x x Not Applicable N/A
legislated requirements
Air quality testing equipment is calibrated / bump tested using standard certified span gases
7. 10 x x Not Applicable N/A
in accordance with the manufacturer and legislated requirements
The types and frequency of the air quality testing is identified, scheduled and conducted pre-
7. 11 x x Not Applicable N/A
entry and ongoing while persons are in the confined/restricted space
Air quality testing includes O2 and Lower Explosive Limits for flammable vapours (LEL) and
7. 12 x x Not Applicable N/A
others as applicable (H2S, CO, VOCs etc.)
Isolation and lock out
All energy sources within the confined space that could result in undue risk from an existing
7. 13 x x Not Applicable N/A
energized state, start-up or unexpected energy release are controlled
Entry
All confined spaces have signage at the entry points stating that a permit is required prior to
7. 14 x Not Applicable N/A
entry
7. 15 A permit signed by the entry supervisor is posted at all entrances x Not Applicable N/A

7. 16 Entry permits are used, and sign-off for responsible parties is provided and followed x x Not Applicable N/A

7. 17 An attendant (watch person) is present at all times during a confined space entry x Not Applicable N/A

7. 18 Effective cleaning, purging and venting processes are used as appropriate x x Not Applicable N/A

7. 19 Communication is maintained at all time with attendants x x x Not Applicable N/A


Emergency Response

7. 20 A rescue plan for confined space entries is available for immediate implementation x Not Applicable N/A
Recue plans include at a minimum specific information on the methods of rescue and
7. 21 equipment requirements (i.e. hauling equipment, overhead anchors, tripod system, reserve x x Not Applicable N/A
equipment, medical equipment, additional PPE, etc.)
Required emergency equipment is available (i.e. tripod, body harness, S.C.B.A., fire
7. 22 x x Not Applicable N/A
extinguisher)

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 16 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Ref. 8. Excavations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
8. 1 A Safe Work Permit is used for all excavations deeper than 1.2 m (4') x Not Applicable N/A

8. 2 Excavations greater than 6 m (20') in depth are assessed and approved by an engineer x x Not Applicable N/A

8. 3 All excavations exceeding 1.2 m (4') in depth are cut back and/or shored x Not Applicable N/A
Trenches more than 1.2 m (4') deep and over 6 m (20') in length have a means of egress
8. 4 x Not Applicable N/A
located every 6 meters along the trench

8. 5 All spoils materials are kept a minimum of 1 m (3') back from the edge of any excavation x Not Applicable N/A

All buried utilities within the excavation or trench area are identified and protected from
8. 6 x Not Applicable N/A
damage or are de-energized or controlled to prevent energy release
All excavations with a vertical face greater than 1.8 m (6') high are protected to prevent falls
8. 7 x Not Applicable N/A
into the excavation

Barricades and/or plates are used to protect or cover any excavation or trench which crosses
8. 8 a site or public roadway or sidewalk and shall be designed/approved such that they are x Not Applicable N/A
appropriate for the use (i.e. load consideration for vehicle and/or pedestrian traffic, etc.)

A spotter is used whenever mechanical excavation work comes within 1 meter of a buried
8. 9 utility and then manually excavation or hydro-vac methods are used until the utility is x x Not Applicable N/A
adequately exposed (daylighted)
8. 10 Personnel are made aware of excavations through flagging, markings, etc. x Not Applicable N/A
Excavations and trenches that personnel may be required, or permitted to enter, are kept free
8. 11 x Not Applicable N/A
of an accumulation of water that may pose a hazard to the occupants
An excavation permitting system is used for all excavations containing buried utilities, voids,
8. 12 x Not Applicable N/A
manholes etc
All personnel involved in excavating and exposing buried utilities to review and sign the
8. 13 x x Not Applicable N/A
excavation permit before commencing work
Locate and as-built drawings are readily available for review by equipment operators and
8. 14 x x Not Applicable N/A
spotter personnel
Soil Classification, Cut Back and Shoring
8. 15 Soil conditions and classification of soil type are assessed x Not Applicable N/A

8. 16 Soil is stabilized through cut backs, shoring or a combination of both x Not Applicable N/A
Shoring systems are appropriate to soil conditions and work activities and are inspected and
8. 17 x Not Applicable N/A
certified by a Professional Engineer as applicable
A construction plan is developed and followed for all excavations which use shotcrete walls as
8. 18 the principle method of shoring; the excavation design and construction plan must be x Not Applicable N/A
approved by a Professional Engineer

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 17 of 36

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Ref. 9. Risk Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Risk Register
9. 1 There is a current and active Risk Register in place x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 2 The Stature Tool (or matching spreadsheet) is in use x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 3 The Risk Register is developed and updated by a multi-disciplinary team x x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 4 The Risk Register is shared with the contractors and where applicable their input is added x x x Not Applicable N/A

The risk register is reviewed at three month intervals and/or updated more frequently based
9. 5 on audit and inspection findings, corrective actions from incident investigations and pre- x x Not Applicable N/A
mitigated risk levels
There is evidence the Risk Register is being used effectively to proactively identify the
9. 6 x x x Not Applicable N/A
hazards, assess the risk and determine the controls for all activities
There is a change management process in place that identifies possible additional hazards,
9. 7 x x x Not Applicable N/A
evaluates the risk and implements controls before introducing the changes
Job Safety Analysis (JSA)
9. 8 JSA's have been developed for all high/extreme risk activities x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 9 The SNC-Lavalin Job Safety Analysis methodology is used x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 10 Engineers, managers and/or superintendents and employees participate in the JSA process x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 11 Procedures from the JSA's are being considered on the Team StepBack cards x x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 12 JSA's are conducted during pre-planning, not right at the start of a shift or job x Not Applicable N/A

9. 13 JSA's are reviewed and approved by project and operations management x Not Applicable N/A

9. 14 Changes in the field are recorded on the JSA's x x x Not Applicable N/A
Safe Work Permits
Safe Work Permits are in use for the following activities: Excavations, Hot Work, Confined
9. 15 x x x Not Applicable N/A
Spaces and Electrical Work
9. 16 Safe Work Permit Form (6845.2.7.3) or equivalent is being used x Not Applicable N/A

9. 17 Control measures identified in Safe Work Permit are field verified before commencing work x x x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 18 of 36
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Ref. 9. Risk Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Team StepBack Risk Evaluation


9. 18 The SNC-Lavalin Team StepBack card is used and records retained x Not Applicable N/A
Work teams conduct formalized Team StepBack Risk Evaluations at the start of each day,
9. 19 x Not Applicable N/A
new task, or when work conditions change
There is documented evidence that StepBack is being conducted where specific hazards
9. 20 x Not Applicable N/A
are identified and the controls implemented
9. 21 Changes in the field are re-assessed using the Team StepBack cards x Not Applicable N/A

9. 22 Team StepBack cards are signed by all team members including the supervisor x Not Applicable N/A

9. 23 Team StepBack cards are signed by all visitors to the work area x Not Applicable N/A
Completed Team StepBack cards are analyzed by the local H&S team and used to identify
9. 24 x Not Applicable N/A
the top potential unsafe behaviors and conditions
Personal StepBack Risk Evaluation
9. 25 Personal StepBack Risk cards are provided to all workers x x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 26 Personal StepBack Risk Evaluations are conducted prior to commencing any task x x x Not Applicable N/A

9. 27 Workers have the Personal StepBack mind-set and approach when discussing their task x x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 19 of 36

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Ref. 10. Health and Safety Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Scope of Management System


10 1 A site specific H&S plan has been developed x x x Not Applicable N/A

10 2 The site H&S plan includes all the elements and clauses of the GHSMS x x Not Applicable N/A

10 3 Deviations and variances from the GHSMS are recorded, approved and communicated x x Not Applicable N/A
Policy
10 4 The Global H&S policy is up-to-date, signed, known and posted at key locations x x Not Applicable N/A

10 5 The SNC-Lavalin "WE CARE" value statement is known and posted at key locations x x Not Applicable N/A
Leadership and Personal Commitment
Management demonstrates visible safety leadership (i.e. being an example to others, taking
10 6 x x x Not Applicable N/A
the time to understand worksite hazards and managing all risks effectively)
Management acknowledges the efforts of others to work safely and proactively; above all
10 7 x x x Not Applicable N/A
demonstrates that "We Care" as an organization
10 8 Management provides for sufficient resources to conduct safety training x x x Not Applicable N/A
Legal and Other Requirements
10 9 The site has identified and recorded all applicable legal and other requirements x Not Applicable N/A

10 10 The site tracks compliance to the identified legal and other requirements x Not Applicable N/A
Objectives and Planning
10 11 There is a firm understanding of the annual H&S objectives under the GHSMS x x x Not Applicable N/A

10 12 All targets and objectives are tracked and reviewed at planned intervals x x Not Applicable N/A
Organizational Structure
10 13 H&S roles and responsibilities for all levels of the project team are well defined x x x Not Applicable N/A

10 1 Sufficient qualified H&S staff for both SLI and (sub)contractors are available x x x Not Applicable N/A
Meetings and Communication
Planned interval meetings are held with the client and (sub)contractors/suppliers to discuss
10 14 x x Not Applicable N/A
H&S and assess (sub)contractors performance
A joint H&S Committee has been established that includes management, employees,
10 15 contractors' management and contractors' employees where appropriate (i.e. over 25 x x Not Applicable N/A
persons)
10 16 Minutes of the joint H&S Committee meetings are recorded and posted x Not Applicable N/A

10 17 All workers know how they can have representation on H&S matters x Not Applicable N/A
Document and Record Control

Procedure(s) are in place for controlling all documents related to the site H&S Safety
10 18 x Not Applicable N/A
Management System (i.e. approvals before issue, removal of obsolete documents, etc.)

Records are legible, easily accessible, and maintained in good condition. Electronic records
10 19 x Not Applicable N/A
are backed up and can be recovered by personnel on site

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 20 of 36
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Ref. 10. Health and Safety Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

All Health & Safety documents are identified with 68XX.x.x.x series consistent with the
10 20 x Not Applicable N/A
OHSAS 18001 system structure
Operational Controls
A current copy of the SLI Critical Risk Control Protocols (CRCP) and additional site controls
10 21 x x x Not Applicable N/A
are available to management
Where the CRCP cannot be fully implemented, alternate controls have been documented,
10 22 x x Not Applicable N/A
approved and communicated
The CRCP Banner, minimum 1.2m x 2.4m (4' x 8') is visible and displayed in multiple
10 23 x Not Applicable N/A
locations
10 24 There is a documented workplace inspection program in place x Not Applicable N/A

10 25 Inspections are conducted as per the pre-determined schedule x Not Applicable N/A
The scope of the inspection program aligns with the complexity and size of project or
10 26 x Not Applicable N/A
operation
Management demonstrates their commitment to safety by participating in the Behaviour
10 27 x x Not Applicable N/A
Intervention Program (BIP)
10 28 BIP forms are completed and tracking sheet uploaded into the HSES Database x Not Applicable N/A
Where applicable, Office Safety Standard (6845.2.5.1) is implemented and completed office
10 29 x Not Applicable N/A
inspections are documented
10 30 Management is regularly involved in inspections x Not Applicable N/A
Contractor Management
10 31 Past H&S performance is evaluated during contractors selection process x x Not Applicable N/A

10 32 Contractors are informed of SNC-Lavalin project H&S requirements prior to mobilization x x Not Applicable N/A

10 33 Contractors are properly classified into categories (Level 1 to 4) x Not Applicable N/A
Each contractor has completed Sections 9 and 20 (For level 3 and 4) in the SNC-Lavalin
10 34 x Not Applicable N/A
Global Procurement System
10 35 Contractors' Pre-Mobilization Forms (6845.2.1.3-EN) are completed, signed and dated x x Not Applicable N/A

10 36 Contractors' performance evaluations are conducted and include safety performance x x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 21 of 36

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Ref. 10. Health and Safety Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

10 37 Contractors' non-compliances are documented in each contractors file x x Not Applicable N/A
Performance Measurement and Monitoring
10 38 Leading and lagging safety indicators are posted in a prominent place x Not Applicable N/A

10 39 Leading (proactive) H&S statistics are utilized to identify trends x Not Applicable N/A

10 40 Lagging (trailing) H&S statistics are utilized to identify trends x Not Applicable N/A

10 41 The site injury log corresponds with the statistics in the HSES database x Not Applicable N/A

10 42 Monthly H&S data is directly entered into the HSES database by the site x Not Applicable N/A
Incident Reporting and Investigation
10 43 Incident Investigation and Reporting procedure 6853.2 is utilized x Not Applicable N/A

10 44 A formal investigation is conducted and recorded for each recordable & HiPo incident x Not Applicable N/A

10 45 A Modified Work (Restricted Work) program is established and is implemented at site x x Not Applicable N/A

10 46 The SNC-Lavalin incident report and investigation forms 6853.3 and 6853.4 are used x Not Applicable N/A

10 47 Imminent dangers (unsafe acts and conditions) are reported and addressed x Not Applicable N/A

10 48 Incidents are correctly classified as High or Low Potential x Not Applicable N/A
All High Potential Incidents are investigated )i.e. formal root cause analysis using the ICAM
10 49 x Not Applicable N/A
methodology within 14 days)
10 50 Root cause analysis reports are posted on the HSES database x Not Applicable N/A

10 51 Management is proactive in post-incident follow up and closure of action plans x x Not Applicable N/A
Corrective and Preventive Actions
10 52 Non-conformances are documented and corrective actions implemented x x Not Applicable N/A
A formal risk assessment is conducted on each preventive/corrective action request to avoid
10 53 x x Not Applicable N/A
creating new hazards
10 54 Corrective and preventive action plan items are closed in a timely fashion x Not Applicable N/A
Internal Evaluation
10 55 Safety perception surveys are conducted x Not Applicable N/A

10 56 Self-audits are performed on a monthly basis x Not Applicable N/A

10 57 A documented action plan from the self-audits is available x Not Applicable N/A

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Ref. 10. Health and Safety Management D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Management Review
Periodic project management reviews are conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the
10 58 x x Not Applicable N/A
project H&S program/plan and adjustments are made accordingly
Outputs from the management review include decisions and actionable items related to
10 59 x x Not Applicable N/A
possible changes to the project H&S program/plan
10 60 The records of the management review are retained and made available x x Not Applicable N/A

10 61 Internal and external lessons learned are known and communicated x x Not Applicable N/A
Positive Incentive Program
10 62 A documented Positive Incentive Program is in place x x x Not Applicable N/A

10 63 The program is using the SNC-Lavalin Positive Incentive Card x x Not Applicable N/A

10 64 The program is desirable, attainable and associating x x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 23 of 36

Audit
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Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
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Ref. 11. Site Conditions D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Housekeeping and General Site Conditions


All work areas are clean and free of trash and debris (i.e. floors, working surfaces, walkways
11 1 x x Not Applicable N/A
and passageways)
11 2 Offices / storage rooms and areas are orderly and maintained x x Not Applicable N/A

11 3 Trash receptacles are provided in all work areas x Not Applicable N/A

11 4 Scrap lumber is free of protruding nails or other puncture hazards x Not Applicable N/A

11 5 Rebar, lumber, etc. are stacked neatly with proper access x Not Applicable N/A

11 6 Exposed rebar ends are capped x Not Applicable N/A

11 7 Smoking is allowed only in designated areas (i.e. away from flammable materials) x Not Applicable N/A
Cigarette butt cans, where used, are maintained free of combustible material and emptied
11 8 x Not Applicable N/A
routinely
11 9 Sufficient lighting is provided for the work being performed x Not Applicable N/A
Health and Hygiene
11 10 Occupational hygiene reports are available x Not Applicable N/A
Insect borne infectious disease (i.e. Malaria, West Nile Virus, etc.) control programs are
11 11 x Not Applicable N/A
established and implemented when required
11 12 There are enough toilets and washing facilities for the workers x Not Applicable N/A

11 13 Washing facilities are kept clean and in good working order x Not Applicable N/A

11 14 Working temperature is considered when accommodating workers x Not Applicable N/A

11 15 When applicable, a heat stress and/or extreme cold awareness program is in place x Not Applicable N/A

11 16 Ventilation in work areas is provided x Not Applicable N/A

11 17 Fumes are removed by means of mechanical ventilation x Not Applicable N/A


Employees can eat meals and take breaks at designated areas in a sanitary environment,
11 18 x Not Applicable N/A
separate from any toilet facility, and are not exposed to toxic materials
11 19 Potable drinking water is available, kept clean and individual cups are provided x Not Applicable N/A
When required, protection against sunburn is provided (i.e. shade, sun block cream, training,
11 20 x Not Applicable N/A
etc.)

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 24 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Ref. 11. Site Conditions D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Camp and Accommodation Conditions


The temperature in sleeping, eating and resting areas is maintained between 20°C (68°F)
11 21 x Not Applicable N/A
and 24°C (75°F)
11 22 There is adequate ventilation in all areas to control humidity with no evidence of mould x Not Applicable N/A
Drinking water quality is regularly tested and recorded, at a minimum each week and meets
11 23 x Not Applicable N/A
local or WHO drinking water standards
Wastewater, sewage, food and any other waste materials are adequately discharged in
11 24 x Not Applicable N/A
compliance with both local and/or WHO standards
11 25 All occupied rooms are cleaned on a daily basis by camp accommodations staff x Not Applicable N/A
Every resident is provided with adequate furniture (i.e. a single bed, a table, a chair, a mirror,
11 26 x Not Applicable N/A
a bedside light and lockable cupboards)
11 27 Separate sleeping, sanitary and toilet areas for male and female x Not Applicable N/A
All hot water tanks supplying multi-shower washrooms are capable of supplying 300 gallons
11 28 x Not Applicable N/A
(1,136 litres) per hour
Cooking areas are clean, food is prepared by cooks and the WHO guidelines for food safety
11 29 x Not Applicable N/A
are followed
Working Alone

11 30 Safe work practices are in place for conditions when an employee needs to work alone x x Not Applicable N/A

Workers understand the procedure which outlines the means by which a lone worker can
11 31 x x Not Applicable N/A
obtain assistance if necessary
The Working Alone Standard is followed if the worker cannot be contacted, including
11 32 x Not Applicable N/A
provisions for an emergency rescue
11 33 Employees frequently call-in as per the Working Alone Standard x x Not Applicable N/A
Communication devices (i.e. radio, cell phone, satellite phone, etc.) are supplied and are
11 34 x x Not Applicable N/A
adequate for the task
11 35 "Spot device" or similar are available and in use when working in remote areas x Not Applicable N/A
Material Handling and Storage
11 36 All materials are maintained in a safe and stable manner x Not Applicable N/A

11 37 Weight loads are known and clearly marked on mezzanines and storage areas x Not Applicable N/A

11 38 Material handling equipment is used to handle/move material when possible x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 25 of 36

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2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


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Audit Finding
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Points PRIORITY
Max Points
Ref. 12. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) D O I Awarded WEIGHT Score Outcome
0 33% 66% 100% Points Missed

Issue
Danger
(1-3) 1-4

Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General

12 1 PPE selection is based on a risk assessment process x x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 2 PPE is provided as per the PPE selection and assessment process x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 3 Personnel wear shirts with a minimum 10cm (4") sleeve x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 4 Personnel wear long trousers, jeans, or full overalls (no shorts) x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

Head Protection

12 5 Personnel wear safety hard hats/helmets x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 6 Hats are date stamped and expiry dates are not exceeded (maximum 10 years) x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 7 Chin straps are worn if working at height or at unusual angles x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 8 Hard hats used by traffic control persons have a high visibility reflective striping x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A

Hearing Protection
12 9 Hearing protection is worn in designated areas and/or when undertaking noisy tasks x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 10 Noise surveys are conducted x x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Controls are implemented to reduce the exposure of personnel to excessive noise (i.e. over
12 11 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
85dBA)
12 12 Hearing protection provides the desired level of protection from noise x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 13 Hearing protection is stored in a clean and protected area to reduce contamination x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 14 Audiometric testing is conducted for personnel exposed to high noise x x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Eye and Face Protection

12 15 Personnel wear proper safety glasses with side shields (i.e. CSA, ANSI, AS/NZS standards) x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 16 Face shield and safety glasses are worn when grinding x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 17 Safety glasses and an approved welding mask is worn when welding x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 18 Goggles and if applicable respiratory protection is worn when using chemicals x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
When grinding, welding or cutting, suitable screens are placed around the work area to
12 19 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
protect others within the hazard path
Where personnel need to wear prescription glasses for their work these are approved lenses
12 20 x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A
and frames, with side shields; otherwise approved over-spectacles are worn

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 26 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Points PRIORITY
Max Points
Ref. 12. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) D O I Awarded WEIGHT Score Outcome
0 33% 66% 100% Points Missed

Issue
Danger
(1-3) 1-4

Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Respiratory Protection

12 21 Respiratory protection is used by workers exposed to respiratory hazards x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Minimum recommended NIOSH approved N95 respirator or equivalent is worn when
12 22 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
engaged with likely hazardous concentration of particulates
When respirators are required for protection against occupational hazards, faces are clean
12 23 x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A
shaven to ensure effective sealing of the respirator
All workers using specified respirators are fit tested for the respirator being used and
12 24 x Not Applicable N/A 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A
retested at least annually
Foot Protection
Only protective footwear meeting CSA Z195-02, ANSI Z41.1, AS/NZS 2210.3, EN ISO
12 25 x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A
20345/A1, or equivalent is used.
Protective footwear has a minimum height of 15 cm (6"), from bottom of the sole to highest
12 26 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
point on the boot, and a steel/kevlar toe cap.
12 27 Footwear is properly fitted, laced, zippered, and secured x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 28 Personnel are not permitted to wear footwear that is in a state of disrepair x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Hand Protection

12 29 Hand protection is appropriate to the hazards x Not Applicable N/A 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A

12 30 Use proper gloves/hand protection at all times x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Hair Protection
Long hair is contained within a hair net or otherwise secured in a safety helmet/hat when
12 31 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
working with or near rotating equipment.
Body Protection
High visibility clothing with reflector stripes are worn at all times on an active
12 32 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
project/construction site.
For electrical switching, fire-fighting or where other heat or fire hazard exists, fire retardant
12 33 x Not Applicable N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A
clothing is worn as necessary

Totals 0 0 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 27 of 36

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Audit Finding
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Ref. 13. Fire Prevention and Hot Work D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Fire Prevention
13 1 Fire suppression systems are inspected on a regular basis x x x Not Applicable N/A
Fire extinguishers are provided as required (i.e. where flammable and combustible material
13 2 x x Not Applicable N/A
is stored or used)
Portable storage tanks containing liquid flammables are located at least 6 m (20') away from
13 3 x x Not Applicable N/A
buildings
13 4 There are written guidelines on how to report and what to do in case of fire x x Not Applicable N/A

13 5 Access to fire extinguishers is unobstructed x Not Applicable N/A

13 6 Extinguishers are identified as required x Not Applicable N/A

13 7 Monthly and annual inspections are conducted and documented x x x Not Applicable N/A

13 8 Materials that react with water are not stored with flammables x Not Applicable N/A
Containers are electrically interconnected (bonded) when flammable liquids are transferred
13 9 x Not Applicable N/A
from one container to another
"No Smoking" signs are posted appropriately and other restrictions on sources of ignition are
13 10 x Not Applicable N/A
complied with
Escape routes are clearly signed, kept clean and wide enough to quickly evacuate to a safe
13 11 x Not Applicable N/A
area
13 12 Gas appliances are regularly checked and serviced by a qualified contractor x Not Applicable N/A

13 13 Oxygen and acetylene tanks (full and empty) are segregated x Not Applicable N/A

13 14 Clear fire instructions are displayed throughout the workplace x Not Applicable N/A

13 15 Emergency lights, fire alarms and smoke detectors are checked and tested x Not Applicable N/A
Hot Work
Hot work on or near areas or processes that involve flammable, combustible or explosive
13 16 x x Not Applicable N/A
materials or chemicals is performed under a safe work or hot work permit
13 17 A fire watch is in place for hot work when required x Not Applicable N/A

13 18 A fire extinguisher is immediately available and operable at all hot work locations x Not Applicable N/A

13 19 Welding screens are used around all ground or floor level arc welding x Not Applicable N/A

13 20 Arc welding is performed with a required electrical ground x Not Applicable N/A

13 21 Welding cables and ground cables are free of damage and inspected x x Not Applicable N/A

13 22 Compressed gas cylinders are labelled x Not Applicable N/A

13 23 Compressed gas cylinders are stored securely in upright position and properly capped x Not Applicable N/A

13 24 Reverse flow or flash back arrestors are used on all oxygen/acetylene rigs or built into torch x Not Applicable N/A

13 25 Regulator gauges are attached as required and in good condition x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 28 of 36
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Ref. 13. Fire Prevention and Hot Work D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

13 26 Compressed gas cylinder valves are turned off when not in use for extended periods of time x Not Applicable N/A

13 27 Hot slag and sparks are maintained and controlled x Not Applicable N/A
Required PPE is worn for the hot work activity (i.e. eye protection, apron, gloves, and
13 28 x Not Applicable N/A
respirator if needed)
13 29 Oxygen/acetylene hoses are maintained free of oil and grease x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 29 of 36

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Audit Finding
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Ref. 14. Non-Routine Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Designated Substances (i.e. Asbestos, Lead, etc.)


14 1 When applicable, medical surveillance is provided to exposed employees x x Not Applicable N/A

14 2 Engineering controls to minimize exposure to designated substances are in place x Not Applicable N/A

14 3 Exposure control procedures including provisions for respiratory protection are in place x Not Applicable N/A

There are site specific procedures for handling and disposing of designated substances as
14 4 x Not Applicable N/A
applicable
14 5 Records of all sampling, handling and disposal activities are complete x Not Applicable N/A
Radiation
14 6 Non-destructive testing is planned and communicated x x Not Applicable N/A

14 7 Emergency plan for foreseeable radiation incidents is in place x Not Applicable N/A

14 8 Testing/monitoring equipment documentation is available x Not Applicable N/A

14 9 Each radiographer wears a dosimeter x Not Applicable N/A

14 10 Barricades and warning signs for radiation work is clear and communicated x Not Applicable N/A

14 11 A radiation safety advisor/officer is appointed where required x x Not Applicable N/A


Hot Tapping
14 12 A detailed procedure has been written for each hot tap x x Not Applicable N/A
Each procedure conforms to the requirements of American Petroleum Institute (API) 2201,
14 13 x x Not Applicable N/A
latest edition or prevailing legislation
14 14 The client is included in all phases of each hot tap process as appropriate x x Not Applicable N/A
Each proposed hot tap procedure has passed through all engineering design and approval
14 15 x x Not Applicable N/A
cycles including client, SNC-Lavalin contractor and subcontractor approvals
14 16 Metallurgical analysis has been completed for each hot tap x x Not Applicable N/A

14 17 Certification documentation for specific conditions is on file for each hot tap machine x x Not Applicable N/A

14 18 Hot tap machines are carefully inspected (particularly the cutter and pilot bits) prior to use x x Not Applicable N/A

14 19 A Job Safety Analysis (JSA) has been executed prior to starting hot tap procedures x Not Applicable N/A

14 20 Hot tapping is performed by competent persons x Not Applicable N/A

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 30 of 36
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Ref. 14. Non-Routine Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

High-Pressure Water Cleaning


14 21 Equipment to be cleaned is isolated, locked, and tagged prior to cleaning x x x Not Applicable N/A

14 22 All hose data and safe factors are recorded and retained x Not Applicable N/A

14 23 All fittings and components meet manufacturer's guidelines and specifications x Not Applicable N/A

14 24 Records of high-pressure water cleaning equipment inspections are on file x Not Applicable N/A

14 25 Operators are not allowing any part of their body to be placed in front of the water jet x Not Applicable N/A
Work area is barricaded at a minimum of 45 feet (15 meters) and signs stating, "DANGER -
14 26 x Not Applicable N/A
HIGH PRESSURE WATER CLEANING"
14 27 Safety equipment has not been altered or by-passed x Not Applicable N/A
Abrasive Blasting
Respiratory protection is selected, provided and worn based on a thorough hazard
14 28 x x x Not Applicable N/A
assessment
Oil free air is provided for breathing - if a compressor is used, an adequate air purifier and
14 29 x x x Not Applicable N/A
filter for removal of contaminants are provided
All personnel conducting abrasive blasting have had sufficient medical clearance and fit
14 30 x x Not Applicable N/A
testing
A pressure regulator with an attached gauge is provided if the compressor exceeds 25 psi or
14 31 x Not Applicable N/A
equivalent
14 32 A pressure relief valve is attached in case of regulator failure x Not Applicable N/A

14 33 If needed, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms are provided x Not Applicable N/A

14 34 Employees wear adequate hearing protection devices x Not Applicable N/A

14 35 Abrasive blasting areas are barricaded and posted "KEEP OUT" x Not Applicable N/A
Considerations are made for inhalation hazards of those in close proximity to abrasive
14 36 x Not Applicable N/A
blasting areas
Line Breaks
14 37 Isolation points have been identified and locked and tagged out x x Not Applicable N/A

14 38 A walk down of the line/equipment was performed with site personnel x x Not Applicable N/A

14 39 Line/equipment has been drained, flushed, purged and is free of pressure x x Not Applicable N/A

14 40 Work is being performed under a work permit x Not Applicable N/A


Contents of line/equipment have been identified and a review of associated hazards
14 41 x Not Applicable N/A
conducted

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 31 of 36

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Audit Finding
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Ref. 14. Non-Routine Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

14 42 Barricades and signs are posted in the area to warn employees as required x Not Applicable N/A
Marine Operations
14 43 Each vessel involved has a vessel H&S Plan x x x Not Applicable N/A

14 44 All vessels are properly certified by the in-country and local regulations x x Not Applicable N/A
All activities are coordinated and scheduled with impacted parties including port authorities,
14 45 x x Not Applicable N/A
clients, contractors and subcontractors, and emergency personnel
There are specific equipment and procedures for the transfer of personnel from vessel to
14 46 x x Not Applicable N/A
vessel or shore
14 47 The risk assessments consider meteorological data and conditions x x Not Applicable N/A
PPE and equipment for marine operations are used including life jackets, retrieval harness,
14 48 x Not Applicable N/A
life lines, buoys, beacons and flares

Sufficient life saving equipment, including life jackets, flares, smoke indicators, retrieval rings
14 49 x Not Applicable N/A
and ropes for all personnel are stored in a waterproof floatation container

14 50 Proper communications equipment is in place x x x Not Applicable N/A


Railroad Operations
14 51 Only authorized persons are allowed to work on or near railroad tracks x x x Not Applicable N/A
Mobile equipment and vehicles stop, look both ways and wait for at least 3 seconds to verify
14 52 x x Not Applicable N/A
that the track is clear before proceeding to cross grade level railroad crossings

14 53 Tracked equipment is not allowed to cross any railroad without management authorization x x Not Applicable N/A

14 54 Personnel are forbidden to board a stationary or moving locomotive or rolling stock x x Not Applicable N/A

14 55 No person may obstruct tracks without permission x x Not Applicable N/A

14 56 Personnel are prohibited from climbing over, under or between locomotives or rolling stock x x Not Applicable N/A

14 57 All work is scheduled and coordinated with the local railroad authority and the client x x Not Applicable N/A

14 58 A railroad work H&S plan has been documented x x Not Applicable N/A

14 59 The plan is available to all employees and contractors x x Not Applicable N/A
Authority for track possession conditions was received in writing from the railroad operating
14 60 x Not Applicable N/A
authority and is posted at work site

14 61 No equipment or no person is to "walk the track" unless under track possession conditions x Not Applicable N/A

No derailed vehicle is to be run on the track unless inspected and authorized by a qualified
14 62 x x Not Applicable N/A
person

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2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Ref. 14. Non-Routine Operations D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Helicopter Operations
14 63 Helicopter safety procedures are posted and communicated to all passengers x x x Not Applicable N/A
Helicopter safety training to all passengers, including orientation specific to helicopter model
14 64 x x Not Applicable N/A
being utilized

14 65 Aviation life-jackets are provided and worn by all passengers when operating over water x x Not Applicable N/A

Helicopter inspections are performed regularly by the owner/operator and are adequately
14 66 x Not Applicable N/A
documented
Helicopter landing areas provide required clearance for rotors away from trees, buildings,
14 67 x Not Applicable N/A
roadways, utilities, poles, and overhead wires
14 68 Loose debris is kept clear of the landing area x Not Applicable N/A
Qualified loadmasters with documented experience and qualifications used for all slinging
14 69 x x Not Applicable N/A
operations
14 70 Required landing pad lighting is provided and operable for night operations x Not Applicable N/A

14 71 A wind sock or wind direction indicator is in place and in view of the landing area x Not Applicable N/A
Diving Operations

14 72 Diving work method statement is available and found acceptable by a competent person x Not Applicable N/A

14 73 Diving supervisor is qualified and competent x x Not Applicable N/A

14 74 Work is being performed under diving work permit x x x Not Applicable N/A

14 75 Emergency rescue plan is current and tested x x Not Applicable N/A

14 76 Stand-by emergency rescue vessel is in the water while diving operations are taking place x Not Applicable N/A

14 77 Certifications on file for boats, dive equipment and divers x Not Applicable N/A

14 78 Divers medical clearances are available x Not Applicable N/A


Triple redundancy for air supply is available (i.e. compressor, back-up tanks, pressurized
14 79 x x Not Applicable N/A
emergency tanks)

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 33 of 36

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Ref. 15. Emergency Response D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Emergency Preparedness
The Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is specific to the site and adequately addresses all
15 1 x x x Not Applicable N/A
potential emergency scenarios

15 2 The ERP includes a method of accounting for all employees after an emergency occurs x x x Not Applicable N/A

15 3 The ERP is documented and posted on site x x Not Applicable N/A

15 4 Emergency Preparedness coordinator or similar position has been appointed x x Not Applicable N/A
Employees have a working knowledge of emergency/evacuation procedures, escape routes
15 5 x x Not Applicable N/A
and the emergency notification process
15 6 Emergency drills are conducted at least once per year x x Not Applicable N/A

15 7 The emergency evacuation plan has been communicated to the local authorities x x Not Applicable N/A

15 8 The ERP incorporates client's emergency procedures x Not Applicable N/A


Pre-planning for local natural disasters includes written procedures and assigned
15 9 x x Not Applicable N/A
responsibilities for executing local disaster plans
15 10 Emergency lighting, power, radios and rescue equipment are available x Not Applicable N/A

15 11 Emergency evacuation signs or exit signs are posted x Not Applicable N/A
First Aid/Medical Response
15 12 Medical response personnel are trained and certified in First Aid, CPR, and AED use x x Not Applicable N/A

15 13 A specific first aid medical response plan is available x x Not Applicable N/A
Procedures are in place to accompany any injured employee to doctor/emergency room,
15 14 x Not Applicable N/A
notify supervisor and emergency contact

15 15 All medical files including surveillance, and exposure records are maintained in confidence x Not Applicable N/A

15 16 Personnel knows who to call if there is a medical emergency x x x Not Applicable N/A

15 17 Medical response kits and required first aid station and supplies are available x Not Applicable N/A

15 18 Medications of any kind are only dispensed by medical staff x Not Applicable N/A

15 19 The medical treatment facility is maintained in a clean and sanitary condition x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 34 of 36
2015 Global Health and Safety Audit
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Ref. 16. Training D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

General
16 1 Records and dates of training are kept on file x Not Applicable N/A

16 2 All workers on site have been trained in the StepBack process x x x Not Applicable N/A

All SNC-Lavalin personnel and contractor personnel who work on site more than 30
16 3 x x Not Applicable N/A
business days have completed the 8 Critical Risk Control Protocols e-learning modules

16 4 New employees receive the H&S orientation and it is documented x x Not Applicable N/A

16 5 Supervisory Leadership Training is in place (minimum 1 day duration) x x Not Applicable N/A

16 6 Risk Competency Training is provided to all supervisory personnel x x Not Applicable N/A

16 7 Competency of key workers is assessed based on education, training or experience x x Not Applicable N/A

16 8 H&S "Toolbox" meetings are conducted at least once per week x x x Not Applicable N/A

16 9 Toolbox meeting attendance is documented and available x Not Applicable N/A

16 10 Toolbox meetings are relevant to current hazards x x Not Applicable N/A

16 11 Toolbox meetings are conducted in all relevant languages x x Not Applicable N/A

16 12 Employees have been trained on how to operate a fire extinguisher x x Not Applicable N/A

16 13 Employees have received training on heat and/or cold stress x x Not Applicable N/A
Employees have been trained in safe material handling techniques and use safe handling
16 14 x x Not Applicable N/A
techniques
Workers received training to ensure they understand their roles and responsibilities in the
16 15 x x Not Applicable N/A
event of an emergency
Vehicles, Mobile and Heavy Equipment
Only qualified personnel or personnel in training under direct supervision are permitted to
16 16 x x Not Applicable N/A
operate heavy and mobile equipment

16 17 Traffic control persons (spotters) have sufficient documented training to complete this task x x Not Applicable N/A

Hazardous Materials

16 18 Employees are trained in workplace hazards materials (i.e. WHMIS, HazCom, HMIS, etc.) x x Not Applicable N/A

Employees with potential exposure to designated substances (i.e. asbestos, lead, etc.) are
16 19 x x Not Applicable N/A
trained sufficiently

Personnel transporting hazards material are trained in transportation, storage, handling, use
16 20 x x Not Applicable N/A
and disposal of, and emergency response procedures for hazardous materials

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 35 of 36

Audit
Audit

2015 Global Health and Safety Audit


Auditor(s):
Date: #

Source AT RISK SCORE RESULTS COMMENTS


Audit Finding
(Use Hot Buttons or
Drop Down Menu)
Ref. 16. Training D O I Outcome
0 33% 66% 100%

Issue
Danger
Imminent

Repeating
100%-BP N/A Skip

Equipment Safeguarding
16 21 Employees performing electrical work are trained and/or certified x x Not Applicable N/A

16 22 Employees using powder actuated tools (with correct load strengths) have been trained x x Not Applicable N/A

16 23 Employees handling and using explosives have been trained and are certified x x Not Applicable N/A
People likely to come into contact with high-energy moving and rotating parts are trained on
16 24 x x Not Applicable N/A
the associated risks
De-Energization, Isolation, Lock-Out And Tagging
A competency based training system and field assessment is in place to approve personnel
16 25 x x Not Applicable N/A
before they conduct isolation processes
Working at Heights

16 26 All persons who work at heights are trained in the proper use of fall protection equipment x x Not Applicable N/A

All persons who erect or dismantle scaffolds are competent and trained on scaffolding
16 27 x x Not Applicable N/A
hazards
All persons operating elevated work platforms and cages are certified for the specific
16 28 x x Not Applicable N/A
equipment they are using
Lifting Operations
Only suitably qualified, certified and competent person(s) are involved in the planning,
16 29 x x x Not Applicable N/A
supervision and implementation of the lifting operations
Confined Space Entries
All employees, contractors, consultants and visitors who will or may be required to enter a
16 30 x x Not Applicable N/A
confined space are trained in the confined space procedure.
Rescue workers are trained in confined space entry, emergency response, PPE including
16 31 x x Not Applicable N/A
respiratory protective equipment (i.e. SCBA), first aid and CPR

16 32 Emergency response training includes practice exercises as part of the training program x x Not Applicable N/A

Excavations

Proper training and instruction is provided to all personnel involved in excavating and
16 33 x x Not Applicable N/A
working in an excavation

PPE
16 34 Training is provided in the correct wear, use and inspection of all issued PPE x x Not Applicable N/A

16 35 All workers requiring fit tested respirators are trained and receive annual refresher training x x Not Applicable N/A

Totals 0 0

SNC-Lavalin Confidential 36 of 36
INCIDENT
INVESTIGATION
2015

Incident
Incident Investigation Standard

Revision History

Revision Date Description Prepared by Approved by


st
September 1 , Global Health &
0 Original Issue T. Van Wieren
2011 Safety

st Root Cause Analysis Method Global Health &


1 January 1 , 2013 T. Van Wieren
Added Safety

st Table 1: Incident category and Global Health &


2 January 1 , 2014 T. Van Wieren
investigation schedule updated Safety

st Table 1: Incident category and Global Health &


3 January 1 , 2015 T. Van Wieren
investigation schedule updated Safety

Caution: Un-Controlled Copy


Valid only at time of retrieval from network source directory.
User should verify that the revision number is the most current.

Incident

6853.2-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-18 3:54:00 PM Page 1 of 12


Incident Investigation Standard

Table of Contents
1.0 PURPOSE 3
2.0 SCOPE 3
3.0 DEFINITIONS 3
4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES 3
5.0 REFERENCES 3
6.0 PREAMBLE 4
7.0 PROCEDURE 4
8.0 ICAM – INCIDENT CAUSE ANALYSIS METHOD 7
9.0 PERMANENT CORRECTIVE ACTIONS 11
10.0 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION TRAINING 11
APPENDIX 1: ICAM CHART – TEMPLATE 12
Incident

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Incident Investigation Standard

1.0 PURPOSE
SNC-Lavalin believes in leveraging our extensive knowledge and experience to continually improve our
H&S systems and performance. One way that we accomplish this is by actively learning from our
experiences. All high potential incidents (HiPo) on our project sites and operations, in our offices, or
involving our personnel need to be investigated with the express purpose of improving our
performance, managed systems, and to further reinforce our WE CARE value statement.
The depth and types of investigative processes required will depend upon the significance and
complexity of each individual incident.
This standard is designed to ensure that all HiPo incidents are investigated to establish root cause,
implement corrective actions and ultimately contribute to ensuring no repeat incidents occur.

2.0 SCOPE
This standard applies to all offices, operations and projects where SNC-Lavalin has a primary
legislative or contractual responsibility for the H&S of its employees or subcontractors. Where SNC-
Lavalin does not hold primary responsibility (such as secondment of SNC-Lavalin staff to client
operations), this standard shall apply to incidents occurring within the applicable scope of work.

3.0 DEFINITIONS
Refer to 6851.1.1 SNC-Lavalin Health and Safety Indicators.

4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES
4.1 PERSONNEL INVOLVED

ƒ The SVP GHS is responsible for the content, administration and maintenance of this procedure. It
shall be subject to the annual review process.
ƒ It is the responsibility of the BU H&S VP / Director to ensure that this procedure is fully implemented
within their respective Business Units / Divisions.
ƒ Each Division / Project H&S Manager is responsible to make sure that this procedure is
implemented in their home office / project operations.
ƒ It is the responsibility of the Division General Manager and / or Project Manager to ensure that the
investigation team is established to meet the requirements of this procedure and have the
appropriate levels of authority and resources to fulfill its mandate.
ƒ The EVP IMS is responsible to escalate with the CEO and Office of the President, as required.

5.0 REFERENCES
6801 Global Health and Safety Management System
Incident

6851.1.1 SNC-Lavalin Health and Safety Indicators


6853.3 Incident Notification Form
6853.4 Incident Investigation Reporting Form
6853.5 ICAM Chart Template

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Incident Investigation Standard

6853.6 Incident Investigation Training


6853.6.1 ICAM Case Study

6.0 PREAMBLE
There are a number of reasons / root causes that contribute to the ineffective implementation of safety
systems and controls which results in sub-standard safety performance and / or incidents.
Research and experience suggests the majority of incidents are caused by system influences, which is
why it is so vitally important to complete thorough and transparent investigations to determine managed
system improvements.
Managed system improvements and corrective actions need to take a broad view of the root causes of
an incident (i.e. absence of competency assessment, inadequate resource allocation, etc.) and not
focus on the easy or superficial fixes. (i.e. update orientation package, deliver toolbox talk, etc.).
Some incidents are human behavior-based errors. For these types of incidents the focus should be on
how our systems have permitted or allowed the behavior, and how we can improve the system to
remove the possibility of reoccurrence. In cases where human performance has had a direct role to
play in an incident, and regardless of whether disciplinary action is regarded as likely or not, it is usually
appropriate to suspend the individual worker(s) with pay, pending completion of the investigation or
until emerging facts suggest this to be unnecessary. Such action must be taken prior to the start of the
investigation or when emerging facts dictate.
Information obtained during the incident investigation process shall not be used for disciplinary
purposes. This philosophy has been adopted to ensure that all persons involved in the investigative
process are comfortable and open to sharing all information related to the incident. If personnel fear
reprisal or discipline, they may not share all the relevant facts in issue, which would not allow us to fully
understand what happened, and would hamper the realistic and effective corrective actions. This
condition shall not apply where the investigation identifies the existence of gross negligence or reckless
actions.

7.0 PROCEDURE
7.1 SCALE OF INVESTIGATION

The scale of the investigation shall be determined by line management and will be based on the
significance and complexity of the incident, and the opportunity to make improvements (see table 1). If
an incident is rated as a HiPo, but the circumstances of the incident are such that a team investigation
is not deemed appropriate because of the limited opportunity, or a technical investigation is more
appropriate, the business level authority shall approve this decision and provide the rational to the SVP
GHS as soon as possible.
Incident

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Incident Investigation Standard

Investigation
Initial Report Completion
(6853.1.3-EN
Type of Safety (6853.1.2-EN Type of Investigation Investigative Lead Incident
Incident Incident Investigation
Notification Form) Reporting
Form)
Serious Incidents
BU H&S VP / Director and
(see 6801 GHSMS for Formal investigation using the Global Health and Safety
definition) Incident Cause Analysis
Within 24 Hours of the Method (ICAM) to determine
14 days
incident occurring root causes and make
Other High Potential recommendations to prevent Division H&S Lead and /
Incidents and all reoccurrences. or Internal H&S resource
recordable incidents

Entered into the HSES


Low Potential FA and Database by the 10th At the discretion of the local
Internal H&S Resource 1 month
NM day of the month management team
following the incident

Table 1: Incident category and investigation schedule

7.2 HIGH POTENTIAL INCIDENTS

All HiPo incidents and recordable incidents must be reported via line management through to the most
senior manager for the project / office. All Serious Incidents shall be reported immediately. Thereafter
the responsible line manager must ensure that the incident is investigated in accordance with Table 1:
Incident category and investigation schedule, to determine the root causes – immediate and
contributory (organizational / systemic). The root causes must be addressed with an action plan and the
final incident investigation form must be submitted to line management and the BU H&S VP / Director
and uploaded into the SNC-Lavalin HSES Database
(https://hses.snclavalin.com/SummarySearch.aspx) within 14 days.
Note that even “uncontrolled” incidents which have the potential for reputational risk for the company,
project or client, must be reported to the Business Unit Executive Vice-President (EVP) for follow up.

7.2.1 INVESTIGATION PROCESS FOR INCIDENTS

The investigation is comprised of the following stages.


1. Data gathering and fact-finding phase:
Ƈ
Review of field-investigation data, visit incident site, and interview employees (i.e. affected
employee(s) / victim(s), witness(es), supervisor and / or manager).
2. Data analysis phase (apply the following analytical techniques as appropriate):
Incident

Ƈ Events and conditions chart


Ƈ Energy barrier analysis
Ƈ Other analytical techniques as required
3. Root cause analysis phase

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Incident Investigation Standard

Ƈ Determine root cause(s) using the Incident Cause Analysis Method (ICAM)
4. Police report
5. Regulatory findings / report

7.2.2 INVESTIGATION REPORT

The investigation report shall include, as a minimum:


ƒ Executive summary (synopsis of events, root causes and recommendations)
ƒ Sequence of Events (upstream, incident and post-incident)
ƒ Analysis methods used
ƒ Root causes / causal factors
ƒ Recommendations supported by findings
ƒ Appendices (i.e., Events and Conditions Chart; Energy Barrier Analysis; List of Documents
Reviewed, Photographs of the Incident Scene; Terms of Reference).
Investigation reports shall have “Draft” clearly indicated on the cover page until final approval is
received. For investigation reports involving a fatality, and / or serious injury or the existence of
circumstances which have or could prompt legal action, the report shall be forwarded to the Legal
Department for review, comment, and distribution instructions.
The following disclaimer should be included in the footer section of any reports, diagrams, or
photographs:

“This document was prepared without prejudice in contemplation of legal


proceedings and for the purpose of obtaining legal advice. This document,
together with all appendices, attachments, photographs, supporting
documentation and other material evidence is confidential and subject to
solicitor and client privilege. This document is not to be disclosed by any
person or party outside of SNC-Lavalin unless approved for release by SNC-
Lavalin Global Communications.”

For investigations in which the team leader believes there is the possibility of regulatory charges
relating to the incident, the team leader shall ensure that members of the team are not permitted to
have access to any copies of the investigation report (draft or final) outside of meetings of the
investigation team.

7.2.3 CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN

ƒ The accountable line manager will develop a Corrective Action Plan to address the findings and
recommendations of the investigation.
ƒ Corrective Action Plans shall be practical and meet the intent of the investigation recommendations
or will clearly identify alternatives. When determining the permanent corrective actions, due regard
Incident

shall be given to addressing the hierarchy of controls for possible elimination of the hazard, risk or
systemic issue which caused, or contributed to causing the incident. Administrative controls should
be used only as a last resort. The appropriate drop down control shall be selected in the form for
tracking purposes.

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Incident Investigation Standard

7.2.4 INVESTIGATION FINAL REPORT

A final report, along with an approved Corrective Action Plan, shall be delivered to the SVP GHS and
uploaded to the HSES Database, no later than 14 calendar days after the incident was assigned a high
potential rating.

7.2.5 FOLLOW-UP

ƒ The Corrective Action Plan must be tracked and monitored by an appropriate level of line
management to ensure milestones are met and completed as planned.
ƒ Make available to the SVP GHS the status of all high potential corrective actions. This status
update must be up to date and available by the 10th of each month.
ƒ Annually review implemented corrective action plans for all incidents to confirm effectiveness of
implemented corrective actions.

7.3 INVESTIGATION PROCESS FOR ALL OTHER INCIDENTS AND IMMINENT


DANGERS

The process and depth of the investigation for the above incidents will be at the discretion of the BU or
project manager.

8.0 ICAM – INCIDENT CAUSE ANALYSIS METHOD


The Incident Cause Analysis Method (ICAM) is used to determine the contributing factors and root
causes of HiPo incidents. The ICAM team must recommend actions in an ICAM report, using the ICAM
process to prevent future incidents.

8.1 TEAM FORMING (FOR SERIOUS INCIDENTS ONLY)

In the event of a Serious Incident (as described in Table 1: Incident category and investigation
schedule), the SNC-Lavalin GHS team in consultation with the impacted BU EVP and H&S VP /
Director and additional key stakeholders must select an ICAM Investigation Team to investigate the
actual incident. There must be at least one (1) person independent of the affected project management
team in the ICAM Investigation Team. Where possible, that person must be the Team Leader.

Investigation team roles Position

ICAM Team Leader Independent party (external to location)

ICAM Facilitator Senior H&S representative

Senior site representative Senior line manager

Other site representatives Line managers and workforce representatives


Other independent Independent subject matter experts with knowledge relevant to the
Incident

members incident, including technical specialists, where required.


Table 2: ICAM Team composition to investigate a serious incident.

For other HiPo Incidents, the BU H&S VP / Director will determine the best qualified ICAM facilitators, in
consultation with the SVP GHS.

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Incident Investigation Standard

8.2 PLANNING THE INVESTIGATION

The ICAM Team must:


ƒ Arrange site visits, interviews, data collection and investigation resourcing.
ƒ Set up document control, recording and reporting procedures for the evidence gathered (i.e. training
records, work permits, Job Safety Analysis completed, Team StepBack cards completed, applicable
inspections, and minutes of tool box meetings.).
ƒ Confirm with the site manager the reporting deliverables.

8.3 CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

The Site Manager must determine for the ICAM investigation: the boundaries or terms of reference,
scope of the ICAM Team’s jurisdiction, and requirements for legal professional privilege and
confidentiality agreements.
The ICAM Team must:
ƒ Collect information on events leading up to the serious incident, facts around the incident itself and
what occurred immediately after the incident, to build the timeline chart. Specialist input such as
forensic analysis may be required as part of the data collection process.
ƒ Collect data from the following categories related to the serious incident:
Ƈ People: including but not limited to witnesses and relevant people involved.
Ƈ Environment: including but not limited to weather, workplace and incident scene.
Ƈ Equipment: including but not limited to vehicles, plant, tools and infrastructure.
Ƈ Procedures and documents: including but not limited to existing maps, charts documents,
report, risk analyses (JSA, StepBack.) and photographs.
Ƈ Organization: factors in the GHSMS affecting the incident outcome.
ƒ Use data collection techniques such as site inspections, photography, physical evidence collection,
witness interviews, physical documents and records collection and organizational information.
ƒ Probe within each of the categories using the questions “who”, “what”, “where”, “when”, “why” and
“how” to ensure all the facts are uncovered.
ƒ Concentrate on gathering factual evidence and avoid opinions, where possible, when interviewing.
Where a witness opinion is recorded, it must be made clear that it is an opinion.

8.4 ANALYZING DATA

As input to the ICAM report, the ICAM Team must develop a timeline chart in conjunction with the 5
why’s methodology to validate and organize the collected data.
In order to develop a timeline chart, the ICAM Team should:
ƒ Identify the incident facts and document this on a timeline chart
ƒ
Incident

Record the incident. Recording the incident facts formalizes the incident and identifies all of the
elements within it. It also helps the ICAM Team to focus on the incident.
ƒ Break down the incident into a sequential series of events with each step represented by a single
box.

6853.2-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-18 3:54:00 PM Page 8 of 12


Incident Investigation Standard

ƒ When separate sequences of events converge to create an incident, draw separate timelines on the
timeline chart showing the interrelationship between those events
Applying the 5 why’s methodology:
ƒ Select one of the timeline chart boxes and ask “Why did the event happen?” and record the answer
beneath the event in the selected timeline chart box.
ƒ If this answer does not identify the root cause of the event, ask “Why?” again and record the
answer.
ƒ Loop back to Step 1 until the ICAM Team agrees the root cause of the issue has been identified.
This may take more or less tries than the five “why’s”
Eventually, the ICAM Team must:
ƒ Transfer information from the timeline into the ICAM chart for classification into the following
categories:
Ƈ Absent / Failed Defences: Does the finding describe the equipment, work process, control
measure, detection system, and procedure or attribute which normally prevents this incident or
limits the consequences?
Ƈ Individual / Team Actions: does the finding indicate an error or violation of a standard or
procedure, which lead to the incident?
Ƈ Task / Environmental Conditions: Do the condition(s) describe something about the task
demands, work environment, individual capabilities or human factors that promoted errors and /
or violations, or undermined the effectiveness of the system defences?
Ƈ Organizational Factors: Do the factor(s) identify a non-conformance with performance
requirement of the GHSMS, which resulted in any task / environmental conditions, individual /
team action or absent / failed defences to not be addressed?
The ICAM categories and factors chart is a means of selecting factors for each ICAM category. Use the
question: “Is this a contributing factor or a root cause?” to determine whether the item must be
transferred to the ICAM chart.

Incident

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Incident Investigation Standard

Review and categorize each finding

Identify Task/
Identify nonconformity Identify individual/team Identify absent/failed
Environmental
with GH&SMS actions defenses
Conditions

No
The issue remains as
Is this a contributing factor or a root cause ?
part of initial findings
and is documented

Yes
Add item to ICAM chart
under correct heading

Task/environmental
Organizational factors Individual/team actions Absent/failed defenses
conditions

Incident

Figure 1: ICAM Categories and Factors chart

ƒ Identify at least one Task / Environmental Condition for each Individual / Team Action
ƒ Identify the Organizational Factors for each of the identified Task / Environmental Condition.
Incident

Figure 2: Example of a final ICAM Chart

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Incident Investigation Standard

8.5 ACTION PLAN AND REPORTING

The ICAM Team, in collaboration with site management, must develop preventive and corrective
actions to eliminate or mitigate the risk of recurrence to an ALARP (as low as reasonably practicable)
level.
The ICAM Team must apply the hierarchy of controls when developing these actions.
The ICAM Team must address the identified organizational factors and absent / failed defences with
recommendations for preventive and corrective actions.
Preventive and corrective actions must be SMART: Specific, Measureable, Achievable and
accountable, Relevant and with Timely implementation.
The ICAM Team’s conclusions must only be made based on established facts. Where a definite cause
cannot be determined form the facts and the ICAM Team is only able to venture an opinion on
contributing factors and root causes, then this distinction must be clearly stated in the ICAM Report.

9.0 PERMANENT CORRECTIVE ACTIONS


Management must maintain a register of all corrective actions tabled following incident investigations.
These corrective actions shall be tracked and reported until completion and close out of the incident
report by the Project Manager. Incident reports are to remain “open” until all corrective actions have
been implemented.

10.0 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION TRAINING


A training package (6853.1.5) outlining the investigation process using the ICAM methodology is
available; it also provides advice in completing incident investigation reports.

Incident

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Incident
Incident Investigation Standard

APPENDIX 1: ICAM CHART – TEMPLATE

6853.1.1-EN-Rev.1 Last printed 2014-12-18 3:54:00 PM Page 12 of 12


Incident Notification Form
(to be completed electronically)

Incident Type (choose one):


Health Safety Environment

Incident Category (choose one):


Fatality Lost Time Modified Work Medical Aid First Aid Near Miss
Incident Potential (choose one):
Low High
Must be reported in the HSES Database by the 10th day of the following month. Must be reported within 24 hours (Form 6853.1.2 Incident Notification Form), BU
conference call within 72 hours, incident investigation (Form 6853.1.3 Incident
Investigation Reporting Form) completed and uploaded in HSES Database
within 14 days.

Click to enter Incident


Incident Number: Click to enter incident title
incident number Title:
Incident Date: Incident Time:
Click to enter date Click to enter time
(i.e. yy-mm-dd) (i.e. 09:15 or 21:15)
Site/Project Click to enter project number
Country: Click to enter country
Number & Name: and name
Contractor Name
Click to enter contractor name City: Click to enter city
(if applicable):

Persons Involved in Incident, check all that apply: Employee Contractor Third Party

Work Category of Person Injured or Involved: Click to choose a work category

Incident Details
Incident Type Injuries
Click to select incident type Click to select body part
(select 1): (select 1):
Body Movement Click to select body movement Repetitive Activity
Click to select repetitive activity
(select 1): factor (select 1):
Energies Cause
Click to select energy factor Click to select cause factor
(select 1): (select 1):
Manual Material Handling
Click to select material handling activity Click to select material handling activity
(select up to 2):
Activity (select up to 3): Click to select incident activity details
* *
Hardware (select up to 5): Click to select hardware factors
* *
* *
People (select up to 5): Click to select people factors
* *
* *
Physical Environment (select up to 5): Click to select environment factors
Incident

* *
* *
Procedures (select up to 5): Click to select procedural factors
* *
* *

6853.3-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:46:00 PM Page 1 of 2


Incident Notification Form
(to be completed electronically)

Incident Description (who, what, how, when) Incident Photo


Click to enter incident description

The image is to help visualize the incident conditions and aftermath only.
Be sure the image does not capture company logos, personal information
or any other sensitive material.

Details of Injury/Damage/Impact (nature and extent):


Click to enter details of injury/damage/impact

Immediate Corrective Actions (what should or has been done to prevent recurrence of this incident):
Click to enter corrective actions

Was a Team StepBack card completed? Click for yes or no

Associated Critical Risk Control Protocol: Click to choose CRCP

Was this a Repeat Incident? Click for yes or no


Incident

Approved by:
Supervisor Click to enter date
Health & Safety Click to enter date
Site Manager Click to enter date

6853.3-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:46:00 PM Page 2 of 2


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

Incident Type (choose one):


Health Safety Environment

Incident Category (choose one):


Fatality Lost Time Modified Work Medical Aid First Aid Near Miss

Incident Potential (choose one):


Low High
Must be reported in the HSES Database by the 10th day of the following month Must be reported within 24 hours (Form 6853.1.2 Incident Notification Form), BU
conference call within 72 hours, incident investigation (Form 6853.1.3 Incident
Investigation Reporting Form) completed and uploaded in HSES Database
within 14 days.

Incident Title Click to enter incident title


Incident Number Click to enter incident number

Incident Date (yy-mm-dd) Click to enter incident date

Was a Business Unit conference call held? Click for yes / no

Was this activity / task identified in the Risk Register? Click for yes / no

Does a standard / procedure exist to control the risk? Click for yes / no

If yes, was the standard / procedure adhered to? Click for yes / no

Was this incident a system failure? Click for yes / no

Was there any property damage? Click for yes / no If yes, what amount? Click to enter amount
Click to enter
Modified Work Injury Click for yes / no If yes, how many days modified work?
number of days
Click to enter
Lost Time Injury Click for yes / no If yes, how many days lost time?
number of days

Root Cause Analysis Session:


Session start date(s) Click to enter session start Session end date Click to enter session end
(yy-mm-dd) date (yy-mm-dd) date
List session participants Click to enter participant names

Sequence of Events:
Click to enter details of sequence of events
Incident

6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 1 of 6


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Investigation Results:


Absent or Failed Defenses Description:
Click to choose absent or failed Defense Click to enter description

Individuals / Team Actions Description:


Click to choose individual / team actions Click to enter description

Task / Environmental Conditions Description:


(Workplace) Click to enter description
Click to choose task/ environmental
conditions (workplace)

Task / Environmental Conditions (Human) Description:


Click to choose task / environmental Click to enter description
conditions (human)

Organizational Factors Description:


Click to choose organizational factors Click to enter description

Underlying (Root) Causes and Key Contributing Factors:


Click to enter details of underlying causes and key contributing factors
Incident

6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 2 of 6


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

Description of Incident FOLLOWING the Root Cause Analysis Investigation:


(Complete if changed from Incident Notification Form)

Click to enter description of incident following RCA investigation

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Diagram (if applicable):

Permanent Corrective Actions to be Taken (Actions should relate back to RCA Investigation findings):
Where the corrective and preventive action identifies new or changed hazards or the need for new or
changed controls, the proposed corrective action(s) shall be taken through a documented risk assessment
prior to implementation. Effectiveness of corrective action(s) shall be reviewed in a timely manner.
Action Responsible Person Due Date
Click to enter
Click to enter action Click to enter name
due date
Click to enter
Incident

Click to enter action Click to enter name


due date
Click to enter
Click to enter action Click to enter name
due date
Click to enter
Click to enter action Click to enter name
due date
Click to enter
Click to enter action Click to enter name
due date

6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 3 of 6


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

Key Lessons Learned (Summary of lessons from incident):


Click to enter lessons learned

Project / Office Risk Register updated following investigation: Click for yes / no

Does this incident require Government Authority notification? Click for yes / no

Responsible Line Manager: Click to enter name Telephone: Click to enter phone number
Incident

Title: Click to enter title Email: Click to enter email

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6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 4 of 6


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

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Incident

6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 5 of 6


Incident Investigation Reporting Form
(to be completed electronically and uploaded to HSES Database within 14 days of the incident)

Click here to enter description of graphic

Click here to enter description of graphic

Click here to enter description of graphic


Incident

6853.4-EN-Rev.3 Last printed 2014-12-15 4:41:00 PM Page 6 of 6


HEALTH & SAFETY

Health&Safety.Corporate@snclavalin.com
HEALTH & SAFETY

Health&Safety.Corporate@snclavalin.com