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UMUC – MAT Program

Unit Overview and Lesson Plan

Unit Overview

Course: Biology

Grade Level: 9

Unit Title: Evolution of Life

Unit Rationale/Context: Evolution is a topic that is fundamental to the study of Biology,


linking areas such as genetics, molecular biology, reproduction, anatomy and classification. In
this unit, students will learn about the history of the theories of evolution. They will learn about
the process of natural selection and how it is the basis for evolution. They will outline events in
the evolution of life on earth from the first unicellular organism to the first multicellular
organism and they will learn what evidence has led to our understanding of how life evolved and
how new evidence is changing our view of the relatedness of organisms.

Relevance to Students: I will make the content relevant to students by showing them that all life
on earth evolved from a common ancestor that first appeared billions of years ago. They will be
able to conclude that variation exists in all species and allows some individuals to be better able
to survive in a environment than others. Students can demonstrate understanding of the content
by explaining why they live in a certain region of the world and what would happen if conditions
were changed (extreme heat, no access to water, etc.).

Standards Addressed:
NSTA Standards: LS4: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
LS4.A: EVIDENCE OF COMMON ANCESTRY AND DIVERSITY, LS4.B: NATURAL
SELECTION, LS4.C: ADAPTATION, LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS
NGSS Standards: HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-1, HS-LS4-2, HS-LS4-3, HS-LS4-4, HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-6
ISTE Standards: 1a, 3b, 5b,

Unit Objective(s)/Big Idea(s)/Key Learning(s): 1. Identify “key events” in the evolution of life
on Earth. 2. Use biochemical evidence (amino acid sequences or DNA sequences) to show how
closely two organisms are related. 3. Explain how evolution is linked to how closely two species
are related. 4. Give examples of variations and explain their importance to natural selection.

Summative Assessment: Evolution Unit Test Summative Assessment.pptx

Evolution Unit Test SA.SR.pptx


Lesson #1
Course: Biology

Unit Title: Evolution of Life

Grade Level: 9

Lesson Title: Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity

Time Required: Two 90-minute class sessions

Context for Learning: Students should have knowledge of Standard LS3 – Heredity. Students
should have knowledge of how both genetic and environmental factors affect expression of traits
and the ways in which genetic variability is important.

Standards Addressed:
NSTA LS4.A: Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity
NGSS HS-LS4-1
ISTE 1a, 3b

Objectives (observable and measurable): Students will use biochemical evidence (amino acid
sequences or DNA sequences) to show how closely two organisms are related. Students will
describe similarities in skeletons between different contemporary animals.

Materials:
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-aGAX27SIo
 https://www.nap.edu/read/6024/chapter/4#16
 https://www-tc.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/teachers/activities/pdf/0304_01_nsn_01.pdf
 https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/teachers/activities/0304_01_nsn.html
 file:///C:/Users/cbruton/Downloads/Day%202%20_%203%20-
%20Homologous%20_%20Vestigial%20_%20Analogous%20Structures%20.pdf
 https://www.honolulu.hawaii.edu/sites/www2.honolulu.hawaii.edu/files/care-resource-
notes-template.pdf
 https://teach.genetics.utah.edu/content/evolution/ancestry/pdfs/seed-cards-and-TG.pdf
Proactive Behavior Management: Desks will be arranged in sets of 2 for partner activity.
Students will be greeted at the door with a high- five. Directions for the warm-up are posted in
the front of the class as well as, in the online classroom. A stopwatch is also posted so students
know to get settled quickly because it is a timed activity. Agenda for the day is posted at the
front of the room in addition to the essential question.

Provisions for Student Learning: I will promote participation by creating a class dojo account
the tracks students’ points earned. Once students earn a certain number of points, they can
receive prizes such as, no homework passes. bonus points on assessments, lunch bunches etc.
Procedures:
 Introductory/Developmental Activities
o Warm Up/Opening (Also known as a Bellringer): Students will read “Evidence
Supporitng Biological Evolution”. After reading, List 5 things you already knew
before reading the article, List 5 things that you learned while reading the article,
List 5 things you found interesting and can share with a friend or family member
later.

o Motivator/Bridge (Also known as an Activator): Pick a partner. The oldest of the


pair will share their list first followed by the youngest. Next, students will discuss
how you can tell when two organisms are closely related.

 Instructional Strategies: The teacher will review a PowerPoint presentation that


will go over important vocabulary terms, introduce some evidence for evolution, enable
students to determine how closely related two species are and more. I will provide
students with Cornell note sheets to help organize their thoughts.

 Guided Practice and Independent Tasks


o Guided Practice: Students will complete Cornell notes on PowerPoint
Presentation (Vestigial, Homologous, and Analogous Structures). Teacher will
lead the discuss by providing the students will information and accessing
questions throughout the presentation to test their understanding.
o Independent Tasks: Complete NOVA scienceNOW: Bird Brains Activity.

 Summary/Closure (also known as a summarizer):


List 3 pieces of evidence that support the theory of evolution.
Examples of evidence could include similarities in DNA sequences, anatomical structures, and order of
appearance of structures in embryological development.

Adaptations: I would provide students with graphic organizers to help organize their thoughts
and ideas. These organizers will vary from Venn Diagrams, T-charts, and note sheets. I will
increase the font on the texts as well as, the assessments to ensure students can read the
documents with no problems.

Assessment:
Exit Ticket - Determine how homologous structures are evidence of DIVERGENT evolution and
analogous structures are evidence of CONVERGENT evolution. How can there be so many
similarities among organisms yet so many kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms?

Extension Activities: Complete common ancestry module. Sort seeds by classification schemes.

Review/Reinforcement (Homework): Define


● anatomy - bodily structure of humans, animals, and other living organisms
● ancestor - someone you descended from
● evidence - a possible explanation using limited evidence as a starting point for further
investigation
● extinct - died out, no longer living
● fossil - the remains of a prehistoric organism preserved in rock
● hypothesis - an informed guess based on evidence
● observe - to look closely
● organism - a living thing; an animal, plant or other life form
● origin - a point or place where something began
● species - a group of organisms that can interbreed and produce offspring
● theory - an explanation of all the known facts and observations
● homologous structures - a physical similarity that shows that two organisms are related
through a common ancestor
Lesson #2

Course: Biology

Unit Title: Evolution of Life

Grade Level: 9

Lesson Title: NATURAL SELECTION & ADAPTATION

Time Required: Two 90-minute classes

Context for Learning: This lesson relates to the overall unit because should will be able to
determine what main factors are necessary for evolution to occur. Students will identify what the
relationship is between natural selection, adaptations, and evolution.

Standards Addressed:
NSTA LS4.B: Natural Selection, LS4.C: Adaptation
NGSS HS-LS4-2, HS-LS4-3, HS-LS4-4
ISTE 1a, 3c

Objectives (observable and measurable): Students will determine what main factors are
necessary for evolution to occur. Students will define natural selection and how it relates to
evolution

Materials:
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VM9YxmULuo&feature=youtu.be&list=PLwL0M
yd7Dk1F0iQPGrjehze3eDpco1eVz
 https://www.amoebasisters.com/uploads/2/1/9/0/21902384/video_recap_of_natural_selec
tion_by_amoeba_sisters_v3.pdf
 http://cf.linnbenton.edu/mathsci/bio/thomasw/upload/Week%2009.pdf
 https://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/naturalselection.html
 https://www.biointeractive.org/classroom-resources/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-
adaptation
 https://www.biointeractive.org/sites/default/files/IDGquiz_NaturalSelection.pdf
 https://clarkscience8.weebly.com/adaptations--natural-selection.html
 https://create.kahoot.it/details/e9102053-90d3-4757-92e9-098f0368c9bd
Proactive Behavior Management: Transitions are taught and managed well. Visual schedule of
classroom activities is used. Cuing systems to release and regain student attention and foster high
student engagement are used. Five positive comments, gestures, and interactions to every one
correction, reprimand, or negative interaction (5 to 1 ratio)

Provisions for Student Learning: I will promote participation by creating a class dojo account
the tracks students’ points earned. Once students earn a certain number of points, they can
receive prizes such as, no homework passes. bonus points on assessments, lunch bunches etc.
Procedures:
 Introductory/Developmental Activities
o Warm Up/Opening (Also known as a Bellringer); Watch Amoeba Sisters Video
and Complete handout provided on Natural Selection
o Motivator/Bridge (Also known as an Activator): Whole class discussion regarding
how the video relates to what students learned last class about common ancestry.

 Instructional Strategies: I will review a PowerPoint presentation that identifies


important terms as well as, the history of natural selection and how it relates to
adaptation.

 Guided Practice and Independent Tasks


o Guided Practice: Show presentation on Natural Selection.
o Independent Tasks: Complete Natural Selection Simulator and answer discussion
questions.

 Summary/Closure (also known as a summarizer): Kahoot activity on Natural


Selection and Adaptation.

Adaptations: Provide students with additional resource for background information. Chunking
of text.

Assessment: Exit Ticket: Darwin and other people in his time noticed similarities among
different animals. In your journal entry, include details he might have noticed when he looked at
animal skeletons. Also include questions he might have asked himself as he thought at these
animals. Also include questions you have based on what we have done in the last three lessons.

Extension Activities: View the making of the fittest. Answer questions.

Review/Reinforcement (Homework):
Answer the following:
● What is meant by virulence and resistance?
● What is the potential impact of a new pathogen on a population?
● How has the increase in prescribing antibiotics impacted the evolution of bacteria?
Lesson #3
Course: Biology

Unit Title: Evolution of Life

Grade Level: 9

Lesson Title: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS

Time Required: One 90-minute class

Context for Learning: The purpose of the lesson is to allow students to gather evidence to
answer the question “What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect
humans?”. Students will need to recall information on changes in ecosystems.

Standards Addressed:
NSTA LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS
NGSS HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-6
ISTE 5b, 3c

Objectives (observable and measurable): Students will determine what is the importance of
sustaining biodiversity to support and enhance life on Earth and some potential causes of
extinction and speciation.

Materials:
 https://sciencing.com/humans-affected-planets-biodiversity-positive-negative-ways-
2286.html
 https://opentextbc.ca/biology2eopenstax/chapter/the-importance-of-biodiversity-to-
human-life/
 https://www.biointeractive.org/sites/default/files/WildCam_HumanImpacts_Student.p
df
 https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/56bbca04d7b5daa37f3d0f51/biodiversity-and-human-
impact

Proactive Behavior Management: Teacher mobility and proximity control is used (teacher
does not stand in one spot. Providing students with numerous opportunities to respond to teacher
questions. A motivation system to reward desirable behavior is in place.

Provisions for Student Learning: I will promote participation by creating a class dojo account
the tracks students’ points earned. Once students earn a certain number of points, they can
receive prizes such as, no homework passes. bonus points on assessments, lunch bunches etc.
Procedures:
 Introductory/Developmental Activities
o Warm Up/Opening (Also known as a Bellringer: Explain why evolution will
never become a scientific law. Explain why evolution is accepted even though it
is “just a theory”.
o Motivator/Bridge (Also known as an Activator): Explain how biodiversity loss
can impact crop diversity. Crop plants are derived from wild plants, and genes
from wild relatives are frequently brought into crop varieties by plant breeders to
add valued characteristics to the crops. If the wild species are lost, then this
genetic variation would no longer be available.
o Describe two types of compounds from living things that are used as medications.
Secondary plant compounds are toxins produced by plants to kill predators trying
to eat them; some of these compounds can be used as drugs. Animal toxins such
as snake venom can also be used as drugs. (Alternate answer: antibiotics are
compounds produced by bacteria and fungi which can be used to kill bacteria.)

 Instructional Strategies: Competent communication with all students is observed.


Review natural selection and adaptation. Define Biodiversity. Go over writing prompt
and rubric.

 Guided Practice and Independent Tasks


o Guided Practice: Compare the affects that humans have on biodiversity and vice
versa.
o Independent Tasks: Write an essay in which you discuss, what are some impacts
of human activity on biodiversity

 Summary/Closure (also known as a summarizer): Students respond to


discussion question, “What is the importance of sustaining biodiversity to support and
enhance life on Earth?”

Adaptations: Have students complete a C-E-R chart before beginning essay. The C-E-R chart
will allow students to clearly organize their thoughts and develop a thesis.

Assessment: Complete 12 questions on Quizizz

Extension Activities: Human impacts on biodiversity bio interactive.

Review/Reinforcement (Homework):
What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect humans?