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Common Maintenance Strategy
Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Table of Contents Introduction Introduction Reliability

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Table of Contents

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Table of Contents Introduction Introduction Reliability Culture Asset

Introduction

Introduction Reliability Culture Asset Management Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Assessments

CMS Elements

Leadership and Organization Facility Availability Work Management Materials Management Change Management Continuous Improvement

CMS Processes and Tools
CMS Processes and Tools

Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Knowledge Management Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) Defect Elimination Program Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection Data Analysis Operator Performed Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Spare Parts Management Supply Chain Management Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies Campaign Maintenance Redeploy and Optimize Staffing

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Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables Common

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects Capital Value Process for Turnarounds (CVP-TAR)

Related Processes and Tools

Succession Planning TeamShare Performance Evaluation (myPerformance) Training Program (Competency On Line) Health, Safety, and Environment (gHSEr) Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM) Choke Model Operations Value Process (OVP) Capital Value Process (CVP)

Appendices A. Assessments B. Success Stories C. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) D. Glossary of Terms
Appendices
A. Assessments
B. Success Stories
C. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
D. Glossary of Terms

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Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Introduction bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date:

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Introduction

Strategy bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Introduction bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003
Strategy bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Introduction bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Common Maintenance

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Common Maintenance Strategy

– Common Maintenance Strategy Common Maintenance Strategy I. Introduction The Common Maintenance Strategy (CMS) is a

I.

Introduction

The Common Maintenance Strategy (CMS) is a set of measurable elements and sustaining processes which cost-effectively support bp’s overall excellence programs as an integral part of the Great Operator (GO) Strategy.

Supporting the Great Operator Strategy means:

q Engaging people

ß Feeling like bp is the great place to work

ß People feel their talent is fully used and valued ß There are many development
ß People feel their talent is fully used and valued
ß There are many development opportunities for proven
performers
q
Better Health, Safety, and Environment performance and
effective integrity management
Higher efficiency and first year operability
q
Lower unit operating costs
q
The entire workforce has the personal responsibility to ensure that our
assets are properly maintained. This means that the right work will be
done the right way and at the right time.
bp is committed to seeking new and innovative ways to manage
maintenance and reliability better, being safe, and creating value in all that
we do. Our business plans include measurable targets for all our
maintenance and reliability activities in order to achieve world-class
levels.

bp has identified best practice maintenance and reliability expectations for all of our assets. This document sets standardized, identifiable, and auditable requirements for all maintenance and reliability activities worldwide in support of the GO initiative.

Our goal is to use best in class maintenance and reliability processes within the industry and to verify our performance with auditable systems and benchmarking processes. The flowchart below highlights the relationship between the GO initiative and the CMS.

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Improve Integrity
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Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy II. Reliability Culture

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

II. Reliability Culture “Every man's ability may be strengthened or increased by culture.” John Abbott
II. Reliability Culture
“Every man's ability may be strengthened or increased by culture.”
John Abbott (1821–1893) Prime Minister of Canada

bp has increasingly searched for a competitive advantage; maintenance and reliability of assets have evolved as major contributors. As an organization, bp is being challenged to improve work efficiency. Over the years many initiatives have taken small steps toward achieving competitive advantage; these initiatives have resulted progress toward enhanced reliability of assets, but, to achieve world-class performance, a fundamental shift in the mindset of workers and the nature of work is needed. A holistic and evergreen approach to asset management processes provides the capability to change the nature of work and drive a reliability- centered culture. This is the true underpinning of the GO initiative. The Operations Excellence (OE) GO Team objective is to deliver the Operations element of The Great Operator Agenda.

The majority of new processes implemented by world-class performers have been proactive, reliability-focused processes derived from post- execution reliability analysis. The six elements outlined within the common maintenance strategy are the foundation of a reliability-focused culture.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
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Lower Unit Operating
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Engaged and
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Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
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9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy A reliability-centered

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

A reliability-centered culture for asset management seeks to better understand assets before failure, put in place proactive equipment reliability strategies to cost-effectively eliminate the likelihood and consequence of failures, and move toward an environment where equipment failures will be pre-determined.

This provides the basis for focusing personnel and other resources on the equipment that has the most direct impact on the business. CMS within the context of a reliability culture guides the organization to that area of the facility where it should focus its efforts, along with the specific assets within that area that deserve the most attention.

CMS seeks to establish a continual or "evergreen" improvement process. This results in "evergreen"
CMS seeks to establish a continual or "evergreen" improvement process.
This results in "evergreen" reliability strategies that are continually
customized to ensure optimal performance for equipment. The ultimate
result of the "evergreen" process is to move toward an equipment-specific
reliability strategy for each equipment item based on its actual
performance.
Significant cultural changes, cost savings, and increases in facility
availability can be achieved within a reliability culture. To reach quantum
and long-term improvement, a change in mind-set and work is required.
The reality is that this is a journey, not a destination, and unfortunately,
there is no "Holy Grail" which will work for everyone. CMS and the GO
initiative provide bp with the foundation for cultural change.
The journey from Maintenance Innocence to Excellence is depicted in the
following grid. The journey involves the implementation of multiple
processes to move from a reactive to a proactive business atmosphere.
The grid details progress along nine dimensions:
Strategy
q
Human Resources Management
q
Planning and Scheduling
q
Maintenance Tactics
q
Performance Measures
q
Information Technology
q
Employee Involvement
q
Reliability Analysis
q
Process Analysis
q

Maintenance Excellence depicts a fully-integrated business environment that maximizes its personnel utilization and thoroughly analyzes all available information to make significant process improvements.

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Increase Production
and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy III. Asset Management The

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy III. Asset Management The GO initiative and CMS

III. Asset Management

The GO initiative and CMS are designed to deal with the pressure to be increasingly cost-effective and competitive in global markets. Management at all levels within bp has begun to focus on the importance of production equipment and systems reliability as a critical strategy for improving financial performance.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy An effective,

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

An effective, comprehensive asset reliability strategy typically results in a 20-35% reduction in maintenance cost accompanied by a 15-25% increase in production with no capital investment in new equipment.

The net effect on the bottom line is often several million dollars annually per site. While unit production costs are significantly decreased by implementation of asset reliability program, the majority of the financial improvement opportunity comes from increased Asset Utilization in terms of real production output.

The most effective way to increase Fixed Asset Productivity is to maximize asset utilization by increasing the Reliability of the Assets.

Developing and implementing an asset reliability program requires significant effort and knowledge. Most business units have difficulty finding a sufficient supply of these valuable commodities to implement an asset utilization program internally. Many business units also struggle with figuring out how to get started and what direction to proceed.

Three basic principles are woven into the CMS and form the foundation for support of
Three basic principles are woven into the CMS and form the foundation
for support of the GO initiative:
1. The strategy consists of a set of well-defined business process
models and supporting documentation that define the ways in
which work is accomplished.
2. It establishes effective measures or performance indicators that
clearly reflect the adoption of new behaviors and trend the
achievement of stated objectives that results from these changes.
3. It supports development of a learning environment and a
“reliability culture” that rewards development of people and
improving Asset Utilization.

CMS provides the roadmap to increasing asset utilization.

IV. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Management by exception is critical in ensuring the goals of the Common Maintenance Strategy (CMS) portion of the Great Operator (GO) initiative. Identifying and addressing performance gaps is necessary in the pursuit of best-in-class operations. Generating trends of key performance indicators (KPIs) ensures that the facility is moving in the right direction. KPIs are snapshots of different aspects of a facility’s operations. Trending these values is comparable to continuous benchmarking against best-in- class targets. Analyzing the data generated by these KPI trends helps

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Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
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9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy identify the important

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

identify the important and urgent performance gaps that are impeding progress.

KPIs come in multiple formats and cover the full-range of a site’s operation. They track aspects such as revenue, expenses, incidents, backlog, compliance, reliability, etc. For CMS, individual KPIs track either the site’s efficiency in doing something (i.e. proactive maintenance costs) or the site’s effectiveness in doing something (i.e. equipment reliability). By comparing efficiency and effectiveness measures, we can calculate how much it costs to get the performance we are experiencing (i.e. proactive maintenance spending yields the corresponding equipment reliability). Considering this association, logic implies that the more the site spends on proactive maintenance (i.e. less efficient), the better the equipment reliability will be (i.e. more effective). These two KPIs are directly related in this manner – more spending, better performance. Performance will move along the expected trade-off line in the graph below.

move along the expected trade-off line in the graph below. Eventually, increased spending will no longer

Eventually, increased spending will no longer improve performance due to the law of diminishing returns. Therefore, increasing spending may not yield the performance level demanded. In order to reach this world-class performance, a change must be made. A change will move the expected trade-off line towards the world-class performance quadrant. A change means changing actions from the status quo. Examples of changes include starting a new program (i.e. root cause failure analysis), reviewing staffing

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy levels, analyzing available data, creating incentives for performance, conducting

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

levels, analyzing available data, creating incentives for performance, conducting specialized training, etc. These
levels, analyzing available data, creating incentives for performance,
conducting specialized training, etc. These changes are the same
processes and tools used in the CMS to realize the goals of the GO
Initiative:
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Increase Production and Operating Efficiency
q
Lower Unit Operating Costs
q
Improve Integrity Management
q
An Engaged and Competent Workforce
q
As performance is monitored with the KPIs, performance gaps are
identified and addressed by instituting changes. As changes are
implemented, performance continues to be tracked by the KPIs. This is
the cycle for continuous improvement. As changes are incorporated into
the status quo, optimization of the process can occur to drive down its
implementation costs. The ultimate goal of each change is to further
increase the effectiveness of the process at reduced expense to the facility
until world-class performance is attained – high effectiveness at low cost.
KPIs are the road markers on the road of continuous improvement. They
show current status and suggest processes that need to be optimized in
order to reach best-in-class performance.
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
V.
Assessments
The maintenance assessment is a tool within the Common Maintenance
Strategy utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of the facility’s maintenance
management practices and to identify opportunities for improvement. The
facility is assessed against best in class maintenance practices and work
processes. Assessments look at the six elements within the CMS:
Leadership and Organization
q
Facility Availability
q
Work Management
q
Materials Management
q
Change Management
q
Continuous Improvement
q
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Fundamental to the CMS philosophy is the belief that maintenance is a
shared responsibility of the various functional groups within the facility.
CMS requires that operators/technicians perform minor maintenance tasks
and conduct routine surveillance of the equipment condition. CMS relies
on cross functional teams to be involved in ESMP/RCM and RCFA
activities, and requires that the personnel survey equipment using the best
non-intrusive technologies to track equipment condition and trend

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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy degradation to predict

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

degradation to predict what might otherwise be unexpected functional failures. Teamwork, cooperation and shared accountability are essential for successful implementation of CMS.

The outcome of maintenance assessments will provide a detailed qualitative analysis of the facility’s current maintenance management practices. A list of recommendations and an implementation plan with estimated cost and return on investment will be generated as part of the assessment. The implementation plan costs can be used to set budgets and schedule resources as needed.

There are three levels of assessment within the CMS:

q Self-Assessment – completed every year by personnel located at the site to give an overview of performance on all six elements of the CMS (½-1 day)

q Peer-Assist Assessment – completed every two years or as needed by subject matter experts
q
Peer-Assist Assessment – completed every two years or as
needed by subject matter experts within the Business Unit
(BU) or a central support group (E&PTG) to focus on specific
deficiencies identified by self-assessment or other internal
process (1-2 days)
q
Formal Facilitated Assessment – completed every four years at
a minimum by personnel external to the BU to perform a
detailed review of all six elements of the CMS (4-5 days)
See Appendix A for copies of the three types of assessments.

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Elements bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Elements

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Leadership and Organization Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Leadership and Organization Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve
Leadership and Organization
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
I.
Overview
Definition
Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality.
power is the basic energy needed to initiate and sustain action or, to
put it another way, the capacity to translate intention into reality and
sustain it.
Leadership is the wise use of this power: Transformative
leadership.
The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is
a genetic factor to leadership. This myth asserts that people simply either
have certain charismatic qualities or not. That's nonsense; in fact, the
opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born.
Warren G. Bennis
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Professor of Business/Management at University of Southern California
Importance
To meet the exploration, production goals of bp it is imperative that
Leaders with responsibility for the Maintenance and Reliability functions
be held accountable for accomplishing specific targets related to
performance in these areas. Each is responsible for leading and engaging
the workforce and clearly defining Maintenance and Reliability roles and
responsibilities, providing needed resources, and measuring, reviewing
and continuously improving our performance in these areas.
In order to sustain best-in-class exploration and production operations,
bp’s aim is to operate systems and processes to manage the selection,
training, development, assessment, and reward of our people and those
working for third parties.
II.
Expectations
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Leaders model positive Maintenance and Reliability behaviors by personal
example both on and off the job, and reinforce and reward positive
behaviors.

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Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
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9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Leaders engage in clear,

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Leaders engage in clear, two-way communication with employees, contractors and others on Maintenance and Reliability issues.

Leaders develop a clear Maintenance and Reliability Strategy. The strategy and performance indicators should have high visibility with the workforce and be reviewed regularly to determine the effectiveness of the strategy. The strategy should be updated and reissued on an annual basis.

Leaders integrate the Maintenance and Reliability Strategy with expectations into business planning and decision-making processes, ensuring that documented systems are in place to deliver these expectations.

In the Strategy, leaders establish clear Maintenance and Reliability goals and objectives, roles and responsibilities, performance measures and allocate competent resources and, where necessary, specialist expertise.

Maintenance and Reliability Management systems are developed, documented, implemented and supported throughout the
Maintenance and Reliability Management systems are developed,
documented, implemented and supported throughout the organization.
These address health, safety, technical integrity, environment, security,
equipment reliability and maintainability, the productivity of Maintenance
resources, as well as operational risks in accordance with the appropriate
expectations.
Each Leader’s performance is assessed against their personal annual
objectives, based on feedback from line management, peers and others in
the Business Unit.
Leaders integrate Group Maintenance and Reliability targets into their
business activities and personal performance objectives.

Leaders promote the sharing of Maintenance and Reliability lessons learned inside and outside their Business Unit.

Qualified competent personnel are selected and placed to meet specified job requirements. Provision for initial and on-going training to meet job and legal requirements includes:

q

Definition of required competencies.

q

Assessment of training requirements.

q

Training documentation.

q

Mechanisms for assessing training effectiveness.

q

On-the-job competence assessment.

Personnel performance is assessed, documented and feedback given.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Exchange of personnel

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Exchange of personnel between operational areas to promote self- confidence and breadth of experience.

Relevant professional development for those working in the maintenance and reliability community.

Clear Maintenance and Reliability Leadership accountability for the selection, training, development and competence assurance of their personnel.

Maintenance and reliability performance is linked to individual or team reward.

Contractor’s skills, performance, availability and value to the bp Common Maintenance Strategy are assessed on a periodic basis.

Within an organization implementing the CMS exists a set of core functional requirements. These requirements
Within an organization implementing the CMS exists a set of core
functional requirements. These requirements detail functions that must be
performed to establish a world-class organization. This is not an exclusive
list, but includes minimum core functions. Some functions may be
performed by more than one person, and some individuals may fill several
functional positions.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Leadership –

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

q

Leadership – Senior, Field, and First-Line

- Fully endorse Common Maintenance Strategy and accountable for implementation and results

- Provide resources and training for CMS implementation

- Make business decisions based on performance indicators directly affected by CMS processes

q

Mentoring

- Committed to and advanced knowledge of CMS processes

- Assists in implementation of CMS processes

- Monitor and incorporate best practices

q

Facility Operations

- Responsible for the operation, monitoring, and basic care of the equipment

- Serve as first-line-of-defense against equipment failures

q

Facility Maintenance

- Responsible for proactive and corrective maintenance and emergency repairs of the equipment

- Directly supports the condition-based maintenance program Planning q - Use rigorous bp planning and
- Directly supports the condition-based maintenance program
Planning
q
-
Use rigorous bp planning and scheduling model to develop
planned work packages with competency requirement and
accurate time and material estimates
Scheduling
q
-
Use rigorous bp planning and scheduling model to schedule
and assign all planned proactive and corrective
maintenance work
Materials Coordination
q
- Purchase materials needed for repairs and inventory control
- Ensure accurate inventory accounting and make
suggestions to optimize storehouse operations
Engineering Support
q
- Provide specific technical expertise for the CMS processes,

in particular, condition monitoring and reliability analysis (ESMP/RCM/RCFA) techniques

- Research and implement industry best practices

q

Data Analysis

- Interpret condition monitoring, performance, and financial data and convert to information useful for business decisions

- Collect data and develop trends for CMS KPIs

q

CMMS Support

- Assist personnel as required (e.g. forms, queries, reports, troubleshooting, etc.) in the data entry and retrieval from the CMMS

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Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy III. Related Key

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

III. Related Key Performance Indicators

In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Leadership and Organization, the following KPIs are suggested.

Key Performance Indicator Target Value Overall Operating Efficiency (%) Site specific Production Efficiency (%) Site
Key Performance Indicator
Target Value
Overall Operating Efficiency (%)
Site specific
Production Efficiency (%)
Site specific
MI/HiPos
0
Lifting Cost ($/boe)
2.30 $/boe
Maintenance Cost per Total
Operating Cost
15%
Maintenance Cost per Equipment
Replacement Value
1.5% - 3.0%
CMS Implementation Cost
Site specific
CMS Implementation Status
100% in 2 yrs.
See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS
Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the
target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are
specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.
IV.
Processes and Tools
In order to improve performance within the Leadership and Organization
CMS Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools apply.
CMS Processes and Tools
1. Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)
2. Knowledge Management

3. Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)

4. Defect Elimination Program

5. Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection

6. Data Analysis

7. Operator Performed Maintenance

8. Planning and Scheduling

9. Spare Parts Management

10. Supply Chain Management

11. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program

12. Risk Based Inspection (RBI)

13. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies

14. Campaign Maintenance

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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy 15. Redeploy and Optimize

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

15. Redeploy and Optimize Staffing

16. Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables

17. Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects

18. Capital Value Process for Turnarounds (CVP-TAR)

Related Processes and Tools

1. Succession Planning

2. TeamShare

3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance)

4. Training Program (Competency on Line)

5. Health, Safety, and Environment (gHSEr)

6. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM)

7. Choke Model

8. Operations Value Process (OVP)

9.

Capital Value Process (CVP)

See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for detailed information on
See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for
detailed information on each process.

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Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
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Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Facility Availability I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Facility Availability

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Facility Availability I. Overview Definition Facility availability is directly

I. Overview

Definition

Facility availability is directly related to the reliability of equipment and processes. Availability is defined
Facility availability is directly related to the
reliability of equipment and processes.
Availability is defined as an item that is ready
to function or is online under a predetermined
operational context and stated support
conditions.
Availability takes into account planned and unplanned downtime.
Reliability minus Availability equals the amount of intentional downtime
due to planned intrusive maintenance activities. Availability is measured
to drive elimination of intrusive maintenance inspection activities.
Reliability is defined as the probability that equipment, machinery, or
systems will perform their required functions satisfactorily under specific
conditions within a certain time period; measured by mean time between
failure (MTBF); the duration or probability of failure-free performance
under stated conditions.
Glossary of Reliability and Maintenance Terms, McKenna and Oliverson
Importance

We will put in place systems and processes to ensure maximum availability of plant and equipment whilst recognizing company and site safety objectives, legislative requirements and the need for cost effectiveness associated with maintenance and reliability activity.

II. Expectations

Systematically and logically optimize the amount and type of maintenance work performed.

Use Reliability Analysis (ESMP/RCM) to:

q Create a list of critical equipment ranked on risk (likelihood of failure times consequence of failure)

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

q Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged
q
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Create an optimized proactive maintenance plan, which replaces
intrusive time-based maintenance tasks with condition monitoring
tasks and predictive maintenance techniques when possible (e.g.
vibration analysis, process variable trending, PV analysis, sonic
analysis, oil analysis, and thermography)
q
Eliminate non-value added maintenance activities on equipment
which can be cost-effectively run without proactive maintenance
Use criticality analysis (RBI) to develop condition-based maintenance
plans for fixed equipment.
Undertake timely investigation of plant and equipment failures to:
Identify failure root causes and contributing factors.
q
Determine actions needed to prevent a re-occurrence.
q
Ensure that Action Plans are generated.
q
q
Ensure any recommendations are implemented within an agreed
time scale.
Findings and recommendations resulting from inspections and routine
maintenance of equipment must be reviewed, and the resulting
information is utilized in re-assessing:
The most appropriate maintenance and reliability techniques.
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
q
The frequency of inspection/overhaul.
q
Application of condition monitoring techniques.
q
Undertake timely and cost-effective replacement of plant equipment by
reviewing reliability and performance with respect to inspection and repair
histories, age, vendor support availability, and life cycle costs.
Ensure that the availability of materials and spares does not impact upon
plant reliability and production.
Undertake systematic review of the inspection scope and frequency for
each asset.
Undertake systematic review of the frequency, content and duration of
major turnarounds.
Eliminate intrusive maintenance and inspections where possible.
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Equipment will be operated and controlled within specified operating
envelopes and in accordance with regulatory requirements and design
specifications.
Use myPerformance to evaluate operator/technician performance relative
to equipment maintenance.

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Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy III. Related Key

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

III. Related Key Performance Indicators

In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Facility Availability, the following KPIs are suggested.

Key Performance Indicator

Target Value

Facility Availability

>98%

Overall Equipment Effectiveness

85%

Reliability of Critical Equipment

99%

Availability of Critical Equipment

>98%

Proactive Maintenance Cost

Site specific

Maintenance Cost per Capacity

Site specific

Reliability Analysis Program Cost

Site specific

See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS Program. This
See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS
Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the
target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are
specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.
IV. Processes and Tools
In order to improve performance within the Facility Availability CMS
Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools apply.
CMS Processes and Tools
1.
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)
2.
Knowledge Management
3.

Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)

4. Defect Elimination Program

5. Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection

6. Data Analysis

7. Operator Performed Maintenance

8. Planning and Scheduling

9. Spare Parts Management

10. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program

11. Risk Based Inspection (RBI)

12. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies

13. Campaign Maintenance

14. Re-deploy and Optimize Staffing

15. Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy 16. Common Maintenance

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

16. Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects

17. Capital Value Process for Turnarounds (CVP-TAR)

Related Processes and Tools

1. TeamShare

2. Training Program (Competency On Line)

3. Health, Safety, and Environment (gHSEr)

4. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM)

5. Choke Model

6. Capital Value Process (CVP)

See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for detailed information on each process.

and Tools section for detailed information on each process. bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April

bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Work Management I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Work Management

Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Work Management I. Overview Definition Work Management includes techniques

I. Overview

Definition

Work Management includes techniques applied to the organization and conduct of work for purposes of
Work Management includes techniques
applied to the organization and conduct of
work for purposes of maintaining
efficiency or effecting improvement.
Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management
Terms, www.pmforum.org
Work management is the efficient use of
personnel in the completion of valuable
tasks, making resources available when needed for timely work
completion.
Importance
Each operating facility will carry out the best-known reliability practices
that dramatically eliminate breakdowns and subsequent work, convert the
nature of maintenance activities from reactive to proactive, and maximize
equipment on-stream time. Each site should carry out repair maintenance
work using a planned approach that makes effective use of resources and
guarantees the quality of repairs.
II. Expectations

Business Units will be sufficiently staffed with well trained Maintenance and Reliability resources that address all equipment breakdowns and eliminate the true root cause in a timely manner.

Trained autonomous teams of cross-functional employees will be used to investigate and solve issues that affect equipment reliability.

Continuous and sustained effort will be directed to change the composition of maintenance and reliability activities from reactive repair of breakdowns to proactive PPM and condition monitoring.

Operating technicians will be involved in a level of equipment care that dramatically enhances their ability to operate equipment, monitor condition and avoid breakdowns.

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Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Minimize unplanned work

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Minimize unplanned work consistent with Business Strategies by proper prioritization of repairs and PPM activities.

Efficient use of resources, via effectively estimating the labor, equipment and materials required for efficient, predictive, preventive, and responsive maintenance.

A CMMS is used which supports the planning, scheduling, and work

documentation processes.

analysis tools for a best in class Maintenance and Reliability effort. And

all maintenance, operations, and engineering personnel are trained in its use.

It should also provide the reporting and data

Regular meetings are held at which operations, maintenance, and planning personnel can review, approve and schedule maintenance work.

Effective measurement of the planning effort. Contractors are selected and managed on the basis of
Effective measurement of the planning effort.
Contractors are selected and managed on the basis of quality, competency,
service, cost, and HSE performance.
Contractor agreements that include clear deliverables, performance
measures and standards, and compliance assurance.
The Statement of Requirements/Decision Support Package attached to
project work must recognize and integrate the plant’s strategy towards
maintenance, reliability, shutdowns and life cycle costs.
III. Related Key Performance Indicators

In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Work

Management, the following KPIs are suggested.

Key Performance Indicator

Target Value

Percent Planned Work

90%

Man-Hour Schedule Compliance

>80%

Overdue Safety Critical Equipment Work Orders

0

Maintenance Personnel Utilization (Wrench Time)

70%

Maintenance Personnel Utilization (Value Added Work)

90%

Man-Hour Backlog

30 Days/FTE

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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Percent Emergency

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Percent Emergency Maintenance <5% Percent Proactive Maintenance 65% Percent Prompted Corrective Maintenance 20%
Percent Emergency Maintenance
<5%
Percent Proactive Maintenance
65%
Percent Prompted Corrective
Maintenance
20%
Percent Breakdown Corrective
Maintenance
10%
Proactive Maintenance Man-Hours
Overdue
<5%
Corrective Maintenance Man-Hours
Overdue (non-emergency)
<15%
Estimated to Actual Proactive
Maintenance Man-Hours
+/- 5%
Estimated to Actual Corrective
Maintenance Man-Hours
+/- 20%
Maintenance Overtime
<5%
Contractor Cost
Site specific
Effectiveness of PM Program
Site specific
See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS
Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the
target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are
specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.
IV. Processes and Tools
In order to improve performance within the Work Management CMS
Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools apply.
CMS Processes and Tools
1. Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)

2.

3. Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)

4. Defect Elimination Program

5. Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection

6. Data Analysis

7. Operator Performed Maintenance

8. Planning and Scheduling

9. Spare Parts Management

Knowledge Management

10. Supply Chain Management

11. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program

12. Risk Based Inspection (RBI)

13. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies

14. Campaign Maintenance

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy 15. Redeploy and Optimize

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

15. Redeploy and Optimize Staffing

16. Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables

17. Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects

18. Capital Value Process for Turnarounds (CVP-TAR)

Related Processes and Tools

1. Succession Planning

2. TeamShare

3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance)

4. Training Program (Competency On Line)

5. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM)

6. Choke Model

See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for detailed information on each process.

and Tools section for detailed information on each process. bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April

bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Materials Management I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Materials Management

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Materials Management I. Overview Definitions Materials Management. The grouping
bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Materials Management I. Overview Definitions Materials Management. The grouping

I.

Overview

Definitions

Materials Management. The grouping of management functions supporting the complete cycle of material flow, from the purchase and internal control of production materials to the planning and control of work-in-process to the warehousing, shipping, and distribution of the finished product. This is also referred to as Business Logistics – the transportation and distribution of materials. Procurement and Purchasing are sub-systems to overall Materials Management.

Procurement. The business functions of procurement planning, purchasing, inventory control, traffic, receiving,
Procurement. The business functions of procurement planning,
purchasing, inventory control, traffic, receiving, incoming-inspection, and
salvage operations.
This is a term used often used to describe the tactical level and/or front-
end part of Materials Management.
Inventory Control. The activities and techniques of maintaining the
desired levels of items, whether raw materials, work-in-process, or
finished products.
This also applies to Operating Spares, and includes the elements of
classification, verification, inventory levels and reorder points, issuance,
and vendor arrangements.

Warehouse Management. The policies, procedures, and activities related to receiving, storing, and distribution of materials to and from production or distribution points. Because inventory is stored in warehouses, the physical management of inventory and warehousing are intimately connected. This is especially true when inventory is turned over quickly and the warehouse functions as a distribution center.

Operating Spares. The maintenance, repair, and operating supplies used in support of general operations and maintenance such as maintenance supplies, spare parts, and consumables used in the manufacturing process and supporting operations.

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Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Operating Spares does not

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Operating Spares does not include raw or intermediate materials incorporated into products.

Importance

Balancing customer service and costs against production requirements and equipment reliability (known or unknown) is a dynamic process, especially when striving for continuous improvement and cost reduction. Variables include:

q

Material quality and availability

q

Vendor qualification and reliability

q

Flexibility in storage facilities

q

Equipment reliability and flexibility

q

Production rates and product quality

q

Personnel and skills available

II. Expectations As each of bp’s business units strive to maximize profits they will have
II.
Expectations
As each of bp’s business units strive to maximize profits they will have at
least the following strategic expectations of material control:
Maximum customer service.
q
High efficiency / low operating costs.
q
Minimum inventory investment.
q
‘Just in Time’ materials strategy
q
Several things determine the right levels of inventory. Strategic objectives
and the resultant policies, systems, and procedures govern the inventory
control and levels in companies. The degree of discipline and
accountability against these elements also plays an important role.
Ultimately, the desired or accepted inventory levels are a result of

ensuring that needed items are immediately available while minimizing “money sitting on the shelf”. The balancing act falls into four categories. Inventory investment should be balanced with:

1. desired customer service levels

2. the impact of changes in production or maintenance activities

3. the cost of ordering and reordering

4. transportation and storage costs

ESMP/RCM will determine critical spares requirements. Analysis covers availability, lead times, cost, and risk to production.

CUSTOMER SERVICE is broadly defined to be the ability to satisfy the needs of customers. In inventory management or control, it is the

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy availability of items

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

availability of items when they are needed. For Operating Spares, it is the availability of supplies, spare parts, and tools for maintenance, repair, and operations. The availability of equipment when needed is directly linked to its reliability and maintenance, and is therefore the ultimate measure of providing customer service.

Inventories help to maximize customer service by protecting against uncertainty. As equipment reliability and maintenance planning and scheduling improve, uncertainty decreases and inventory needs are lessened.

Customer service is a measure of inventory-management effectiveness, and can be calculated in various ways. Order-filling time, stock-outs (number of, duration of), inventory turns, inventory levels or values, and inventory accuracy are some typical measures.

OPERATING EFFICIENCY is impacted by inventories in many ways. The most applicable example for Operating
OPERATING EFFICIENCY is impacted by inventories in many ways.
The most applicable example for Operating Spares items is an inventory
of spare parts and maintenance supplies. Inventory build-up provides a
buffer between functions and equipment operating at different rates thus
preventing their individual efficiencies to be hampered by the
inefficiencies of other operations. This is especially important for different
pieces of equipment or systems that have varying reliabilities. Also,
having needed parts and supplies in inventory and readily available
shortens the down time of equipment and the preparation time for repairs
and maintenance.

Other examples of how inventories impact efficiencies and operating costs include level-loading production to build anticipation inventory for seasonal demands. An application for Operating Spares items is found in the annual (or bi-annual, etc) shutdowns or turnarounds. Long-term planning allows efficient and cost-effective organization and accumulation of supplies, tool, parts, and even temporary personnel. Volume purchasing can also be an effective way to achieve lower item and purchasing costs, although the carrying costs of the inventories don’t always justify this strategy. A diligent cost-benefit analysis should be the basis for purchasing inventory.

INVENTORY INVESTMENT, while beneficial, comes at a price as mentioned above. The problem is to balance inventory investment (costs) with the level of customer service desired or needed. The lower the inventory, the higher the likelihood of a stockout. But, excessive inventories are not desirable either. High inventories not only come with higher costs, but excessive levels can also overload a system or warehouse, disrupting effective organization. Too much of a good thing is not a good thing.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Today, the term

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Today, the term “vendor” is sometimes replaced with “supplier” because of the connotation of a vendor being a sidewalk hot-dog seller. But both terms are used interchangeable in this course and when they are used in the workplaces.

Vendor stocking refers to situations when vendors stock items for a company either on the vendor’s site or the company’s site.

q

If

the items are stocked on the company’s site, the vendor is

usually allowed on the site to review stock levels and replenish stock. Arrangements for this include access limited to authorized and relevant areas, record keeping, inventory verification, and billing/payment options.

q

If

the items are held at the vendor’s site, they are usually identified

and held for the specific company according to arrangements made. In this case, when the
and held for the specific company according to arrangements
made. In this case, when the items are not on the company’s site,
but the company is depending on their availability, solid
arrangements and understandings would have to have been made
to ensure the availability. An element of this is how many of the
items the vendor is expected to have on hand at any time, agree-
upon reorder points, and the means and timeframe in which the
items can be moved from the vendor to the company when needed.
A company should treat vendor-site stocking as just another
warehouse site with all the same controls that their own warehouse
abides by.
Advantages of vendor-stocking arrangements
q
Uses less of a company’s own storage areas and material-handling
equipment
Uses less of a company’s own personnel time
q

q Vendor inventory controls may be better than the company’s own controls

Disadvantages of vendor-stocking arrangements

q

Liability and security issues of vendors on company property need

to

be addressed

q

Lack of hands-on control for vendor-stocked items

q

Access to vendor items may be inconsistent with needs (e.g., weekends, 3am, etc)

q

Vendor inventory controls may be worse than the company’s own controls

q

Excessive stocking costs (as much as 10% of an items cost)

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy The chart below

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

The chart below illustrates when spare parts should be held based on customer service, operating efficiency, inventory investment, and equipment criticality.

III. Related Key Performance Indicators In order to track the site performance on the CMS
III. Related Key Performance Indicators
In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Materials
Management, the following KPIs are suggested.
Key Performance Indicator
Target Value
Savings due to Preferred Providers
Site specific
Storehouse Cost per Inventory
Value
<35%
Storehouse Inventory Value per
Equipment Replacement Value
0.5%
SKU Stockouts
<1%
Inventory Turns per Year
>2
Parts Expedited
2%

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials
Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy See Appendix C for

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.

IV. Processes and Tools

In order to improve performance within the Materials Management CMS Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools apply:

CMS Processes and Tools

1. Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)

2. Knowledge Management

3. Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) 4. Defect Elimination Program 5.
3. Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered
Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)
4. Defect Elimination Program
5. Planning and Scheduling
6. Spare Parts Management
7. Supply Chain Management
8. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program
9. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies
10. Campaign Maintenance
11. Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects
Related Processes and Tools
1. Succession Planning
2. TeamShare
3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance)
4. Training Program (Competency On Line)

See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for detailed information on each process.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change
Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Change Management I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Change Management

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Change Management I. Overview Definition Change Management is ‘the key
bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Change Management I. Overview Definition Change Management is ‘the key

I. Overview

Definition

Change Management is ‘the key component’ when it comes to implementing the Common Maintenance Strategy. Sometimes it is used

as a catchall term to describe organizational change and the techniques to

achieve a successful outcome. At its heart, change management is a unique opportunity to encourage correct behaviors to build a tighter, more focused business using both activity-centered and results-driven programs aimed at strengthening fundamental corporate competitiveness.

Importance Change. It’s all around us, and accelerating. Maintenance and reliability organizations are no different.
Importance
Change. It’s all around us, and accelerating. Maintenance and reliability
organizations are no different. To survive, organizations must innovate,
adapt, and master change as a tool for continuous improvement. For
example:
Over 400,000 businesses failed during the first half of the ‘90’s
q
Merger and acquisition activity is at an all time high
q
85% of US organizations now outsource some services
q
45% of US companies have reduced their workforces every year
q
This section provides the precepts for driving change - for making it work
for the employees and for the company.

II. Expectations

Don’t let the old way dictate the better way

Contemporary American observer Will Rogers said, “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” Sitting there is the ‘status quo.’ In order to drive change, we can not continue doing things the same old way; after all, that is what produced the current status quo.

A humorous definition of insanity that applies directly to change

management is ‘doing the same things over and over again and expecting

different results’. In order to change our results, we must change our behaviors.

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Business Focus bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating

Business Focus

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Spending too long trying to understand where the department is right now
allows the status quo to entrench itself. It is a stalling tactic that allows
those who are resistant to change to slow the process.
Don’t waste precious time and resources by looking backward. Keep the
focus on the future vision – where the business wants to be performing.
The current vision for bp is to be the Great Operator – an operating
environment without defects. The vision is to improve corporate value by:
increasing production and operating efficiency
q
lowering unit operating costs
q
improving integrity management
q
establishing an engaged and competent workforce
q
All business activities should be directed towards the vision.
Destabilize to promote movement
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change
Management
Continuous
Improvement
Organizational change is frequently required to maintain progress towards
the corporate vision. The Great Operator (GO) Strategy will strengthen
the company and increase shareholder value.
Existing corporate structures are oftentimes not ideally suited for change.
Attempts at incremental change or “tweaking” the organizational culture
usually die from lack of consistent energy. Going slow allows the old
bureaucracy to overtake the change effort. The entire company must be
aware of the vision and its benefits in order to understand why
organizational changes are necessary. A streamlined business model leads
to quick decisions and rapid movement.
Be Firm
In a climate of accelerating change, the team leader’s job is to help the
organization, business unit, and department keep up. If the culture doesn’t
adapt rapidly – the organization loses.
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
In times of rapid change the organization must do what works, not what
feels good. This goes for processes, policies, and people.
Team leaders must be focused on the company’s vision and goals. They
must care enough to take the tough, unpopular stance so the organization
can survive. Don’t lead people on. Present them with the facts, goals, and

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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change
Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy objectives. Seeking to

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

objectives. Seeking to appease the crowd by taking it slow only compounds impending disaster.

Team leaders must be held accountable for making the necessary changes and ensure clear roles and responsibilities are defined and adhered to throughout the organization.

Change the reward system

Incentivize positive behaviors that create progress towards the vision. Do not reward resistance or the old manner of doing things.

Restructure the rewards and sanctions to make them consistent with the new priorities, goals, and values.

Align maintenance and reliability, HSE, and project management teams based on their ability to achieve substantial behavioral changes toward supporting the common maintenance strategy.

Keep score As detailed elsewhere in the Common Maintenance Strategy, what gets measured, gets managed.
Keep score
As detailed elsewhere in the Common Maintenance Strategy, what gets
measured, gets managed. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are vital to
the success of any reliability and maintenance strategy. Change
management is no different.
Set incremental targets and measure the change. Reward results and the
attitude of the organization will shift in the direction of the change.
Measuring also enables leadership to track progress to see where the
program or process is bogging down, where the resistance lies.
Measurement provides the best form of feedback on performance.

Promote vision

The job as a team leader is to promote the vision of the Great Operator and the supporting common maintenance strategy. Shifting away from the concepts contained here is jarring, demoralizing, and there is a tendency to become disoriented. Keep the focus.

Leadership support is vital to ensuring the new programs success. Without leadership support, excitement, and faith, employees will experience fear, doubt, and will resist the change.

Free employees from constraints

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Organization
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Work Management
Materials Management
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Management
Continuous
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19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy “But that’s the way

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

“But that’s the way we’ve always done it” is the battle cry of resistance to change. It is the axiom of the bureaucracy. “Not invented here” syndrome is another obstacle to progress. Learning from others is necessary for rapid and effective change.

Simplify. Simplify. Simplify. Eliminate unnecessary policies and procedures. Don’t keep old rituals that support the old way of doing things.

Stripping away bureaucracy forces people to change the way business is done.

Maximum communication

Non-stop two-way communication is the only way that any change management endeavor will succeed. Specifically, information that needs to be shared with the workforce includes:

The rationale behind the change q The facts (market demands, competition) q The details of
The rationale behind the change
q
The facts (market demands, competition)
q
The details of the change and how each person is affected
q
The expectations for each person
q
Never stop expounding the vision. Communication is what keeps
ambiguity and confusion at bay.
Maximize involvement
Involve everyone in the organization from the newest maintenance
technician to the master craftsman. Hold the employees personally
accountable for transforming the organization.

Assign specific responsibility for making the required changes to each level of the organization – from the top to the bottom.

Change structure and administration

The organization will not be able to break the ties of the ‘way we’ve always done it’ if it continues to operate within the same structure that created the bottleneck.

q

Design organizational capabilities to execute CMS processes, which reduce operating cost and maximize efficiency

q

Realign function to breakdown departmental barriers

q

Improve cross-team, departmental communication

q

Alter approval processes

q

Reengineer work processes

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Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change
Management
Continuous
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19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy The key here is

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

The key here is to alter the structure and administrative constraints that support the old way of doing things and reinforcing the new program.

Lead by example

Team leaders must “walk the talk.” Every employee will be watching how they manage change themselves. Are they actively involved, trending the required KPIs, joining RCFA studies and Equipment Improvement Teams, promoting planning and scheduling, etc.?

If the behavior of the team leader portrays the programs contained within the Common Maintenance Strategy, then it’s fair to expect the employees to do so as well.

Win quick

Perhaps the hardest task of a team leader undertaking a change management project is the
Perhaps the hardest task of a team leader undertaking a change
management project is the necessity of achieving measurable results
quickly. It is vital to obtain early proof that each program is worth the
effort. The longer without evidence that the benefits exceed the costs, the
harder it will be to stay the course with superiors or subordinates.
Set incremental targets and express victories monetarily at every
opportunity. Financial returns on investment are the surest measurement
of success.
Educate and Train
Employees are better equipped to support change if they are trained.
Training builds confidence, competency, and a willingness to accept
change.

In order to fully accept and implement the common maintenance strategy, employees must be trained in each of the toolbox processes to ensure success.

The Change Management Cycle

The effort of change management is essentially a continuous improvement cycle:

q

Plan

q

Execute

q

Analyze

q

Improve

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19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Team leaders evaluate the

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Team leaders evaluate the current status quo and develop an implementation plan to promote progress towards the vision. In this case, the implementation plan is the processes within the Common Maintenance Strategy. An assessment helps identify performance gaps and what specific processes need to be implemented.

Once identified, leadership must approve and actively support the implementation plan. In order to demonstrate commitment to the CMS, use myPerformance to set objectives for team leaders that correspond to positive trends on the CMS KPIs. This is essentially the leaders’ approval of the implementation steps. Specific responsibility for the execution of the CMS plan will be delegated down the organization, but ultimate accountability for the results resides with the facility leadership team.

Track the performance of the organization and modify the implementation plan as required to maintain progress towards the Great Operator vision. Reward positive behaviors quickly, specifically, and publicly. Reward and recognition for positive behaviors can range from the simple (verbal or written praise, small gift) to the significant (bonus, promotion, large gift). As the changes become highly visible, the workforce becomes more engaged and change becomes easier.

III. Related Key Performance Indicators In order to track the site performance on the CMS
III. Related Key Performance Indicators
In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Change
Management, the following KPIs are suggested.
Key Performance Indicator
Target Value
Key Personnel Roles and
Accountabilities
100%
Maintenance Training Costs
40 Hrs/FTE
CMS Assessment Score
70%

See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.

IV. Processes and Tools

In order to improve performance within the Change Management CMS Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools apply.

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Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change
Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy CMS Processes and Tools

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

CMS Processes and Tools

1. Knowledge Management

2. Defect Elimination Program

3. Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection

4. Data Analysis

5. Operator Performed Maintenance

6. Planning and Scheduling

7. Spare Parts Management

8. Supply Chain Management

9. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program
10. Risk Based Inspection (RBI)
11. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies
12. Campaign Maintenance
13. Redeploy and Optimize Staffing Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables

14.

Related Processes and Tools 1. Succession Planning 2. TeamShare 3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance) 4. Training
Related Processes and Tools
1. Succession Planning
2. TeamShare
3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance)
4. Training Program (Competency On Line)
5. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM)
6. Choke Model
7. Operations Value Process (OVP)
See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for
detailed information on each process.

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Change Management
Continuous
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19 CMS Processes
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Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Continuous Improvement I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Continuous Improvement

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Continuous Improvement I. Overview Definition There are several techniques that
bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Continuous Improvement I. Overview Definition There are several techniques that

I. Overview

Definition

There are several techniques that apply to maintenance performance. Their common goal is to ‘continually improve’ that performance by:

q Dealing with each type of failure most appropriately, in the most cost-effective way. q
q
Dealing with each type of failure most appropriately, in the most
cost-effective way.
q
Enhancing productivity with a more proactive and planned
approach.
q
Ensuring active support and cooperation of people from
maintenance, materials, operations, technical and administrative
functions.
Uptime Strategies for Excellence in Maintenance
Management, John Dixon Campbell
Importance
Without continuous improvement in the delivery of maintenance, there is
stagnation and complacency. There are opportunities in every
maintenance operation. A 1995 study of maintenance organizations in
Canada revealed:
Possible Savings of Maintenance Budget Dollars
39%
Reengineering and maintenance improvements
26%
PM improvement and correct application of PM
27%
More extensive application of predictive maintenance
7%
Store room improvements

Continuous improvement is the only antidote to the constant pressure of competition. It is essential that management realizes that continuous improvement in the maintenance department is everyone’s business and can only be achieved with everyone’s input.

II. Expectations

There are five basic and generic steps to continuous improvement.

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Continuous
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19 CMS Processes
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Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes Commitment bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Team leaders

Commitment

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Team leaders will commit the time to do all necessary analysis. They will allow and encourage worker participation, involve other departments. Commitment is for the long term.

Measurement

Effective measurement is fundamental to effective continuous improvement. The KPIs identified in this document are all measures to determine if an operation is truly improving. The assessments also used herein are a form of benchmarking to determine current position and improvement.

Information

All value-added data contributes to effective use of information. Examine all production data, all minor
All value-added data contributes to effective use of information. Examine
all production data, all minor jam-ups, all failures, all short repairs, all PM
activity, and every other maintenance event. The CMS Virtuous Cycle is
the model for enabling continuous improvement in reference to the CMS.

Data Analysis

The organization is expected to review and assess production losses from six different points of view:

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Work Management
Materials Management
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Continuous
Improvement
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Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy 1. Economic - What

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

1. Economic - What is the direct cost and indirect (production/revenue loss) of the incident? What is the projected ROI?

2. Maintenance – How disruptive is the breakdown? What is the root cause of the failure?

3. Statistical – How often does the incident occur? Is there a pattern or trend?

4. Engineering – What was the mode of the failure? Why did the breakdown take place?

5. Operations – How does this event impact operation? Is inadequate operator/technician training a cause of a contributor?

6. Marketing/Business – What is the impact of this failure on the customer? Can this event impact quality?

The organization must also review data regarding facility optimization.

q

Identify opportunities to reduce the frequency of data collection for items that are routinely not in an alarm condition.

q Identify optimized equipment intervention times based on condition monitoring results. Action Based on the
q Identify optimized equipment intervention times based on
condition monitoring results.
Action
Based on the results gleaned from the investigation phase, improvements
can be started in any or all of the following areas:
q
Modify PM or maintenance procedures re. Add or delete tasks,
modify frequency
q
Modify the equipment re. Improve/add equipment or remove the
source of the problem
Modify a part or product re. Make the product easier to produce
q
q
Modify the production process re. Improve the process by allowing
greater variation in materials or new technology

Results

Following the steps detailed in the CMS Virtuous Cycle should yield continuous improvement in the different steps shown in the cycle:

q

Optimized maintenance activities

q

Improved maintenance efficiency

q

Optimized manpower levels

q

Improved equipment reliability and availability

q

Optimized cost management

q

Engaged and effective workforce

q

Satisfied customers

Other positive results that will occur include improved performance in:

q HSE and integrity management

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Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Schedule compliance

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

q

Schedule compliance

q

Plan attainment

q

Resource utilization

q

Workforce competencies

III.

Related Key Performance Indicators

In order to track the site performance on the CMS Element Continuous Improvement, the following KPIs are suggested.

Key Performance Indicator Target Value Availability Improvement Site specific Reliability Improvement Site specific
Key Performance Indicator
Target Value
Availability Improvement
Site specific
Reliability Improvement
Site specific
Maintenance Utilization Improvement
Site specific
Schedule Compliance Improvement
Site specific
Mean Time To Repair (MTTR)
Site specific
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF)
for Critical Equipment
Site specific
See Appendix C for detailed information on all the KPIs for the CMS
Program. This information includes the formula to calculate each KPI, the
target value and desired trend, and what CMS Processes and Tools are
specifically recommended to improve performance for each KPI.
IV. Processes and Tools
In order to improve performance within the Continuous Improvement
CMS Element, the following CMS and Related Processes and Tools
apply:

CMS Processes and Tools

1. Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)

2. Knowledge Management

3. Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan/Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)

4. Defect Elimination Program

5. Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection

6. Data Analysis

7. Operator Performed Maintenance

8. Planning and Scheduling

9. Spare Parts Management

10. Supply Chain Management

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Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
19 CMS Processes
9 Related Processes
Improvement 19 CMS Processes 9 Related Processes bp – Common Maintenance Strategy 11. Quality Assurance and

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

11. Quality Assurance and Precision Maintenance Program

12. Risk Based Inspection (RBI)

13. Generic Equipment Maintenance Strategies

14. Campaign Maintenance

15. Redeploy and Optimize Staffing

16. Roles, Accountabilities, and Deliverables

17. Common Maintenance Strategy for New Projects

18. Capital Value Process for Turnarounds (CVP-TAR)

Related Processes and Tools

1. Succession Planning

2. TeamShare

3. Performance Evaluation (myPerformance)

4. Training Program (Competency On Line)

5.

Health, Safety, and Environment (gHSEr)

6. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM) 7. Choke Model 8. Operations Value Process (OVP) 9.
6. Process Safety Integrity Management (PSIM)
7. Choke Model
8. Operations Value Process (OVP)
9. Capital Value Process (CVP)
See the appropriate topics in the CMS Processes and Tools section for
detailed information on each process.

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy CMS Processes and Tools bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date:

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

CMS Processes and Tools

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy CMS Processes and Tools bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April
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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Increase Production and Operating

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating
Computerized Maintenance
Management System (CMMS)
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
I.
Introduction
The goal of a Computerized Maintenance Management System is to cost-
effectively and efficiently aid in the management of all maintenance
activities, including:
Work Order Accounting
q
Planning and Scheduling
q
Inventory Control
q
Procurement
q
Reporting
q
Overview
A
computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) is commonly
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
recognized as a maintenance and performance improvement tool. A
CMMS is a tool, which alone provides little or no value until information
is
captured and reported. It is the strategy, processes, and procedures that
add value to the CMMS.
The term Enterprise Asset Management System (EAMS) is used
interchangeably with CMMS within the Common Maintenance Strategy.
Modern asset management requires accurate and effective information
flow to decision-makers unlike manual paper systems, which commonly
provide inaccurate and ineffective information flow.
Industry pace setters are cognizant of the untapped wealth of information
that lays hidden in a data repository such as a CMMS. Pace setters have
also realized that performance improvement can only occur when facility
personnel effectively use information to achieve business goals.
Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Today’s asset team leaders rely upon computerized maintenance
management systems to gather data and transform data into knowledge.
Pace setters within industry require accessible and accurate information to
assist business team leaders, engineers and facility personnel to make well
informed business decisions concerning capital improvements, equipment
reliability, material procurement and resource management.

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Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Definition bp – Common Maintenance Strategy A Computerized

Definition

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

A Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) is an electronic data and information management and reporting system.

II. Objectives

The owner specifications and CMMS design should be configured to allow for maximum functionality. Included in these functions are:

q

Hierarchical listing of company maintained equipment in the asset register

q

Asset accounting such as purchase price, depreciation rates, etc.

q

Equipment vendor information such as part number, cost, site delivery time

q

Minimum and maximum on-shelf count

Warranty documentation and tracking q q Documentation (job plans) of scheduled planned maintenance activities
Warranty documentation and tracking
q
q
Documentation (job plans) of scheduled planned maintenance
activities
Scheduling abilities for planned work
q
q
Equipment failure codes for accurate documentation of corrective
maintenance history
q
Preventive and predictive maintenance procedure and
documentation control
Documentation control of engineered equipment redesign
q
Personnel calendars of company and contract employees
q
Personnel training qualifications
q
Maintenance cost statistics and accounting
q
Inventory control, requisitioning, and stock procurement
q
Analysis and reporting tools for maintenance performance.
q
q
Equipment priority and criticality matrix such as Ranking Index
for Maintenance Expenditures (RIME)

III. Process Model

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Continuous
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Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Components of CMMS

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Components of CMMS

Components of a comprehensive CMMS include: q Work Order Management (requests, work history, identification of
Components of a comprehensive CMMS include:
q
Work Order Management (requests, work history, identification of
failure type and causes)
q
Planning and Scheduling (standard work plans, pick lists,
scheduling tracking)
q
Materials and Inventory Management (spare parts, reordering,
optimized warehousing)
Labor (rates, hours, overtime)
q
Cost and Budgets (cost tracking, work approval)
q
q
Equipment History (‘as found’/’as left’ conditions, work
performed, recommendations)
Preventive Maintenance (plans and schedules, tracking)
q
q
Equipment Identification (master equipment list, type, hierarchical
structure, equipment status)
q
Knowledge Management (work history, lessons learned,
procedures, standards, guidelines)
Personnel Information (training, qualifications, calendars)
q
q
Procurement (requisitions, purchase orders, restocking capabilities,
approved vendors)
Reporting (reports for all sections, KPIs)
q
Financials (interface to financial accounting system)
q
Business Objectives (performance targets, HSE goals)
q

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Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy IV. Implementation

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

IV.

Implementation

Analyze

Determine the needs of the facility. For any amount of maintenance work and reliability reporting, a computer-based system is justified.

Design

Develop work flow processes that incorporate the effective use of the CMMS. The CMMS is the backbone to effective maintenance management. The idiom ‘junk in, junk out’ applies nowhere better than here. Maintenance work processes must fully use the capabilities of the CMMS, especially in terms of planning, inventory management, and work history documentation. Develop procedures to populate database and keep it updated via periodic reviews or change requests.

Design training programs for users of the CMMS. Training topics should include: Access to the
Design training programs for users of the CMMS. Training topics should
include:
Access to the system
q
Data entry and retrieval
q
Reporting capabilities
q
Expectations for minimum acceptable level of detail entered
q
q
Who to contact to make changes (i.e. add equipment or failure
types)
Who to contact to troubleshoot problems with the system
q
Consider developing a computer-based training (CBT) program for the
CMMS. Internal experts and external consultants are readily available to
develop these training materials.

Develop

Develop simplified reports within the CMMS to aid in the rapid retrieval of information. These reports should be able to generate:

q

Backlog Status

q

Inventory counts and storehouse costs

q

Reliability in MTBF and failure type/rate for each equipment type

q

Bad actors list

q

Planned and actual material and labor costs

q

Overtime rate

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Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Implement bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Evaluate the

Implement

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Evaluate the performance of the existing CMMS at the facility. If necessary, plan a switch. If the CMMS is not being fully utilized, review existing work processes to determine if these features need to be included in maintenance workflow. The CMMS is the documentation of all things done by the maintenance department – preserve that history well.

Maximo is the preferred maintenance management system in bp Exploration and Production. See current version 5.0 on MRO Software website www.mro.com.

Evaluate

Evaluate the effectiveness of the CMMS by verifying its performance against several measures:

Efficient data entry and retrieval q Rapid and complete reporting ability q Small amount of
Efficient data entry and retrieval
q
Rapid and complete reporting ability
q
Small amount of training required to fully utilize system
q
Low computer systems administrator upkeep required
q
For CMMS best practices, see website
http://aberdeen.bpweb.bp.com/myplace/maintnet/
For iMax (Maximo) implementation information, see website
http://aberdeen.bpweb.bp.com/myplace/imax/
V. CMS Elements Improved by Computerized
Maintenance Management System

The CMS Elements that can be improved by the Computerized Maintenance Management System include:

q

Leadership and Organization – Effective use of the CMMS provides the means of reviewing historical data to drive down maintenance costs.

q

Facility Availability – Details around common failure modes can be used to proactively address potential equipment problems.

q

Work Management – Optimized planning and improves the productivity of the workforce.

q

Materials Management – Computerized storehouse inventory control and procurement dramatically improves spare parts management.

q

Continuous Improvement – Historical data, planning and scheduling, inventory control, accounting, etc. are all improved by

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Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Computerized
Maintenance
Management System
(CMMS)
Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy the use of computers.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

the use of computers. Improved control over these activities improves maintenance performance in the field, which improves the facility’s performance.

in the field, which improves the facility’s performance. bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1,

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Knowledge
Management
Management Continuous Improvement Knowledge Management bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Knowledge Management I.

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Knowledge Management

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Knowledge Management I. Introduction The goal is to have highly knowledgeable

I. Introduction

The goal is to have highly knowledgeable people who can operate and maintain. The trend towards a more highly skilled workforce makes it imperative to have a system for maintenance knowledge that has instant access, high integrity and actually helps people make decisions.

Overview

In 1993 bp Exploration organized its regional operating centers into forty- two separate business assets or a federation of assets. Each of these units was to have the freedom to develop processes and solutions appropriate to their particular problems. The best and most adaptable local innovations could be used elsewhere in the larger company. In effect, bp would be able to draw on the variety and creative power of forty-two moderate- sized companies. bp wanted to combine the agility of a small company with the resources of a large one.

Definition Knowledge is a fluid mix of framed experience, values, contextual information, and expert insight
Definition
Knowledge is a fluid mix of framed experience, values, contextual
information, and expert insight that provides a framework for evaluating
and incorporating new experiences and information. It originates and is
applied in the minds of knowers. In organizations, it often becomes
embedded not only in documents or repositories but also in organizational
routines, processes, practices, and norms.
Working Knowledge, Davenport and Prusak

II. Objectives

Knowledge of maintenance benchmarking, best distinctive practices, and expert listings will be open to everyone who needs the information to do their job better. This knowledge should be linked to the computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) as an aid to actual work instructions, managed for accuracy and applicability, and be directed at achieving business goals.

The computerized maintenance management system will be linked to Maintenance Plans, engineering documentation, and other maintenance

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy documents. The vision is to have computerized maintenance information completely

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

documents. The vision is to have computerized maintenance information completely accessible at the workplace. Assuring
documents. The vision is to have computerized maintenance information
completely accessible at the workplace.
Assuring personnel have access and know how to use the system
q
Assuring they are expected to utilize this resource
q
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Assuring they will participate in system upkeep and accuracy
q
Knowledge originates and resides in people’s minds. Members of
knowledge communities should be identified and linked with technology.
Knowledge sharing requires trust. Build relationships through actual and
virtual face-to-face meetings.
Technology enables new knowledge behaviors. Use computerized
maintenance management systems and internal cyber and web based
assets for collaboration and communication.
Knowledge sharing must be encouraged and rewarded. Training and upper
management support must emphasize the importance of new behaviors.
Management support and resources are essential. Upper management must
initiate the projects and authorize funds for the core team.
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
The businesses will support people to bring best distinctive practices
forward to the exploration, production and maintenance community,
allowing the time, money, and resources to accomplish this sharing and
dissemination.
III.
Process Model (Work Flow Diagram)
Knowledge Management Project Flow
Knowledge Management Project Flow
Structure
Structure
Structure
Define
Define
Define
Rate
Rate
Rate
Implement
Implement
Implement
Link
Link
Link
Knowledge
Knowledge
Knowledge
Knowledge
Knowledge
Knowledge
Performance
Performance
Performance
knowledge
knowledge
knowledge
Knowledge to
Knowledge to
Knowledge to
competencies
competencies
competencies
required
required
required
To knowledge
To knowledge
To knowledge
competencies
competencies
competencies
Training
Training
Training
Knowledge
Management
Link knowledge, competencies,
Link knowledge, competencies,
Link knowledge, competencies,
information, data and expertise to on-line
information, data and expertise to on-line
information, data and expertise to on-line
(CMMS) system to provide feedback
(CMMS) system to provide feedback
(CMMS) system to provide feedback

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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Knowledge
Management
Management Continuous Improvement Knowledge Management bp – Common Maintenance Strategy IV. Implementation

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

IV.

Implementation

Analyze

Determine where knowledge useful to business goals is located or stored. These knowledge repositories can be in almost any form but generally follow three distinct areas:

q

q

External knowledge (example: competitive intelligence, training workshops, publications, presentations, OEM recommendations, vendor supplied data)

Structured internal knowledge (example: work processes, engineering and design standards and practices, internal inspection reports, RCFA reports, PPM trend data, work histories, training programs. Outside of the commonly found knowledge repositories, bp has also developed a Competency on Line skill matrices. Within the skill matrices bp has clearly defined five competence levels within its operating organization as follows.

1. Awareness-the employee should possess a basic understanding of the relevant concepts and apply the
1.
Awareness-the employee should possess a basic
understanding of the relevant concepts and apply the
concepts in their work environment.
2.
Basic Application- the employee should possess a practical
understanding of concepts and effectively participates in
their implementation according to the requirements defined
in the related processes.
3.
Skillful Application-the employee should possess a
thorough understanding of relative concepts and be
competent to facilitate and mentor others in the concepts.
4.
Mastery- the employee proactively uses their relevant
skills, to provide significant input to improve work
processes, applicable tools and applications.
5.
Expert- the employee is the primary driver of continuous

improvement in relevant concepts. Employee provides innovative thinking and influences relative concepts and company strategies.

q Informal internal knowledge (example: lessons learned, after action reports or post turnaround critiques, visual workplace for field personnel)

Design

The most efficient method of attaching or inputting disparate forms of information and data that then becomes knowledge is to attach or link a Microsoft Word template form to a computerized maintenance management system either as part of an equipment record, or job plan.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Knowledge
Management
Management Continuous Improvement Knowledge Management bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Knowledge management

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Knowledge management assists in the sharing of information and data that can then be converted by the user to knowledge. Linking is just data and information stowage, using the information converts it to knowledge.

Develop

q

An “expert” network of employees within the normal work structure to seek out and submit new knowledge

q

Develop internal document repositories based on the results of the analyses

q

Develop a lessons learned knowledge base to capture major data and information from unique events

q

Develop single point training lesson plans that provide high-level descriptions of the knowledge management processes and goals to educate all personnel

Implement Knowledge management should start with a recognized business problem that relates to knowledge. Customer
Implement
Knowledge management should start with a recognized business problem
that relates to knowledge. Customer defections, poorly designed products,
losses of key personnel, or a lower “win” rate for service engagements,
poor job plans, lack of skills or technical expertise at various levels, or
excessive turnover of personnel are all business problems that might be
traced to poor knowledge management.
Success in implementing knowledge management processes can be
described by nine factors:
q
q

Knowledge-oriented culture – The absence of knowledge inhibitors in the culture. People are not afraid or resentful of the company and do not fear that sharing knowledge will cost them their jobs

Technical and organizational infrastructure – A uniform set of technologies for desktop computing and communications (re. Microsoft Office, Lotus Notes, Computerized Maintenance Management System). An established set of roles, organizational structures and skills from which an individual project can benefit

q

Senior management support – Team leaders must communicate to the organization that knowledge manage and organizational learning are critical to success; clearing the way and providing funding for infrastructure; clarifying the type of knowledge most important to the company (Like CMS)

q

Link to business goals – Benefits can be direct, i.e. money saved or earned; or indirect i.e. reduced cycle time, customer satisfaction, reduced Mean Time for Repair (MTFR)

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Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Knowledge
Management
Management Continuous Improvement Knowledge Management bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Process orientation

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

q

Process orientation – Knowledge management implementation must support business processes, and reliability and maintenance work practices

q

Clarity of vision – Define the language and objectives in terms of reliability and maintenance KPIs

q

Motivational aids – Knowledge is intimately bound to people’s egos. Create motivational aids to foster, create, and share knowledge

q

Some level of knowledge structure – All employees must be capable of inputting data and information that can be translated into knowledge.

q

Multiple channels for knowledge transfer – Templates, after action reports and lessons learned; post incident or shutdown critiques all are channels for knowledge transfer.

Evaluate

Effective knowledge management programs are evaluated using KPIs established for the particular element being improved
Effective knowledge management programs are evaluated using KPIs
established for the particular element being improved and through
assessment procedures.
For the Global Maintenance Network, see website
http://maintenance.bpweb.bp.com/
There are also numerous websites available outside of the bp intranet with
valuable information about maintenance and reliability practices.
V. CMS Elements Improved by Knowledge
Management

ALL CMS Elements can be improved by using the knowledge management process.

q

Leadership and Organization – Valuable internal knowledge, such as lessons learned, helps reduce overall maintenance costs by eliminating poor practices.

q

Facility Availability – Visual workplace operating instructions and related success stories help identify root causes of equipment failures. Using existing information improves the efficiency of eliminating defects, which improves equipment reliability.

q

Work Management – By learning from past mistakes and developing internal training programs, planning and scheduling can be optimized within a facility.

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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Knowledge
Management
Management Continuous Improvement Knowledge Management bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Materials Management

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

q

Materials Management – Readily available knowledge can help improve spare parts quality and strengthen relationships with preferred providers.

q

Change Management – Understanding the internal workings of a facility helps management avoid creating initiatives that do not last (‘flavor of the month’ syndrome).

q

Continuous Improvement – By maintaining and dispersing valuable knowledge throughout the organization, knowledge grows. Learning from the lessons of others helps avoid the same mistakes. Retaining lessons learned is required for continuous improvement.

lessons learned is required for continuous improvement. bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan and
Reliability Centered
Maintenance (ESMP/RCM)
I.
Introduction
The goal of the Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan (ESMP) and
Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) programs is to optimize
proactive maintenance activities, which will decrease maintenance
spending while improving equipment reliability and availability.
Extensive proactive maintenance programs ensure a maintenance
philosophy shift from reactive to condition-based repairs.
Overview
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
The ESMP and RCM processes are similar in that they each determine the
criticality, analyze the failure modes and effects, and recommend
proactive maintenance tasks for individual pieces of equipment. The
processes are focused on equipment reliability and preserving the
availability of the equipment function, which means preventing the effects
of the failure, not necessarily the failure itself. Specific items addressed
during each process include:
Equipment criticality based on risk to the function, in terms of:
q
Impact on safety
Impact on environment
Production loss
Maintenance cost
q
Proactive maintenance (preventive and predictive maintenance and
condition monitoring) activities for maintenance and operations
personnel
Engineering opportunities
q
Spare parts requirements
q
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Definition
The RCM process was modified for use in the exploration, production,
and process industries in the early 1990s. Streamlined RCM is variation
of classical RCM, but focuses on common and expected failure modes for
equipment and takes credit for operator/technician response and

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Lower Unit Operating
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Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy equipment redundancy

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

equipment redundancy where appropriate. Cross-functional teams answer specific questions in order to generate an optimized proactive maintenance program for each individual piece of equipment.

The ESMP process was derived from the RCM process in that it reviews equipment individually and determines the appropriate type of proactive maintenance (preventive maintenance, predictive maintenance, and condition monitoring) needed. The database also captures engineering improvement opportunities. The ESMP process uses a cross-functional team and is much quicker, but less detailed than the RCM process. The ESMP process meets all requirements established by Process Safety Integrity Management and the Great Operator Initiative and is the preferred tool for conducting reliability analyses.

Both processes use computer software to manage the information generated for each piece of equipment.

A decision tree has been created to help differentiate between the use of ESMP and
A decision tree has been created to help differentiate between the use of
ESMP and RCM. Cyber-Alpha and Cyber-RCM are other reliability
analysis techniques that are used to perform maintenance reviews and cost
benefit analyses. The programs help identify maintenance activities,
which, although within a production critical system, are of low value and
can thus be removed from the proactive maintenance program. Cyber-
Alpha and Cyber-RCM are rarely used. ESMP and RCM are the methods
of choice for equipment reliability analysis.

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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy II. Objectives Proactive

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

II. Objectives

Proactive maintenance uses existing technologies and the knowledge and experience of engaged operators/technicians and craftpersons to identify equipment component deterioration at its earliest detectable stages and take corrective actions to maximize the availability of the equipment. These corrective actions include adjusting operating conditions, performing advanced condition monitoring tasks, and removing the equipment from service to complete a smaller repair (as opposed to allowing the component to run to failure, which could require a more extensive repair).

Several objectives are realized upon the completion of an ESMP or RCM study, which include:

q

Establishing the criticality of every piece of equipment within a study

q Determining the source of criticality – Safety, Environmental, Production, or Economic q Creating a
q
Determining the source of criticality – Safety, Environmental,
Production, or Economic
q
Creating a ranked list of critical equipment based on risk – the
probability of failure and consequence of failure
q
Creating an optimized proactive maintenance plan for each piece
of equipment, including spare parts requirements
q
Eliminating non-value added maintenance activities on equipment
which can be cost-effectively run without proactive maintenance
q
Emphasizing condition monitoring and predictive maintenance
technologies over preventive time-based maintenance activities
q
Identifying one-time equipment improvement opportunities to
address design or procedural issues
Creating an environment for reliability analysis
q
Creating effective training material for unit personnel
q

III. Process Models (Work Flow Diagrams)

A general work process diagram that illustrates the benefits of the ESMP/RCM process is shown below. There are three steps involved:

q

Stage One – Complete an ESMP/RCM analysis to develop a comprehensive proactive maintenance program.

q

Stage Two – Review spare parts and staffing levels.

q

Stage Three – Review systems to institute a continuous improvement cycle.

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Following are process

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Following are process models for the ESMP and RCM

Following are process models for the ESMP and RCM processes.

Following are process models for the ESMP and RCM processes. bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date:

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy bp Common Maintenance

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy bp Common Maintenance Strategy Revision Date: April 1, 2003

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Reliability Centered

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Model

Strategy Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Model Alternative Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Model
Alternative Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Model
Alternative Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Model

Both ESMP and RCM processes follow the same logical process – define the function, identify the failure modes and effects, determine the criticality, and specify the proactive maintenance program.

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bp – Common Maintenance Strategy IV. Implementation Analyze Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

IV. Implementation Analyze Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve
IV.
Implementation
Analyze
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Reliability analysis is performed on distinct process areas or operating
units, which includes vessels, rotating equipment, other mechanical
equipment, and instrumentation. Review the facility for distinct areas of
equipment (i.e. operating units) and create a prioritized list for full-facility
ESMP/RCM implementation. Units analyzed first are usually production
critical units, not utilities-type units. Other items to consider when
prioritizing the ESMP/RCM studies include unit reliability history, unit
maintenance costs, downtime schedule, and personnel availability.
Designate a process leader/champion who will have prime responsibility
for organizing the cross-functional teams, making meeting locations
available, serving as a focal point for questions during the ESMP/RCM
process, and ensuring the recommendations are forwarded to the
appropriate personnel for actual implementation.
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Ensure the understanding that reliability analysis is the selected method
for ensuring the continued operation of the facility by increasing
equipment availability and decreasing maintenance spending.
Design
The ESMP and RCM processes use cross-functional teams with a
facilitator familiar with the process. Facilitators can be contracted from
reliability consulting firms or they can be trained personnel within the
facility or from other locations. Using an outside consultant is the
preferred method for several reasons:
Provide fresh perspective and avoid internal bias
q
More efficient use of company personnel time
q
Fewer interruptions from the field due to scheduled meetings
q
Provide information from previous studies on similar units
q
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Company personnel involved in ESMP/RCM studies need training on the
process to be used. bp Exploration and Production Technology Group
(E&PTG) can provide training and facilitation support for these studies.
In addition to internal support, several courses and books exist on the
subject to assist in the training effort. Externally led studies often include
training with the study facilitation. Software exists to manage the findings
of the study.

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and Operating
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Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) Develop bp – Common Maintenance Strategy Develop a plan to

Develop

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

Develop a plan to utilize all the information generated during the ESMP/RCM process.

q

Enter preventive maintenance tasks as recurring work orders in the CMMS

q

Create or modify spare parts records in the CMMS

q

Enter predictive maintenance and condition monitoring tasks into a field data collection system

q Enter one-time opportunities into an action item tracking system Create a feedback loop to review the findings every year to ensure that the recommended tasks are being effective according to the key performance indicators (KPIs) on equipment reliability

Implement

The ESMP/RCM process includes the following steps: Identify the system boundaries q Identify the performance
The ESMP/RCM process includes the following steps:
Identify the system boundaries
q
Identify the performance objectives of the system to be studied
q
q
Separate the system into distinct functions that account for all the
equipment
q
Perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) on each
piece of equipment
Determine if each piece of equipment is critical or non-critical
q
q
Select the appropriate proactive maintenance tasks to address the
effects of failure
Implement the recommendations in the field
q
Create a Living Program so that the study can be revisited
q

Data generated by condition monitoring and predictive maintenance activities must be reviewed and analyzed. Once this data has been converted to valuable information, appropriate action must be taken based on the findings. If the operations or maintenance departments do not take suitable action in a timely manner, the value of the data will be lost. See the CMS Process section on Condition Monitoring and Process Data Collection for information regarding capturing and analyzing condition monitoring data.

Evaluate

Each ESMP/RCM study should be able to be completed within three months. Recommendations from the study can be implemented over the following several months. Some may require a unit downtime to complete (i.e. function testing protective instrument systems, new installations, etc.).

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Increase Production and Operating Efficiency Lower Unit Operating Costs Improve Integrity Management Engaged and
Increase Production
and Operating
Efficiency
Lower Unit Operating
Costs
Improve Integrity
Management
Engaged and
Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy The primary output from a

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy

The primary output from a study is the proactive maintenance program. Results from the condition monitoring activities will not be immediate, but improvements in equipment reliability should become apparent within 12 months. Key performance indicators (KPIs) on equipment reliability and availability and maintenance time on PPM activities and condition-based repairs should be increasing.

Other benefits for a reliability analysis program are listed below.

QUALITY SERVICE COST TIME RISK Increased Plant Availability (2 - 10%) Elimination of chronic failures
QUALITY
SERVICE
COST
TIME
RISK
Increased Plant
Availability
(2 - 10%)
Elimination of
chronic
failures and
inherent
reliability
problems
Flexibility to
accommodate
production
requirements
Documented
basis for
maintenance
program
Improved
ownership for
maintenance
program
Better
teamwork and
communication
Improved
understanding
of the
‘customer’
requirements
Less disruption
of production
processes due
to unplanned
breakdowns
Optimized
maintenance
program
Reduced
levels of
scheduled
maintenance
(10 - 50%)
Better
maintenance
contract
administration
Clear
guidelines for
application of
new
maintenance
technology
Longer life of
expensive
equipment
Reduction in
secondary
damage
Shorter repair
times
Reduced
duration of
scheduled
overhauls
Extended
periods
between
overhauls
(60 - 300%)
Safety and
Environmental
integrity a
priority
Reduced
likelihood of
multiple
failures as
maintenance
inspection
intervals are
based on
allowable
levels of risk
Reduced
numbers of
routine
invasive tasks
Reduced risk
to plant
maintenance
workers

For more information on the ESMP process, see the website http://houston.bpweb.bp.com/reliability/esmp.htm The RCM process has details at website http://houston.bpweb.bp.com/reliability/Rel_Maint_Proc_Tools.htm

V. CMS Elements Improved by ESMP/RCM

The CMS Elements that are improved by the Equipment Specific Maintenance Plan and Reliability Centered Maintenance programs are:

q Leadership and Organization – Creating an optimized proactive maintenance strategy directly impacts bottom-line results.

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Competent Workforce
Leadership and
Organization
Facility Availability
Work Management
Materials Management
Change Management
Continuous
Improvement
Equipment Specific
Maintenance Plan /
Reliability Centered
Maintenance
(ESMP/RCM)
Plan / Reliability Centered Maintenance (ESMP/RCM) bp – Common Maintenance Strategy q Facility

bp – Common Maintenance Strategy