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ASSIGNMENT Name:

MODULE 3 Roll No:


Due date:

1. Write a comprehensive note on the importance of sensorial exercises.

Since a child naturally uses all his powers of observation during his early years, this is the ideal time to
give the child equipment which would sharpen his senses and enable him to understand the many
impressions he receives through them. Sensorial comes from the words sense or senses. As there are no
new experiences for the child to take from the Sensorial work, the child is able to concentrate on the
refinement of all his senses.
Importance of Sensorial Exercises:
The importance and aim of Sensorial exercises are for the child to acquire clear, conscious, information
and to be able to then make classifications in his environment. It is believed that sensorial experiences
began at birth. Through his senses, the child studies his environment. Through this study, the child then
begins to understand his environment. The child is a “sensorial explorer”. Through work with the sensorial
materials, the child is given the keys to classifying the things around him, which leads to the child making
his own experiences in his environment. Through the classification, the child is also offered the first steps
in organizing his intelligence, which then leads to his adapting to his environment.
Different Grouping in Senses:
Sensorial Exercises were planned to cover every quality that can be apparent by the senses such as size,
shape, composition, texture, loudness or softness, matching, weight, temperature, etc. Because the
Exercises cover such a wide range of senses, Montessori categorized the Exercises into eight different
groups:

Visual Sense: In this exercise child learns how to visually discriminate differences between similar
objects and differing objects.
Tactile Sense: In this exercise child learns through his sense of touch. “Although the sense of touch is
spread throughout the surface of the body, the Exercises given to the children are limited to the tips of the
fingers, and particularly, to those of the right hand.” This allows the child to really concentrate on what
he is feeling, through a concentration of a small part of his body.
Baric Sense: In this exercise child learns to feel the difference of pressure or weight of different objects.
This sense is sharp through the use of a blindfold or of closing your eyes
Thermic Sense: In this exercise child works to enhance his sense of temperature.
Auditory Sense: In this exercise child differentiate between different sounds. In doing these different
exercises, the child will enhance and make him more sensitive to the sounds in his environment.
Olfactory Sense: In this exercise child is given a basic to his smelling sense. Although not all smells
given to the child in these exercises, the child does work to differentiate one smell from another.
Gustatory Sense: In this exercise child is given a basic to his tasting sense. Although not all tastes are
given to the child in these exercises, the child does work to differentiate one taste from another. He can
then take these senses, and apply them to other tastes in his environment.
Stereognostic Sense: In this exercise child learns to feel objects and make recognitions based on what he
feels. “When the hand and arm are moved about an object, an impression of movement is added to that
touch. Such an impression is attributed to a special, sixth sense, which is called a muscular sense.

Need of Sensorial Exercises:


It is possible for children, to receive any number of sensory impressions and be none the richer. Sense
impressions are not enough by themselves; the mind needs education and training to be able to
discriminate and appreciate. Montessori materials help the child to distinguish, to categorize, and to relate
new information to what he already knows. Dr. Montessori believed that this process is the beginning of
conscious knowledge. It is brought about by the intelligence working in a concentrated way on the
impressions given by the senses.
Sensorial materials are self-correcting to allow independent use, they foster muscular development which
lays the foundation for writing skills, and they are produced to precise metric tolerances. Correct
terminology (binomial cube, isosceles triangle) and mathematically exact relationships enrich the child's
experience so that abstract concepts may attach to familiar reality.

2. What is stereognostic sense and how can we develop it?

Stereognostic sense is the ability to perceive and understand the form and nature of objects by the sense
of touch.
Stereognostic Sense: The stereognostic sense exercises enable the child to develop concepts by feeling
objects and making recognition based on the feeling. The exercises include also movement of the hand
and arm around the object, creating an impression of movement as added to the sense of touch, resulting
in what is known as muscular memory. This is the knowledge derived from the recognition of the
movements made. The Montessori materials and exercises used in the stereognostic sense are Geometric
solids, Mystery bags, Sorting Trays, Puzzle maps, and Sandpaper Globe.
How to develop Stereognostic Sense: The development of the Stereognostic sense is an important part
of the child’s work in the sensorial area. Just as important as any of the other of senses, the stereognostic
sense allows the child to discriminate size and shape through the use of touch. The use of this sense allows
the child to have a mental picture through the use of touch and movement. Once the child knows how to
feel the object in the hand and is familiar with it, the objects are then used with the blindfold. In addition
to using our sense of touch to determine texture and weight, our sense of touch can also provide
information about size and shape.
Exercises for Stereognostic Sense: Below are few exercises that can be used to enhance this sense. The
directress needs to do all these exercise in front of the child herself. The stereognostic activities are first
done with eyes open and then by using blindfold. But try not to force children to use blindfold. By doing
very simple but interesting exercises we can start developing strong stereognostic sense.

Mystery Bags:
1. A bag that has a drawstring to hide the contents.
2. Fill that bag with amazing contents such as tiny pebbles, glass marbles, soft feathers, wooden blocks,
ribbon, spoons, key, small cars, etc. and anything else you find interesting.
3. Child look all these objects, feel them by touching via hands. Introduce names of each item.
4. Then closes his eyes or used blindfold, put his hand in the bag feel the object and named it and then takes
it out from the bag.
5. Then open his eyes and sees what it is.

Sorting Trays:
1. A tray having four or more saucers.
2. Each saucer contains different kind of grains, seeds, beans, peas, rice, lentils etc. separately.
3. Another tray of same quantity of saucer but empty.
4. Child first checks all these things by their hands and feels them. And then put each item in the second
tray’s saucer separately. Introduce names of each item.
5. Then child closes his eyes or used blindfold, again feel the items, named it, and then put it into the second
tray.
6. Then open his eyes and sees how perfectly he done.
7. It can also be done by changing this exercise as by mixing all these items in one bowl and child needs to
separate them in different saucers.

Puzzle Maps:
1. A puzzle map of Pakistan and a Globe.
2. Let’s take the puzzle map of Pakistan, where puzzles are divided in provinces.
3. Show the child a globe and the complete map of Pakistan. Show the child where
is Pakistan in the Globe. After that put that globe aside.
4. Focus on puzzle.
5. Child point out the outline of each province and named the province.
6. Slowly and carefully put all pieces of puzzles one by one back into the puzzle.

Sandpaper Globe:
A world Globe with land areas covered with sandpaper and water are with blue paint. Child
holds the globe and calls its name. Child point to the sandpaper area and says “This is land”,
the point to blue area and say “This is water”. Feel another area on the globe and repeat where
land is and where water is.

3. Write a note on Three Period lesson and Memory Games.

Three period lessons are used throughout the Montessori environment to help introduce a new lesson or
concept and lead the children along a path to understanding and mastery. However, in the area of language
they are used to increase, enrich and broaden a child's vocabulary.

The Three Period Lesson is to be given after the child has had much experience with the material itself.

The Three Period-Lesson: The Three Period-Lesson are:

1. Naming Period 2. Recognition and Association Period 3. Pronouncing Period

Begin this learning, by putting three contrasting objects on a table in front of a child. For example a
block of, circle, square and triangle.

1. Naming Period:
This period is overall rather short as it simply involves giving the object a name.
Directress point to the first object and say circle.
Repeat names several times clearly and slowly. Also make small sentences like “This is a circle”.
Child observed the object hold it in his hand feels it.

2. Recognition and Association Period:


This period is much longer then the first one.
Rearrange the objects and ask the child to show you.
Ask child to “Show me the circle”, or “Put your finger on the triangle”.
Rearrange the objects and again ask these questions.

3. Pronouncing Period:
When directress sure that child remember all the objects plus their names in to his long term memory, than
this period starts. This is a testing period.
Directress challenges the child to name the object himself.
Point out to one object and ask “What is this?”
If child fails to tell any name, casually end the lesson without making the child feel as though he is failed.
For this repeat second period.

There is the Three Period-Lesson for grading an object positively, comparatively, and superlatively.
Here taking an adjective to explain these periods.
Grading Positives Comparatives Superlatives
First Period This is big book This book is bigger This book is biggest.
than this.
Second Period Show me the big book Show me the book Show me the biggest
which is slightly bigger book.
than this book.
Third Period What is this? Which book is bigger? Which book is biggest?

Memory Games: Memory games are to be introduced to the child when the child’s interest in the
materials is fading and to bring new interest to the material the child already know very well. These games
could also be shown to bring the older to revisit the material and can be given before or after the three
period-lesson is given, depending on the game itself.

Purposes of Memory Games:


1. To prolong the activity with the material, this will assure a stronger absorption by the child.
2. The games work as a motivation in discovering more variations of the material.
3. To help directress verify the child’s language of the material.
4. To bridge the work of quantity and to allow the child to discover the quality of the materials in the word
around him.

Game 1: Matching at a Distance: Two different tables placed with a distance.


Take a pair of material and put one on each table.
Directress takes one of the objects from one table and offer child to feel it by holding in his hand.
Directress asks the child to bring the same object from the distant table. Repeat this until all pair of material
matched correctly.

Game 2: Grading from a Distance: Two different tables placed with a distance. Placed a grading
material like pink tower randomly on one table.

A) From an Extreme:
Pick up one of the extremes like the largest one. Put it on the second table.
Ask the child to bring the slightly smallest of it and put it on the second table.
Complete this exercise after child put all the blocks on second table from largest to smallest.
B) From Midpoint (For this game child must have the vocabulary)
Pick up one of the middle of the block from it. Put it on the second table.
Ask the child to bring the slightly smallest then largest of it and put it on the second table.
Complete this exercise after child put all the blocks on second table from largest to smallest.
Game 3: Stereognostic: Play this game with a group of children, who are sitting around a round table/
mat.

Directress gives Pink tower block to each child. Children hide them at their back while holding them in hand.
Directress asks for the largest block. Children feel them and put it on the table.
Repeat this until complete tower blocks placed from largest to smallest.
Game 4: Material to the Environment: In this game materials are related from environment. (Color
tablets/ shades, geometric shapes/ solids etc.)

Place a mat, put the material on the mat e.g. color tablets.
Directress point to one of the color and ask children to find something from the environment which is of that
color.
Repeat this for all the colors and shades.

Game 5: Environment to the Material: This is similar to the above game but opposite in directions.
Place a mat, put the material on the mat e.g. color tablets.
Directress point to one of the color from the environment and ask children to find the same color from
the color tablets.
Repeat this for many of the colors and shades.

4. Explain all exercises briefly in chapter 4.1 Exploring Dimensions. Make


illustration/diagram and mention vocabulary also.

Exploring Dimensions:
Exploring dimension is a basic division of Visual sense. In these exercises child can differentiate between
objects which have similar shapes and color but different in length, width, height and thickness. Below
are the few exercises:
1. The Cylinder Blocks 2. The Pink Tower 3. The Broad Stairs
4. The Long Rods 5. The knob less Cylinders

The Cylinder Blocks:

Materials:
Four finely polished wooden blocks each having ten cylinders. Cylinders have knob to hold.

Block 1 Cylinders Block 2 Cylinders Block 3 Cylinders Block 4 Cylinders


Vary in height, Vary in height, Same height of 5.5cm Same diameter of 2.5
length and diameter, length and diameter or 3 cm
5.5cm to 1cm by 1/2cm(5.5cm to
1cm)
Largest one is tallest Height increases by Diameter decreases by Height decreases by
and thickest 0.5cm(from 1cm to 0.5cm(from 5.5cm to 0.5cm(from 5.5cm to
5.5cm) 1cm) 1cm)

I. Exercise:
In this exercise directress guide the child how to hold the cylinder from the knob and then put it into the table.
After bringing all the cylinders from Block 1 to the table, directress put each cylinder back into the block
without making noise. Repeat this exercise with Block 2 and 3.When few children mastered in these three
blocks after that Block 4 introduce.

II. Exercise:
In this exercise directress guide the child how to use two blocks at a time. Mix cylinders and then put them back
to their right position.

III. Exercise:
In this exercise directress guide the child how to use three blocks at a time while placing them in a triangular
shape. Mix cylinders and then put them back to right position.

IV. Exercise:
When child mastered with all three blocks then directress guide the child how to use all blocks at a time. Placed
all blocks on table in shape of square. Mix the cylinders inside the square and then put them back into
their right position.

The Pink Tower:

Materials:
Ten wooden cubes from the size of 1cubic centimeter to 1cubic decimeter. Cubes may be finely painted
with pale pink or plain wooden finely lacquered. Strong pink color avoided.

I. Exercise:

In this exercise directress use table or mat for this, place all cubes on it. First hold the biggest cube with
both hands compares with others and put it on the table. After that, take the second biggest cube compare
with other cubes; put it carefully without any mistake on the middle of the first cube. Repeat it until all
cubes finished and a tower build. Now place both hands on the sides of the tower, slowly move hands
upward aside the tower, hands join each other at the top of the tower. When child mastered this exercise
introduce him the second one.

II. Exercise:
In this exercise directress make the tower exactly the same way just like in exercise 1, but this time the
cubes are placed on the one corner side of the previous one. This shows that one side of the tower is
straight. The smallest cube first place at the top of the bottom cube and with the help of index finger
pushed it to the top of tower. This helps the child to differentiate the sizes.

III. Exercise:
In this exercise directress make a tower horizontally on the table. Place the largest cube on the right hand
side. Place the second cube very carefully in the center of the previous cube. Repeat it with all cubes.

The Broad Stairs:

Materials: Ten brown wooden prisms having same length of 20cm but vary in height and width from1
cm to 10 cm.
Prism 1 Prism 2 Prism 3………… Prism 10
Length 20 cm 20 cm 20 cm …………. 20 cm
Width 1 cm 2 cm 3 cm …………… 10 cm
Height 1 cm 2 cm 3 cm …………… 10 cm

I. Exercise: In this exercise directress use table or mat for this, place all prisms randomly on it. First hold
the largest and thickest prism with both hands compares with others and put it on the table. After that, take
the second largest and thickest prism compare with other prism; put it carefully without any mistake aside
of first prism. No space between the prisms left, if there is space slightly pushed second one towards the
first. Repeat it until all prisms finished and a horizontal stair build. Now pass hand over the stairs from
biggest and thickest to the narrowest. When child mastered this exercise introduce him the second one.

II. Exercise: In this exercise directress build the stairs just like exercise 1 but for showing child the
difference of the height of the smallest prism, she hold each step of the stair from index finger of both
hands and slightly move it, then again place it to proper position.

The Long Rods:

Materials: Ten wooden rods usually painted red having height and width constant and length increased
by 10cm, shortest have 10cm and longest one is 100cm.

I. Exercise: In this exercise directress use mat for this, place all rods horizontally and randomly on it. First
hold the smallest rod with both hands compares with others and put it on the left of the mat. After that,
take the slightly longer rod compare with other rods; put it carefully without any mistake aside of first rod.
Repeat it until all rods finished. The shortest rod near to the directress and the longest rod farthest on mat.
II. Exercise: In this exercise directress arrange the rods as in exercise 1. Hold the smallest rod with the index
finger of both hands and place it aside with other rods just to compare its length.

The Knob less Cylinders:

Materials: Four sets of wooden cylinders.

Yellow Cylinders Green Cylinders Red Cylinders Blue Cylinders


Big-Small Deep-Shallow Thick-Thin Tall-Short
Vary in height- Vary in height- Vary in diameter Vary in height
diameter diameter

I. Exercise: In this exercise directress use table or mat for this. First teach the child how to open the lid of
the box of cylinders. Then place all cylinders randomly on table. First hold the largest cylinder with hand
compares with others and put it on the center of the table. After that, take the slightly shortest cylinder
compare with others; put it carefully without any mistake at the top of the first cylinder on the middle of
it. Repeat it until all cylinders finished and tower build.

II. Exercise: Directress may put cylinders in a row for grading them.

Extension Exercises with Pink Tower and Broad Stairs:

Materials: Pink Tower, Broad Stair, a Mat, a White Sheet (2.25 meter long and 1 meter wide)
I. Extension- Horizontal: Place Broad Stairs on the mat according to its exercise I. Then place Pink Tower
cubes aside with the broad stairs prisms, as the largest cube with the largest and thickest prism. Continue
until all cubes placed aside with the prism.

II. Extension- Vertical: Take the thickest prism from the Broad Stairs and put it on the mat facing
rectangular side to the directress. Then take the second thickest prism place it on the center of the first
one. Continue until all prism sets vertically. Now take the largest cube of the Pink Tower and place it very
carefully to the right square side of the thickest prism. Then take the second largest cube and put it on the
first cube in such a way that its side attach with the square side of the prism. Continue until all cubes
placed aside the prisms and build a tower.

III. Extension- Monument: Place the Broad stairs just like Exercise I of it on the left side of the mat and
Pink Tower cubes according to their grading horizontally on the right side.
First level: Take the thickest prism from the Broad Stairs and put it on the mat facing rectangular side
to the directress. Now take the largest cube from the Pink Tower and placed it aside with the prism on its
right side. Take the second thickest prism and placed it on a first cube. Half of the second prism comes to
the first prism. Now take the second largest cube and put it aside with the second prism on to the first
prism, a place which is left after placing the second prism. Continue until all prisms and cubes arranged
and look like a wall.
Second level: Take away the smallest cube from the top of the wall and put it on the left side of the
mat. Now hold the first top prism with finger and thumb and take away the second cube. After that hold
the second top prism and carefully take away the third cube. Continue this procedure until all cubes take
away one by one.

Extension Exercises with the Long Rods:

Materials: Long Rods, a Mat

I. Extension- Vertical: Place the rods randomly in a horizontal way on the mat. Take the longest rod
and put it on the mat. Then take the second longest rod and put it on the top of first rod while their left
edges even. Continue until all rods placed vertically.

II. Extension- Maze: Place the rods randomly in a horizontal way on the mat. Take the largest rod and
put it on the floor. Now take the second largest rod and put it on the floor at the 90 degree with the first
rod and their ends meet. Continue with all rods making 90 degree with their previous rods and having a
shape of a maze. Allow the child to walk in slowly in a maze and then comes outside without touching
rods.

Extension Exercises with the Cylinder Blocks and Knob less Cylinders:

Materials: Cylinder Blocks, Knob less Cylinders, a Mat

I. Extension- Comparison: Place green set of a knob less cylinders horizontally on a mat from biggest to
smallest. Then take the block cylinders and put it on the top of the knob less cylinders.
After that compare each set of knob less cylinders with the set on cylinder blocks.

Vocabulary from all these Exercises:

Long-Short Tall-Short Long-Longer-Longest Big-Bigger-Biggest


Big-Small Thick-Thin Short-Shorter-Shortest Thick-Thicker-Thickest
Large-Small Middle Small-Smaller-Smallest Thin-Thinner-Thinnest
Deep-Shallow Cube Deep-Deeper-Deepest Tall-Taller-Tallest
Broad-Narrow Straight Large-Larger-Largest Broad-Broader-Broadest
Rod-Stairs Prism Shallow-Shallower-Shallowest Narrow-Narrower-Narrowest

5. How does Montessori program help develop Tactile Sense?


In Tactile sense child learns to perceive his world via touch. For young children, the sense of touch is a
key to understanding the world around them. Encourage touch and exploration, discussing what your child
is touching. Is it "rough" or "smooth"? Is it "bumpy" or "silky"? Use rich descriptive words that will teach
your child the language to describe what he feels. It is to be remembered that these games are of
the greatest importance in the method, because upon them, in union with the exercises for the movement
of the hand, we base the acquisition of writing.
Tactile Exercises are divided into four classifications:

Sense Classifications Different Exercises


Exploring Textures: Touch Board, Touch Tablets, Touch the Fabric
Exploring Weight: Baric Tablets
Tactile Sense
Exploring Temperatures: Thermic Bottles, Thermic Tablets
Exercises of Stereognostic Sorting Trays, Mystery Bags, Puzzle Maps,
Sense: Sandpaper Globe

How Montessori program help to develop Tactile Sense:


In Montessori program, materials such as the Rough and Smooth (Touch) Boards, Touch Tablets, and
Fabric Box are some of the first touch materials that child will use. Look for fabric, wood, different grades
of sandpaper, different types of paper, and other materials that help your child learn about the language
and explore the experience of touch.
Note: For all different exercises mention above the pre-requisite is to sensitize fingers. Below mention
few exercises and how to do it.

Exploring Textures: Touch Tablets:

Materials: One box having five pairs of wooden tablets with gradations of roughness. A blindfold.
Procedure:
 Take out two to three pairs with greater contrast and put it on the table.
 Mix them and then pick one tablet at a time feel it in hand, lightly stroke it and then put aside.
 Tell the child “I am going to find the one which is just like this”.
 Find the other tablet and put it with previous one. Allow child to feel the similarity.
 Repeat this exercise with all the rest tablets. Now again repeat this exercise while using blindfold. Now
again mix the tablets and allow child to do this himself.
Here child learn a tactile sense to differentiate between rough and smooth. The blindfold will help the
child to focus on his attention upon one sense. Children learn the vocabulary by three period-lesson.
Vocabulary: rough and roughest
Directress plays five memory games with the child.

Exploring Weight: Baric Tablets:

Materials: Three separate boxes having six to eight wooden tablets. Each set is a different weight, color
and wood from each other. Tablets are however same in shape and size. A blindfold.

Procedure:

 Bring two boxes on table which contains heaviest and lightest tablets.
 Directress shows the child how to hold the tablet in palm of a hand.
 Feel the heaviest tablet and also let the child to feel it. After that child can handle the tablet himself. Now
again repeat this exercise while using blindfold.
Here child learn a tactile sense to differentiate between the weights and later on for mathematics. The
blindfold will help the child to focus on his attention upon one sense. Children learn the vocabulary by
three period-lesson. Vocabulary: Heaviest and lightest
Directress plays five memory games with the child.

Exploring Temperature: Thermic Bottles:

Materials: Four pairs of metal containers, each pair containing water at various temperatures.
Bottle Pair 1: 37 (Room temperature), Bottle Pair 2: 27 (tap water), Bottle Pair 3: 17 (Refrigerated
water), Bottle Pair 4: 47 (warm water), Cool refrigerator water, tap water.

Procedure: Directress prepares bottles.

Take out first set of bottles have the child feel the bottles one at a time. Tell the child that “I am finding
the bottle which has the same temperature”. Put bottles in a line and let the child take the bottles and feel
it.
Repeat with second set, third and fourth. Mix them and line up and let the child do it by himself under
directress supervision.
Here child learn a tactile sense to differentiate between different temperatures. Children learn the
vocabulary by three period-lesson. Vocabulary: Hot and cold. Directress plays five memory games with
the child.

6. Prepare material of Smell Bottles and Mystery Bags and send it along with your
assignment papers.

Mystery Bag:
This work presupposes the child already knows that names of each of the objects
Materials:
A bag as attractive as possible with approximately 10 objects that are very different from each other
such as, a key, a cotton ball, a pine cone, a button, a small basket, etc.
Presentation:
Invite the child or children to come and work with you. Show the child/children the Mystery Bag and
name it for him/them. Tell the child/children that we will be working with the Mystery Bag today. Bring
the bag over to a table and have the child sit to your left, or if there is a group, have them sit around the
table.
Procedure:
- Place the bag flat on the table with the opening near you.
- Put one of your hands into the bag.
- Choose one object to feel.
- Feel the object and tell the child/children what you feel, i.e. soft, fluffy, light, etc.
- Once you think you know what you are feeling, say the object’s name out loud: i.e. “I think this is a
cotton ball.”
- Pull the object out of the bag and you can say, “Yes! It is a cotton ball.”
- Place the object to the side of the table.
- Allow the child sitting to your left to try.
- Remind the child to feel, and then to say the object’s name before taking it out of the bag.
- Once the child has had a turn, allow the next child to have a turn or if there is only one child, you can
have another turn.

- If you are working with one child, you can take turns feeling and guessing the objects in the bag until
all of the objects have been chosen.
- If you are working with a group, make sure each child has a turn until all of the objects have been
chosen.

Language:
The names of the objects.
Purpose:
To refine the stereognostic sense and material visualization.
Control of Error:
In the other children (if they happen to be watching a child working with this material)
The child, when the object is taken out of the bag.
Age:
3 1/2 – 4 years
Notes
Change the objects as often as needed to keep the childrens’ interest.
Use real objects.
Do not put any objects in the bag that are sharp, dangerous, or breakable.

Smelling bottles:
Materials:
A tray with two sets of opaque jars, each containing a ball of cotton moistened with substance of
different odors:
- These sets make up four pairs.
- The tops of each set should be a different color.
- The tops should open and close easily.

Presentation:
Bring the child to the shelves and show him the smelling jars. Tell the child that you will be showing
him how to use the smelling jars. Have the child carry the tray to that table, placing the tray in the upper
part of the table. Have the child sit to your left.

Procedure:
- Take out one set at a time and line them up in parallel lines (based on their group) but keeping
sufficient room between both lines.
- Move the tray off to the side.
- Mix one of the lines up, keeping them in a line.
- Bring the first jar from the left row up near you, thus isolating it from the others.
- Open the jar and show the child how to smell it, by placing the opening a little under your nose and
moving the jar from side to side as you take in the smell.
- Have the child smell the same jar as you have shown.
- Place it off to the left of the line of other jars.
- Isolate the next jar from the left line.
- Have the child open the jar.
- You smell and then have the child smell in a similar fashion as with the first jar.
- Place this jar next to the first jar.
- Smell the rest of the jars from this set.
- Replace the jars you have smelled in a line where they were.
- Isolate the first jar from the left line.
- Tell the child that you are going to find the one that smells just like this one.
- Isolate the first jar from the other line and place it next to the first jar.
- Open the lids of both bottles, one at a time.
- Smell each of the jars, one at a time.
- If the two jars smell different, shake your head and turn to the child to tell him that they do not smell
the same.
- Close the jar to the right and place it to the right of the right line.
- Bring down the next jar from the right line.
- Smell both jars in front of you.
- If the two jars smell the same, tell the child they do, have the child smell both
to check, and then close their lids.
- Place them side-by-side, in between the two lines of jars.
- Repeat until you have matched all the jars.
- Place the jars back into their respective lines, mix one of the lines and allow
the child to match the jars based on their smells.
- Once he is done, have him replace the jars in two rows (based on their colors)
on the tray, and then the tray back onto the shelves.