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TV SHOW

/

IDEAS

TO

MAKE, COOK

BUILD

GROW,

WELCOME TO OUR NEW LOOK!

COME INSIDE AND MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME

TURN US ON!

PASTA!

Sooo delish

2 RECIPES IN 1

Best lamb shanks = fab ragu sauce

PLUS MORE PAGE

Get crafty

with your old man’s ties

create a belle of a bathroom

Reno your laundry

It's a flatpack marvel

GO LUSH

FLASH AND BRASH

JUNE

AUST . (inc GST)

NZ . (inc GST)

The art of seduction with awesome orchids

Forage for foliage to make big bold b ouquets

What grows up your wall won’t let you down

ZIN_BHG_0619

WHIP UP

JOIN TARA

JASON

YUM WAFFLE

DENNIS TO

HODGES

STICKS WITH

MAKE A MAGIC

ROCKS YOU

FAST ED

PLAYROOM

WITH GABION

SOUTHERN ITALY & SICILY

11 DAYS • 16 MEALS

Venture from Sicily to the spectacular coastlines of Southern Italy. Be amazed by the Greek Theatre in Taormina. Travel to “Sassi di Matera,” an ancient town known for its cave dwellings. Sample some local specialties at a family-owned limoncello factory. Wine is included with every lunch and dinner.

ROME & AMALFI COAST

9 DAYS • 13 MEALS

Enjoy three nights in Rome and five nights on the breathtaking Amalfi coast. Visit the seaside resort town of Sorrento. Discover the amazing mountaintop monastery of Montecassino. Tour a buffalo milk mozzarella factory. Enjoy a tasting and lunch at a local winery at the foot of Mt Vesuvius.

SEE THE BEST OF Italy

Explore the excavated ruins of Pompeii.

Savour farm-to-table delicacies in Tuscany.

Feel the thrill of a Vespa ride through rolling vineyards.

These are just some of the adventures you’ll have when you tour with Collette, a guided travel company with 100 years of experience.

Choose from more than 15 classic and small group tours through Italy and enjoy it like you never have before.

Call us on 1300 027 254, visit gocollette.com.au or see your local travel agent and ask for Collette!

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EDITORIAL Editor-in-chief Julia Zaetta Deputy editor and decorating editor Dora Papas Creative director Scott Cassidy Managing editor Artemis Gouros Production editor Joseph Kenworthy Editor’s assistant Elaine Nasr Enquiries (02) 9394 2496 Design director Monique Larracy Senior designer Carol Tang Garden editor Jenny Dillon Acting food editor Jennene Plummer DIY writer Greg Fahey Craft editor Siobhan Rogers Beauty editor Annie Millar Photo librarian Autumn Mooney Decorating stylist Vanessa Tidy Editorial digital assistant Amamda Ghalaini

REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Garden diary Tony Fawcett Moon gardening Milton Black Health & beauty Samantha Harrison Pets Caroline Zambrano

Content management team Copy directors Chrystal Glassman, Daniel Moore

ADVERTISING Brand solutions director Clarissa Wilson (02) 9394 2647 Brand solutions manager Alison Kirkman (02) 9394 2033 Brand solutions coordinator Calvin Simpson (02) 9394 2938 Vic sales director Fran Vavallo (03) 8636 7526 Qld sales director Angela Coley (07) 3368 4203 WA account manager Jessica Mohen (08) 9482 3306 SA account manager Danielle Coffey-Carter (08) 7231 5909 NZ – Auckland (+64 9) 979 2700 Executive creative director Andrew Cameron

PUBLISHING Group category and business manager Adam Blount Group marketing director Belinda Thornton Marketing manager Jana Williams Senior business analyst Roula Yiallouros Group Production Manager Mark Boorman Deputy print operations manager Morgan Harris Premedia solutions Louisa Dertadian

TELEVISION Host Johanna Griggs Gardening researchers Vivien Kappos, Grahame Rowe Gardening presenters Graham Ross, Jason Hodges Food researchers Sarah Allchurch, Marnie Rowe Food presenter Karen Martini ‘Food in a flash’ presenter Ed Halmagyi Decorating researchers Karenza Jewell, Chris Cort Decorating presenter Tara Dennis Props stylist Joanna Greenwood DIY researchers John Rae, Greg Sparke DIY presenter Adam Dovile Pets presenter Dr Harry Cooper Construction manager Scott Marvell Project manager Kylie Sams Segment producers Cassandra Felix, Stephanie Walsh, Daniel Gustafson, Cameron Hartley, Daryll Maguire Associate producers, Sharon Field, Tiana Speter Post production Cathy Foote, Matthew Bawden, Jack Webb, Lawrence Humphry, Edvin Mandic, Luke Robinson, Stephanie Lee Associate Producer Brand Partnerships Jessica Stone Executive producer Russell Palmer Series Producer Rani Eaton Production Manager Jenni Vinten Senior Production co-ordinator Mel Gleissner Senior Accountant Gregoire De Langlade Production assistant Kurt Davies Social media co-ordinator Jai Chouhan

Publicist Jonathan Boulos

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Reproduction: Printed in Australia by Franklin WEB, 1 Huntingwood Drive, Huntingwood, NSW 2148. Distributed in Australia by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 088 251 727). Published 13 times a year by Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd (ACN 097 410 896). For competition entries, use the address on entry forms. Title and trademark BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS ® reg US Patents Office, Canada and Australia, by Meredith Corporation. Use of trademark is strictly prohibited. Recommended and maximum price $6.50 (NZ $7.80), inc GST. All content © 2018 Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, all rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. All prices and information are correct as at the time of printing. Prices quoted are recommended retail prices and may vary. All material sent to Better Homes and Gardens (whether solicited or not) will not be returned. Unless otherwise agreed beforehand, all rights including copyright in such material is assigned to Pacific Magazines upon receipt and Pacific Magazines may use or sell the material in all media worldwide in perpetuity without further consent or payment. Better Homes and Gardens does not accept or assume responsibility for such material.

This is general information and does not take into account your financial situation. All products are promoted and distributed by Australian Seniors Insurance Agency, a trading name of Greenstone Financial Services Pty Ltd (ABN 53 128 692 884, AFSL 343079). The insurer for Car, Home, Landlords and Pet Insurance products is The Hollard Insurance Company Pty Ltd (ABN 78 090 584 473, AFSL 241436), for Funeral Insurance products is Hannover Re of Australasia Ltd (ABN 37 062 395 484) and for Travel Insurance products is Chubb Insurance Australia Limited (ABN 23 001 642 020, AFSL 239687). Please consider the Product Disclosure Statement available at seniors.com.au. Terms and conditions apply. H1609_ASIA_TVWeek_Multi_Q419

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Cover photography Andre Martin; styling Elle Vernon

JUNE CONTENTS

58

36

come inside

58

ON THE COVER

Pasta! Sooo delish 2 recipes in 1

– best lamb shanks = fab ragu sauce

Get crafty with your old man’s ties Create a belle of a bathroom Reno your laundry

It’s a flatpack marvel

The art of seduction with awesome orchids Forage for foliage to make big bold bouquets What grows up your wall won’t let you down Whip up yum waffle sticks Make a magic playroom 8 Rock you with gabion

DECORATING & CRAFT

Ideas notebook Colour school Freshen

up your place with pretty shades of pink and mint

Take your home into the

zone! Savvy style ideas to create distinct, yet connected, zones in an open-plan space

Have a belle of a bathroom

Transform your pamper zone

into the room of your dreams with this handy go-to guide All tied up Colourful, practical and downright stylish ways to repurpose your old man’s ties

Love your laundry Give your

dated and dingy washroom a much-needed makeover

Daydream & play! Turn an

empty room into a fun space for your kids to be creative

Room to relax! Design a fabulous

living area with unique DIY elements

GARDENING

It’s show time! Put on a

dazzling display with orchids

Go bold and brazen with

bouquets Make an impact with

a stunning flower arrangement

Walls with a view Tart up your

yard with a vertical garden

Size doesn’t matter! Turn your

outdoor space into leafy green jungle

Lust for lush How to make

a small space grand

Rock your world Add raw appeal

to your garden with a gabion table

In your garden

Moon guide Fully tanked Don’t let

your rain go down the drain – install a water tank!

DIY & BUILDING

Up the value of your real

estate 10 tips, tricks and fix ups to maximise your home’s appeal

Time to burn Create a

timepiece with a difference

Make it for Mum! Knock up a

jewellery stand for Mother’s Day

FOOD

Super fresh pasta made by

you! Get out your rolling pin and pinny – it’s time to make pasta!

Get your waffle on! Bake

or chill your way to sweet or savoury treats – plus, get your own waffle stick pan

Cooking with Karen

Make easy bites and recipes with a delicious twist

Fast Ed’s kitchen From

brekkie to dinner, these tasty meals have you covered

24

BETTER YOU

The best make-up for women

over 40 Simple tweaks that will give you a fresher look

Eat to feel good Enjoy

better health inside and out

What’s the point? The benefits

of acupuncture explained

Better health

BETTER TRAVEL

Into the wild Have the time of

your life when you sail the waters of Alaska and visit Canada

Stress-free travel Eight handy

hacks for a happy holiday

Better travel

REGULAR FEATURES

Editor’s letter BHG Shop Cuddle up

to this big softie

Better books

BHG Shop Knit crochet love!

Better pets How to subscribe Stockists Better shopping

114

Subscribe now & receive

6ISSUES

FOR ONLY

$ 15

SEE PAGE

VISIT US ONLINE FOR ALL THE LATEST UPDATES, PROJECTS AND GREAT IDEAS

bhg.com.au

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instagram.com/bhgaus

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TV CONTENTS

watch us on tv

Every issue we bring you projects and recipes from the show for you to make and cook

104

44

148

138

SEEN ON BHG TV

FRIDAYS 7.00

MAY TO MAY

NOTE Television content subject to schedule changes. Check your local program guides for viewing times.

decorating & craft

Give your tired old laundry

a

storage-packed makeover

Turn an empty space into an

amazing playroom for your kids Revamp your living room with unique DIY elements

Gardening

Create bold, brazen and

beautiful flower arrangements Grow your own living wall

Steal ideas from a small-space

garden and go big on greenery Take inspiration from a ruin

turned into an inner-city oasis How to build a gabion table

Choose the right water tank for your place

diy & building

Turn up the heat to create a

timepiece with a difference Show Mum how much you love her by making her

a jewellery carousel

food

Karen Martini’s Baked

custard tarts; Sausage rolls with sage, apple and pistachio; Special fried rice; Roast chicken and black barley salad Fast Ed’s Scrambled egg and spiced salsa tartlets in easy chickpea pastry; Cowboy brisket with pumpkin and charred chillies; Mexican beef and bean pastry fingers; Cheat’s beef Wellington; Country lamb and prune pot roast; Chunky pork and parmesan ragu; Easy liquorice pudding; Glazed poppyseed and walnut cake; Savoury avocado funnel cakes

bring nature indoors

enjoy the aromas of 100% pure essential oils

For a delightful, mood elevating atmosphere and gentle, effective beauty care.

Testers available on all Natio Home Happiness stands.

www.natio.com.au

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A DASH OF MILK

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Inject a sense of fun into your next get-together with these simple tips:

• A pastel tablecloth is an inexpensive way to set the mood and tie back to key pieces within the same colour palette.

• Get creative with napery – a simple knot or twist adds playfulness and personality.

The texture of White Basics Diamonds looks great mixed with our Tint collection.

For those moments that deserve a little more finesse and elegant flare:

Less is more – keep the colour palette simple to allow other

accent pieces, including the meal,

a canvas to shine upon.

• Little touches like ribbon around cutlery or napery under first course plates show attention to

detail and are a simple way to bring

a sophisticated feel to your table.

For a modern monochrome setting try White Basics layered with Caviar Granite.

White Basics Diamonds 16-piece Dinner Set, gift boxed, RRP $149.95

Rectangular Platter & Bowl Set, gift boxed, RRP $19.95

Mortar & Pestle, 9cm, gift boxed, RRP $6.95

A touch of Scandi style with a

splash of colour creates the perfect weekend setting:

• Add a natural element with wooden boards and linen napkins to create

a relaxed vibe.

• Alternating between patterned and classic white pieces helps to create impact.

Suomi mixed with White Basics

is

white tableware.

a fresh take on classic blue and

Salt & Pepper, RRP $5.95

White Basics Tribeca 12-piece Dinner Set, gift boxed, RRP $89.95

View the collection at maxwellandwilliams.com.au

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Smeg ’50s Style Series 2 Slice Toaster TSF01PBAU $179 Smeg ’50s Style Badged Kettle KLF03PBAU $199 Smeg ’50s Retro Style Hand Blender HBF02PBAU $199

EDITOR’S LETTER

Hello!

You know how good you feel when you give yourself a makeover – well, welcome to ours!

e very few years, it’s a great joy

to redesign the magazine,

to freshen it, give it a bright

new facelift and make it easier and even more delightful for you to turn from page to page. Yes, yes, but while we do this we are still absolutely dedicated to loading you up with ideas, inspiration and information to make your home as wonderful as it can be for the people who matter most to you. We plan to deliver that with exquisite images to take your breath away, or with hard-working pictures to help you undertake and make any of the projects that take your fancy. For your reading pleasure we have collected a whole new range of lovely typefaces for what we write for you, then captured, captioned and boxed

them in all manner of ways, big, small, delicate and bold, to make it easy for you to navigate the pages and find your own way around how you decide. But our ultimate plan is for you to be totally entertained as you go. In fact it’s our intention for you to travel from cover to cover, page by page every issue and know that we have wrapped all the content up in our redesign as our gift for you to create magic in your home and home life. We hope you love the new magazine as much as we do, find it as delightful, easy, captivating and engaging as we designed, and then we’d be delighted to hear what you think. Now begin the new journey, turn those pages and enjoy!

OUR COVER RECIPE

LAMB SHANK RAGU WITH FETTUCCINE

If ever there was a secret pasta ingredient to take your tastebuds to heaven, it’s lamb shanks. Use the recipe on page 86 but to match the cover you can use store-bought pasta and make it in double-quick time. Yum!

skin happiness

cleanse

3 easy steps

to happy, healthy, radiant skin with Natio’s gentle Aromatherapy skincare. For all skin types.

www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and selected Pharmacies.

tone

moisturise

FABULOUS FLOWERS

Rise above the rest with pots of orchids. Stunning in their colours and pa erns, they’ll take your breath away with their beauty – and their long-lasting flowers during the cooler months will push their competitors out into the cold.

IT’S

SHOW

TIME!

MAKE MAGIC MOMENTS WITH ORCHIDS AS THEY CAST THEIR SPELL ON YOU

FABULOUS FLOWERS

e xquisite and supremely serene, orchids are like the standout exhibit in an art gallery

– you dare not touch, but

must just stand back and

gaze in awe. But there’s

a preciousness that also

says they’re ‘too complex, too different, too difficult’

for you to grow.

FOR YOU TO KNOW Complex and different, yes. But not difficult, having thrived in the wild for millions of years. Orchids

are the second largest family of flowers (more than 20,000 species, more than 100,000 varieties and hybrids galore) and they’re not exclusively tropical, growing everywhere except Antarctica – the world’s driest continent. And this is the key to orchid success: moisture.

WHAT THEY NEED What makes orchids different is that most are epiphytes, in that they don’t grow in soil. They started growing on leaves and moss of forest floors

So cool, so glorious – cymbidiums shine in shade.

millions of years ago until some sought sunlight and began climbing trees, using their roots to grip and drawing nutrients from the air and rain water. Those that stayed below are terrestrials. Over the millennia, they have evolved to thrive in three climates: cool but sunny and humid, temperate and humid, and warm and humid. So there is an orchid for you that is definitely complex and different, but also easy to care for. So start your own personal art gallery now.

TAKE THIS ONE OUTSIDE

The cymbidium orchid’s

magnificent flower spikes

dominate in winter. It

originated high in the

Himalayas where the climate

is cool and moist. Being

semi-terrestrial, it is hardy

enough to thrive outside

in many Australian gardens.

COLOURS

FOR

EVERY

OCCASION

Orchids are fabulous and fascinating because of their colours, each of which has symbolism and meaning.

PURPLE

This represents admiration, respect and dignity. Most importantly it’s about royalty.

WHITE

Humility, innocence and purity, elegance and beauty.

PINK

Grace, joy and happiness.

RED

Passion and desire, as well as courage and strength.

YELLOW

Friendship, joy and fresh beginnings.

ORANGE

Enthusiasm, boldness and pride.

GREEN

Good fortune, good health and longevity.

BLUE

Orchids don’t come in true blue, but blue tints represent rarity.

To learn more about orchids, go to the Australian Orchid Council and find your local society. orchidsaustralia. com.au

Brightly coloured mokaras are a hybrid of three varieties (Ascocentrum, Vanda and Arachnis). Hardy and easy to grow. They’re ideal if you’e an orchid beginner.

FABULOUS FLOWERS

Cluster several pots together to create a flight of fancy.

HOW TO GROW YOUR ORCHID

It’s the perfect indoor plant requiring very simple care in a pot

WHAT TO CHOOSE

With elegant and long-living flowers, the moth orchid (Phalaenopsis spp) is the perfect indoor plant with an imperfect name – ‘butterfly’ orchid seems more appropriate! In the tropics most orchids flower in the wild all year round. In Australia, where

they are best kept indoors, flowering depends on where you are. Most stop blooming in spring or autumn.

CONDITIONS

Give your moth warmth, moisture and a shady place with morning sunlight, or bright, indirect light.

CARING FOR IT

Winter heating

keeps it warm, but this may dry out the growing medium so check its moisture regularly. Water only the medium, not the leaves. Instead lightly spray about – not on – leaves. Don’t let water pool in the centre as this causes rot. In summer, keep it

moist and away from fans or air conditioning.

REFLOWERING

Once the last flower has gone, cut the spike to just above the lower node (or bump). A secondary spike will emerge to produce more flowers in a couple of months.

GROWING TIP

Orchids don’t grow in soil so repot in special free-draining orchid mix in spring or autumn when the flowers have gone. Leave aerial roots outside pot and trim if damaged.

THE VIBRANT COLOURS AND PATTERNS REMIND YOU OF THE DAZZLING WINGS OF BUTTERFLIES

TOP ROW

Mokaras are known as smile orchids and come

in a broad range of colours, from purple to blue, yellow and

coral.

moth orchid.

Blue hues make striking points of interest on this

There’s nothing mellow about the red and

yellow. MIDDLE ROW

Masses of moths (left and right)

make pink and purple hazes.

(Paphiopedilum sp, centre) is great for orchid beginners and

comes in a fantastic range of colours and patterns (see care

tips, opposite page).

are a speciality in this stunning line-up of moth orchids.

The lady slipper orchid

BOTTOM ROW

Speckles and stripes

FLORAL ART

w hen it comes to arranging

Be bold. Turn a simple

flowers the ‘b’s are the best.

arrangement into a stunning display. Be brave. Team up the fresh with the dried for an enduring botanical sculpture. Be boutique. Create a unique, evolving work of art. And be brazen. Some elements of your arrangement may be rubbish, but they can turn it into something quite radiant.

There’s still life in these wonderful things yet. Dried palm bark (top) and the gnarly branches of a banksia with its curious seed pods can give your arrangement an exciting twist.

NEVER

ENDING

BEAUTY

You can use stunning ways to keep your floral arrangement lasting longer a er the initial flowers have faded. Check out these three ideas to stimulate your eye.

BE A SCAVENGER

Pick up fallen branches and twigs

with interesting or quirky forms, textures or colours. A good find is gum tree twigs that have dropped to the ground with leaves and clusters

of nuts still a ached.

They will eventually dry but not drop off, giving background and volume to an arrangement, as well as offse ing the flowers’ vibrant colours.

LEARN TO BORROW

Take li le po ed plants from around your home and position them, still in their pots, within the arrangement’s container. Gorgeous!

THINK ABOUT FOLIAGE

A leaf’s individuality

– its shape, size and colour – can be overlooked when part of a tree or shrub. It’s surprising how dramatic a leafy stem can look when isolated from the crowd. And leaves last longer when still on a stem.

A tip for creating stunning flower arrangements is to include a found object (the banksia branch), a flower (the roses and hydrangeas) and foliage (the po ed begonias in front and rhipsalis in a separate vase at the back).

SEEN ON BHG TV

FRIDAYS 7.00

Go bold and brazen with

BOUQUETS

Scrounge around to ensure your floral arrangement makes an impression

FLORAL ART

EASY STEPS TO YOUR AWESOME ARRANGEMENT

Sean Cook, from Sydney florist Mr Cook, combines the power of green and pink, of form and flu er, of flowers’ fluidity and branches’ strength to make an extravagant arrangement. Here, the only floral aspects are hydrangeas and roses, picked from your garden or bought from a florist or market. The rest is an eclectic collection of po ed plants and cu ings from your garden that are placed next to, not in, the arrangement. But the star is a discarded banksia branch. This arrangement is very large so it’s probably best to arrange your branch first where you want it to stay.

Gather your supplies • Cu ings from a fruiting fig tree (Ficus carica) • Po ed chalk sticks (Senecio serpens)

• 2 po ed painted leaf

begonias (Begonia rex)

• Branch from

a banksia tree

• 3 hydrangea blooms • 2 dozen standard red roses

• 2 dozen red and pink Colombia roses • Large rhipsalis leaf (Selenicereus chrysocardium, formerly Epiphyllum chrysocardium)

You’ll also need Large bowl; wide shallow container; 2 tall vases (can be different heights and shapes); secateurs

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

Need to know Refreshing the water regularly may disturb this large arrangement. Add Milton anti-bacterial tablets (used to sterilise baby-feeding accessories) to water before you start arranging to keep it fresh.

Here’s how STEP 1 Put the bowl in the shallow container and fill bowl and vases with water. STEP 2 Trim all leaves

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

off fig tree branches to highlight the immature fruit and place in vase. STEP 3 Place vase of fig, po ed chalk sticks and begonias next to – not in – the container. STEP 4 Put end of

STEP 8

STEP 9

banksia branch inside large container but outside bowl and let top end drape across table. STEP 5 Trim hydrangea stems to about 15cm long but keep most of the leaves. Place in bowl. STEP 6 Trim standard red rose stems to about 20cm, remove thorns but keep leaves. Place as a bunch in bowl next to the hydrangeas. STEP 7 Keep the Colombia rose stems as long as possible, but strip all leaves and thorns. STEP 8 Very gently roll back outer petals of Colombia roses. STEP 9 Arrange Colombia roses in bowl. STEP 10 Put rhipsalis leaf in tall vase, behind – not in – the arrangement.

Orchids and hydrangeas are eye-catching as individual displays placed side by side.

Something borrowed, something broken, something blooming, and you have a bouquet that is simply beautiful.

Sit po ed chalk sticks and begonias outside the container.

Position large leaves like rhipsalis (selenicereus chrysocardium) behind the container.

Colombia roses are so much bigger than standard roses.

Photography Brent Wilson

FLORAL ART

THE VEGIES HAVE IT

Look beyond the ordinary – find edible plants to star in your arrangement and let your containers be the co-stars - exquisite and exciting

1

3

2 4

1 Celebrate with white and purple Asian eggplants, broad vegetable leaves and Queen Anne’s lace (wild carrot). Container: Vintage champagne bucket.

2 Inspired by roses, these red and white radishes form a beautiful bouquet. Onion roots add a so texture. Container: Old water pitcher.

3 Who’d have thought carrots could be the main

feature of an arrangement. Add kohlrabi and green cherry tomatoes. Yum! Container: Glass jug.

4 Now this is a salad bowl! Sprigs of rosemary

give spike to this arrangement with kale and cabbage. Container: Silver trophy bowl.

LOOK BEYOND

Include other aspects

of plants in your art, to

add even more interest.

STARS IN YOUR EYES

Small eucalyptus roots

have fabulous shapes.

BUNDLE OF JOY

A pussy willow’s furry

buds give height

without dominating.

GO NUTS

Urn-shaped gum nuts

demonstrate that

elegance can be

eternal.

FEATHER TOUCH

Fountain grass adds

height and softness

to an arrangement.

Or use it on its own.

Vegetable leaves are amazing – large, textured and with colourful veins

Win the trophy for coming first by using your imagination to mix fresh blooms, including zucchini flowers, with large vegetable leaves,

such as cabbage.

VERTICAL GARDENING

1 Stick with tradition by trailing ivy along your bagged wall. It holds itself in place with tiny suckers that can leave an impression when removed, and that in itself can be a ractive. But don’t let it grow along anything wooden.

2 Go ultra-modern

and turn one of the new green walls into a triptych. This reduces

the intensity of one giant slab of foliage and allows your garden to breathe.

3 A vegie patch takes

up minimal space and there is no competition

for light when your dinner essentials are growing up the wall.

4 It will climb every

mountain, but clematis needs supports for its tendrils to curl around. A trellis is good, or you can run string or wire along your wall to help clematis along.

1

3

2

4

WALLS WITH

You’ve been given a huge, blank canvas, so go to town – find your flair and paint

o ne of the best ways to put a fancy facade on your privacy and security needs

is to garden up the wall! You can go for a vertical garden, have a green wall installed or grow creepers. Either way, that crumbling brick wall keeping the neighbour’s dog at bay or that concrete slab separating you from the apartment next door can easily be tarted up or completely greened out.

PRICE OF TIME If you install a green wall, consider the costs of an integrated water delivery system, or the time needed if you choose to water the plants manually. Apartment dwellers will need to check with the body running your block, and ensure the installation won’t compromise the building’s integrity, and that drainage won’t be a problem. Or, you can just stick to the more basic DIY vertical garden options!

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REAP REWARDS Apart from looking beautiful and reflecting your own individuality, living walls come with other benefits, too. These include helping to clean the air, making your yard more serene by absorbing sound, and helping to reflect light and glare. It’s a space worth exploiting!

IT’S WORTH WAITING ALL YEAR FOR THE SPRING FLOWERING OF WISTERIA DRAPED ALONG A WALL

A VIEW

your outdoor walls with living, breathing colour

Photography Chris Jones, Brent Wilson, Getty Images

VERTICAL GARDENING

HIGH ACHIEVER

Ribbon plant gives a sculptural effect on the edge of the wall.

SILVER SERVICE

Dichondra’s impression of cascading water.

VERY PROPER

English ivy is a natural for many walls.

JASON HODGES Let me show you how to make your own living wall on BHG TV, Fridays at 7pm on Channel 7.

(Apologies, may be subject to change)

Go to bhg.com.au for more gardening tips and tricks.

GREEN IT UP!

Whatever the size of your yard, your living walls can be as decorative as your garden beds – and you can get one to suit your budget

LIFE

FORCE

Your living wall can

be as simple as

growing a vine or

a creeper – taking

it

a step further by

fixing flower pots to

a wooden or metal

frame, or going as

complex as installing

a self-watering

system that can soar

several storeys high.

DESIGN OPTIONS

What you plant on

or against your wall

depends on the

design and content

of the rest of your

garden. If you have

a courtyard, you can

make a feature of

the wall, and vary

the colours, shapes

and textures of your

plants. If it is to

be part of a larger

garden, keep it

simple so it doesn’t

become visually overwhelming.

GARDEN TIPS

Before you plant, consider your wall’s microclimate and how it will affect your plants.

You need to look at the direction your

wall faces and what light it gets. It will be different from other

areas of your garden. Think about temperatures, air circulation and humidity. If you live in an apartment block, you also need to consider winds and street pollution.

circulation and humidity. • If you live in an apartment block, you also need to consider

5

6

5 Vary the textures and colours on your green wall with silver dichondra, droopy liriope, English ivy, variegated ivy and pink-tinged bromeliads.

6 Make your wall breathe by using a wire screen, rather than a wall, and hanging pots at random intervals.

7

9

8

10

STAY IN CONTROL OF CREEPERS BY GUIDING THEM ALONG A WALL WITH STRING OR WIRE AND J U D I CI O U S LY P R U N I N G

7 Growing Boston ivy

is like investing in a coat of many colours, enabling you to make a new fashion statement each season.

8 Grey is a perfect

colour for garden walls,

as it makes most other colours pop. This small collection of po ed plants can make just as strong an impression as a totally green wall.

9 Sometimes ivy is like

unruly hair, but you can keep it as a tidy fringe on top of a wall by trimming back the tendrils before their tiny suckers grip the surface.

10 Red rambling roses will clamber all over your brick wall from late spring until early summer, bringing a joyful welcome to the warmer months in your garden.

GARDEN DESIGN

Fringed with an elegant gum, the plants in this garden reach (bamboo and ginger), arch (fuchsia and Brazilian walking iris) and creep (native violet and dichondra). Put a mirror on your back wall to double your garden’s size and greenery.

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SIZE

doesn’t matter!

Steal ideas from this tiny inner-city garden to transform your small – or large – space into a verdant jungle of greenery

GARDEN DESIGN

MAKE IT YOURS

It’s the li le things

that can help transform

your garden.

ACCENTUATE SHAPES

Buds emerge from the

elephant ears plant.

LOOK AFTER VISITORS

Beneficial and

beautiful, a bug

takes time out.

GO FOR CONTRAST

Pretty in pink

fuchsia pops out

of the greenery.

KEEP GROUNDED

Native violet covers

the floor like a

corps de ballet.

d ripping with lush, verdant foliage, this inner-city garden of florist Sean Cook catches you unawares. The masses of tropical and subtropical plants are countered

by a smattering of succulents and a dash of daintiness, while the striking accents make this garden seem larger than it is and totally unfazed by the confines of city life. The secret is the use of contrasting textures, heights and shapes, all beautifully layered to create visual intrigue while cleverly disguising the boundaries. It looks a little wild, but it’s carefully considered and can inspire you to fill your backyard with all means of greenery– where more is more.

ABOUT

THE

GARDEN

Just shy of 40sqm, this small but mighty garden is the backdrop to a modern home in the inner Sydney suburb of Redfern. Owner Sean Cook and designer Richard Unsworth of Garden Life set about creating a garden full of lush greenery, using only the colour green (Sean’s fave!) and keeping flowers to a minimum.

AN OPEN INVITATION

The result is an all-green planting scheme, heavy on succulents, tropical and subtropical plants, and striking foliage. All are thoughtfully chosen to help maximise the small space, making it feel like a tropical jungle rather than an urban backyard. The garden invites you to relax, wonder and admire the beauty of plants.

GARDEN TIPS

To give the illusion of

living in a larger space,

make your garden feel

like an extension of

the indoors. Welcome

the outside in by using

large doors – sliding,

French or bifold – and

feature similar colours

and materials on the

interior furniture

and outdoor pieces.

Indoor plants can help

make the transition

from inside to out feel

seamless.

Go for height and

screen out neighbours

(or unsightly views)

with clumping

bamboo. Slender

Weavers (Bambusa

textilis var. Gracilis)

grows 6-7m high.

It may seem

counterintuitive, but

large outdoor features

can make a small

area seem larger. But

don’t go overboard

or you’ll end up

cramping your space.

Mix textures,

colours, shapes

and sizes

with the long, undulating leaves of ginger (Alpinia nutans)

and large, aged

terraco a urns.

Repeat, repeat, repeat: the tough li le plectranthus ( P. ciliates) is so

lush

en masse.

The

undersides

add

great colour,

contrast and

texture.

This stunning-

looking cactus

(Cereus

peruvianus

‘Monstrose’) is a living sculpture. Its rippling form is quite compelling.

Words Tammy Huynh; photography Chris Jones

It’s easy being green when foliage comes in so many different shapes, sizes and textures

Make starry, starry days in your garden with this eclectic combination of cascading Chinese star jasmine, the sumptuous, shiny leaves of Philodendron ‘Congo’ and a bright, limy

green splash of crassula.

GARDEN RESTORATION

BHG JUNE

A peaceful sunken garden has helped salvagean inner-city ruin, and greenery cascading from the old roof gives a modern look to a remnant of olden days.

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The delicate fronds of a lacy tree fern, backed by a swamp banksia, so en the hard, industrial edges of the old brick walls.

LUST FOR

LUSH

How you can make your small space seem grand

Photography Brent Wilson

GARDEN RESTORATION

LIKE THE HANGING GARDENS OF BABYLON OR THE ANCIENT BATHS OF ROME, THE PADDINGTON RESERVOIR GARDENS IS INSPIRING

a partment living now your thing? You can learn how to turn your pocket

of a garden space into a mini paradise by taking inspiration from an oasis that has risen from the ruins of one of Sydney’s first water stores. Like much of today’s high-density housing, this garden is ruled by hardscapes that have the potential to dominate any greenery. Instead the mass of bricks, slabs of concrete and a skeleton of iron have become warm homes to the collection of plants carefully selected for their environment.

SHINE A LIGHT Outside the Paddington Reservoir Gardens, the noise of the traffic is ever present, while inside there is still the sense of utility. But these plantings turn the thrum and function from a distraction into a delight. And they shine a light on the raw beauty of the ruin. The garden shows that you don’t need a large space for a place of peace. Your little balcony can still be a lush patch with a strategic arrangement of greenery that can enhance your surroundings.

The pool pays homage to the original use of these ruins and adds to the restrained elegance of the gardens.

GRAHAM ROSS

Join me as I take you on a tour

around this garden on BHG TV

on Fridays at 7pm on Channel 7.

(Apologies, may be subject to change)

Go to bhg.com.au for

more gardening tips

and tricks.

WHAT GRAHAM LOVES ABOUT THE GARDEN

A HARSH BEAUTY

What strikes me is

that such a minimal

quantity of plants

creates such a

lush effect. The

cathedral-like

structure is very

dominant, very

powerful. Only about

30 per cent

of the landscape is

plants, while two-

thirds of it is taken up

with hard surfaces.

This place is friendly,

it’s an oasis. There’s

lots of concrete,

bricks and steel

that have a beauty

of their own – and the

plants don’t detract

from that. The plants

really work.

CLEVER SELECTION

The designers have

been clever in that

they’ve selected

plants that suit the

space’s special

microclimate. It’s just

the sort of thing you’d

want to adapt for

courtyards or on

high-rise balconies.

It’s a small garden,

but it’s highly

effective.

BANKSIA

LILLY PILLY

SERRATA

(SYZYGIUM ’CASCADE’)

Make that important first impression by using old bricks to create interesting pa erns along your entrance path.

Snake vine loves crawling along a balcony rail, peeking into next

PALM GRASS

door. If only it

(MOLINERIA

could talk!

CAPITULATA)

LACY TREE FERN (CYATHEA COOPERI)

PALM LILY (CORDYLINE RUBRA)

Photography Phil Aynsley

OUTDOOR LIVING

rock

YOUR WORLD!

Go natural with raw beauty that will enhance the cultivated elements of your garden

S tone and steel –

they’re tough,

enduring and, when

turned into furniture, have a raw beauty. Gabion walls, columns, pedestals and benches have style, sophistication and a sculptural element. And don’t stick to monochromatic grey. Go for blue, yellow or red stones. Or mix it up for a multi-hued effect.

STEP 1

EASY STEPS TO MAKE A GABION TABLE

Gather your supplies • Reo mesh or recycled steel mesh fencing (anything that is sturdy enough to hold stones and weight of tops) • Mesh clips or cable ties • Stones • Sandstone slab • Recycled sleepers

You’ll also need Tape measure; angle grinder with metal and stone cu ing blades; safety goggles; ear muffs; dust mask; pliers or multigrips; circular saw; cordless drill and bits; 50 x 50 x 30mm treated pine stakes; 100mm treated pine screws; hose

Here’s how STEP 1 Cut reo mesh or recycled mesh into 5 panels of desired width, depth and height for each cage. Make bench cages about 400mm high and table cages so finished table height will be 750mm high. Join panels to make cages using pliers or multigrips for mesh clips or use cable ties. Use a minimum of 3 clips, depending on height of each side. STEP 2 Put cages in their intended location and fill with stones, carefully stacking so all crevices are filled. Ensure the stones at the top are just below the level of the cage so the table and bench tops will sit evenly on the cages and won’t wobble.

STEP 3 Cut sandstone 5-15cm wider than table cages, or cut to fit, depending on your taste, using angle grinder. STEP 4 Cut sleepers to length for benches. Trim ends of pine stakes at 45 angle to make cleats. Place 2 sleepers side by side on ground near cages. Place cleats on sleepers so they sit in the gap between the cages. Predrill, then screw cleats to sleepers with 100mm screws. STEP 5 Put tops on the cages, then hose stones to remove dirt and dust.

FOR PROJECT SUPPLIES, SEE OUR STOCKISTS PAGE

STEP 2

STEP 4

STEP 5

Put it on a pedestal!

Use strong but flexible wire mesh to make

a conical cage, top it with a round paving

stone – or metal tray

– and you have an

eye-catching plinth for

your most flamboyantly planted pot.

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GARDEN TRENDS

Jenny Dillon

Garden Editor

SEASON

SPECIALS

Winter is a time of rare

and singular pleasures

in your garden

AUTUMN LEAVES

that floated on your

pond are now at the

bo om. Time to clean.

In your

GARDEN

Much of the garden is sleeping now, but that’s no excuse to slacken off!

KEY TO CLIMATE ZONES

ZONE Mild warm summer Cold winter

ZONE

Warm summer

Cold winter

ZONE Hot dry summer Cold winter

ZONE Hot dry summer Mild winter

ZONE

Warm humid

summer

ZONE

Hot humid

summer

PLANT NOW

In each issue we give ideas, tips and planting advice for cooler, warmer, we er and drier areas in each zone, so ask at your local nursery which zone best matches your conditions.

STOP AND GASP

at the silver birch trunk

as its white skin unfurls

to reveal its beautiful,

dark underbark.

RICH, GREEN MOSS

is now decorating your

walls and rockeries.

But on your paths it’s

slippery and has to go.

FLOWERS

ALL ZONES Alyssum, calendula, dianthus, primula, pansy, viola.

ZONES 2-5 Candytu , Canterbury bells, bellis, carnation, cornflower, forget- me-not, foxglove, polyanthus, poppy, snapdragon, stock, sweet pea, wallflower.

ZONES 6-8 Aster,

celosia, marigold, nasturtium, salvia, zinnia.

VEGETABLES

ALL ZONES Broad

beans, cress, le uce, mustard. Seeds of cress, le uce, spinach.

ZONES 2-5 Beetroot, cabbage, garlic, onion, peas, radish, silverbeet, spinach, rhubarb crowns.

ZONES 6-8 Beans,

beetroot, broccoli, leek, spring onion, sweet potato, turnip, zucchini.

PINK MEANS

GRACE, JOY AND

HAPPINESS.

THIS ORCHID

IS A TRUE BEAUTY.

WILLIAM BLAKE, ENGLISH POET

In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy

ADD THIS TO YOUR FAVOURITES

A STAR

IS BORN

English horticulturist Ellen Willmo so loved Eryngium giganteum, with its star-shaped foliage and flower cones, she allegedly carried seeds to secretly sca er in gardens she visited. Known as Miss Willmo ’s ghost or sea holly, this short-lived herbaceous perennial adds architectural intrigue to gardens. Drought tolerant, it grows to 1m and its flowers go from pale green to blue as they mature. Grow in situ from seed as it’s hard to transplant.

GARDEN SECRETS

Here’s how to have a garden that’s always in colour

1

PERENNIALS

Sequential planting is the key to a year-round vibrancy in your garden. You need to put in perennials that ‘pass the baton’ from one season to the next.

2

FOLIAGE

Flowers come and go, leaving behind shrubs and trees that maintain your garden’s structure, and foliage that changes its colours before your eyes.

3

DRAMA

In autumn and winter this comes from red and gold maple leaves, ornamental grasses, pink shrub roses and bright pink chrysanthemums.

GARDENING ADVICE

PREPARE beds for planting bare-root deciduous fruit and

ornamental trees and roses over coming weeks.

PLANT UP

pots of cyclamen, polyanthus, primula and viola for lots of

heart-warming colour over winter.

TREAT your citrus

trees to a winter once-over. If scale is present, hit with a few

weekly sprays of white or eco oil.

vegie beds by planting broad beans as a green manure

crop.

RETURN nutrients to

EASE off watering indoor plants.

better gardening

[ THE LATEST NEWS AND TRENDS ]

HIGH AND MIGHTY

HANG IN THERE

Set off your favourite indoor plant with a hand- crafted rattan Wilbur hanging planter by Stix & Flora. With a 15cm terracotta pot, it is 85cm high and $110. Visit stixandflora.com.au for stockist details.

TANGLED UP IN MAUVE

This gorgeous rose named a er a southern right whale will be popular. Tangles was rescued from cray pot ropes last year and Treloar Roses (treloarroses.com.au) named this rose Tangles to help the endangered species. Buy via mail order or from selected nurseries; $2 from each sale goes to the Southern Right Whale Identification Project.

SHARING IS CARING

divide and conquer

Fancy growing your collection of indoor plants

without having to visit a garden centre? It’s

feasible with Root, Nurture, Grow: The Essential

Guide to Propagating and Sharing Houseplants

by Rose Ray and Caro Langton (Quadrille/

Hardie Grant, $29.99). Superbly illustrated and

filled with tips and tricks, it’s a keeper.

WHAT’S ON?

Go right to the edge

There’s interest aplenty at Maleny in the hinterland of Queensland’s Sunshine Coast on the weekend of June 8-9 with the Gardening on the Edge Festival. Held annually since 2005, it boasts a trail of open gardens, plus plant and produce stalls, and a camellia display at the Maleny showgrounds. Visit six beautiful gardens. Entry to all the gardens is $20 ($5 for one garden). For more details, go to malenygardenclub.org.

GARDEN TRENDS

moon guide

Use the phases of the moon to your advantage by following Milton Black’s planting guide

JUNE

SUN

MON

TUES

WED

THUR

FRI

SAT

 

Moon in

Taurus

Moon enters

New Moon in

Moon enters

Moon enters

Gemini 9:48pm

Gemini 8:02pm

Cancer 2:17am

Leo 5:16am

Moon

First Quarter

Moon enters

Moon enters

Moon enters

enters Virgo

Moon in Virgo

Libra 10:29am

Scorpio 2:02pm

Sagittarius

7:45am

3:59pm

7:03pm

Full Moon

Moon enters

Moon enters

in Sagittarius

Capricorn

Aquarius

6:31pm

2:13am

12:00pm

Moon enters

Moon enters

Moon enters

Pisces

Aries 12:38pm

Taurus 11:32pm

12:01am

Last Quarter

Moon enters

Gemini

7:09am

Moon 7:46pm

You must plant all ABOVE-ground crops during the moon’s WAXING cycle. You must plant all BELOW-ground crops during the moon’s WANING cycle.

Times are in Australian Eastern Standard Time, AEST. This applies to NSW, the ACT, Qld, Vic and Tas.

For SA and NT, deduct half an hour. For WA, deduct two hours. During Daylight Saving Time, add hour.

ZODIAC SIGNS

The signs of the zodiac are divided into four groups – fire, air, earth and water.

Fire signs Aries and Sagittarius are in harmony with all fruit. Leo is in harmony with nuts and all seed-producing crops. Earth signs Capricorn and Taurus are in harmony with all root vegetables that produce crops below the ground, including garlic. Virgo is in harmony with all herbs.

Air signs Libra, Aquarius and Gemini are in harmony with plants that produce flowers and perfumes. Water signs Cancer, Scorpio and Pisces are in harmony with above-ground crops, including trees, shrubs, lawns, and leafy, juicy and fleshy vegetables.

Aries

Taurus

Gemini

Cancer

Leo

Virgo

Libra

Scorpio

Sagittarius

Capricorn

Aquarius

Pisces

How to use the calendar

Best days

Second-best days

On these days, thin out seed boxes, sow all types of seeds and plant seedlings that produce their crop above the ground. These include all varieties of peas, beans, corn, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, brussels sprout, eggplant, lettuce, celery, silverbeet, spinach, endive, Chinese cabbage, tomato, cucumber, asparagus crowns, artichoke, marrow, pumpkin, capsicum, melon, zucchini, chicory, sprouts, rhubarb, all herbs (except garlic) and all agricultural crops, such as sunflower, grains, cereals, canola and cotton. During these days, you can also plant flowering shrubs, annuals, flowers (not bulbs), cactus, flax, tree ferns, passionfruit vines and kiwifruit. Plant all fruit trees and trees that produce edible nuts, such as almond, pecan, macadamia and walnut. Grapes and banana can also be planted during these times. Take cuttings from established trees and shrubs, and propagate. This is also a good time for planting trees and climbers and sowing new lawns.

Best days

Second-best days

On these days, sow all seeds and plant seedlings of root vegetables that grow their crop below the ground, such as carrot, parsnip, radish, beetroot, onion, leek, swede, turnip, sweet potato, seed potato, yam, cassava, peanut, garlic and ginger. This is a good time to plant flowering bulbs, or bulbs for propagation and development rather than flowers. Also, plant bare-rooted trees, to develop root growth, and refurbish established lawns.

A favourable time for transplanting all types of established trees, shrubs, ferns and bulbs.

Weed and lightly feed. Water with seaweed-type products only.

Destroy or spray weeds, pests and noxious growth. Burn off, cut lawns, do heavy pruning and clear rubbish – don’t plant or transplant anything. Prepare soil and fertilise garden beds for future planting; spread and make compost; feed all established plants, shrubs and lawns, then water in. This is the best time for dethatching or coring lawns.

Do not plant or transplant anything, as the moon is adversely aspected with the sun.

Any questions?

Email milton@miltonblack.com.au.

DECO INSPIRATION

Ideas

NOTEBOOK

You gotta love fresh decorating ideas to combine contemporary style with vintage vibes

SCENE STEALER

Remember the saying, ‘if only walls could talk’? Well, the same phrase could apply to furniture – beautiful furniture bearing the charming character scars of long and loving service. If you have a fave piece that’s been in the family since forever, or you’ve bought the perfect specimen, use colour to highlight it just as an artwork, hung low, does here.

CLEARLY GORGEOUS

A li le bit of this, a li le bit of that – embrace the old, bring in the new and let texture and calming pinks or blues bridge the gap between now and then. Here, a contemporary drum shade covered in a hand-blocked pink fabric teams with a glass lamp base, which rests on a metal table worn and textured by time.

feather your nest

Are you into collecting feathers? Not sure how to display them? Any smallish silver vessel, tarnished or not, is key to the sweetest of arrangements. Display it solo or place on a stack of books. Now, where did you put that old toddler mug of yours?

Photography ri-mediacontent.com, GAP Interiors/Ingrid Rasmussen

DOUBLE ACT

Layer your tablecloths, plain over pa erned.

WOW ’EM

Search vintage shops for a striking and robust pendant.

SHUTTER UP

Frame the

scene with

powder blue

louvres

VINTAGE NOW

Well-loved, country-style interiors are as popular as ever. It’s a look that is all about elegant comfort and homespun charm. Hues are soothing, pa erns are gentle and the accent pieces noteworthy. Here, the character shu ers, multicoloured painted chairs, aged patinas and the fresh flowers plucked from the garden combine beautifully for a cosy dining se ing.

Photography ri-mediacontent.com, GAP Interiors/THE CONTENted NEST, GAP Interiors/Douglas Gibb. Due to the printing process, colour reproduction is a guide only.

DECO INSPIRATION

ROMANCE YOUR BATHROOM

Bathroom in need of a refresh, not a full-on reno?

Resurface the bath, go big on pamper goodies and

line a pastel drape with a clear shower curtain.

TOWER YOUR INTERESTS

Your possessions say so much about you, so take

the opportunity shelving provides to tell your story.

Include a few colourful objects to catch the eye.

TOP

NOTCH

IDEAS

Once the basics of

your decor are in place,

add in details you’ve

created for a fab

multi-layered scheme.

MAKE THE CUT

Put your DIY hat on

and glue a wood bowl,

sliced in half, to an old

bread board to create

a rustic planter for air

plants or succulents.

YOUR CR AVING FOR COLOUR

Let your front door be an ode to colour, even if everywhere else your home is blanketed in white. Go

wild with a hue you would never pick for your interiors – be it bold and bright or pastel and pre y!

WHITE OUT

1970s brick planters are in sync with the rest of the decor.

BUTTON UP

Here’s a tip for your

bu on stash – a

rainbow of these

pre ies in a printer’s

tray are accessible and

look way be er than in

a jar or a biscuit tin.

LET’S HOOK UP

Scoop up a handful of

silver cutlery from an

op shop. Heat, cool

then bend and fla en

them to shape with

pliers and a hammer.

Best hooks ever!

THINK

PINK

PASTELS ARE BACK PERFECT COLOUR

A bathroom needs

hard surfaces, but

welcoming sanctuary, where

you relax and unwind. The

secret is in the colours and

textures you choose. If you’re giving your bathroom an update, pick one key colour

and build your scheme

from there. Choose fresh

a range that’s designed to

mix and match, such as

the modern Luna range from Caroma. Designed in Australia, it lets you express your individuality and get the designer look you love - without the guesswork. Add natural greenery to complete your relaxing oasis.

AND THEIR MUTED HUES ARE THE PALETTE FOR A SERENE SANCTUARY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: LUNA BASIN MIXER $220.80 CONTEMPORARY FIXED OVERHEAD SHOWER $265 LUNA SHELF WALL BASIN $338.90 CONTEMPORARY TOILET ROLL HOLDER $46.20 LUNA WALL BASIN/BATH MIXER $266

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT CAROMA.COM.AU

ADVERTISING FEATURE

1

ADD ACCESSORIES

Choose a metallic tone for your tapware and match your accessories to it, such as chrome, copper tones or black.

2

POP IN SOME POTS

Succulents and ferns fare well in bathrooms. Cluster them on windowsills or drape from an elevated position on top of cabinets for a burst of fresh green.

Photography ti-mediacontent.com. Prices are a guide only. Colours may vary due to the printing process.

COLOUR SCHOOL

mint & pink

Dora Papas Decorating Editor

Freshen your home using today’s delicate pastels – they’re a delightful mix of serenity and fun!

Pretty sorbet shades offer a desirable vintage vibe yet are so thoroughly modern they’ll inspire you to pick up a paintbrush or switch out your furnishings. Then again, if you’re an all-white or all-grey minimalist, just a flash of this colour duo is enough to rock the trend and make an impact.

TABLE MATTERS

Florence Breakfast Tray

in Pink, $69.99, adairs.

com.au.

BLOOMING

LOVELY

Finlayson

Taimi cushion

40 x 60cm in

Green, $59.99,

albi.com.au.

LIGHT SCENE

Bryce flush mount ceiling

light in Pink and White,

montauklightingco.com.

WALL STYLE

Top up a white wall,

above picture rail height,

with an unexpected

shade of crisp mint.

NATIVE PRINT

Hakea print

(A3 unframed),

$79, stateofeden.

com.au.

LOUNGING ABOUT

As colourful as this living room looks, it still feels

serene. What’s its secret? Beyond the white and

grey backdrop, notice how the brighter tones are

kept low while chalkier, so er shades edge upwards.

LESSON NOTES

Mellow out to the happy hues of mint and pink

Dulux

Gracilis

Dulux

Deco-rate

Dulux

Slubbed Silk

TEAM PLAYERS Partner these pretty feminine hues with white and grey, adding hints of grounding black for an edgier, sophisticated look.

ROCK IT These colours sing to a different tune when mixed with mid-century geometric patterns, pale blues, marble and/or metallic accent pieces.

IN THE KITCHEN Show off

retro-look appliances in these shades, first made popular in the 1950s, for a space that feels chic and cool.

CHRISCHRIS CONNELL,CONNELL, CHRISCHR

CONNELL DESIGN

The new Laminex Colour Collection captures the organic beauty of nature, with laminates taking on the life, colour and texture of timber, stone and metal. To create this sophisticated bedroom space, Chris Connell designed wardrobes in Laminex Fox Teakwood, bolster in Lava Grey and concertina wall in Aries.

To find a showroom or order free samples visit laminex.com.au

INTERIOR STYLE

Open-plan spaces need you to carve out distinct yet connected zones. These savvy style ideas will help you do just that!

DIVVY UP

If you have the luxury of a larger than usual open-plan space, get creative with your furniture arranging and rug placement. Create two living zones – one for family and social gatherings (see floor plan overleaf), the other for ‘me time’ or cosy chit-chats, as here.

Take your home

BOOK A NOOK

Seize any opportunity for built-in shelves (with drawers for quick tidy-ups) . To style the shelves, mix up your book arrangements – horizontal, vertical, to one side, in the middle, or none at all. Then fill in the blanks with decorative objects. The key to well-styled shelves is to allow breathing space between each piece.

into the zone!

INTERIOR STYLE

w ithout the furnishings and

personal possessions that

make it a home, a house –

be it a new build or one that’s

been around for generations –

is a blank canvas ready for you to decorate. Tap into the ideas that follow and, whether you’re planning a full-on reno or simply redecorating a room, you’ll appreciate the effect details such as shiplap, built-ins, a mix of furnishings and rich layering can have on spaces. When it comes to open-plan living areas, unity is important, so keep materials and colourful details consistent throughout.

To create intimacy where no walls exist, an open-plan layout relies on you to strategically place furniture, rugs and lighting to provide a feeling of separate yet connected rooms.

DISGUISE THE TV

How do you deal with the big black hole on the wall that is your television set? Once upon a time you could hide them in a cabinet. Not so now! The best way is to camouflage it within a gallery wall of prints and pictures in so colours that don’t vie for a ention when the telly is on.

RUG UP

If you’re absolutely

smi en by a rug that’s

nowhere near the size

you need, don’t despair.

The solution lies in

layering it on top of

a bigger rug, such as

this beachy seagrass

number, ensuring the

scale is right for the

large space. Bordering

a smaller pa erned

rug with a plain colour

draws a ention to

its presence.

DROP THE CEILING

A clever lighting plan

and a change of ceiling

height can visually

divide an open-plan

space without the

barrier of walls. The

dropped ceiling of this

chic kitchen makes it

feel like its own room

while still being open to

the neighbouring

space. Underscoring

the division is the island

with its trio of low-hung

pendants.

Create a bar-style servery with a standard window that folds back or slides to open, so you can pass food from your kitchen out to the deck.

YOUR BEDROOM Cosy up your sleeping quarters

with curtains that puddle to the floor, a fabric bedhead and rug. Note the different textures

– leather bench, juju hat and woven blinds.

YOUR BATHROOM Look to

a furniture-like vanity, pendant lights and a

gallery wall so your bathroom feels less clinical.

There’s no rule that says you must tile to the ceiling!

A feature chandelier and an oversized photo or poster can draw you into a space, making it feel like another room

DETAILS DO MATTER

Pull up two types of dining chairs and show off your individual style. For a touch of playfulness, combine traditional spindle-back seats with today’s penchant for metal hairpin legs painted a cheeky aqua or your preferred colour.

Keep colours consistent for cohesion – so black frame, black chairs.

INTERIOR STYLE

MONEY-SAVER TIPS

To stay on budget, incorporate

high-impact, low-cost pieces

POSTER IT

Original artworks can be costly. Posters, prints and photos are a way to address this expense, but framing them can quickly add up. Match the pieces you intend to buy to standard-size, inexpensive store-bought frames and you’ll save yourself a packet.

GO CUSTOM WITHOUT THE TAG

Thinking about custom blinds but worried they’ll blow the budget? You can get the look for less by going through an online retailer.

You can order free swatches to check the fabrics and colours before you buy. You are guided through the measuring and ordering process, and you can even track your order.

PAINT IT

An unremarkable piece of furniture you barely notice anymore can be the one knockout piece your room is lacking. And the fix is cheap – paint and your time. Investigate the crop of ma paints on the market that you simply brush on a er minimal prep.

only. a guide only.

is a guide and

are approximate

reproduction

process, colour Prices

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to the printing

Photography

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DESIGN TRENDS

Have a belle of a

BATHROOM

Your go-to guide for inspirational styles and colours for your pamper zone