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There are a number of Enclosure variations that you can explore when soloing in any style, but we will look at the most commonly used version, ½ step above and ½ step below.

This means that when you want to bring a sense of tension and releaseinto your playing, you can play a ½ step above a target note, then a ½ step below that target note, before finally landing on your target note and resolving that tension.

Here is an example of that concept appliedto the note G in the first bar, and then to a G triad in the second and third bars. Try playing through these examples to get an idea of how they soundbefore moving on to the more complex examples below.

​ before moving on to the more complex examples below. Minor Pentatonic Scales With Enclosures Now

Minor Pentatonic Scales With Enclosures

Now that you know what an Enclosure is, let’s look at applying it to a few common melodic patterns, starting with the Minor Pentatonic Scale.

As this is one of the first scales we learn when improvising, in jazz or rock/blues styles, this is a great place to begin with Enclosures.

Here is an example of Enclosures, ½ step above and ½ step below, being added to each note in a D minor pentatonic scale.

Notice that I kept the same basic scale fingeringthat I would use without the Enclosures, and then just added the Enclosures on top of that shape on the fretboard.

Start by learning these Enclosures in the given key, with a metronome to keep the rhythm steady, and then take them to other keys and other fingerings for any minor pentatonic scale shapes you know as you continue to develop this sound in your practice routine.

fingerings for any minor pentatonic scale shapes you know as you continue to develop this sound

Arpeggios With Enclosures

You can also add Enclosures to arpeggiosin the same way that you did to minor pentatonic scales.

If you are a more experienced player, and already have experience in improvising with arpeggios, then this is a great

place to start when learning how to build tension and release with your improvised arpeggio lines.

Here is an example of how to apply the ½ step above and ½ step below Enclosureto each note in a two-octave G7

arpeggio.

When you have this example under your fingers, take it to all 12 keys, as well as to other arpeggios such as maj7,

m7, m7b5 and mMaj7 sounds.

arpeggio ​ s such as maj7, m7, m7b5 and mMaj7 sounds. Enclosure Practice Tips After you

Enclosure Practice Tips

After you have started exploring Enclosures over both Minor Pentatonic Scales and Arpeggios, here are three

exercisesthat you can use in order to take this concept further in the practice room.

● Put on a one-chord vamp backing track, such as G7, and solo over that chord using only the minor pentatonic or related arpeggio with enclosures until you are comfortable, then change chords and keys from there.

● Put on a ii-V-I backing track and solo over those chords with the ii minor pentatonic scale, or related arpeggio for each chord, adding enclosures to your lines. From there take this to other keys until you reach all 12.

● Put on a tune such as any major or minor blues and solo over the changes using the related minor pentatonic scales or arpeggios, adding enclosures to your lines along the way.