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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS WITH

PSYCOLOGICAL SENSES
By – Pragya Chattree (2015bar013),VIII sem,

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE,
DKNMU, NEWAI, RAJASTHAN

1. INTRODUCTION:

The creative process has everything to do with the psyche and psychic function. Architecture
has to do it with the utilization of space.
- Oscar Niemeyer
The psychological attitude of a human is affected by the design of architecture through various
aspects. Every person receives, perceives and responds in different way, this is due to physical
and psychological differences in addition to the differences in personal experience. Culture,
physical status, age, gender, socioeconomic class etc are factors with special concerns that
shaping occupants’ needs.

Psychology is directly related to culture, art, and architecture. Appropriate use of various
artistic components such as colour, space and size has the capacity of enlightening the
atmosphere. For example, a room with white coloured walls make us feel light and make the
space brighter and more pleasurable to be inside. Architectural Psychology can be described as
a branch of environmental or ecological psychology. It is the interaction between human and
their environment. This includes spatial perception, orientation behaviour, living requirement
and satisfaction. The architecture provides a sense of space and support to all type of human
activities if used appropriately and it provides firmness, service, and delight. Architectural
psychology is an important multidisciplinary field, bridging traditional psychology, engineering,
architecture, domestic planning, and much more to assist people to design buildings and living
spaces for better occupation. By understanding more about how people experience the built
form, one can further take a more occupant-centred approach towards designing and
engineering, which will lead to more truly innovative architectural designs.

Architecture and interior design have been classified as aesthetic bonuses to the built
environment, with their special designing principles (Space, Balance, Rhythm, Movement,
harmony, hierarchy and Scale and Proportion) and design elements (line, colour, texture,
shape, form). Which plays an important role in the mood swings of a person.
Within architecture, buildings communicate through visual perception conveying both
function and aesthetics so, the study focuses on architectural design style as it is important due
to its immense influence on the emotional and psychological well being of human and in
creating a healing environment. Therefore, developing relation between human psychology and
architecture of a space.
2. AIM:

2.1) To create a healing environment by developing a relationship between human


psychology and principle and elements of architecture.

3. OBJECTIVE:

3.1) To understand human psychology and emotions.


3.2) To understand different theories of design elements and principles.
3.3) To ascertain the role of elements & principles in user’s daily life.
3.4) Determine effect of elements and principles over spaces.
3.5) Analyse the psychological impact of design elements and principles on people.

4. LIMITATIONS:

4.1) The domain contains elements and principle on users & spaces and its physiological
and psychological effects over them. Our limit is only restricted to the built masses
and their users
4.2) The study is restricted to aesthetics only and has nothing to do with structure.

5. NEED OF THE PROJECT:

`To develop a healing environment for the betterment of living by accordingly utilizing the
space, to uplift the sprite and provide necessary environment to the user.

6. METHODOLOGY:

6.1) In the frame of this research we wish to explore humans’ aesthetic judgments and
feelings towards spaces characterised by different design elements and principles. There is no
doubt that properties of space include colour, light, texture, smell and sound as well, yet in
order to simplify the problem and concentrate on a dominant long debated aspect in the field
of architecture, we decided to investigate the property of geometry.
7. CHAPTERISATION

7.1 EXPERIMENTAL DESCRIPTION


7.1.1 PRACTICAL INTRODUCTION
7.1.2 THEORITICAL INTRODUCTION

7.2 HUMAN PSYCHE AND EMOTIONS


7.2.1 UNDERSATDING PSYCHOLOGY
7.2.2 UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
7.2.3 THEIR IMPORTANCE IN ARCHITECTURE

7.3 DESIGN ELEMENT


7.3.1 INTRODUCTION
7.3.2 EXPERIMETAL RESPONSE
7.3.3 BEHAVIOUR RESPONSE
7.4 DESIGN PRINCIPLES
7.4.1 INTRODUCTION
7.4.2 EXPERIMETAL RESPONSE
7.4.3 BEHAVIOUR RESPONSE

7.4 DESIGNING
7.5.1 UTILIZATION OF SPACE WITH PRPOER ELEMENTS
7.5.2 UTILIZATION OF SPACE WITH PRINCIPLES

7.5 COMUNICAION WITH ARCHITECTURE


7.5.1INTRODUCTION
7.5.2 CASE STUDY

7.6 CONCLUSION
7.7 BIBLOGRAPHY
REFERENCES

• Anglin, G. J., Vaez, V., & Cunningham, K. L. (2003). Visual representations and learning: The role of static and
animated graphics. In D. H. Jonassen & M. P. Driscoll(Eds.), Handbook of research for educational
communications and technology: A project of theAssociation for Educational Communications andTechnology (2nd ed.). London,
UK: Routledge.
• Black, A., & Stanbridge, K. L. (2012). Documents as “critical Incidents” in organization to consumer communication.
Visible Language, 46(3), 246-281.
Retrieved from http://visiblelanguagejournal.com
• Architecture and psychology book by Lucy Galvin