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ST. JOSEPH SCHOOL OF SAN JOSE CITY, NUEVA ECIJA, INC.

Brgy. Malasin, San Jose City, Nueva Ecija

Senior High School Student’s Levels of Perception on Social Media as an Educational Tool

Submitted by:

Agustin, Julienne Alexandra

Carenan, Loraine Ann

Dela Cruz, Manuel Jr.

Fabrigas, Wenna Jullies

Gonzales, Denver John

Matic, John Glenn

Rodriguez, Cassandra Nicole

Yuson, Alyssa Janina

March 2019
CHAPTER I

Background of the Study

Millions of people all over the world witness revolutionary in their daily life. The advent

of modernization has made the use of gadgets as an everyday necessity for everybody. No one

can deny the effect of technology on different aspects of people’s lives. It is undeniable that one

of these aspects is education that has undergone different changes. This has also given rise to the

increase in the number of students related to the social media usage as an educational tool. Social

media refers to platforms that are either web-based or mobile applications which allow

individuals or organizations to create and engage with user generated content in digital

environments (Deil-Amen, 2016). Social media also serves as virtual communities or networks

that allow participants to interact with each other, develop communities, and share information

and ideas (Al-Bahrani & Patel, 2015).

Being involved in social media (social networking) is one of the most active web-based

activities in the Philippines. Because of this, Filipinos are declared to be the most active users on

a number of web-based social network sites, such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter.

The Philippines again topped the world in terms of social media usage as the number of internet

users in the country hit 67 million people, according to a new report by London, United

Kingdom-based consultancy We Are Social. In its Digital 2018 report, which compiled data

from various third-party sources, We Are Social said Filipinos spent an average of 3 hours and

57 minutes a day on social media sites, mainly on Facebook. It said there were 67 million

accounts on Facebook in the Philippines, matching the total number of internet users in the

county. Another 10 million Filipinos were on Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. Overall,

Filipinos spent 9 hours and 29 minutes a day on the internet, based on the 2018 report.
Does social media create opportunities for students who grew up in a generation of

hyperlinks and massive volumes of disconnected information, to be more engaged in their own

learning? Tadros (2011) states “technology creates a more engaging and innovative classroom

experience that makes students more interested in the learning process if the correct tools are

used. Social media tools give students the ability to think critically and creatively”. Integrating

social media into the classroom shifts the teacher-student education model to more of a group

learning setting. Social media has morphed into one of the preferred methods of communication

for many people; much has been written to proclaim its benefits including its usefulness as a tool

to help students achieve success within the classroom.

One reason social media is so popular is that it allows people to personalize the way they

experience and interact with the Web. Tools like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram used to be

almost exclusively used to take a break from academics, but social media is increasingly being

leveraged as a study tool, especially for today's tech-savvy students. When it comes to social

media, schools tend to adopt different positions. It’s a general consensus that they’re useful when

it comes to sharing information or organizing the school tasks. Social media no longer has to be

an obstacle to studying; it can help students create and manage a study community, make the

best use of study time, and find new resources to help them learn and retain knowledge.

Social media has a natural collaborative element. Students critique and comment on each

other’s assignments, work in teams to create content and can easily access each other and the

teacher with questions. Students can post questions and answers to school math blogs, where a

student struggling with algebra could find several classmates willing to walk him or her through

a problem or even post video of the best way to solve it. Social media is proving to have a

profound impact on many industries including education, and can elevate nearly every aspect of
the education system with its versatile applications and will continue to play a large role in

education. As several studies demonstrate, social media interaction could have positive and

negative effects on students. They can provide flexibility in learning, stimulate innovative ideas,

and increase interpersonal relationships among students and instructors. These tools, however,

can have negative impacts on students as they might distract their attention from the learning

process.

During the workshop on Education of the 2nd Philippine Healthcare & Social Media

Summit on 21 April 2016 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), speakers

who were doctors themselves cited the use of social media in teaching and learning. According

to Dr. Nomar Alviar of UP Manila National Teacher Training Center for the Health Professions,

maximizing social media is crucial in transmitting and constructing knowledge. Among the

processes that social media can promote are feedback, interactivity, integration and reflection. In

using Twitter as a tool in teaching, Dr. Iris Thiele Isip-Tan of UP Medical Informatics Unit,

emphasized that Twitter can be used as platform to convey credible information sources to

students.

This quantitative study focuses on the student’s perception on social media as an

educational tool. A research questionnaire was designed to determine the factors that may have

affected the students’ perceptions in relation to age, gender and strand. Through analysis of the

data, this study attempts to identify the students’ perceptions that can be used as a foundation for

more in-depth research. Therefore, this study aims to investigate if students are utilizing social

media tools as a means to aid in the student learning experience. At the same time, it will give

the students the opportunity to express their opinion regarding the adoption of the social media

as an educational tool for more creative and interactive learning environment. It also sought to
understand how students informally use social media and what implications such uses predict for

the potential integration of social media as a formalized learning tool within classroom settings.

Importantly, we offer insights into how educators can strategically incorporate social media tools

into the classroom as well as how the use of social media can potentially affect students’ views

of the instructor and the school.

Statement of the Problem

The study seeks to answer the following questions:

1. What is the profile of the senior high school students in terms of;

a. Sex;

b. Strand; and

c. Grade Level?

2. What is the level of perception of the senior high school students on social media as an

educational tool?

3. Is there a significant difference in the respondent’s level of perception on social media as

an educational tool when grouped by the profile variables?

Hypothesis of the Study

1. There is no significant difference in the respondent’s level of perception on social

media as an educational tool when grouped by the profile variables.


Significance of the Study

This study is beneficial to the following:

Senior High School Students. That through this study, the senior high students shall

learn to assess the social media or social networking sites as an educational tool reflectively in

order for them to be cultured and become responsible users;

School. That through this study, the school may develop their classroom into more

engaging, relevant, and culturally diverse and that the school may serve as an avenue where the

students and teachers can share information with each other through the use of social media;

Community. That through this study, the people can be more cultivated and aware of the

events happening around them by taking advantage of the information dissemination tool; and

Future Researchers. That this study may motivate future researchers to carry on

conducting studies relevant to social media as an educational tool.

Scope and Delimitation

This study is limited to the identification of: (a) the profile of the senior high school

students in terms of sex, strand, and grade level; (b) the level of perception of the senior high

school students on social media as an educational tool; and (c) the significant difference in the

respondent’s perception on social media as an educational tool when grouped by the profile

variables. Additionally, the study scope is limited to the time factor, respondents, and techniques

used in this study.


Conceptual Framework

Phase 1: Perceptual Level

Perception on Social Media as


an Educational Tool

Phase 2: Relational
Dimensions

- Sex -Grade Level


- Strand

Qualitative Part

Manifestations of Social Media as


an Educational Tool

Towards the enhancement of


responsible usage of social
media for educational purposes

Figure 1: Research Paradigm

Phase 1 of the study describes the perceptions of the respondents about social media as an

educational tool.
Phase 2 shows the relations among the profile variables presumed to affect or influence

the perception of the respondents. In this study, the presumed profile variables are sex, strand,

and grade level.

Phase 3 determines some manifestations of the senior high school students as regards

their levels of perception. These perceptions towards the social media as an educational tool will

then be assessed or validated using the survey questionnaire.


CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

Related Literature and Studies on Social Media

Dollarhide (2019) stated that social media is computer-based technology that facilitates

the sharing of ideas, thoughts, and information through the building of virtual networks and

communities. By design, social media is internet-based and gives users quick electronic

communication of content. Content includes personal information, documents, videos, and

photos. Users engage with social media via computer, tablet or smartphone via web-based

software or web application, often utilizing it for messaging. The power of social media is the

ability to connect and share information with anyone on Earth, or with many people

simultaneously.

According to Baruah (2012), social media is media for social interaction as a superset

beyond social communication. There are pros and cons to the use of social media. One most

important advantage is the online sharing of knowledge and information among the different

groups of people. This online sharing of information also promotes the increase in the

communication skills among the people especially among the learners/students of educational

institutions. There is also a flip side to the use of social media tools. Sometimes, such tools are

misused by people which leads to interference into one‘s privacy. Such instances can lead to

dangerous proportions keeping in view the ethical aspect of the use of such media. Since the age

of Social Media climbed its way to the top, it began to affect the lives of many people, most

especially the lives of the students. It has its advantages and disadvantages. The Hudson Group

stated that social media has been criticized a lot due to the effect it has on the way students

produce and retain information. Some parents are of the opinion that social media can be very
distracting and harmful for students. On the contrary, social media offers plenty of opportunities

for learning and interaction. It is rather simple to see how students benefit from social media. By

using technology in classrooms, the young generation is paving a new way of education and

learning. Students are getting to explore and experience the world not only by books and

assignments; but also by adapting a new form of communication. In a world where your

networks and connections are important, graduates enter the workplaces with a lot more to offer.

What exactly are students learning by using social media? Social media connections are

designed to increase your networks, form communities and interact easily. Today’s students are

accessing Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other such social networking sites to connect and

share information with those around them. One of the most fascinating things about social media

is the way the users can interact and engage with each other through a mere web presence

without having to meet someone in person.

Dlamini (2017), a content creator at Educor Holdings, explained that social media has

gained credibility over the years as a trusted source of information and platform where

organizations can interact with audiences. We are seeing education institutions adapting these

developments into their systems and relying on group resources and mechanisms to improve the

student life. The use of social media in education provides students with the ability to get more

useful information, to connect with learning groups and other educational systems that make

education convenient.

Social network tools afford students and institutions with multiple opportunities to

improve learning methods. Through these networks, you can incorporate social media plugins
that enable sharing and interaction. Students can benefit from online tutorials and resources that

are shared through social networks and LMS’s.

There is valuable knowledge to be gained through social media such as analytics and

insights on various topics or issues for study purposes. Social media is also a medium where

students can establish beneficial connections for their careers. As an educational institution, it is

crucial to be active in many social platforms possible; this helps create better student training

strategies and shapes student culture. Social media offers audience and subject monitoring tools

that are useful and it is one of the best platforms to extract data. You can find out how the

majority people feel about a particular topic or how experts perceive and advice on specific

issues. This can help students compile and produce useful content for research. Whether students

are working on an assignment, working on a project or trying to gain more insight on a subject,

some of the best information and results can be extracted from social media.

Social media plays an important role in every student’s life. It is easier and convenient to

access information, provide information and communicate via social media. Teachers and

students are connected to each other and can make good use of these platforms for the working

of their education (Gupta, 2015).

According to Hopkins (2018), social media can increase student collaboration. Students

become friends with their classmates on social media and are more likely to collaborate on

projects. This can lead to higher retention rates as students become more connected to the

institution. Faculty can use social media as a way to get students to participate. Many students

are naturally shy in person, and many may not speak up in a classroom, but that may not be the

case on social media.


Today’s students grew up on social media, and for many, it is the natural way to interact.

Faculty can ask questions on social media such as Twitter and students can answer those

questions, by including a specific hashtag. This not only allows the faculty to find the student

answers but also allows other students to see what others are answering and create a dialog.

Many learning management systems incorporate a discussion board to accomplish this same

educational pedagogy but are just as useful if not more by using a social media platform in

Education. Social Media can be useful for team projects. Many colleges stress the importance of

the soft skill of working in groups. Social Media sites can be helpful to increase this ability as the

students can hold meetings in real time and work on their projects. This enhances the likelihood

that they will also spend time together working on projects and may not have to make time to

meet in person all the time as the project progresses. Having teams work together using social

media only strengthens advantage one and two of your educational activities.

Social media can provide a richer experience for resources. Videos, resource websites,

and tutorials can be shared very easily with the entire classroom at the click of the button. This

eliminates the need for students to copy website links from a handout and have the risk of

mistyping. It is much easier just to click a link than to type it. Video Conferencing in the

Classroom is also a significant benefit. Using social networking sites such as Google Plus will

allow the use of Google Hangouts. These sorts of resources can be used to setup class sessions

where everyone can collaborate through video in real time. Google Hangouts can also be saved

for future reference, in case one of the students has a conflict and cannot make the meeting.

These are just a few of the many advantages of using social media in education, but like anything

else, where there is an advantage there are also disadvantages of social media in education
Students can get distracted and start using the social media for their purposes and not pay

attention to the educational content. Distraction is going to happen to a certain extent, and there

is not a lot the faculty member can do to prevent it. The key to explain to the students that you

are using social media as an educational resource, and they need to stay focused on those tasks

during classroom participation. Using the feedback model for answering questions listed in the

advantages of social media will help to reduce this disadvantage. Posting inappropriate content

can also be a significant problem. This can damage the reputation of the educational institution

and likely one of the reasons that many educational institutions have not embraced social media.

This can be overcome by ensuring you have the proper social media policies in place and dealing

with students who violate the plan in a manner that still encourages social interaction, but lets

them know they need to remain professional. The risk of these sorts of incidents can typically be

reduced with proper education of the students. Students, especially those in college that posting

inappropriate content on social networks can not only hurt them in their classes but also raise a

red flag to potential employers that the student may not be a good fit. Many companies now use

social media posts as a background check before hiring and having content you would not want

your mother to ready could reduce the chance of a student landing a great job. It has many of the

social media interaction applications and still will allow you to keep your social media in

education somewhat protected and private.

Relying too much on social media for communication can stifle a student’s ability to

interact in person. This is a problem throughout society and not just limited to education. Many

of today’s youth have grown up with technology and many times it is easier for them just to

communicate online and not in person. That is one of the reasons to incorporate video

conferencing into the classroom as part of your strategy. Having the student interact through a
social media technology such as Google Hangouts, can sometimes break the ice and allow them

to communicate better in person. This is one of the main reasons that social media in education

should be a supplement to your educational activities and not the only method of instructional

delivery. These are just a few of the advantages of social media in education and also some of

the potential disadvantages. Social media can be a powerful enhancement to the way students

learn. It does take some planning and thought process before implementation.
CHAPTER III

Research Methodology

Research Design

The study utilized a quantitative research approach using a survey questionnaire. The

descriptive part will assess the profile of the respondents and the levels of their perception on

social media as an educational tool.

Research Locale

This study was conducted in the province of Nueva Ecija, Region 3. The respondents are

senior high school students of St. Joseph School of San Jose City Inc., a current member of

Catholic Education Association of the Philippines (CEAP) and Apo Jose Catholic Educational

System (ACES) in the Diocese of San Jose de Nueva Ecija. It offers Pre- Elementary,

Elementary and Secondary Education. Additionally, SJS is Senior High School ready. This is in

response to the K-12 mandate of the government. Social media has an important role to a

student’s educational life which was the primary goal of the selection of respondents. It has a

huge impact for most of the students especially in helping them to learn and achieve more.

Respondents of the Study and Sampling

The respondents of the study are senior high school students of St. Joseph School. All of

them currently live in the province of Nueva Ecija. The respondents were determined through a

stratified random sampling since there will be only fifty six (56) respondents from a total of five

hundred five (505) senior high school students.


Research Instrument

The following research instruments were used in the study:

1. Social Media Questionnaire. - This questionnaire was lifted from Taras Berezowsky

and Anis Safiah. The questionnaire consists of ten questions that will assess the

degree to which the students perceived social media as an educational tool. The five

possible responses for each question were scored 1 to 5, with 1 indicated as little level

of perception and 5 assigned as high level of perception. The scores were totalled to

obtain the results.

2. Social Media Survey. – This questionnaire was developed by Doralyn Rossman,

Justin Shanks, and Scott Young to produce demographic and usage data for a

community of social media users. It was also designed to help individuals understand

social media use and expectations better and to assess how often they use the nine

social media sites. The five possible responses, never, rarely, monthly, weekly, and

daily were scored 1 to 5 with 1 as the little frequency of usage and 5 as the high

frequency of usage. The scores were totalled to obtain the results.

Data Gathering Procedure

The researchers had allotted time and cooperation in preparing the questionnaire so as to

serve the intended respondents. The stratified random sampling technique was used to gather the

fifty six (56) respondents. The respondents were senior high school students mostly aged 17-18

years old enrolled in the different strands which are Accountancy and Business Management

(ABM), Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Humanities and Social

Sciences (HUMMS). The researchers assured confidentiality of the respondent’s survey sheets.
The researchers also understood that people’s consciousness may also affect their honesty and

effectiveness in answering the survey, and so, the researchers gave the respondents the option of

being anonymous. Initially, the respondents accomplished the informed consent form and were

asked to answer the questionnaires and were allowed to ask questions and clarification regarding

the study. After answering, it was collected by the researchers and was compiled for analysis and

interpretation. The data gathered from this research instrument were tallied and computed for

interpretation according to the frequency of items checked by the respondents.

Treatment of Data

The following treatment of data was used:

(a) To describe the profile of the respondents, computation of frequencies and percentages

were utilized;

(b) To determine the perceptions of the respondents on social media as an educational tool,

computation of means, overall means and standard deviations were used. As for the

qualitative descriptions, the five-point Likert scale model was used:

Mean Scale Perception


1.00 – 1.49 Very Low
1.50 – 2.49 Low
2.50 – 3.49 Moderate
3.50 – 4.49 High
4.50 – 5.00 Very High
(c) To determine significant differences in the respondents’ level of perception when

grouped by sex, strand, and grade level, the parametric test was used because of the

normality of the distribution of the respondents’ perceptions on the dependent variable.

Name (optional):

Strand:___ABM___STEM___HUMSS

Grade Level:

Sex:

Direction: Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements related to

your social media use.

Strongly Disagree Neither Agree Strongly

Disagree Agree Agree

or

Disagree

I often use social media to

obtain work related

information and knowledge.

I regularly use social media

to search for information

which could be useful for

my task at work.

I often spend time browsing


social media networks for

interesting contents created

by others related to my

work.

I often use social media to

inform myself about new

trends in developments.

An increasing number of

educational institutions are

using social media for

promotional reasons.

Schools are beginning to use

Facebook groups to

communicate with students.

Members of the groups can

exchange files, links,

information, polls and

videos very quickly;

anytime someone

contributes the group its

member will receive a

notification. If you have the

Facebook smart phone app


this can be push to your

device.

Students and teachers can

share information with one

another.

Social media offers a lot of

use to the educational

setting.

Social media is used to

communicate information

from the school to parents.

How often do you use the following social media sites?

Mark only one column per row

Never Rarely Monthly Weekly Daily

Facebook

Twitter

Tumblr

Instagram

Pinterest

Snapchat

Flickr
Youtube

Blogs
CHAPTER IV

Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data

Section 1: Profile of the respondents in terms of sex, strand, and grade level

Table 4.1 shows the respondents’ profile in terms of sex, strand, and grade level.

In terms of the distribution by sex, there are 28 or 50 percent male and 28 or 50 percent

female with a total of 56 respondents in the study.

In terms of the distribution by strand, there are 15 or 26.8 percent ABM students, 25 or

44.6 percent STEM students, and 16 or 28.6 percent HUMSS students with a total of 56

respondents in the study.

In terms of the distribution by grade level, there are 28 or 50 percent grade 11 students

and 28 or 50 percent grade 12 students with a total of 56 respondents in the study.

Table 4.1:

Frequency and percent distribution of respondents according to profile variables

A. Sex Frequency Percent C. Grade Level Frequency Percent

Male 28 50.0 Grade 11 28 50.0

Female 28 50.0 Grade 12 28 50.0

Total 56 100.0 Total 56 100.0

B. Strand Frequency Percent


ABM 15 26.8
STEM 25 44.6
HUMSS 16 28.6
Total 56 100.0
Section 2: Level of perception on social media as an educational tool

Table 4.2 presents the respondents’ level of perception on social media as an educational tool

Mean QD
A. Perception on Social Media as an Educational Tool
Item 1. I often use social media to obtain work related information and knowledge. 4.05 High

Item 2. I regularly use social media to search for information which could be useful for 4.00 High
my task at work.
Item 3. I often spend time browsing social media networks for interesting contents 3.82 High
created by others related to my work.

Item 4. I often use social media to inform myself about new trends in developments. 4.14 High

Item 5. An increasing number of educational institutions are using social media for 3.90 High
promotional reasons.
Item 6. Schools are beginning to use Facebook groups to communicate with students. 3.84 High

Item 7. Members of the groups can exchange files, links, information, polls and videos 4.27 High
very quickly; anytime someone contributes the group its member will receive a
notification. If you have the Facebook smart phone app this can be push to your device.

Item 8. Students and teachers can share information with one another. 4.29 High

Item 9. Social media offers a lot of use to the educational setting. 4.09 High

Item 10. Social media is used to communicate information from the school to parents. 3.68 High

MEAN 4.01 High


Scale: 1:00-1.49 – very low, 1.50-2.49 – low, 2.50 – 3.49 – moderate, 3.50-4.49 – high & 4.50 – 5.00 – very high,
N=56

In terms of the Perception on Social Media as an Educational Tool, all of the items

were rated high by the senior high school students with a mean score between 3.50 – 4.49. The

respondents highly believe that social media serves as an educational tool. In the survey, item 8

“Students and teachers can share information with one another.” gained the highest mean of ( =

4.29). This could mean that they can communicate and exchange information by means of using

social media especially for educational purposes.


On the other hand, the lowest mean although still described as high is item 10 “Social

media is used to communicate information from the school to parents.” ( = 3.68).” This could

mean that the senior high school students

The senior high school students rated their perception on social media as an educational tool with

an overall mean of 4.01, described as high.

Section 3: Frequency of usage of social media

Table 4.3 shows the respondents’ frequency of usage of social media

Mean QD
A. Frequency of usage of social media

Item 1. Facebook 4.78 Very High


Item 2. Twitter 3.63 High
Item 3. Tumblr 1.41 Very Low
Item 4. Instagram 3.88 High
Item 5. Pinterest 2.00 Low
Item 6. Snapchat 2.54 Moderate
Item 7. Flickr 1.09 Very Low
Item 8. Youtube 4.66 High
Item 9. Blogs 2.34 Moderate
MEAN 2.92 Moderate
Scale: 1:00-1.49 – very low, 1.50-2.49 – low, 2.50 – 3.49 – moderate, 3.50-4.49 – high & 4.50 – 5.00 – very high,
N=56

Under the Frequency of usage of social media, one item (Facebook) was rated very

high by the senior high school students with a mean of ( = 4.78). The results showed that

among the other social networking sites, Facebook dominated the frequency of usage. In the

survey, item 8 “Students and teachers can share information with one another.” gained the

highest mean of ( = 4.29). This could mean that they can communicate and exchange

information by means of using social media especially for educational purposes.


On the other hand, the lowest mean although still described as high is item 10 “Social

media is used to communicate information from the school to parents.” ( = 3.68).” This could

mean that the senior high school students

The senior high school students rated their perception on social media as an educational tool with

an overall mean of 4.01, described as high.

Section 4: Comparison in the respondents’ level of perception on social media as an

educational tool and frequency of usage of social media when grouped according to sex,

strand, and grade level

Table 4.4 show the respondents’ perception on social media as an educational tool and frequency

of usage of social media

A. Sex

Table 4.4 presents the group statistics and test of difference in the respondent’s level of

perception on social media as an educational tool and frequency of usage of social media when

grouped by sex.
Categories Sig. Decision
Levene's Mean
QD (2-
Sex N Mean SD Test t df tailed) Diff.

F Sig.

Level of Male 28 3.90 1.00 High 1.89 -0.93 52.42 0.45 -0.22 Acc. Ho
0.38
Perception
Female 28 4.05 0.89 High

Frequency of Male 28 2.90 1.01 Mod. 1.37 0.35 -0.17 53.48 0.52 -0.06 Acc. Ho
Usage
Female 28 2.95 1.04 Mod.

B. Strand

Table 4.5 presents the group statistics and test of difference in the respondent’s level of

perception on social media as an educational tool and frequency of usage of social media when

grouped by strand.

Categories Levene's Sig. Mean Decision

Strand N Mean SD QD Test t df (2-tailed) Diff.

F Sig.

Level of ABM 15 3.74 1.12 High 2.26 -1.39 30.49 0.020 -0.44 Acc. Ho
Perception
STEM 25 4.18 0.78 High 0.40

HUMSS 16 4.00 0.97 High

Frequency of ABM 15 2.87 0.98 Mod. 2.15 0.35 -0.26 34.23 0.56 -0.08 Acc. Ho
Usage
STEM 25 2.95 1.07 Mod.

HUMSS 16 2.92 0.96 Mod.


CHAPTER V

Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations

Summary

This study tried to determine the levels of perception among senior high school students

and its relation to certain variables. Additionally, the study attempted to describe the profile of

some senior high school students and the levels of their perception.

Findings

Section 1: Profile of the respondents in terms of sex, strand, and grade level

In the study, there are 28 male respondents and 28 female respondents. The distribution

of respondents is equal when grouped by sex. Most respondents are aged 17-19 years old.
In terms of strand, there are 15 ABM students, 25 STEM students, and 16 HUMSS

students. The STEM strand appeared to have the majority of the respondents followed by the

HUMSS strand and then the ABM strand.

In terms of year levels, there are 28 grade 11 students and 28 grade 12 students. The

distribution of respondents is also equal when grouped by year level.

Section 2: Level of perception on social media as an educational tool

a. Level of Perception

One item was rated very high by the teenage parents with a mean score between 4.50 –

5.00. This is the item, “being a self-reliant person ( = 4.60).”

Additionally, four items were rated high by the teenage parents with mean scores

between 3.50 – 4.49, described as high. These are: When making plans, they are certain that they

can make it work ( = 3.75); If they can not do a job the first time, they keep trying until they

can ( = 3.66); when deciding to do something, they go right to work on it ( = 3.58); and failure

just makes them try harder ( = 3.89). In addition, eleven item were rated moderate by the

teenage parents with mean scores between 2.50 – 3.49, described as moderate. In the category

for general self-efficacy, the teenage parents rated themselves moderate ( = 3.45).
Section 3: Frequency of usage of social media

a. Frequency of usage of social media

One item was rated high by the teenage parents with a mean score between 3.50-4.49.

This is the item on: “being curious and eager to acquire new knowledge

( = 4.06)”. All other items were rated moderate by the respondents with mean scores between

2.50-3.49. Overall, the mean in critical thinking is rated moderate by the respondents ( = 3.41).

Section 4: Comparison in the respondents’ level of perception on social media as an

educational tool and frequency of usage of social media when grouped

according to sex, strand, and grade level

a. Sex

The independent samples’ test yielded no significant difference between the female and

male respondents. All the computed p values were greater than .05.

b. Strand

Results showed that there were no significant differences in the perceptions of the

respondents when grouped by civil status as evidenced by the computed p values which are all

greater than .05


Conclusions

Anchored in the summary of findings, the following conclusions were derived:

1. The teenage parents are sensible and modest in rating themselves in terms of their general

self efficacy, social self efficacy and decision making skills because they knew based on

their experiential learnings that they are “neophyte or beginning” parents and that a lot of

improvements can still be done as they go through the many hustles and bustles of

parenting duties;

2. Self efficacy and decision making skills are intricately interwoven. The skills in decision

making such as critical thinking, risk assessment, alternative weighing and perception

and judgment reflect the worth and or value of the “self”. The efficiency to deal with

“others” and “themselves” are indicative of the responses and or the choices they make in

making rational decisions.


3. The perceptions of the teenage parents on their self efficacy and decision making skills

do not vary regardless of sex, civil status and the family status of their parents; and

4. Problems among teenage parents are pervasive (encompassing) and multifarious (varied),

which are characteristics of “beginning families”. They view education as the prime

catalyst to maintaining stability in their “newfound family” which is reflective of the

teenage parents’ ardent desire to finish their education.

Recommendations

In the light of the aforesaid findings and conclusions of the study, the following

recommendations are advanced:

1. Teenage parents should continuously hone their decision making skills especially on

critical thinking, risk assessment, alternative weighing, and perception and judgment.

Their continuous immersion to difficult situations in their young life as teenage parents

would make them rational decision makers in the future. Since self efficacy and decision

making skills have been found to correlate greatly with each other, they also increase

their self-efficacy;

2. Since teenage parents occupy a significant portion of the school population in tertiary

education, welfare programs under the Guidance and Counseling Office be accorded to

them to help them cope with their daily life as teenage parents;

3. Teenage parenting as a topic or subject theme should find itself imbedded in psychology,

sociology or any social sciences subjects whenever appropriate to educate teenage


parents of the complexity of the matter, which will also serve to inhibit others to commit

the same until at least after their tertiary education;

4. The omniscience of problems is a fact of life. Their presence should never derail good

and responsible parenting. Parents should continue to be vigilant of their children’s needs

and desires, to educate them of the pros and cons of teenage parenting; and

5. That similar studies on teenage parenting be conducted with the inclusion of other

variables not mentioned in the study to widen one’s understanding of the issue.

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