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A Wordsworth-Pope Parallel Author(s): Chester L. Shaver Source: Modern Language Notes, Vol. 61, No. 7

A Wordsworth-Pope Parallel Author(s): Chester L. Shaver Source: Modern Language Notes, Vol. 61, No. 7 (Nov., 1946), pp. 467-468

Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press

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AN ADEQUATE

TEXT OF J. MI. SYNGE

467

and fivepoems2 but strangely enoughcontainsthe hithertounre- printed" An AutumnNightin the Hills." Both the London and the New York publishersclaim to have assembledtheir editions fromtextssubmittedto themby the Syngeestate,but apparently no checkwas made to determinetheiraccuracyor completeness. In 1908 Synge wroteto MIaxMeyerfeldthat he had rewritten

and improveda portionofthethirdact ofThe WellOfThe Saints.3 Therewere,therefore,twoversionsofthethirdact oftheplay: the firstpublishedin 1905,4 and the secondreferredto by Synge as havingbeen writtenin 1908. Althoughthis improvedversionof the thirdact had been givento the AbbeyTheatreforits acting version,5it was notsubstitutedforthediscarded,olderversionuntil the London edition of 1932 printedit. To complicatematters further,theRandomHouse editionforsomecuriousreasonreverted to theearliertext. In orderto have a complete,authentictextof Synge'sworksone thereforemust use the London edition,because it alone has the

approvedreadingof The Well Of The Saints and

some hitherto

unpublishedmaterialfromthe notebooksof Synge. But sincethis London edition omits two essays, " Under Ether " and " An Autumn Night in the Hills," one must also have the Random House edition,whichis the onlyone containingthe latteressay.

Washington Square College, NetwYork University

A WORDSWORTH-POPE

DAVID H. GREENE

PARALLEL

None of Wordsworth'sbest-knowneditorshas drawnattention to the possibilitythat the openingline of his famousaddressto the Poet, "If thou indeedderivethylight fromHeaven," echoes

2 The translations fromVillon, Colin Musset, Walter von der Vogelweide, and Leopardi. 3"Letters of John Millington Synge," Yale Review (XIII, 1924), 708-9. 'London, A. H. Bullen.

6 Synge wrote to Meyerfeldthat he had rewrittenthe act for the Abbey's production of the play in May, 1908. It was from the Abbey company's acting version that the revised version was finally obtained.

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468

MODERN LANGUAGE NOTES, NOVEMBER, 1946

a passagein Pope's An Essay on Criticism.1-Comparingthe critic to thepoetin the originof his distinguishingmerit,Pope writes:

In Poets as true genius is but rare, True Taste as seldom is the Critic's share; Both must alike fromHeav'n derive their light. (11-13)

Wordsworth,thoughnevera championof Pope's verse,had a higherregardfor An Essay on Criticismthan for Pope's later poems. Writingto AlexanderDyce on May 10, 1830, he said:

Pope, in that production of his Boyhood, the ode to Solitude, and in his Essay on Criticism, has furnished proofs that at one period of his life he felt the charm of a sober and subdued style,which he afterwardsabandoned for one that is to my taste at least too pointed and ambitious, and for a versificationtoo timidly balanced.

At some time in his life, too, Wordsworthgot many of Pope's versesby heart,for about 1836 he remarked: "To this day I believe I could repeat,with a little previousrummagingof my

memory,severalthousandlines of Pope." 2

therefore,thathe could recallthe line in question.

It is notimprobable,

Oberlin College

CHESTER L. SHAVER

THE "DUKE'S

" TOOTH-POWDER RACKET:

A NOTE ON HUCKLEBERRY

FINN

Just afterthe " King " and the " Duke " comeaboardthe raft in HuckleberryFinn, the " Duke " reveals that he has gotten himselfinto troubleby " sellingan articleto take the tartaroff the teeth-and it does take it off,too, and generlythe enamel along withit -" Evidenceof the actual existenceand extentof this racketis offeredin the followingindignanteditorialfrom The New York Weeklyof August24, 1871,page 6:

1 No allusion to the possibility is made by Knight, Dowden, Hutchinson, George, Harper, or De Selincourt. 2 See R. D. Havens, The Mind of a Poet (Baltimore, 1941), p. 402.

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