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St Aloysius College (Autonomous)

MangalURU

Re-accredited by Naac “a” Grade


With a CGPA – 3.62 (3rd cycle)

Course structure and Syllabus

of
Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in English

M.A English

CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM (CBCS)


(2016 –17 BATCH ONWARDS)
¸ÀAvÀ C¯ÉÆòAiÀĸï ST ALOYSIUS COLLEGE
PÁ¯ÉÃdÄ
(¸ÁéAiÀÄvÀÛ)
(Autonomous)
P.B.No.720
ªÀÄAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ- 575
003 MANGALURU- 575 003, INDIA
Phone:+91-0824 2449700,2449701
Fax: 0824-2449705
Email: principal@staloysius.edu.in
Website: www.staloysius.edu.in

Re-accredited by NAAC with ‘A’ Grade with a CGPA – 3.62 (3rd cycle)
Recognized by UGC as “College with Potential for Excellence”
College with “Star Status” conferred by DBT, Government of India

No: SAC 40/Syllabus 2016-17 Date: 24–11–2016

NOTIFICATION

Sub: Syllabus of M.A English Under Choice Based


Credit System.

Ref: 1. Academic Council decision dated 24-09-2016


2. Office Notification dated 24-11-2016

Pursuant to the Notification cited under reference (2)


above, the Syllabus of M.A English Under Choice Based Credit
System is hereby notified for implementation with effect from
the academic year 2016-17.

PRINCIPAL REGISTRAR

To:
1. The Chairman/Dean/HOD.
2. The Registrar
3. Library
4. PG Office
PREAMBLE

St Aloysius College, a premier institution of Higher Learning, has been catering to the
educational needs of the people of the Coastal districts of Karnataka for the past 136
years. The college is managed by Jesuit priests, who have created a niche for themselves
in the field of quality higher education all over the world. The college boasts of 6
undergraduate degree programmes and more than 18 postgraduate programmes, along
with research programmes. While the major thrust of the education imparted by the
college is academic excellence, the vision of the college endeavours to make the students
socially sensitive and ultimately churns out men and women for others. The college,
besides being conferred with an autonomous status, has been reaccredited with an “A”
grade by NAAC (CGPA 3.62) and has been conferred with ‘College with Potential for
Excellence’. Realizing the challenges and opportunities of Globalization the college has
created effective systems like career guidance and placement cells to prepare our
students for gainful employment. The college intends to enhance the quality of
education constantly through the mechanisms of NAAC, IQAC, and TQM which facilitate
the efficient academic and extra-curricular audit of the institution. The college has one of
the most vibrant Industry-Academia Interfaces. Having established many post graduate
courses and considering the expertise available in the college and career opportunities in
the outside world, we have been keenly looking for courses that would make the
institution more relevant and meaningful. One of the fields that require immediate
attention from all academic institutions is producing proficient and highly skilled
manpower for the English industry. Since there are not many institutions offering a post
graduate course in English, the college decided to offer this course to the graduates of
this area. It is intended to make the course academically of high calibre and sensitive to
the needs of the Industry.

Objectives

To impart comprehensive knowledge of the various aspects of English Literature and


Effective skills of Proficiency in English through a competent and cutting-edge curriculum
and to prepare the students for various professions in teaching, communication and the
industry.

 To impart quality input on English Literature taking into consideration the recent
developments and thrust areas in the field.
 To make the students competent in the linguistic performance by focusing on skill
acquisition through peer teaching-learning, tutorials, practical sessions and soft
skills in the regular curriculum.
 To train the students in the methods and skills of independent academic work
through projects, class reports, assignments, seminars, research papers and
projects.

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 To train the students in the effective use of ICT through periodical presentations
on the various topics in literature and communication.
 To encourage students to make effective use of the internet for gaining
knowledge by providing internet browsing facility in the department.
 To establish a network of industry-academia interaction with the major industries
in the area and constantly interact with them to understand the needs of the
industry.
 To organize intellectually stimulating programmes, workshops and seminars every
semester on various topics in English literature.
 To encourage students to take projects, and to research and document the work
and present research papers at research seminars.
 To expose the students to the imperatives of careers by training them in various
fields including preparing them for the NET exam.

Nomenclature of the course


Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in English (M.A English)

Scope
Placements available for the students of English are many.

 To take up competitive examinations like IAS, IFS, IPS, IRS and State and Central
Government jobs. Records show that many of those who have proved successful
had taken English Literature as one of the Optionals.KAS class I and class II officers
can choose English as one of the optionals which is a scoring subject.
 Reserve Bank, State Bank, Nationalised Banks, Cooperative Banks and Private
Banks recruit their officers through competitive examinations where General
English (objective and essay type) is a compulsory paper and M.A. English
students can score better.
 Air lines, Railways, LIC, GIC and P&T select their officers through examinations
with English as a compulsory paper and surely students of English language and
literature have a definite edge over others.
 Public Relations and HRD officers need to have effective communication skills and
mastery in Spoken English and students of English Literature and Communication
will get their preference.
 Translation officers for the Ministry of External Affairs and other departments are
required to have high level competency in English and the necessary skills are
provided in this programme.
 Advertising and Journalism fields extensively employ M.A. English students.
 Publishing Houses need candidates proficient in English.
 Teaching at various levels (Universities, Colleges, Pre-university Colleges) requires
candidates with English at Post-Graduate level.

2
 Medical colleges, Engineering colleges and Para-medical colleges need English
teachers with post-graduation in English.
 Various IT companies require Postgraduates in English to work as instructional
designers, content writers, language editors and so on.

Allotted Intake: 40

Structure under the credit system:


The structure includes
 Eligibility for admission
 Attendance requirement
 Credit structure

Eligibility for Admission


As per the regulations of Mangalore University

Attendance Requirement
 Each course (paper) shall be treated as an independent unit for the purpose of
attendance.
 A student shall attend a minimum of 75 % of the total contact hours in a course
including seminars and tutorials.
 NO provision will be made if there is attendance shortage.
 If a student fails to get the required attendance he/she shall repeat the semester.

Credit Structure
The entire course shall consist of FOUR semesters with 18 weeks per semester which will
include teaching, seminars, tutorials, assignments, tests and examinations. Refer the next
page for detailed credit structure.

Evaluation system

Continuous Internal Assessment : 30 marks


End semester exams : 70 marks

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STRUCTURE - M.A. ENGLISH

I Semester = (Hard Core 3 papers and Soft Core 2 papers)

Code Papers Marks


Duration
End Total Credits
of Exam IA
Semester

PH 121.1 Paper I: Chaucer to Cromwell 3 30 70 100 5

PH 122.1 Paper II: The Restoration to the Neoclassic 3 30 70 100 5

PH 123.1 Paper III: Literary Criticism 3 30 70 100 5

PS 124.1 Paper IV: Linguistics 3 30 70 100 4

PS 125.1 Paper V: Children’s Literature 3 30 70 100


4
PS 126.1 Paper VI: Ecocriticism 3 30 70 100

500 23

II Semester = (Hard Core 3 papers and Soft Core 1 paper and Open Elective 1 paper )

PH 121.2 Paper VII: The Romantics and the Victorians 3 30 70 100 5

PH 122.2 Paper VIII: Literary Theories 3 30 70 100 5

PH 123.2 Paper IX: Research Methodology 3 30 70 100 5

PS 124.2 Paper X: Indian Writing in English 3 30 70 100


4
PS 125.2 Paper XI: Popular Culture 3 30 70 100

PO 126.2 Paper XII: Language Competency and


3 30 70 100
Communication Development 3

PO 127.2 Paper XIII: Literature and Cinema 3 30 70 100

500 22

4
III Semester (Hard Core 2 papers and Soft Core 2 papers and Open Elective 1 paper )

PH 121.3 Paper XIV: Twentieth Century British


3 30 70 100 5
Literature

PH 122.3 Paper XV: English Language Teaching 3 30 70 100 5

PS 123.3 Paper XVI: Cultural Studies 3 30 70 100 4

PS 124.3 Paper XVII: American Literature 3 30 70 100


4
PS 125.3 Paper XVIII: Indian Literary Criticism 3 30 70 100

PO 126.3 Paper XIX: Reading and Interpretation of


3 30 70 100
Literature 3

PO 127.3 Paper XX: Indian Diasporic Fiction 3 30 70 100

500 21

IV Semester (Hard Core 2 papers and one Project and Soft Core 3 papers )

PH 121.4 Paper XXI: Twentieth Century World


3 30 70 100 5
Literatures

PH 122.4 Paper XXII: Postcolonial Studies 3 30 70 100 5

PH 123.4 Paper XXIII: Project 3 30 70 100 4

PS 124.4 Paper XXIV: Gender Studies 3 30 70 100 4

PS 125.4 Paper XXV: Literature from the Margins 3 30 70 100 4

PS 126.4 Paper XXVI: Indian Literature in Translation 3 30 70 100


4
PS 127.4 Paper XXVII: European Fiction and Drama 3 30 70 100

Total 600 26

Grand Total 2100 92

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SEMESTER I
PH.121.1 - PAPER I: CHAUCER TO CROMWELL
HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60
OBJECTIVES: This paper aims at enabling the students to understand the beginnings of
English Literature and how the Renaissance and Reformation began to formulate the
notions of England and English and to provide a framework wherein the various texts are
read, interpreted analysed, evaluated and criticized from various critical perspectives

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 20 Hours


The Renaissance and the Reformation
Rise of the Elizabethan theatre
Metaphysical poetry
The Puritan spirit

UNIT II: POETRY 15 Hours


Geoffrey Chaucer: The Prologue from The Canterbury Tales
Samuel Daniel: Delia, Sonnets 1 & 33
Thomas Wyatt : “They Flee from Me”
John Donne: “The Canonization”
Andrew Marvell: “To His Coy Mistress”
George Herbert: “The Collar”

UNIT III: DRAMA 15 Hours


William Shakespeare: Othello
Ben Jonson: Volpone

UNIT IV: PROSE 10 Hours


The Book of Job
Francis Bacon: “Of Studies” and “Of Marriage and Single life”
REFERENCES

1. Abrams, M.H., English Romantic Poets: Modern Essays in Criticism, 2nd ed., Oxford:
Oxford
2. Bennett, Joan. Five Metaphysical Poets. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1964.
Print.
3. Benson, Robert G. and Susan J. Ridyard. eds. New Readings of Chaucer's Poetry (Chaucer
Studies).
4. Bradley, A.C. Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth.
New Delhi: Dodo Press, 2009. Print. Baldick, Chris. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary
Terms. USA: OUP, 2009 (3ed.). Print.
5. Harbage, Alfred. Shakespeare: The Tragedies (A Collection of Critical Essays). New Delhi:
6. Pearson, 2005. Print.

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PH.122.1 - PAPER II: THE RESTORATION TO THE NEOCLASSIC
HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60

OBJECTIVES: The paper aims at helping the students view England, now established as a
nation, the political turmoil and the further progress of English language and literature
into new genres. It thus aims to view the texts prescribed as canonical texts and aims to
provide alternate interpretations.

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 20 Hours


The Glorious Revolution - 1688
Neoclassicism
The Rise of Periodicals
The Rise of the English novel

UNIT II: POETRY 15 Hours


John Milton: Paradise Lost, Book IX - Lines 1 to 48, 205 to 392
Alexander Pope: The Rape of the Lock (Canto I - The Toilette scene)
John Dryden: “Mac Flecknoe”
Thomas Gray: “Elegy written in a Country Churchyard”
Aphra Behn: “Epitaph on the Tombstone of a Child”, “The Willing Mistress”

UNIT III: FICTION AND PROSE 15 Hours


Daniel Defoe: Moll Flanders
Joseph Addison: “Sir Roger at the Theatre”
Richard Steele: “The Spectator Club”

UNIT IV: DRAMA 10 Hours


William Congreve: The Way of the World
John Dryden: All for Love

REFERENCES

1. Abrams, M.H., English Romantic Poets: Modern Essays in Criticism, 2nd ed.,
Oxford: Oxford
2. Baldick, Chris. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. USA: OUP, 2009 (3ed.).
Print.
3. Edward Albert, History of English Literature, 1971.
4. Loftis, J. Comedy and Society from Congreve to Fielding. Stanford: Calif, 1959.
Print.
5. Ronald Carter and John Mcrae, The Routledge History of Literature in English
2001.
6. Sampson, Concise Cambridge History of English Literature,1975

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PH.123.1- PAPER III: LITERARY CRITICISM

HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60


OBJECTIVES: To introduce the students to the concept of Literary Criticism and to create
a working knowledge of the different types of ‘criticisms’ from the classics to the early
twentieth century

UNIT I: CLASSICAL CRITICISM 14 Hours


Aristotle: Poetics– Chapters I to VI
S.N. Dasgupta: “The Theory of Rasa” from An Introduction to Indian Poetics

UNIT II: 17 to 19 CENTURIES 16 Hours


Dr Johnson: “Preface to Shakespeare”
William Wordsworth: “Preface to the Lyrical Ballads”
Matthew Arnold: “The Study of Poetry”

UNIT III: THE NEW CRITICS AND THE RUSSIAN FORMALISTS 16 Hours
Cleanth Brooks: “The Language of Paradox” from The Well -Wrought Urn
Allen Tate: “Tension in Poetry”
Victor Shklovsky: “Art as Technique”

UNIT IV: ESTABLISHING THE LITERARY CANON 14 Hours


T.S. Eliot: “Tradition and Individual Talent”
F.R. Leavis: “The Introduction” from The Great Tradition

REFERENCES:
1. Abrams (M H). Glossary of Literary Terms.
2. Guerin (Wilfred L); others Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature
3. Nagarajan, M.S. English Literary Criticism and Theory: An Introductory History
4. Nanda, B.K. Advanced Literary Criticism
5. Seturaman (V S); others, Ed, Practical Criticism.

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PS.124.1 - PAPER IV: LINGUISTICS
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the paper is to equip the students with the various techniques of
phonology, morphology, Syntax and the relationship between language and society.

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS 10 Hours


Theory of Language
Linguistics and various branches of Linguistics
Schools of Linguistics

UNIT II: PHONOLOGY 15 Hours


Organs of speech
Classification of speech sounds - Consonants, Vowels, Syllables, Stress and Intonation
Transcription- Recording and transcribing speech sounds, phonetic transcription

UNIT III: SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS 15 Hours


Syntax - IC analysis, constitutes and constituents, Tree Structures, D-Structure, S-
structure, Theta Structure
Semantics -Stylistic analysis of a poem, novel, short story, drama and Discourse Analysis

UNIT IV: SOCIOLINGUISTICS 10 Hours


Language and Society
Language Varieties
Language and contact
Language planning

REFERENCES

1 . Chomsky, N. 1984. Lectures on Government and Binding, USA: Foris Publication.


Catford, J.C. 1990. A Practical introduction to Phonetics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
2. Chechamma, Issac. 1974. An Introduction to the Theory of Transformational Generative
Grammar. Trivandrum: College Book House
3.Lyons, J. 1968. Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics. OUP: Cambridge.
4. Peter Trudgill. 1974. Sociolinguistics: Charmond Sworth, Penguin.

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PS.125.1- PAPER V: CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45
OBJECTIVES: This paper aims to introduce the students to the serious academic study of
children’s literature. This paper aims to explore how writing for children redirects the
way in which genres, texts, and new techniques interact creatively with childhood and
youth culture.

UNIT I: POETRY AND PICTURE BOOKS 15 Hours


Robert Louis Stevenson: “My Shadow”
Ted Hughes: “Tiger”
Roald Dahl: “Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf”
Valery Nash: “Witch Words”
Dr. Seuss: The Cat in the Hat
Anushka Ravishanker & Anita Leutwiter: Excuse me, is this India?
Maurice Sendak: Where the Wild Things Are
Deepa Agarwal: Shanti’s Friend

UNIT II: FICTION 15 Hours


Donna Jo Napoli: The Magic Circle
Kirsty Murray: Bridie’s Fire

UNIT III: CONTEMPORARY TRENDS 10 Hours


Roderick McGillis: “Looking in the Mirror: Pedagogy, Theory, and Children’s Literature”
Hans Heino Ewers: “The Market for Children’s Books and Media”

UNIT IV: MOVIES 10 Hours


Aamir Khan: Tare Zammen Par (2007)
Chris Columbus: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (2001)

REFERENCES

1. Butler, Charles. Ed. Teaching Children’s Fiction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
2. Hughes, Ted. Collected Poems for Children. London: Faber and Faber, 2005.
3. Kipling, Rudyard. Just So Stories. 1902. New Delhi: Tiny Tot Publications, 2004.
4. Murray, Kirsty. Bridie’s Fire. Children of the Wind Series Book 1. Crows Nest NSW: Allen&
Unwin, 2003.
5. Napoli, Donna Jo. The Magic Circle. New York: Dutton, 1993.
6. Ravishankar, Anushka and Anita Leutwiler. Excuse me, is this India? Tara Publishing,2003.
7. Suchismita Banerjee. “Contemporary Children’s Literature in India: New Trajectories”.
Journal of Children’s Literature 2.2. (July 2008). Thrissur: Children’s Literature Association
of India. (p. 6-25).
8. Zipes, Jack et al. The Norton Anthology of Children’s Literature: The Traditions in English.
New York: Norton, 2005.

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PS.126.1- PAPER VI: ECOCRITICISM
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45
OBJECTIVES: The prime objective of this paper is to introduce the students with an
overall view of literature and ecological thinking and to facilitate the understanding of
ecofeminist theory and practice

UNIT I: ECOCRITICAL STIRRINGS 15 Hours


Introduction from The Ecocriticism Reader
U. Sumathy: Introduction to Ecocriticism

UNIT II: WESTERN AND INDIAN TEXTS 10 Hours


Lawrence Buell: “The Environmental Imagination”
A.K. Ramanujan: “The Interior Landscape”

UNIT III: BOOK DISCUSSION 10 Hours


Arundhati Roy: “The End of Imagination”
Indra Sinha: “Animal’s People”

UNIT IV: ECOFEMINISM: 15 Hours


Karen J. Warren: “Introduction to Ecofeminism”
Vandana Shiva: “Women in the Forest”
Susan Hawthorne: “Earth’s Breath”

REFERENCES
1. Dalai Lama, His Holiness The. The Universe in a Single Atom. London: Little Brown,
2005.
2. Dreese, Donelle N. Ecocriticism. New York: Peter Lang Publishing,Inc.,2002.
3. Eiseley, Loren. The Unexpected Universe. University of Pennsylvania: Bison Books,
1972.
4. Garrard, Greg. Ecocriticism. New York: Routledge, 2004.
5. Shiva, Vandana. Staying Alive- Women, Ecology and Development. New York:
South End Press, 2010. Print.
6. Warren, J.Karen, ed. Ecofeminism -Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana: Indiana
University Press. 1997. Print.

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SEMESTER II

PH.121.2- PAPER VII: THE ROMANTICS AND THE VICTORIANS


HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60
OBJECTIVES: The paper aims at understanding the transition from Neo-Classicism to
Romanticism and the growing influence of the Enlightenment and Mainland Europe on
England. The paper also aims to introduce Victorian England to the students – and
explain the rise of new concepts like industrialisation, colonialism, women’s movements,
loss of faith, and development of science

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 20 Hours


The influence of the Enlightenment and French Revolution on Romanticism
Features of Romanticism
Features of the Victorian age and literature
Rise of the New Woman and Beginning of Women Issues
UNIT II: POETRY 15 Hours
William Wordsworth: “Lines Written a few miles above Tintern Abbey”
John Keats: “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
William Blake: “The Lamb”, “The Tiger”
Shelley: “Ode to the West Wind”
Alfred Tennyson: “In Memoriam”
Robert Browning: “My Last Duchess
Matthew Arnold: “Dover Beach
Elizabeth Barrett Browning: “How I Love Thee”, “A Musical Instrument”
UNIT III: NOVEL 15 Hours
Walter Scott: Ivanhoe
Charles Dickens: Great Expectations
UNIT IV: PROSE 10 Hours
Charles Lamb: “New Year’s Eve”, “A Dissertation upon a Roast Pig”
Mary Wollstonecraft: Chapter 2 “The Prevailing Opinion about Sexual Differences” from
Vindication of the Rights of Woman
REFERENCES
1. Abrams, M.H., English Romantic Poets: Modern Essays in Criticism, 2nd ed., Oxford:
Oxford
2. Baldick, Chris. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. USA: OUP, 2009 (3ed.). Print.
3. Bate, Walter Jackson. ed. Keats: A Collection of Critical Essays, New Delhi: Prentice Hall
India Pvt. Ltd., 1978. Print.
4. Compton Rickett A History of English Literature.1981.
5. Hudson, Outline History of English Literature. G. Bell and Sons Ltd, 1947.

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PH.122.2- PAPER VIII: LITERARY THEORIES

HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60


OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to continue from where literary criticism was left of and it
examines the need and the rise of literary theory and thus provides a framework to the
various theoretical movements and its influence on literature and culture.

UNIT I – INTRODUCTION & STRUCTURALISM 16 Hours


Terry Eagleton: “Introduction: What is Literature?” from Literary Theory
Selections from Ferdinand de Saussure’s Course on General Linguistics from Klages, Mary:
Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed
Claude Levi – Strauss: “Incest and Myth” from 20th Century Literary Criticism, edited by
David Lodge, 1972

UNIT II: POSTSTRUCTURALISM AND POSTMODERNISM 16 Hours


Deconstruction and Derrida from Klages, Mary: Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed
Jean -Francois Lyotard: “The Postmodern Condition” from Literary Theory: An Anthology,
2nd edition, edited by Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, 1998, 2004
Barbara Johnson: “Writing” from Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd edition, edited by
Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, 1998, 2004

UNIT III: PSYCHOANALYSIS 14 Hours


Sigmund Freud: Psycho-Sexual Stages, Divisions of the Human Psyche from Klages, Mary:
Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed
Frantz Fanon: “The Negro and Psycho-pathology” from Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd
edition, edited by Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, 1998, 2004

UNIT IV: NEW HISTORICISM /READER RESPONSE 14 Hours


Stephen Greenblatt: Introduction from Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to
Shakespeare
Stanley Fish: “What makes an Interpretation Acceptable” from Is there a Text in this
Class?
REFERENCES:
1. Barry ,Peter: Beginning Theory; An Introduction to Theory and Cultural Studies:
2. Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction:
3. Julie, Rivkin and Michael Ryan: Ed, Literary Theory: An Anthology:
4. Klages, Mary: Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed
5. Leitch, Vincent B: Ed. Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
6. Lodge, David: Modern Criticism and Theory:
7. Waugh, Patricia: Literary Theory and Criticism

13
PH.123.2 - PAPER IX: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60


OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to introduce the students the basics of writing a research
paper or thesis. The paper will focus on how to use the correctly document the thesis and
introduce the students to various approaches to studying and doing research in literature

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION 15 Hours


What is Research? Meaning, Objectives and Motivation
Basic types of research – Basic, Applied, Qualitative, Quantitative
Steps of Research
 Identifying a Research Problem/Research Gap
 Literature Review
 Setting and Fixing of Hypotheses
 Methodology / Finalising the Primary Sources
 Collection of secondary sources/data/materials – libraries, websites,
questionnaire
 Analysis &Interpretation
 Findings& conclusions

UNIT II: WRITING 15 Hours


Difference between a thesis/dissertation/research papers
Writing the thesis
Language
The formal structure
The Thesis Statement
Styles of writing – Narration/ Argumentation/ Exposition/ Description
Documentation/Plagiarism

UNIT III: STRUCTURAL LAYOUT OF THE THESIS 15 Hours


 Parts of thesis – abstract, contents, survey of literature, chapters
 Spelling and punctuation/capitalization, underlining and italics
 Footnotes and endnotes
 Appendix/tables/pictures
 Bibliography/Works cited

UNIT IV: THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO LITERARY RESEARCH 15 Hours


Feminism/Postcolonialism/Ecocriticism/ so on and the application of these approaches
Potential research areas in English literature
Interdisciplinary studies

14
[A method of testing of Unit IV for the exams would be practical. A poem or a piece of
fiction may be given and students could apply a theoretical approach to it]

REFERENCES:
1. Correa, Delia Sousa Da and W.R. Owens: The Handbook to Literary Research
2. Gabrielle, Griffin ed. Research Methods for English.
3. Kothari , C.R. Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques
4. MLA Handbook – 7th Edition
5. Sinha, M.P. Research Methods in English

15
PS.124.2- PAPER X: INDIAN WRITING IN ENGLISH
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45
OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to introduce the students to the later trends of Indian
Writing in English and make the students aware of the diverse nature of this genre, while
at the same time to problematize the concept of ‘Indian’

UNIT I: CONCEPTS 10 Hours


Meenakshi Mukherjee: The first chapter from The Perishable Empire
Aijaz Ahmad : Excepts from In Theory

UNIT II: POETRY 10 Hours


Toru Dutt: “Sita” and “Our Casuarina Tree”
Sarojini Naidu: “Ghanashyam”
Nizzim Ezeikel: “A very, very Indian Poem in English
Kamala Das: “The Old Playhouse”
Chitra Divakaruni Bannerjee: “On Opening a Box My Mother Left in My House”
Vikram Seth: “Sonnet No 19” from The Golden Gate
Agha Shahid Ali: “The Wolf’s Postscript to Little Red Riding Hood”

UNIT III: DRAMA 10 Hours


Vijay Tendulkar: Kanyadaan
Mahesh Dattani: Dance like a Man

UNIT IV: FICTION & PROSE 15 Hours


R K Narayan: The Financial Expert
Amitav Ghosh: The Hungry Tide
Rabindranath Tagore: “Nationalism in India” from Nationalism
Shashi Tharoor: “Growing up with Books in India” from Bookless in Baghdad

REFERENCES

1. Bande, Usha& Atma Ram, 2003.Woman in Indian Short Stories: Feminist


Perspective. New Delhi: Rawat Publications.
2. Chaudhari, Asha Kuthari .2005.Contemporary Indian Writers in English : Mahesh
Dattani. New Delhi : Foundation Books.
3. Dodiya, Jaydipsinh K & Surendran, K.V. 2000. Indian English Drama: Critical
Perspectives. New Delhi: Sarup & Sons.
4. Kirpal, Viney. (ed) .1996.The Post Modern Indian Novel in English. New Delhi:
Allied Publications.

16
PS.125.2- PAPER XI: POPULAR CULTURE
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45

OBJECTIVES: The paper plans to examine the various elements of popular culture and
how they inform or reflect our attitudes, behaviour, and society, in general. It also aims
to enable the students to learn how to develop thoughtful and critical analyses of culture
which will help them to understand the overall cultural situation prevalent around them.

UNIT I: THEORY 10 Hours


Jean Baudrillard: “Simulacra and Simulations” from from Literary Theory: An Anthology,
2nd edition, edited by Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, 1998, 2004
Pramod K Nayar: “Popular Culture and the Ecological Gothic: Frank Miller’s Batman: The
Dark Knight Returns”

UNIT II: FICTION 10 Hours


Agatha Christie: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
Nicholas Sparks: The Notebook

UNIT III: FILMS 10 Hours


Francis Ford Coppola: The Godfather (1972)
Andrew Adamson: Shrek (2001)
Ridely Scott and Andy Weir: The Martian (2015)

UNIT IV: TRENDING IN INDIA 10 Hours


Rajkumar Hirani: PK (2014)
Chetan Bhagat: Half Girlfriend – Novel
Nasheer Ahmad: Kashmir Pending– Graphic novel

REFERENCES
1. Browne, Ray B: Profiles of Popular Culture: A Reader
2. Dasgupta, Sanjukta: Media, Gender and Popular Culture in India: tracking change
and Continuity
3. Lal, Vinay and Ashis Nandy: Fingerprinting Popular Culture: The Mythic and Iconic
in Indian Cinema
4. Storey, John: Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction

17
PO.126.2- PAPER XII: LANGUAGE COMPETENCY AND COMMUNICATION
DEVELOPMENT

OPEN ELECTIVE: 3 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: The paper targets two key areas in the developing the social skills of the
students – language and communication. It aims at making students give a level of
competency in language and how to communicate effectively. The paper will be practical
oriented.
UNIT I: WHAT IS COMMUNICATION? 11 Hours
 Why learn communication skills? The importance and the scope
 Classification of communication - interpersonal, intrapersonal, group, mass and
public
 The 7 C’s of successful communication
 Barriers to communication

UNIT II: LANGUAGE COMPETENCY 11 Hours


Reading
Types of reading - Skim, Scan and In Depth
Reading of comprehension passages
Writing
Paragraph writing – Topic sentences
Essay writing – Thesis statement – Types of essays

UNIT III: EFFECTIVE LISTENING AND NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION 12 Hours

 What is effective listening and why does it matter? Develops the Self helps build
relations, helps growth in profession and at school
 Active vs passive listening - Skills to active listening
 Barriers to Listening - Perception, Bias, Red flag words, Emotions, Language
barriers
NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION /BODY LANGUAGE
 Definition, needs, observation, Interpretation, making inferences,
 Role of eyes and brain
 Kinesics - Face/Gaze - Body
 Vocalics, Proxemics, Haptics and Chronemics

UNIT IV: INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION 12 Hours


 Why study – Definition of culture – How cultures differ
 Oriental and western cultures - Identity, stereotypes and prejudices
 Three approaches to studying intercultural communication - Learning to
communicate across cultures
 Benefits and challenges of intercultural relationships

18
REFERENCES:
1. King, Chris, Communication: Mastering the art of Body Language, Communication
Skills, Social Skills
2. Kirkman, John: Good Style: Writing For Science and Technology

3. Martin, Judith and Thomas K Nakayama: Intercultural Communication in Contexts


4. Raman, Meenakshi, Sangeeta Sharma : Communication Skills, Oxford
5. Singh, V.D: Language Learning Teaching and Testing: A Companion

19
PO.127.2- PAPER XIII: LITERATURE AND CINEMA

OPEN ELECTIVE: 3 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: To orient the students towards cinema study viz-a-viz literature through the
study of Indian and World cinema and to introduce the students with important aspects
and phases of cinema, and adaptation theories.

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION 10 Hours


Theories of Adaptation
Transformation and Transposition
Adaptation as Interpretation
Film Review, Discussions & Presentations on various aspects of Cinema and Literature

UNIT II: HOLLYWOOD 10 Hours


Jonathan Demme: Beloved (Adaptation of Toni Morrison’s Beloved)
Karel Reisz: The French Lieutenant’s Woman (Adaptation of John Fowel’s The French
Lieutenant’s Woman)

UNIT III: INDIAN CINEMA 10 Hours


Satyajit Ray: Shatranj Ke Khiladi
Govind Nihalani: Hazaar Chaurasi Ki Maa
UNIT IV: WORLD CINEMA 10 Hours
Phillip Noyce: Rabbit Proof Fence (Adaptation of Doris Pilkington’s Follow the Rabbit-
Proof
Fence) – Australia
John Williams: Memoirs of a Geisha (Adaptation of Arthur Golden’s Memoirs of a Geisha)
Hollywood/Japan

REFERENCES:
1. Beaver, Frank Eugene. A Dictionary of Film Terms: The Aesthetic Companion to
Film Art. New York: Peter Lang, 2006.
2. Bluestone, George. Novels into Films. California: University of California Press,
1957.
3. Hood, John W. The Essential Mystery: Major Film Makers of Indian Art Cinema.
Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan, 2009.
4. Linda Hutcheon, ‘On the Art of Adaptation’, Daedalus, vol. 133, (2004). 2.

20
SEMESTER III
PH.121.3- PAPER XIV: TWENTEITH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE

HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60


OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to introduce the students to the Modernist
movement and the impact of the World Wars on the life, culture and Literature of the
people of Europe. It plans to analyse how the disillusioned and fragmented society gave
way to new era of postmodernism.

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 20 Hours


The Influence of the Symbolist Movement
The Avant Garde Movements
Modernity and Modernism
The Absurd Theatre

UNIT II: POETRY 15 Hours


D.H. Lawrence : “Snake”
T.S. Eliot: Waste Land
W.B. Yeats: “Easter 1916”
W.H. Auden: “The Unknown Citizen”
Seamus Heaney: “Digging”
Dylan Thomas : “After the Funeral”
Ted Hughes: “View of a Pig”
Radclyffe Hall: “To Roses”

UNIT III: FICTION & PROSE 15 Hours


Raymond Williams: “When was Modernism?”
George Orwell: 1984
Virginia Woolf: Mrs Dalloway

UNIT IV: DRAMA 10 Hours


T.S. Eliot: The Family Reunion
George Bernard Shaw: Pygmalion
REFERNCES
1. Allen, Walter Ernest: Tradition and Dream: The English and American novel from the
twenties to our time. London: Hogarth Press, 1986.
2. Blamires, Harry: Ed. A Guide to twentieth-century literature in English. London; New
York: Methuen, 1983.
3. Cassis, A. F: The twentieth-century English novel: An annotated bibliography of general
criticism. New York: Garland Pub. Co., 1977.
4. Klein, Leonard S: Ed. Encyclopedia of world literature in the 20th century
5. Twentieth Century Literature. Hempstead, NY: Hofstra University Press, 1955-

21
PH.122.3- PAPER XV: ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING
HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60

OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to familiarize the learners with the basics of language
teaching, language learning and testing and to make them understand the process of
generating learning material

UNIT I: THEORIES OF LANGUAGE LEARNING 20 Hours

 Behaviorist theory : Skinner’s behaviorism


 Rationalistic theory : Chomsky’s Innateness hypothesis and his language
acquisition device (nativist approach)
 Interactionist theories : Schumann , Givon
 Difference between First Language acquisition and Second language learning

UNIT II: SYLLABUS DESIGN AND METHODS OF TEACHING 15 Hours

 Principles of syllabus design


 Formulation of objectives
 Types of syllabuses – structural , situational , communicative, notional-functional ,
procedural and others
 Popular methods of teaching in ELT
 Relation between syllabus, classroom teaching /learning and testing and target
situation of use

UNIT III: TEACHING – LEARNING PROCESS: TECHNIQUES & MATERIALS 15 Hours

 Language skills; techniques for teaching the skills of listening, reading , writing
and speaking
 Descriptive and pedagogical grammar; techniques for teaching grammar and
vocabulary
 Principles of selection and production of materials ; adaptation and simplification
 Criteria for a good test : validity ( face validity, content validity, construct validity,
Empirical validity, concurrent and predictive validity ) ; reliability ; feasibility

UNIT IV: ELT IN INDIA 15 Hours

 Functions of English in contemporary India


 Short history of ELT in India
 Problematic areas
 Use of ICTs

22
REFERNECES

1. Ellis, R. 1990. Instructed Second Language Acquisition: Learning in the Classroom.


Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
2. Harmer, Jeremy. 1989. The Practice of English Language Teaching. Lond.& N.Y.:
Longman.
3. Richards, Jack && Ted Rodgers. 2001. Approaches and Methods in Language
Teaching. Cambridge University Press
4. Stern, H.H. 1983.Fundamental Concepts of Language Teaching .Oxford University
Press.
5. --- 1983. Fundamental Concepts of Language Teaching .Oxford University Press.

23
PS.123.3- PAPER XVI: CULTURAL STUDIES

SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to introduce the students to the concept of Cultural studies.
It will highlight that ‘culture’ is that which is socially constructed and needs to critically
analysed. It proposes to portray how it works hand in hand to create various aspects of
human life, including our ‘identity’.

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION – CULTURE & CULTURAL STUDIES 11 Hours


nd
Simon During: “The Introduction” from The Cultural Studies Reader- 2 edition, edited by
Simon During, 1999.
Raymond Williams: “The Analysis of Culture” from Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A
Reader- 2nd edition, edited by John Storey, 1998.

UNIT II: HEGEMONY, IDEOLOGY AND CULTURE 12 Hours


Michel Foucault: “Panopticism” from Discipline and Punish,1977.
John Fiske: “Culture, Ideology and Interpellation” from Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd
edition, edited by Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, 1998, 2004

UNIT III: IDENTITY 11 Hours


bell hooks: “A Revolution of Values: A Promise of Multicultural Change”, from The
Cultural Studies Reader- 2nd edition, edited by Simon During, 1999.
Susie Tharu and K Lalita: “Introduction” from Women Writing in India

UNIT IV: CYBERCULTURE AND MEDIA 11 Hours


Jonathan Sterne: “The Historiography of Cyberculture” from Critical Cyberculture Studies,
edited by David Silver and Adrienne Massanari, 2006.
Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer: “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass
Deception” from The Cultural Studies Reader- 2nd edition, edited by Simon During, 1999.

REFERENCES:
1. Barker, Chris: Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice
2. During, Simon: Ed. The Cultural Studies Reader- 2nd edition
3. Longhurst, Brian: Introducing Cultural Studies
4. Nayar, Pramod: An Introduction to Cultural Studies
5. Storey, John: What is Cultural Studies: A Reader
6. Thwaites, Tony: Introducing Cultural and Media Studies: A Semiotic Approach.

24
PS.124.3- PAPER XVII: AMERICAN LITERATURE

SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: To introduce the students to the concept of American Literature and the
various nuances associated with the culture, ideology and formation of the nation and its
literature and to critically interpret the texts prescribed

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 11 Hours


The Puritan Heritage
Transcendentalism
Harlem Renaissance
The Civil Rights Movement

UNIT II: POETRY 10 Hours


Anne Bradstreet: “In Honor of that High and Mighty Princess Queen Elizabeth of Happy
Memory”
Philip Freneau: “The American Solider”
Emily Dickinson: “Because I could not stop for Death”
Langston Hughes: “As I grew Older”
Amiri Baraka: “Ka’Ba”
Hilda Doolittle: “Adonis”
Allen Ginsberg: “Velocity of Money”

UNIT III: FICTION 12 Hours


William Faulkner: As I Lay Dying
Toni Morrison : Beloved

UNIT IV: DRAMA 12 Hours


Tennessee Williams: A Streetcar named Desire
Edward Albee: The Zoo Story

REFERENCES:
1. Gregg, Crane,: Cambridge Introduction to the Nineteenth-Century American Novel.
2. Hart: The Oxford Companion to American Literature (OUP)
3. McMichel, George: Concise Anthology of American Literature.
4. Palwekar, SD: Literature and Environment: A Select Study of British, American and
Indian Writings, Lambert Academic Publishing, Germany, 2012.

25
PS.125.3- PAPER XVIII: INDIAN LITERARY CRITICISM
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this course is to introduce our students with indigenous
criticism and critical theories. The paper deals with both modern and ancient theories. It
will also provide the students an opportunity to study criticism available in translation
from other Indian languages.

UNIT I: SANSKRIT AESTHETICS 10 Hours


Introduction to various schools of Sanskrit Criticism: Rasa, Dhvani, Alamkara, Riti,
Vakrokti and Auchitya.
Bharata: Natyashastra, tr. Manomohan Ghosh (chapter 6: ‘Sentiments) revd. 2nd ed.
(Calcutta: Granthalaya, 1967), vol. I, pp 100-18.

UNIT II: NATIVISM 11 Hours


G.N. Devy: “Tradition and Amnesia” in After Amnesia.
Bhalchander Nemade: “Sahityateel Desiyata” (Nativism in Literature) in Nativism:
Essays in Criticism. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi, 1997. 233-254.

UNIT III: POSTCOLONIAL THEORY IN INDIA 10 Hours


Namwar Singh: “Decolonising the Indian Mind” translated by Harish Trivedi and
published in Indian Literature. Vol. 35, No. 5, 1992. 145-157.
Ania Loomba: “Challenging Colonialism” in Colonialism / Postcolonialism. London:
Routledge, 1998. 154 – 212. (Selected excerpts)

UNIT IV: MARXISM IN INDIA 10 Hours


Munshi Premchand: “The Aim of Literature”, Presidential Speech given at the First
Progressive Writers’ Conference, Lucknow, 9 April 1936, tr. Francesca Orsini, in The
Oxford India Premchand. New Delhi: OUP, 2004.
Aijaz Ahmad: “Literary Theory and ‘Third World Literature’: Some Contexts” in In
Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures. New Delhi: OUP, 1992. Print. (Selected excerpts)
REFERNCES:
1. Ahmad, Aijaz. In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures. New Delhi: OUP, 1992.
2. Bharata. Natyashastra, tr. Manomohan Ghosh. Calcutta: Granthalaya, 1967, vol. I,
3. Chaitananya, Krishna. New History of Sanskrit Literature. 2nd. ed. New Delhi:
Manohar, 1977.
4. Devy, Ganesh N. After Amnesia. Mumbai: Orient Longman, 1992. Print.
5. Loomba, Ania. Colonialism/ Postcolonialism. 2nd ed. London and New York:
Routledge, 2005.
6. Makarand, Paranjape. Nativism: Essays in Criticism. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.
233-254. Print.
7. Nemade, Bhalchander. “Nativism in Literature.” Trans. and ed. by Arvind Dixit and
Makarand

26
PO.126.3- PAPER XIX: READING AND INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE

OPEN ELECTIVE: 3 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45

OBJECTIVES: The paper is targeted for those students with an interest in literature. The
paper will discuss the various genres in literature, the concept of the text and canon. It
will help students to read and analyse the texts by making use of various theoretical
concepts like feminism, ecocriticism, psychoanalysis, holocaust, so on

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION 12 Hours


What Is Literature?
Major Literary Terms
Genres of Literature
Interpretation of Literature

UNIT II: POETRY 12 Hours


William Shakespeare: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s Day?
John Donne: “Busy old fool”
Adrienne Rich: “Aunt Jennifer's Tigers”
Wallace Stevens: “The Emperor of Ice Cream”
e.e. cummings : “anyone lived in a pretty how town”
Nissim Ezekiel: “Goodbye Party for Ms Pushpa TS”
D.H. Lawrence: “Snake”

UNIT III: SHORT STORY AND PROSE 12 Hours


O Henry: “The Gift of the Magi”
Guy de Maupassant: “The Diamond Necklace”
G.K. Chesterton: “On Running after One’s Hat”
A.G. Gardiner: “On Shaking Hands”

UNIT IV: ONE ACT PLAYS 11 Hours


Fritz Karinthy: “The Refund”
Stanley Houghton: “The Dear Departed”
REFERENCES:
1. Bennet, Andrew and Nicholas Royle: An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and
Theory, 2004.
2. Daiches David: Critical History of English literature
3. Evans, Sir Ifor,:Short History of English literature
4. Kusch, Celena: Literary Analysis: The Basics

27
PO.127.3- PAPER XX: INDIAN DIASPORIC FICTION

OPEN ELECTIVE: 3 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: To orient the students towards the term Diaspora, the nuances behind the
term and its role in literature. The paper will examine the writings of select Diaspora
writers and the critically analyse the position of being a Diaspora in today’s globalised
world.

UNIT I: 10 Hours
V.S. Naipaul: A House for Mr. Biswas

UNIT II: 11 Hours


Jhumpa Lahiri: The Interpreter of Maladies
Bharati Mukherjee: Desirable Daughters

UNIT III: 11 Hours


Kiran Desai: Inheritance of Loss

UNIT IV: 10 Hours


Amitav Ghosh: The Shadow Lines

REFERENCES:
1. Braziel, Jana Evans and Anita Mannur. Eds. Theorizing Diaspora: A Reader. Wiley
Blackwell, 2003.
2. Goldberg, David Theo. Ed. Multiculturalism: A Critical Reader. Blackwell, London,
1994.
3. Hall, Stuart. “Cultural Identity and Diaspora” in Williams P. and Chrisman, Laura.
Eds.

28
SEMESTER IV
PH.121.4 - PAPER XXI: TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD LITERATURES

HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60


OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to give the students an introduction to various literatures
from around the world. The paper focuses on the various genres from the twentieth
century. The paper aims to examine the role played by globalisation and multiculturism
which in turn created the genre of ‘world literature’

UNIT I: BACKGROUND 13 Hours


David Damrosch : Chapter 6, “Going Global” from How to Read World Literature?,
2009 Theo D’haen, et. al., eds., “Introduction”, from World
Literature: A Reader, 2012
Franco Moretti : “Conjectures in World Literature” from Debating World
Literature, ed by Christopher Prendergast
UNIT II : POETRY 13 Hours
Kishwar Naheed : “Talking to Myself” – Pakistan
Oodgeroo Noonuccal : “Let us not be Bitter” – Australia
Derek Walcott : “A Lesson for this Sunday – Saint Lucia, Caribbean
Bei Dao : “Teacher’s Manual” – China
Simin Behbahani : “My Country, I will Build you Again” – Iran
Gennadiy Nikolaevich Aygi : “Chidhood” – Russia
Maria Polydouri : “Only because you Loved me” – Greece

UNIT III: FICTION & SHORT STORIES 17 Hours


Haruki Murakami : “Town of Cats” – Japan
Margret Atwood : “Rape Fantasies” – Canada
Gabriel Garcia Marquez : One Hundred Years of Solitude – Columbia
Khaled Hosseini : The Kite Runner –Afghanistan

UNIT IV: DRAMA 17 Hours


Dario Fo : Accidental Death of an Anarchist – Italy
Wole Soyinka : Death and the King’s Horseman– Nigeria

REFERENCES:
1. Damrosch, David. How to Read World Literature. London : Wiley-Blackwell, 2008. Print.
2. D’haen, Theo, et. al., eds., World Literature: A Reader. London: Routledge, 2012. Print.
3. Hornstein,Lillian Herlands and G. D. Percy.The Reader’s Companion to World Literature.
USA : Penguin, 2002. Print.
4. Anderson, Benedick, Emily Apter and Stanley Corngold.Debating World Literature: Verso,
2004. Print.

29
PH.122.4- PAPER XXII: POSTCOLONIALISM
HARD CORE: 5 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 60
OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to introduce the students to the term, ‘Postcolonialism’ and
to critically analyse texts that once came from countries that were under colonial rule. It
aims to examine the impact on the life, culture, language and thinking of the people of
these nations.

UNIT I: POETRY 15 Hours


Judith Wright : “At Coolool’’
James Baxter : “The Ikons”
Al Purdy: “The Dead Poet”
Chinua Achebe : “Refugee Mother and Child”
Derek Walcott : “Forest of Europe”
Oodgeroo Noonuccal : “We are Going”
Michael Ondaatje : “The Time around Scars”

UNIT II: THEORY 15 Hours


John McLeod : “From Commonwealth to Postcolonial” from Beginning
Postcolonialism
Edward Said : “Introduction” from Orientalism
Ngugi Wa Thiong'o : “The Quest for Relevance” from Decolonising The Mind: The
Politics of Language in African Literature
UNIT III: DRAMA 15 Hours
J.P Clark : Song of a Goat
Girish Karnad : The Dreams of Tipu Sultan

UNIT IV: FICTION 15 Hours


Nadine Gordimer : The Conservationist
Jean Rhys : Wide Sargasso Sea
REFERENCES

1. Innes, C.L. Ed.Cambridge Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures in English. USA :


Cambridge University, 2007. Print.

2. Loomba, Ania. Colonialism/Postcolonialism. 3rd ed., New Delhi : Routledge India.


2016. Print.
3. McLeod ,John. Beginning Postcolonialism. New Delhi : Viva Books, 2011. Print.
4. Said, Edward W. Orientalism. New Delhi : Penguin India, 2001. Print.
5. Hiddlestone, Jane. Understanding Postcolonialism. New Delhi : Rawat, 2012.
Print.

30
PS.124.4- PAPER XXIV: GENDER STUDIES
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to introduce the reader/learner to the origin,
development, and theories of feminism and to enrich the students with a distinctly
feminine perception of human experience into literature.

UNIT I: CRITICISM 15 Hours


Kate Millet : Selections from Sexual Politics
Simone Beauvoir : “Chapter XI-Myth and Reality” from The Second Sex
Rita Banerji : Excerpts from Sex and Power: Defining History, Shaping Societies

UNIT II: FICTION 15 Hours


Alice Walker : The Color Purple
Shashi Deshpande : That Long Silence

UNIT III: POETRY 15 Hours


Anne Bradstreet : “The Author to her Book”
Maya Angelou : “I know why the Caged Bird Sings”
Margaret Atwood : “This is a Photograph of me”
Judith Wright : “Eve to her Daughters”
Anne Sexton : “All my Pretty Ones”
Marianne Moore : “The Paper Nautilus”

UNIT IV: DRAMA AND MOVIE 15 Hours


Dina Mehta : Getting Away with Murder
Phyllida Lloyd : The Iron Lady (2011)

REFERENCES
1. Genz, Stephanie and Benjamin A Barbon. Post-feminism: Cultural Texts and
Theories. New Delhi : Rawat, 2011. Print.
2. Glover, David and Cora Kaplan. Genders: New Critical Idiom. 2nd ed., London:
Routledge, 2008. Print.
3. Geetha, V. Gender: Theorisng Feminism. New Delhi: Bhatkal & Sen, 2012. Print.
4. Tandon, Neeru. Feminism: A Paradigm Shift. New Delhi : Atlantic, 2008. Print.
5. Singh,Sushila. Feminism: Theory, Criticism, Analysis. New Delhi : Pencraft
International , 2004. Print.

31
PS.125.4- PAPER XXV: LITERATURE FROM THE MARGINS
SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the concepts of
marginalinsed literature with respect to Dalits.

UNIT I: THEORETICAL WRITINGS 10 Hours

Michel Foucault, "Two Lectures" from Power / Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other
Writings, 1972-1977. Ed. Colin Gordon.(Brighton: Harvester, 1980).78-108.

T M Yesudasan, “Towards a Prologue to Dalit Studies,” from No Alphabet in Sight: New


Dalit Writing From South India. eds. Susie Tharu & K. Satyanarayana (Penguin India, 2011)

Ranajit Guha: “On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India” from Selected
Subaltern Studies

UNIT II: POETRY 10 Hours


Waman Kardak : “Send my Boy to School”
Sunny Kavikkad : “Naked Truths, With Love”
G. Sasi Madhuravelli : “Shambuka”
Arjun Kamble : “Which Language Should I Speak?”
Prakash Jadhav : “Under Dadar Bridge”
(All poems are from Poisoned Bread &No Alphabet in Sight)
UNIT III: SHORT STORIES AND NOVELS 15 Hours
Arjun Dangle : “Promotion”
Baburao Bagul : “Mother”
Mulk Raj Anand : The Untouchable

UNIT IV: AUTOBIOGRAPHY/POLEMIC 15 Hours


Kumud Pawde : “The Story of My Sanskrit”
C K Janu: Mother Forest : The Unfinished Story of C K Janu. Tr. Ravishanker (Delhi:
Kali for Women, 2004)

REFERENCES

1. Limbale, Sharankumar.Towards An Aesthetic Of Dalit Literature: History,


Controversies and Considerations. New Delhi : Orient Longman, 2004. Print.
2. Michael, S M.Dalits in Modern India: Visions and Values. New Delhi :Sage
Publications , 2007. Print.
3. Omvedt, Gail. Dalit Visions. New Delhi :Orient Longman, 1995. Print.
4. Rege,Sharmila. Writing Caste/Writing Gender: Narrating Dalit Women’s
Testimonies. New Delhi: Zuban ,2006. Print.

32
PS.126.4- PAPER XXVI: INDIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: The paper aims to introduce the students to the some of the basic concepts
in translating a text and the problems involved in doing so. The paper will then highlight
the rich tradition available in the regional literature of India by dealing with various
translated texts, thus helping the students form their own interpretations of the
multihued culture present in modern day India.

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO THE BASIC CONCEPTS OF TRANSLATION 20 Hours


Central issues - Language and culture
Types of translation
Decoding and recoding
Problems of equivalence - Loss and gain, Untranslatability
Specific problems of literary translation -Translating prose

UNIT II: POETRY 15 Hours


Nabakanta Barua : “Valmiki in Bhopal” – Assamese
Mallika Sengupta : “The Girl on the Sunlit Road” – Bengali
Rajendra Keshavlal Shah : “Last Day” – Gujarati
Vaidehi : “My Mother’s Saree” – Kannada
Kumaran Asan : “The Fallen Flower” – Malayalam
Namdeo Dhasal : “Man, you should Explode” – Marathi
Kaifi Azmi : “My Past Sits Heavy on my Shoulder” – Urdu
Erode Tamizhaban : “The Poem to my Rescue” – Tamil

UNIT III: FICTION 13 Hours


Prem Chand : Godan – Hindi
M.T Vasudevan Nair : Bhima: Lone Warrior – Malayalam

UNIT IV: DRAMA 12 Hours


Girish Karnad : Nagamandala – Kannada
Mahashewtha Devi : “Mother of 1084” and “Bayen”, taken from Five Plays –
Bengali
REFERENCES
1. Bassnett, Susan. Translation Studies. 4th ed., London : Routledge. 2013. Print.
2. Catford, JC. A Linguistic Theory of Translation. London: OUP, 1965. Print.
3. House, Juliane. Translation. New Delhi. Oxford University Press India. 2012. Print.
4. Kothari, Rita. Decentring Translation Studies. New Delhi : Orient Blackswan , 2014.
Print.
5. Riccardi,Alessandra. Translation Studies: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline.
USA : Cambridge University Press, 2008. Print.

33
PS.127.4- PAPER XXVII: EUROPEAN FICTION & DRAMA

SOFT CORE: 4 CREDITS CONTACT HOURS: 45


OBJECTIVES: To orient the students towards the versatile writings of various European
novelists and playwrights and highlight how these writers changed the very purview of
their society through their works.
UNIT I: FRENCH 11 Hours
Albert Camus : The Outsider
Eugene Ionesco : Rhinoceros

UNIT II: NORWEGIAN 12 Hours


Henrik Ibsen : The Doll’s House
Knut Hamsun : Hunger

UNIT III: GERMAN 11 Hours


Frantz Kafka : The Trial
Bertolt Brecht : Mother Courage and her Children

UNIT IV: RUSSIAN 12 Hours


Fyodor Dostoevsky : Crime and Punishment
Anton Chekhov : The Cherry Orchard

REFERENCES:

1. Bell, Michael .The Cambridge Companion to European Novelists. USA : Cambridge


University Press, 2012. Print.
2. Brecht, Bertolt.“The Street Scene”, “Theatre for Pleasure or Theatre for
Instruction”, “Dramatic Theatre vs Epic Theatre’”. Brecht on Theatre: The
Development of an Aesthetic, ed. and trans. John Willet . London: Methuen, 1992.
Print.
3. Stanislavski, Constantin. “ Faith and the Sense of Truth”.An Actor Prepares. trans.
Elizabeth Reynolds Hapgood . Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1967. Print.
4. Steiner, George.“On Modern Tragedy”. The Death of Tragedy. London: Faber,
1995. Print.

34
PH 123.4 - Paper XXIII: Project

Project Guidelines

Introduction:

The Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) suggested by UGC has given an opportunity to
every Post Graduate student to undertake project in their respective subject specialization
at their IV Semester. Project is a research study wherein a student must make a detailed
study with scientific methodology and analysis on a particular issue relating to English
Literature and Language. The findings of the study must be presented in the form of a
Report. The student must select a topic of her/his interest which is socially relevant and
useful to the society and the student in particular.

Objectives of the Project:


The main objective of the project is to develop a research and scientific temper in the
student which would further motivate her/him take up full-fledged research..
The other objectives are:
 To create an independent aptitude towards research
 To explore the various possibilities of research
 To instill a sense of persuasion
 To arrive at scientific conclusions
 To provide useful results for the betterment of the society
 To provide practical knowledge and exposure in their area of interest

Planning and Preparation of the Project:


The project is a compulsory paper of four credits to be undertaken under the supervision of
a guide in the IV semester. However, preparation for the project commences in the third
semester. Detailed orientation is given in the third semester regarding the purpose of the
project, identification of the problem, methodology to be followed, teacher and guide
responsibilities, method of evaluation and presentation of the report. Allotment of
guides/project supervisors and selection and finalization of topics will be completed in the
third semester. The project calendar is given in the third semester. Students must
undertake individual project and group projects are not permitted.
Area to be chosen for the Project:
A student can choose a project which has relevance in English Literature and Language.
However inter language/ literature projects are encouraged as these areas would widen
their horizon and lead them to further related fields.

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Project Calendar:
The Project calendar is spread over the entire period of IV semester. The Department must
prepare a calendar of events to be followed by the student and guide to complete the
project on time:

Report to be submitted Date


Selection and submission of the project
title to the project supervisor
Confirmation of the title
Submission of the project
proposal/synopsis
Report of review of literature ( desired
20)
Submission of questionnaire
Data Collection From
……………………to…………………..
Submission of tables of data for analysis
Submission of analysis and interpretation
Submission of findings, conclusion and
suggestion
Submission of Project Report

Format of the Project Proposal/Synopsis:


A Student should prepare in detail the proposal/synopsis of the project and submit well in
advance of starting the project work. The proposal must be approved by the project
committee of the Department, which includes Chairperson of the Department and Faculty
members. The proposal must be submitted in the following format;
• Title/topic of the project
• Introduction
• Need for the study
• Statement of the problem
• Objectives of the study
• Hypothesis
• Scope of the study
• Sample and sample size
• Methodology of the study
• Social relevance and Contribution of the study
• Limitations of the study
• Chapter scheme
• References

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Format of the Project Report:
The Project Report covers the following aspects:
 Title Page: College Name and address with College Logo, Title, name of the student with
Register Number, Project Supervisors name and date.
 Preliminary Pages: Declaration of originality, Certificate from the organization, certificate
from the supervisor, certificate from the Head/College, contents with page numbers,
acknowledgement, list of tables and charts with page number
 Abstract: Abstract in 250-300 words covering the issue covered, objectives, methodology and
major findings of the study.

 Chapter Scheme:
 Chapter I: Introduction – General introduction, Need for the study, Statement of the
problem, Statement of objectives, scope of the study, methodology, sample and sample
size, limitations of the study and chapter scheme.
 Chapter II: Literature review – Review of literature/ previous studies concerning the
issue under study.
 Chapter III: Profile of the study area – covering a brief profile of the area/organization
under study
 Chapter IV: Results and Discussion – It covers analysis and interpretation of the data
collected
 Chapter V: Summary of findings, Conclusion and suggestions – This chapter covers
major findings of the study, conclusion and suggestions
 Works Cited (minimum 30 Books/Journals)
 Appendices: Covers questionnaires and important documents to be attached to the
project
Valuation of Project Report:
Internal Assessment Marks (continuous evaluation): Internal assessment 30 marks
distributed as follows;
Criteria Marks
Proposal/synopsis 10
Submission of chapters/reports and 15
regularity in meeting the guide
meeting
Presentations in 05
seminars/conferences/publication of
research articles in the project area
Total 30

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External Valuation of the Project Report:
Project is evaluated against 70 marks of which external valuation is done for 50 marks and
viva voce is for 20 marks.
Division of marks as follows:
Criteria Weightage Marks
Relevance of the issue 10% O5
Methodology 10% 05
Literature Review 10% 05
Profile of the study area/organization 10% 05
Analysis and interpretations 50% 25
Findings, conclusion and suggestions 10% 05
Total 100% 50
Viva voce Examination:
Viva voce examination will be conducted by the Department. The panel of examiners
includes the chairperson of the department, project guide and a competent external.

Criteria Marks
Depth of Knowledge in the area 05
Content of the presentation 05
Communication 05
Level of Confidence & presentation of self 05
Total 20

Submission:
- 3 Bound copies of the project report
- CD in Pdf format
**********

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