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IELTS Practice Tests 1, Test 3, Listening Test, Section 3

Questions 21-25
Answers
21 C
subject a thing or person that is being discussed, described or dealt with
an unpleasant subject of conversation books on many different subjects
a magazine article on the subject of space travel
seminar a class at a university or college when a small group of students and a
teacher discuss or study a particular topic
Teaching is by lectures and seminars.
a graduate seminar a seminar room
essay (on something) a short piece of writing by a student as part of a course of study
an essay on the causes of the First World War
22 C
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
reintroduce something to put a type of animal, bird or plant back into a region where
it once lived
breed, bred, bred [intransitive] (of animals) to have sex and produce young
Many animals breed only at certain times of the year.
23 B
royal adj connected with or belonging to the king or queen of a country
the royal family the royal household
by royal appointment (= a sign used by companies that supply goods to the
royal family)
extermination U the act of killing all the members of a group of people or animals
the extermination of rats and other vermin
24 A
farm [intransitive, transitive] to use land for growing crops and/or keeping animals
The family has farmed in Kent for over two hundred years.
farm something They farm dairy cattle.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
25 B
release to let somebody/something come out of a place where they have been kept or
trapped
release somebody/something to release a prisoner/hostage
release somebody/something from something Firefighters took two hours to
release the driver from the wreckage.
(figurative) Death released him from his suffering.
breed, bred, bred [intransitive] (of animals) to have sex and produce young
Many animals breed only at certain times of the year.
forestry U the science or practice of planting and taking care of trees and forests
commission (often Commission) [countable] an official group of people who have
been given responsibility to control something, or to find out about something, usually
for the government
the European Commission
(British English) The government has set up a commission of inquiry into the
disturbances at the prison.
a commission on human rights
bloodline (specialist) the set of ancestors of a person or an animal / dòng dõi huyết
thống
Script
presentation [ C ] a talk giving information about something
The speaker gave an interesting presentation on urban transport.
Alex: ... Mr. Norris
seminar a class at a university or college when a small group of students and a
teacher discuss or study a particular topic
Teaching is by lectures and seminars.
a graduate seminar a seminar room
essay (on something) a short piece of writing by a student as part of a course of study
an essay on the causes of the First World War
Professor Norris: ... of the Great Wall of China in it. We’re doing a swap with the
history department for just that day... can use this larger room ...
swap (also swop) [usually singular] an act of exchanging one thing or person for
another
Let's do a swap. You work Friday night and I'll do Saturday.
department (abbreviation Dept) a section of a large organization such as a
government, business, university, etc.
the Department of Health the Treasury Department
a government/university, etc. department
the marketing/sales, etc. department
suit to be convenient or useful for somebody
suit somebody/something Choose a computer to suit your particular needs.
it suits somebody to do something It suits me to start work at a later time.
Forest of Dean an area in Gloucestershire, England, on the River Severn. It used to
have an important iron and coal mining industry.
Alex: It’s on the border of ... near the River Severn ...
(just) in case (…)because of the possibility of something happening
You'd better take the keys in case I'm out.
You probably won't need to call—but take my number, just in case.
the Severn the second longest river in Britain. It starts in Wales and flows through
western England and into the Bristol Channel. It is well known for the Severn Bore, a
tall wave of water that flows up the river from the sea.
colony [countable + singular or plural verb] (biology) a group of plants or animals
that live together or grow in the same place
a colony of ants a bird colony
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
spring up, sprang or US ALSO sprung, sprung to appear or develop quickly and/or
suddenly
Play areas for children are springing up all over the place.
Opposition groups are springing up like mushrooms.
Alex: ... if you didn’t know. This fits in with our course subject which explores how new
non-indigenous species ...
fit in (with somebody/something) to live, work, etc. in an easy and natural way with
somebody/something
He's never done this type of work before; I'm not sure how he'll fit in with the
other people.
Do these plans fit in with your arrangements?
explore something to examine something completely or carefully in order to find out
more about it
SYNONYM ANALYSE
These ideas will be explored in more detail in chapter 7.
indigenous adj (formal) belonging to a particular place rather than coming to it from
somewhere else
SYNONYM NATIVE the indigenous peoples/languages of the area
indigenous to… The kangaroo is indigenous to Australia.
Professor Norris: Surely wild boars are native to the UK though?
native (to…) (of animals and plants) existing naturally in a place
SYNONYM INDIGENOUS the native plants of America
The tiger is native to India.
Alex: ... I know it’s not quite the same ... and the forest environment adapted to the
boar’s absence ... the same as if a foreign species were introduced
adapt [ I ] SPECIALIZED biology if a living thing adapts,
it changes slightly over time so it can continue to exist in a particular environment
Species have adapted to climate changes throughout history.
The ways in which organisms have adapted to survive in
this extreme environment are not well understood.
reintroduce something to put a type of animal, bird or plant back into a region where
it once lived
Alex: ... boars were once common ... and were hunted in the medieval time
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
medieval adj (also mediaeval) [usually before noun] connected with the Middle Ages
(about AD 1000 to AD 1450)
medieval architecture/castles/manuscripts
the literature of the late medieval period
Alex: ... boars from the royal forest were supplied ... a record of an order for ... Boars
are thought to have become extinct in Britain
royal adj [only before noun] connected with or belonging to the king or queen of a
country
the royal family the royal household
by royal appointment (= a sign used by companies that supply goods to the
royal family
feast a large or special meal, especially for a lot of people and to celebrate something
a wedding feast
sow a female pig
farm [intransitive, transitive] to use land for growing crops and/or keeping animals
The family has farmed in Kent for over two hundred years.
farm something They farm dairy cattle.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
fashionable adj popular at a particular time
a fashionable nightclub/restaurant
fashionable ideas/clothes
It's not fashionable to wear short skirts at the moment.
Alex: ... but the principal issue facing the industry was that ... farm-raised boars were
dumped near the forest
principal adj [only before noun] most important; main
The principal reason for this omission is lack of time.
New roads will link the principal cities of the area.
face [transitive] if you face a particular situation, or it faces you, you have to deal
with it
face something the problems faced by one-parent families
The company is facing a financial crisis.
be faced with something She's faced with a difficult decision.
The lecture was not particularly (= not very) interesting.
profitable adj that makes or is likely to make money
a highly profitable business a profitable investment
It is usually more profitable to sell direct to the public.
release to let somebody/something come out of a place where they have been kept or
trapped
release somebody/something to release a prisoner/hostage
release somebody/something from something Firefighters took two hours to
release the driver from the wreckage.
(figurative) Death released him from his suffering.
raise something to breed particular farm animals; to grow particular crops
to raise cattle/corn
dump somebody/something (on somebody) (informal) to get rid of
somebody/something or leave them for somebody else to deal with
He's got no right to keep dumping his problems on me.
out of business having stopped operating as a business because there is no more
money or work available
The new regulations will put many small businesses out of business.
Some travel companies will probably go out of business this summer.
Alex: ...go through the selling process
prosecute (somebody/something) (for something/doing something) to officially
charge somebody with a crime in court
The company was prosecuted for breaching the Health and Safety Act.
Trespassers will be prosecuted (= a notice telling people to keep out of a
particular area).
Alex: ... I just focused on the boars
Professor Norris: That’s OK. It’s not important.
Alex: ... very soon it was clear the two released populations had merged and in spite of
worries by the Forestry Commission regarding limited bloodlines, a healthy breeding
population ...
anyway adv (also anyhow)(also North American English, informal anyways) used
when changing the subject of a conversation, ending the conversation or returning to a
subject
Anyway, let's forget about that for the moment.
Anyway, I'd better go now—I'll see you tomorrow.
release to let somebody/something come out of a place where they have been kept or
trapped
release somebody/something to release a prisoner/hostage
release somebody/something from something Firefighters took two hours to
release the driver from the wreckage.
(figurative) Death released him from his suffering.
merge to combine or join together, or to cause things to do this
They decided to merge the two companies into one.
The country's two biggest banks are planning to merge.
After a while the narrow trail merges with a wider path.
forestry U the science or practice of planting and taking care of trees and forests
commission (often Commission) [countable] an official group of people who have
been given responsibility to control something, or to find out about something, usually
for the government
the European Commission
(British English) The government has set up a commission of inquiry into the
disturbances at the prison.
a commission on human rights
regarding prep concerning somebody/something; about somebody/something
She has said nothing regarding your request.
Call me if you have any problems regarding your work.
bloodline (specialist) the set of ancestors of a person or an animal / dòng dõi huyết
thống
breeding the producing of young animals, plants, etc.
the breeding season
grow [intransitive] to increase in size, number, strength or quality
The company profits grew by 5% last year.
grow in something The family has grown in size recently.
+ adj. The company is growing bigger all the time.
steadily adv gradually and in an even and regular way
The company's exports have been increasing steadily.
The situation got steadily worse.
Alex: ... to be in excess of ... expanding out into neighbouring areas. Boars are now feral
throughout the forest and the Forest of Dean population
excess [singular, uncountable] more than is necessary, reasonable or acceptable
You can throw away any excess.
excess of something Are you suffering from an excess of stress in your life?
The increase will not be in excess of (= more than) two per cent.
expand to increase in size, number, or importance, or to make something increasein
this way
The air in the balloon expands when heated.
They expanded their retail operations during the 1980s.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
feral (of animals) living wild, especially after escaping from life as a pet or on a farm
feral cats
(figurative) He looked at me with a feral grin (= like a wild animal).
Questions 26-30
Answers
Forest of Dean an area in Gloucestershire, England, on the River Severn. It used to
have an important iron and coal mining industry.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
26 land owners 27 (family) group/family
young (plural) young animals of a particular type or that belong to a particular mother
a mother bird feeding her young
human (also human being) a person rather than an animal or a machine
Dogs can hear much better than humans.
That is no way to treat another human being.
aggressive adj angry, and behaving in a threatening way; ready to attack
He gets aggressive when he's drunk.
a dangerous aggressive dog
forestry U the science or practice of planting and taking care of trees and forests
commission (often Commission) [countable] an official group of people who have
been given responsibility to control something, or to find out about something, usually
for the government
the European Commission
(British English) The government has set up a commission of inquiry into the
disturbances at the prison.
a commission on human rights
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
animal rights (plural) the rights of animals to be treated well, for example by not
being hunted or used for medical research
His research work was attacked by animal rights activists.
activist a person who works to achieve political or social change, especially as a
member of an organization with particular aims
Gay activists marched in London today to protest against the new law.
The Prime Minister will face party activists when he addresses the Welsh
Labour Conference tomorrow.
28 (forest) rangers
disrupt something to make it difficult for something to continue in the normal way
Demonstrators succeeded in disrupting the meeting.
Bus services will be disrupted tomorrow because of the bridge closure.
ranger a person whose job is to take care of a park, a forest or an area of countryside
cull the act of killing some animals (usually the weakest ones) of a group in order to
prevent the group from getting too large
the annual seal cull
activist a person who works to achieve political or social change, especially as a
member of an organization with particular aims
Gay activists marched in London today to protest against the new law.
The Prime Minister will face party activists when he addresses the Welsh
Labour Conference tomorrow.
patrol (something) to go around an area or a building at regular times to check that it
is safe and that there is no trouble
Troops patrolled the border day and night.
Guards can be seen patrolling everywhere.
Aircraft regularly patrol the frontier.
29 (big) paths
path (pl. paths) (also pathway) a way or track that is built or is made by the action of
people walking
a concrete path the garden path
Follow the path through the woods.
upset to make somebody/yourself feel unhappy, anxious or annoyed
SYNONYM DISTRESS
upset somebody/yourself This decision is likely to upset a lot of people.
it upsets somebody that… It upset him that nobody had bothered to tell him
about it.
it upsets somebody to do something It upsets me to think of her all alone in
that big house.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
30 secret
Script
breeding the producing of young animals, plants, etc.
the breeding season
point of law a particular question relating to the law, especially one that might need
to be explained to people who are not experts
Alex: ... the government’s position is that free roaming wild boars are feral wild animals
and as such ...
position (on something) C an opinion on or an attitude towards a particular subject
to declare/reconsider/shift/change your position
My parents always took the position that early nights meant healthy children.
roam [intransitive, transitive] to walk or travel around an area without any definite
aim or direction
SYNONYM WANDER
(+ adv./prep.) The sheep are allowed to roam freely on this land.
roam something to roam the countryside/the streets, etc.
feral (of animals) living wild, especially after escaping from life as a pet or on a farm
feral cats
(figurative) He looked at me with a feral grin (= like a wild animal).
Alex: ... and that the responsibility for managing wild boars rests with the land owners.
Thus, feral wild boars have the status of ...
rest with somebody (to do something) (formal) if it rests with somebody to do
something, it is their responsibility to do it
It rests with management to justify their actions.
The final decision rests with the doctors.
status [uncountable, countable] [usually singular] the legal position of a person,
group or country
They were granted refugee status.
The party was denied legal status.
deer (pl. deer) an animal with long legs, that eats grass, leaves, etc. and can run fast.
Most male deer have antlers (= horns shaped like branches). There are many types
of deer.
a herd of deer a deer park
fox [countable] a wild animal of the dog family, with reddish-brown fur, a pointed
face and a thick heavy tail / con cáo
excess adj [only before noun] in addition to an amount that is necessary, usual or legal
Excess food is stored as fat.
Driving with excess alcohol in the blood is a serious offence.
Alex: ... the numbers are not a problem. Although there are stories of wild boars being
dangerous
Forest of Dean an area in Gloucestershire, England, on the River Severn. It used to
have an important iron and coal mining industry.
disturb somebody/something to interrupt somebody when they are trying to work,
sleep, etc.
I'm sorry to disturb you, but can I talk to you for a moment?
If you get up early, try not to disturb everyone else.
Do not disturb (= a sign placed on the outside of the door of a hotel room,
office, etc.)
Alex: ... the tendency for one of the larger sows to position themselves between the
walkers and the young, often accompanied by much snorting
sow a female pig
position something (+ adv./prep.) to put somebody/something in a particular
position
SYNONYM PLACE
Large television screens were positioned at either end of the stadium.
She quickly positioned herself behind the desk.
young (plural) young animals of a particular type or that belong to a particular mother
a mother bird feeding her young
accompany something to happen or appear with something else
strong winds accompanied by heavy rain
The curator of the exhibition also wrote the accompanying catalogue.
snort [intransitive, transitive] to make a loud sound by breathing air out noisily
through your nose, especially to show that you are angry or amused / khịt khịt mũi, xì
(tỏ vẻ sốt ruột, khinh bỉ..)
The horse snorted and tossed its head.
snort with something to snort with laughter
snort in something She snorted in disgust.
+ speech ‘You!’ he snorted contemptuously.
Alex: ... leads the young to safety ... the defending sow will usually suddenly turn ...
move off (especially of a vehicle) to start moving; to leave
The signal was given and the procession moved off.
Alex: ... may well also be provoked into a mock charge at the intruding people,
particularly if that group continue to approach for a better look or simply because
they ...
may well if you say that something may well happen, you mean that it
is likely tohappen
She may well not want to travel alone.
provoke somebody (into something/into doing something) | provoke somebody to
do somethingto say or do something that you know will annoy somebody so that they
react in an angry way / xúi giục; kích động
SYNONYM GOAD
The lawyer claimed his client was provoked into acts of violence by the
defendant.
Be careful what you say—he's easily provoked.
mock adj [only before noun] not sincere / giả
SYNONYM SHAM mock horror/surprise
charge [countable] a sudden rush or violent attack, for example by soldiers, wild
animals or players in some sports
He led the charge down the field.
intrude [intransitive] to go or be somewhere where you are not wanted or are not
supposed to be
I'm sorry to intrude, but I need to talk to someone.
intrude into/on/upon somebody/something legislation to stop newspapers
from intruding on people’s private lives
simply adv used to emphasize a statement
SYNONYM ABSOLUTELY
You simply must see the play.
The view is simply wonderful!
Alex: ... there are only stories of dogs ...
aggressive adj angry, and behaving in a threatening way; ready to attack
He gets aggressive when he's drunk.
a dangerous aggressive dog
Alex: ... There are now regular culls ... by the Forestry Commission ...
regular adj following a pattern, especially with the same time or space in between
each thing and the next
regular breathing a regular pulse/heartbeat
A light flashed at regular intervals.
regular meetings/visits
cull the act of killing some animals (usually the weakest ones) of a group in order to
prevent the group from getting too large
the annual seal cull
forestry U the science or practice of planting and taking care of trees and forests
commission (often Commission) [countable] an official group of people who have
been given responsibility to control something, or to find out about something, usually
for the government
the European Commission
(British English) The government has set up a commission of inquiry into the
disturbances at the prison.
a commission on human rights
Alex: ... destroy carefully selected numbers of the animals
ranger a person whose job is to take care of a park, a forest or an area of countryside
destroy something to kill an animal deliberately, usually because it is sick or not
wanted
The injured horse had to be destroyed.
animal rights (plural) the rights of animals to be treated well, for example by not
being hunted or used for medical research
His research work was attacked by animal rights activists.
activist a person who works to achieve political or social change, especially as a
member of an organization with particular aims
Gay activists marched in London today to protest against the new law.
The Prime Minister will face party activists when he addresses the Welsh
Labour Conference tomorrow.
object [intransitive] to say that you disagree with, disapprove of or oppose something
object (to somebody/something) Many local people object to the building of
the new airport.
object to doing something/to somebody doing something I really object to
being charged for parking.
cull the act of killing some animals (usually the weakest ones) of a group in order to
prevent the group from getting too large
the annual seal cull
disrupt something to make it difficult for something to continue in the normal way
Demonstrators succeeded in disrupting the meeting.
Bus services will be disrupted tomorrow because of the bridge closure.
Professor Norris: Can’t the forest just be closed on cull days?
conduct something (formal) to organize and/or do a particular activity
to conduct an experiment/an inquiry/a survey
The negotiations have been conducted in a positive manner.
path (pl. paths) (also pathway) a way or track that is built or is made by the action of
people walking
a concrete path the garden path
Follow the path through the woods.
Alex: ... they can bring vehicles to bring the dead carcasses of the animals away ... divide
the forest up and watch over the big paths ... and move bait
carcass the dead body of an animal, especially of a large one or of one that is ready
for cutting up as meat
vultures scavenging for carcasses on the road
She boiled up the chicken carcass (= the bones of a cooked chicken) to make
soup.
divide [intransitive, transitive] to separate or make something separate into parts
SYNONYM split somethingup
divide (up) (into something) The cells began to divide rapidly.
divide something (up) (into something) A sentence can be divided up into
meaningful segments.
watch over sb/sth (formal) to take care of somebody/something; to guard and protect
somebody/something
bait U C food put on a hook to catch fish or in nets, traps, etc. to catch animals or
birds
Live worms are used as bait.The fish took the bait.
activist a person who works to achieve political or social change, especially as a
member of an organization with particular aims
Gay activists marched in London today to protest against the new law.
The Prime Minister will face party activists when he addresses the Welsh
Labour Conference tomorrow
Alex: ... they can create enough disruption that they have spoiled quite a few of the
planned cull day
to… extent used to show how far something is true or how great an effect it has
To a certain extent, we are all responsible for this tragic situation.
He had changed to such an extent (= so much) that I no longer recognized
him.
To some extent what she argues is true.
disruption (to somebody/something) U C a situation in which it is difficult for
something to continue in the normal way; the act of stopping something from
continuing in the normal way
We aim to help you move house with minimum disruption to yourself.
disruptions to rail services
spoil to destroy or reduce the pleasure, interest, or beauty of something
He tried not to let the bad news spoil his evening.
The oil spill has spoiled the whole beautiful coastline.
quite a few (British English also a good few) a fairly large number
I've been there quite a few times.
point out (to sb)/point sth out (to sb) to mention something in order to give
somebody information about it or make them notice it
She tried in vain to point out to him the unfairness of his actions.
point out (to somebody) that… I should point out that not one of these
paintings is original.
+ speech ‘It's not very far,’ she pointed out.
boar (pl. boar, boars) (also wild boar) a wild pig
Alex: ... haven’t given up though ... catch the activists unprepared
unprepared (for something) not ready or not expecting something
She was totally unprepared for his response.