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Republic of the Philippines

Municipality of Tagoloan

TAGOLOAN COMPREHENSIVE
LOCAL JUVENILE INTERVENTION
PROGRAM

MUNICIPAL COUNCIL FOR THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN


In coordination with
INTER-AGENCY MONITORING TASK FORCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS

I Introduction

II Major Problems and Challenges Confronting Children, CAR and CICL

III Goals and Expected Results

IV Program Components

V Local Referral Network and Coordination Mechanisms

VI Monitoring and Evaluation

Tagoloan CLJIP Results Matrix Annex I

Tagoloan Situational Analysis Annex II


I. INTRODUCTION

The society is a conglomeration of different unique individuals that is living as one in a


community with different personalities. This is why sometimes offenses are committed by children
and old alike. These offenses hold no bar as evil in the eyes of people and the children. Hence
restorative justice holds the offender accountable for the harm caused by the offense committed.
This is why one particular purpose of this restorative justice program is to repair the shattered
relationship with the possible participation of the victim and the community to purposely help the
child in conflict with the law becomes a better person. It gives emphasis the reparation of damage
and conflict resolution rather than punishment or imprisonment. It focuses on a child-appropriate
process of determining the responsibility and treatment with special consideration of his/her needs
without resorting to formal court proceedings.

It is imperative to note that diversion and intervention program is a therapeutic adjunct to


the principle of restorative justice. The program would also prevent destructive labeling. The
practice serves to hinder the negative effects of subsequent proceedings in the juvenile
administration of conviction.

The principle remains that children in conflict with the law are victims of circumstances
beyond their control and should not be treated as criminals, but as individuals with problems from
the parents, environment and time.

Restorative justice is designed to address the issue on children’s stigma being jailed before
the approval of the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act of 2006. Cases vary from simple to heinous
crime. But the question is, how ready is the rehabilitation team particularly Municipal and
Barangay Council for the Protection of Children, to address these problems on child delinquency?
Or better yet are they aware of their roles and responsibilities?

In working with the children always ensures that their rights are respected and their best
welfare given paramount consideration. This applies even to children-in-conflict with the law
(CICL) and children-at-risk (CAR) especially because it looks at them not as offenders and less-
privileged but as individuals who need special protection and assistance. Restorative justice applies
as guiding principles in working with the children in conflict with the law (cicl) and children at-
risk (CAR) of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental

To apply the principle of restorative justice, Sec. 22.b of Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile
Justice and Welfare Act of 2006 mandates the conduct of diversion in the case of a CICL above
15 but below 18 years old and was assessed to have acted with discernment. CICL and CAR have
rights which must be respected. According to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
(CRC):“States Parties recognize the right of every child alleged as, accused of, or recognized as
having infringed the penal law to be treated in a manner consistent with the promotion of the
child’s sense of dignity and worth, which reinforces the child’s respect for the human rights and
fundamental freedoms of other and which takes into account the child’s age and the desirability
of promoting the child’s reintegration and the child’s assuming a constructive role in society”
(Article 40.1)The CRC emphasizes that children should be diverted away from judicial
proceedings whenever possible and redirected to community support services. (Article 37).

Every single individual today is affected by juvenile delinquency. It affects parents,


neighborhood in the barangay, teachers and students at school, and families. It affects the victims
of juvenile delinquencies, the perpetrators, and the bystanders. While delinquency rates in Naga
City can be assumed to have been decreasing, rates are still too high. There have been numerous
programs that have attempted to lower this rate. According to the research made by Zagar & Busch,
“a number of different types of programs currently exist. Those that get involved with the
delinquent after the occurrence of deviant behavior tend to be less successful, since by that point
antisocial habits are well developed. More effective programs are ones that intervene before the
onset of delinquent behavior and prevent that behavior – prevention programs. By getting involved
in children’s lives early, later crime can be effectively reduced.”
Republic Act 9344 otherwise known as the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act of 2006,as
amended by Republic Act 10630 otherwise known as the Act Strengthening the Juvenile Justice
System in the Philippines, provides for the Local Government Units development of a
Comprehensive Juvenile Intervention Program to address the concerns of the Children-At-
Risk(CAR) as well as the Children-In-Conflict with the Law (CICL).
The law mandates that Each barangay, municipality, and city shall appropriate, in its annual
budget, one percent (1%) of its annual internal revenue allotment (IRA) for the strengthening and
implementation of the programs of the Local Council for the Protection of Children (LCPC).

Cognizant to this, the Municipal Government of Tagoloan through the Office of the
Municipal Council for the Protection of Children in coordination with Inter-Agency Task Force
crafted constructive and program and a code that champion the rights of CICL, CAR and victims
of abuse as well. These range from regulatory ordinances to policies that promote rights of children
of the municipality.

These are the following ordinance and code:

ORDINANCE TITLE
Ordinance No. Comprehensive Children and Youth Welfare Code of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental,
49, S 2017 creating the Local Council for the Protection of Children and its technical working
group the inter-agency monitoring task force, appropriating funds therefore, providing
penalties and for other purposes
Ordinance No. Anti - Smoking Ordinance in the Municipality of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
02, S.2007
Ordinance No. Ordinance Establishing a College Institution in the Municipality of Tagoloan,
03, S.2007 Misamis Oriental to be known as Tagoloan Community College
Ordinance No. Ordinance adopting the implementing rules and regulations on RA 8976 or
13 known as Philippine Food Fortification Act of 2000
Ordinance No. Ordinance imposing curfew hour to all minors within the municipality of
398 Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
Ordinance No. Ordinance on Anti-Vagrancy and Prostitution of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
03
Ordinance No. Ordinance regulating the maintenance and operation of madjong; no minors
02 shall be allowed to enter and play madjong
Ordinance No. Ordinance adopting Republic Act 8172 or known as Salt Iodization Nationwide
11 Law
Resolution No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9262 known as Violence Against Women
8, S. 2007 and Their Children, providing protective measures for victims and prescribing
measures
Ordinance No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9208 or known Anti-Trafficking in Person
35, S. 2007 Act of 2003 and its implementing rules and regulation
Ordinance No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9344 known as Comprehensive Juvenile
02, S.2007 Justice and Welfare Act.
Source: Sangguniang Bayan, Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental

EXECUTIVE ORDER TITLE

TAGOLOAN COMPREHENSIVE LOCAL JUVENILE


INTERVENTION PROGRAM
II. MAJOR PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES CONFRONTING CHILDREN,
CHILDREN-AT-RISK, CHILDREN-IN-CONFLICT WITH THE LAW:

• not all iimplementers and law enforcers are informed on proper handling CAR & CICL

• lack of cooperation of the offended victim/parties

• lack of commitment & participation of some parents in the implementation of intervention & diversion program

• strong percentage of migration specifically, the influx of in-migrants

• not all barangays have fully functional BCPC

• some M/BCPC members lack of consciouness & understanding on the importance of promoting & defending the
interest of disadvantaged children

• passive children and youth in the involvement of children & youth organization

• persisting traditional belief that children involved in petty offenses should feel the full brunt of the law.

• no foster family who has the willingness to take custody of CAR & CICL

• role overload being experienced by social workers & law enforcers

• weak data analysis in support of policy formulation/management decision

• weak follow-through or poor execution of ordinances and policies

• weak data collection and management system

• implementation of program & services for CAR & CICL is not the priority target of the LGU

• no facility to cater rehabilitation program of CAR & CICL

• availability of council members in attending the meetings due to the multiplicity of functions and heavy workload
III. GOALS AND EXPECTED RESULTS

• lack of manpower for the rehabilitation to focus on the implementation of programs & services for CAR & CICL
A. OVERALL GOAL:
Functional children living in a child-friendly environment with empowered progressive
citizenry.

SPECIFIC GOAL:
1. Resolution: It seeks to repair the harms that result from crime, in ways that meet
victims’ needs, require offenders to make amends, and help both of them (re)gain
full functioning as members of the community.

2. Community Building: It seeks to respond to crime in such a way that all parties
can be integrated into strong communities as whole, contributing members for
protection, care and rehabilitation of the children.

3. Safety: It seeks to prevent crime, or minimise its harmful effects, for the sake of
maintaining a safe community where peace, harmony, and fairness are possible.

B. EXPECTED RESULTS

Outcome 1: CAR/CICL

1. Children are able to avail of pre-school, primary, secondary and non-formal


education

2. Children's health/normal nutritional status maintained/improved

3. Children will family may it be biological, foster adoptive family who will
provide care, protect and develop

4. Children will live in a community conducive for learning and development

Outcome 2: PARENTS ARE SUPPORTIVE OF THEIR CHILDREN

1. Parents, children and community provided with proper information on


children related laws and ordinances, intoxicating substance abuse, rights
and responsibilities of children and parents, life skills and moral and
psychosocial well-being of an individual.

2. Children and parents provided with needed intervention

3. Parents acquire additional knowledge in parenting


4. Children acquire knowledge on life skills ready to deal with day to day
activities/transactions

5. Children are actively participating in the children and youth organization

6. Parents are actively participating in the children’s watch group or


organization.

Outcome 3: COMMUNITY STRUCTURES ARE FUNCTIONAL

1. BCPC and MCPC members maintain political neutrality

2. Fully functional MCPC and BCPC

3. Functional diversion committee

4. Functional children and youth organizations

5. More people’s organizations (PO’s) and non-governmental organizations


(NGO’s) promotes child & youth welfare

Outcome 4: DATA BASE OF CHILDREN IS AVAILABLE

1. Children’s birth, health, physical and educational status, and other


circumstances are recorded in the barangays to the municipal level
consolidated and readily available in one venue

2. Synchronized data on cases involving children from barangay to municipal


offices

Outcome 5: ALL BARANGAYS MUST HAVE CHILD-APPROPRIATE


FACILITIES

1. All barangays have reading/ALS center


2. All barangay have community assistance center
3. All barangay have playground facilities & devices
4. All barangays have early childhood care and development facilities
5. All barangays have access to K+12 education
Outcome 6: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES ARE RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS
OF THE CAR/CICL

1. Service providers have clear understanding on proper handling of CAR &


CICL and of referral system

2. Trained personnel to handle CAR & CICL

3. Additional working force as service provider for CAR & CICL from
barangay to municipal level

4. Complete membership of diversion team

5. Gaps / strengths and weaknesses in the programs and services identified

Outcome 7: CHILDREN ARE REHABILITATED AND REINTEGRATED TO


THEIR RESPECTIVE COMMUNITIES

1. Children are placed in safe place and provided with needed services

2. Children are attended to by qualified and trained staff on time

3. Children amends on their offense

a. Children takes responsibility and showed feeling of remorse on their


offenses

IV. PROGRAM COMPONENT


The Tagoloan Comprehensive Juvenile Intervention Program is a three-year exclusive and
comprehensive community-based program that aims to address causes of offending, provide
assistance to CICL/CAR and alternative modes to avoid the child’s contact with the formal justice
system.

The Municipal Council for the Protection of Children (MCPC) is hereby established the
Juvenile Intervention Program, based on the Comprehensive National Juvenile Intervention
Program Framework, on the following levels:

1) PRIMARY INTERVENTIONS (Developmental) includes general measures to promote


social justice and equal opportunity which will indirectly tackle perceived root causes of
offending. These shall include programs on advocacy, and socio-economic, health and
nutrition, training and education services.

2) SECONDARY INTERVENTIONS (Protective and Preventive) includes measures to


assist children-at-risk and to prevent them from offending. Interventions are focused on
problem areas in the child, family, and community, that in resolving such problems, the
circumstances of the child would return to a healthy and functioning state.

3) TERTIARY INTERVENTION (Remedial) includes measures to address the needs of


children who have committed an offense to prevent them from reoffending and to avoid
unnecessary contact with the formal justice system and other measures to prevent
reoffending. These include diversion programs, rehabilitation, and reintegration and after-
care services.

The Municipality of Tagoloan, through the Municipal Council for the Protection of
Children, with the Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC) in all the ten (10)
barangays in Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental ensures the protection and the provision for proper
development of children in the municipality. It ensures that children fully enjoy their rights and
are brought up in a society which provides safety, health, good moral environment and facilitates
wholesome development. It shall provide:

1) Intervention Programs for children ages below fifteen (15) years old who have committed
an offense;

2) Intervention Programs for children more than fifteen (15) years old but less than eighteen
(18) years old who acted without discernment; and

3) Diversion Programs for children more than fifteen (15) years old but less than eighteen
(18) years old who acted with discernment and who have committed an offence with an
imposable penalty of not more than six (6) years of imprisonment if diversion is conducted
at the BCPC level, PNP level for cases are imposable is not more than 6 years of
imprisonment and at Prosecutor’s level for cases above 6 years but not more than 12 years.
Hereunder are the suggested forms of diversion:

 Restitution of property
 Reparation of damage caused/ indemnification
 Written or oral apology
 Care, guidance or supervision orders
 Counselling
 Attendance in trainings and seminars
 Participation in community-based programs
 Participation in education, vocation, and life skills programs
 Inclusion or involvement to community service

The program will be further intensified with the program design that consists of interventions from
prevention, development as well as rehabilitation:

Program Description of the Beneficiaries and Budget Required


Component Component’s Activities Location and Sources

Model Local Juvenile These will include activities Children, CAR,


Intervention Program aimed provide opportunities for CICL, parents,
the children and their parents to community
have access to activities that will
make them more productive.
Included in this is educational
assistance for children.

Advocacy This will make use of Children, CAR,


commercial grade Information, CICL, parents,
Education, and community,
Communication(IEC) materials M/BCPC members
& sessions to fathers, mothers &
youth wherein different topics
will be discuss in every session

Sessions for Parents with


children enrolled in ECCD
(PES):
 Myself as a Person and as a
Parent

 The Filipino Family

 Challenges of Parenting
 Child Development

 Keeping Your Child Safe


From Abuse

 Building Children’s Positive


Behavior

 Health and Nutrition

 Home Management

 Keeping a Healthy
Environment For Your
Children

Sessions for mothers (ERMAT):


 Myself as a Person & as a
Parent
 Filipino Values System
 Stages of Human
Development
 Child Development
 Youth Development
 Rights, Obligations &
Liabilities of Parents
 Challenges of Parenting
 Building Children’s Positive
Behavior
 Communicating
Adolescence
 Parent – Child Relationship
 Anger & Stress Management
 Developing Family Morals
& Values
 Cessation of Smoking &
Alcoholism
 Effects of Drug Abuse
 Anti-Violence against
Women & Their Children
 Becoming Husband’s
Bestfriend

Sessions for fathers (ERPAT):


 Myself as a Person
 Accepting My Role as a
Father
 Becoming Your Wife’s Best
Friend
 Fathers as Child Caregivers
 Communicating
Adolescence
 Promoting Family
Spirituality
 Fathers as Advocate in the
Prevention of Family
Violence
 Fathers as Advocate in
Promoting a Drug-Free
Home
 Fathers as Advocate in
Promoting in the Prevention
of HOV-AIDS
 Fathers as Advocate in
Promoting Positive
Discipline

Sessions for out-of-school youth


(YES):
 Rights & responsibilities of
children

Diversion sessions for CAR &


CICL:
 Self-Awareness
 Understanding Filipino
Values System
 Influence of Mass Media
 Rights and Responsibilities
of Children
 Parent – Child Relationship
 Peer Pressure
 Drug Abuse
 Smoking Cessation
 Alcoholism
 Adolescent Health
 Conflict Resolution
 Anger Management
 Time Management
 Pre-marital Sex
 Resiliency
 Love & Affection
 Magic Compounding –
Budgeting Eagle Vision –
Planning
 Communicating with God

Capacity Building Conduct orientation, M/BCPC Members, P 761,000.00/ Child


enhancement seminars and Diversion Friendly Support
training to M/BCPC members, Committee, IMTF, Fund
diversion committee and LEOs
implementers

Other locally
identified
components:
Procurement of construction CAR
Construction of materials & construction of
Youth Home for Male youth home
& for Female
Procurement of children’s
clothing and toiletries, food
supplies, office supplies and
materials & equipment

Hiring or assigning qualified


staff to manage the youth home

Construction of Procurement of construction CAR & CICL Php20,000.00 BCPC
indigenous materials & construction of
community assistance community assistance
center in all
barangays Procurement of children’s
clothing and toiletries, food
supplies, office supplies and
materials & equipment and
improvement of facility
Php24,000.00 – per
Hiring or assigning BSWDO as Brgy
custodian Php432,000.00 –
Mun.

MENU OF INTERVENTIONS:
The intervention program is in participation of all sectors concerned particularly the
child-focused institutions and government agencies involved shall ensure to address the causes of
juvenile delinquency.

Intervention programs include any or combination of but not limited to the following:
a. Guidance and counselling;
b. Spiritual and values formation;
c. Education, skills, and sports development;
d. Provision of support services to the family;
e. Referral to other agencies for appropriate services; and
f. Access to child and youth organizations in the barangay.

The intervention Programs in the Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental are the following:

A. Primary Interventions

INTERVENTIONS Responsible Specific Activity


Office/Agency
Early Childhood Care and MSWDO & DA Continuous implementation and
Development (ECCD) further development of the
EDUCARE Program
Creation of Youth Resource LYDC & SK Resource Centers:
Center 1. Tagoloan Youth Center
2. E-Library
Institutionalization of Activities MSWD & Children’s Months Celebration
on Children and Youth Barangay
Linggo ng Kabataan
LYDC
Search for Child-Friendly Barangay
MCPC/IMTF
Search for Best ECCD Provider
MCPC/IMTF
Search for Best Health Worker
MCPC/IMTF
Implementation of the SPES
Mayor’s Office & Program
PESO
Implementation of Youth
LYDC & SK Development Program

Health Services / Education MHO Implementation of Nutrition-


education to Breast feeding mothers
and parents
MNAO Conduct of Nutrition-education &
Feeding to Pre-school Children

MHO/MSWD/ Conduct of seminars on Drugs,


PNP Reproductive Health, HIV AIDS,
Pre-marital Sex
MHO Provision of free Newborn
Screening, Immunization,
Garantisadong Pambata Program,
Dental Services, Medicine
Dispensing, and TB/HIV-AIDS
Testing

Maintenance and Development of the


Tagoloan infirmary

Operational Development of all


Elementary, Secondary & Tagoloan
Community College
MSWDO Conduct of information education:
1. Parent Effectiveness Seminar
(PES)
2. Empowerment & Reaffirmation
of Maternal Abilities (ERMAT)
3. Empowerment & Reaffirmation
of Paternal Abilities (ERPAT)
& Youth Empowerment Service
(YES)
DEPED & Make compulsory education,
MSWD facilities & manpower available:
1. 1-2 yrs old - ITED
2. 3 - 4 yrs old - ECCD
3. 5 yrs old - Kidergarten
4. 6 – 11 - Primary & Elementary
Level
5. 12 – 17 – Secondary Level
a. Junior High School
b. Senior High School

PESO/MSWD Education Services:


1. Manpower Skills Development
Training
2. Entrepreneurial Management and
Skills training
Accessing of the children to Child M/BCPC Capability-building Training for
and Youth Organizations Officers of the Barangay Children’s
Organizations
MO Organization & Development of:
1. Youth Officials
2. Naga City Council for Youth
Development
3. Naga City Scholars Guild
Value formation Activities L/BCPC Values formation activities

B. Secondary Interventions

INTERVENTIONS Responsible Specific Activity


Office/Agency
Organization of Youth and BCPC Organize/ sustain/ strengthen
Children Organizations Barangay Children’s Organizations
DepEd Peer Counselling Training for
Student Leaderss

Psychosocial Intervention by CSWDO Determine child level of intellectual


Social Workers & psychologist to & emotional functioning
CAR/CICL
Conduct of counselling sessions to
CAR/CICL and their families
(secondary and tertiary)

Construction, Maintenance and


Development of the Tagoloan Youth
Home (center-based facility)

Maintain and strengthen Person-


with-Disability Office

DEPED Support to the School for Special


Children
MNAO Conduct of counselling to parents
with undernourished children
Provision of supplemental feeding to
malnourished children
Involvement of former CICL in MSWDO Profiling of Former CAR/CICL
self-help groups as advocates PNP
Mainstreaming of former CAR/CICL
to youth/children organizations

LYDO Inclusion of CAR/CICL to youth


activities
Family therapy to the family of MSWDO Case Conferencing with Family of
CAR/CICL CAR and CICL. Strengthen case
management of CAR and CICL
cases.
Organization of Watch Groups MSWDO Organization of Social Welfare
Volunteers

LYDO Reorganization of the PAGASA


Youth Movement (PYM)

Brgy. Councils Positive Life Skills and Solo


MSWDO Parenting Trainings
Brgy. Councils Training of Barangay Tanods
Development of Foster Families MSWDO Profiling of Possible Foster Family
BCPC (on process on presenting the Foster
Families Act)
Establishment of Special Drug MADAC Anti-Drugs Information/ Education
Education Center Campaign
Family Drug Abuse Prevention MADAC Conduct Series of Drug Awareness
Program CSWDO Seminars
Institutionalize birth registration LCR Conduct of mobile birth registration
Program in barangays BCPC in barangays (Barangay Visit)

C. Tertiary Interventions
INTERVENTIONS Responsible Specific Activity
Office/Agency
Release on Recognizance MSWDO/BCPC Continuous monitoring / follow-up
of child-related cases
Temporary Shelter PNP Maintenance of Temporary Shelters:
1. Office of the PNP-WCPD

MSWDO 2. Tagoloan Youth Home

BCPC 3. Community Assistance Center

MSWD 4. Construction of Crisis Intervention


Center for victims
Psychosocial and Therapeutic MSWDO Psychosocial and Therapeutic
Programs Programs:
 Self Enhancement Session
 Multi –Grade Class Program
 Group Sessions
 Practical Skills & Sports
Development
 Spiritual and Values Enhancement
 Family Day/Visitation
St. Paul Hospital Accreditation of the St Paul Hospital
as Crime Laboratory (Drugs)
PNP Capability-building training for the
PNP-Women and Children
Protection Desks
Financial Assistance and Support MSWDO Financial assistance to CICL and
Services their families

Livelihood Assistance for CICL


Families
Diversion Program PNP-WCPD Diversion Programs:
MSWDO  Restitution of property.
BCPC  Reparation of the damage caused.
PPO  Indemnification for consequential
DOJ damage.
 Written or oral apology.
 Confiscation and forfeiture of the
proceeds or instruments of the
crime.
 Care, guidance and supervision
orders. Counselling for the child in
conflict with the law and the
child's family.
 Participation in available
community-based
programs/services.
Monitoring PNP Conduct monthly surprise inspection
MSWD and monitoring to video-oke bars,
commercial business, amusements
and any other prohibited
establishments for the purpose of
ensuring that establishment are
adhering to the local and national
laws particularly in protecting
children

V. LOCAL REFERRAL NETWORK AND COORDINATION MECHANISMS

Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental has virtuous referral mechanism (BCPC, MSWDO, PNP and
to the courts) which readily responds to concerns of CICLs/CARs. The steady flow of referral
system makes the processing of cases fast and efficient. This in turn makes the chance of
settlement between offender and victim lessen in number.

If the CAR/CICL is under the custody of the MSWDO, their basic needs are met: food,
clothing and shelter through the temporary shelter for CAR/CICL. However, the center only caters
basic needs and does not offer rehabilitation program having lack of human resources like
houseparents, psychologist and social worker. Hence, children needing medical and dental
attention shall be referred at the Municipal Health Office. The PNP will then refer the child to the
MSWD office for disserment assessment of children 15 years old and above but below 18 years
old and intervention program below 15 years old.

Cases with an imposable penalty of below 6 years shall be refered to Barangay Social
Welfare and Development Volunteer (BSWDV) during Saturdays and Sundays.

The presence of BSWDV in the barangays helps improve response time. As a result, both
children at-risk/children in conflict with the law (CAR/CICL) and children in need of special
protection (CNSP) are easily attended to at the community level. Awareness on the status of CICL
in the community level is also heightened with the use of accurate data collection.

Close coordination in the conduct of diversion proceedings shall be attended by all


members of the Municipal Diversion Committee through a Municipal/Barangay Executive Order.

Discrepancies between data may take place, which can lead to bloated figures, if data
collection is left unchecked or not validated by concerned MPDO personnel. To address this, the
municipality should conduct assemblies or fora on child’s protection to clarify roles of different
agencies in the maintenance of effective referral system, thereby doing away from bureaucracy
and red tape.

Moreover, more effective IEC on children’s rights should be institutionalized to enhance


community awareness on child protection and development. This should be coupled with
education/values formation trainings.

VI. MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Local Juvenile Justice Information System will allow the municipal government to
regularly update the local profile of Children-in-Conflict with the Law (CICL) and Children-at-
Risk (CAR). A design for a Comprehensive Juvenile Justice Intervention Program containing
programs and strategies that is relevant and responsive to the diverse needs of CICL and CAR
population. And the program design should be aligned with the Comprehensive National Juvenile
Program Framework as developed by JJWC. The program will be in manual form and will be
submitted to the Sangguniang Bayan for adoption and to the Municipal Council for the Protection
of Children for implementation.

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is a very important and often overlooked component of
Public Sector Management (PSM), especially among Philippine local governments. It involves the
systematic collection and analysis of information about events associated with the implementation
of development programs and projects. It also provides the framework for improving or facilitating
project implementation.

The Local Project Monitoring Committee as the monitoring arm is mandated to monitor
all development projects (economic, social, infrastructure and other development projects) of the
municipal. The Results Based Matrix will be used as a tool for reporting and monitoring of the
progress of CICL/CAR. (This is to be identified by LCPC)

Reporting and Monitoring Procedures:

ACTIVITY FREQUENCY PERSONS RESPONSIBLE

Conduct Review LCJIP Quarterly


Program Assessment Quarterly
Program Facilitation and Problem Solving Quarterly
Sessions
Generation and Preparation of Reports Quarterly

SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
I. Introduction

This document captures the efforts of the Municipal Government of Tagoloan, Misamis
Oriental and its fellow stakeholders of a child-friendly municipality to put in place a system that
values and promotes restorative justice for children in conflict with the law.

Technical assistance from the Juvenile Justice Welfare Council provided the impetus to bring these
institutions and agencies together in a series of workshops that gathered data on the children of
Tagoloan, analyzed them from the lens of restorative justice, and using SWOT analysis identified
key sectoral interventions aimed at enhancing Tagoloan’s status as an urban community that
genuinely looks after the young, especially those in challenging and difficult circumstances.

The following workshops/activities served as key milestones for its development:

Activity Date
1 Localization of the Implementation of R.A. 9344 c/o Verlyn & Tayang
2 Workshop on the Localization of the National After EO Diversion
Juvenile Justice Intervention Program Committee
3 Data Gathering and Collection re: Rapid SA Tool During Orientation

II. The CICL, CAR and Child Protection System in the LGU

A. The LGU

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

The name TAGOLOAN was envisage through the priest’s curiosity and interest to seek the
primary source of a river that enormous destruction to life, animals, and properties when flood
arises. It was told that after a week of climbing hills and mountains on foot and is carried by horse,
he, finally, discover the source of the river. It was a wellspring concealed under a huge rock, so
hidden that it’s almost barely discernible. The priest called it TAGO-OLOHAN, which mean
“CONCEALED SOURCE”, from “TAGO” (concealed), and “OLOHAN” source. Later, it was
changed into the later name due to the difficulty of pronoun ncing the word especially by the
Spaniards.
Another version of the story also says that it originated from a Moslem word “TAGO” which
means “a place” and “OLOHAN” which mean “head” or “chief”. By this, TAGOLOAN literally
stands for “A place of the Chief”.
Though whatever legend TAGOLOAN may have gotten its definition, at present, it has a
moniker as the “HOME OF THE TIGERS”, “TARANTULA”, and “MANOK”. This was
conceived owing to the committed and dynamic leadership of the present Chief Executive and
together with the disciplines people living in the municipality.

GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

TAGOLOAN is the first municipality east of Misamis Oriental. It is situated north of


Municipality of Vilanueva, South of Cagayan de Oro City; East of Malitbog, Bukidnon; and West
of Macajalar Bay. It lies between 8°33’00” and 8°33’33” north latitude and 124°45’00” east
longitude. It is about 19 kilometers from the Provincial Capital of Cagayan de Oro City. The
municipality is divided into ten barangays, namely: Poblacion, Baluarte, Casinglot, Sta. Ana, Sta.
Cruz, Mohon, Sugbongcogon, Rosario, Gracia and Natumolan.

TOPOGRAPHY

TAGOLOAN consists of a series of plateaus, hilly rettain’s, river delta and valleys. Taking
Barangay Poblacion as point of reference, Barangay Sta. Cruz is towards the north, coastal plains
of Barangay Baluarte, Gracia, Sugbongcogon and Casinglot are in the direction of west and south
and towards the east lies the Barangay’s of Natumolan, Sta. Ana, Mohon, and the hilly terrain,
valleys of Barangay Rosario. The river delt runs along the stretch of TAGOLOAN River. More
than half of the municipality’s land area has 0-3% slope level and a combined 15.4 percent are
within 3 – 8% and 8 – 18% slope level. The remaining 26.20% of the total land area has slopes
above 18% as shown in the table below.
Table 1 – SLOPE CLASSIFICATION
CLASSIFICATION AREA (hectares) PERCENTAGE
0 – 3% 4,604.5640 58%
3 – 8% 547.7843 6.90%
8 – 18% 674.8068 8.50%
18 – 30% 825.6460 10.40%
30 – 50% 873.2794 11.00%
Over 50% 412.8230 5.20%
TOTAL 7,938.9035 100%

LAND AREA

TAGOLOAN has a land area of 7,938.9035 hectares based on the cadastral land survey;
and 11,773 hectares of land area based on the Department of Budget and Management. It
comprises about 3.32% of the total land area of Misamis Oriental which 354,770 hectares. Among
the 10 barangays, Sta. Ana has the largest land area of about 2,934.0818 hectares which is 37% of
the municipality’s total land area.

Barangay Rosario follows aftof er Sta. Ana with the land area of 1,728.0721 hectares
included herewith is the contested area between the Municipality of Malitbog and Barangay
Rosario; and Sta. Cruz (11.20%) comprises a land area of 890.1596 hectares relatively bigger from
amongst remaining 7 barangays. All other barangays have land area less than 10% of the total land
area of the municipality, and barangay Gracia has the least area of about 1%. See the table below.

Table 2 – LAND AREA PER BARANGAY


BARANGAY AREA (hectares) PERCENTAGE
Baluarte 289.3181 3.5%
Casinglot 680.1912 8.6%
Gracia 83.4166 1.0%
Mohon 282.4778 3.6%
Natumolan 622.3527 7.8%
Poblacion 341.3494 4.3%
Rosario 1,728.0721 21.8%
Sta. Ana 2,934.0818 37.0%
Sta. Cruz 890,1596 11.2%
Sugbongcogon 87.4842 1.1%
TOTAL 7,938.9035 100%

DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF POPULATION

The table bellow shows the demographic profile of the municipality focusing children:

Population by Gender:

Male Female Total


39,505 38,116 77,621
st
Source; MPO - 1 Quarter 2018)

Population by Barangay:

BARANGAY POPULATION PERCENTAGE


Baluarte 10,058 12.95%
Casinglot 10,697 13.78%
Gracia 1,990 2.56%
Mohon 4,690 6.04%
Natumolan 8,001 10.31%
Poblacion 12,480 16.08%
Rosario 1,133 1.47%
Sta. Ana 9,934 12.79%
Sta. Cruz 13,634 17.56%
Sugbongcogon 5,004 6.45%
TOTAL 77,621 100%

No. of Families by Barangay:

BARANGAY FAMILIES PERCENTAGE


Baluarte 2,230 12.57%
Casinglot 2,535 14.28%
Gracia 534 3.01%
Mohon 1,134 6.39%
Natumolan 1,745 9.83%
Poblacion 2,714 15.29%
Rosario 283 1.59%
Sta. Ana 2,306 12.98%
Sta. Cruz 3,114 17.66%
Sugbongcogon 1,152 6.49%
TOTAL 17745 100%
st
Source; MPO - 1 Quarter 2018)

Children’s Population:

Male Female Total Percentage


16,821 15,885 32,706 42.13%
Source; MPO - 1st Quarter 2018)

Children’s Population by Barangay

Barangay Male Female Total


Casinglot 2,976 2,823 5,799
Sugbongcogon 871 891 1,762
Gracia 392 372 764
Baluarte 2,086 2,007 4,093
Poblacion 2,428 2,215 4,643
Natumolan 2,044 1,667 3,711
Sta. Cruz 3,104 3,127 6,231
Mohon 995 898 1,893
Sta Ana 2,422 2,374 4,796
Rosario 221 254 475
TOTAL 17,539 16,628 34,167
st
Source; MPO - 1 Quarter 2018)
Population of Children According to Age by Barangay:

Casinglot Sugbongcog Gracia Balaurte Poblacion Natumola Sta Cruz Mohon Sta Ana Rosario Grand Total
on
Age n
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
47 43 13 12 25 16 37 34 71 28 39 68 58 50 10
Below 1 y/o 8 0 908 55 36 91 23 31 54 0 5 5
75 86
1 2 4 6 5 5 0 39 41 80 1 6 87 10 10 20 2048 2,004 4,052
20 20 11 11 22 13 13 26 17 16 16 32 16 12 12 24
1 year 0 5 405 43 43 86 29 22 51 3 5 8 2 4 6 97 74 1 1 5 6 86 74 0 6 3 9 12 9 21 999 964 1,963
20 20 12 11 23 13 14 27 15 15 16 31 10 12 12 24
2 years old 0 0 400 47 36 83 26 32 58 1 7 8 4 3 7 86 65 1 6 2 8 57 48 5 1 8 9 18 13 31 966 944 1,910
21 21 11 11 22 12 14 27 13 17 14 32 12 12 25
3 years old 0 0 420 39 40 79 30 33 63 7 2 9 5 5 0 78 57 5 7 9 6 54 42 96 8 8 6 15 14 29 973 930 1,903
22 21 10 11 21 12 12 25 13 18 18 36 10 12 12 24
4 years old 0 5 435 37 43 80 33 22 55 2 0 2 8 2 0 79 57 6 3 2 5 56 48 4 3 0 3 12 18 30 973 937 1,910
10 10 12 10 22 12 13 25 18 19 17 36 11 10 10 20
5 years old 0 5 205 43 45 88 22 20 42 3 1 4 7 0 7 95 87 2 6 2 8 61 49 0 4 1 5 10 12 22 881 822 1,703
14 13 10 20 14 14 28 16 15 15 31 10 10 20
6 years old 0 93 233 73 64 7 23 22 45 4 99 3 0 0 0 85 80 5 4 7 1 68 41 9 1 99 0 12 12 24 900 807 1,707
11 15 11 12 11 24 13 14 27 16 18 17 35 10 10 20
7 years old 9 0 269 49 65 4 16 17 33 9 1 0 5 1 6 88 72 0 3 2 5 52 52 4 3 99 2 19 14 33 893 893 1,786
11 15 11 10 21 13 14 27 10 19 16 12 28 10 10 20
8 years old 0 0 260 37 46 83 15 14 29 7 1 8 4 0 4 5 89 4 2 5 7 57 50 7 2 99 1 11 15 26 850 829 1,679
12 12 12 24 12 20 11 18 16 15 31 10 10 10 20
9 years old 5 95 220 35 46 81 16 18 34 0 9 9 8
80
8 0 74 4 1 6 7 57 47 4 0 9 9 12 19 31 864 773 1,637
12 10 10 20 13 12 25 10 18 14 15 30 19
10 years old 5 8 233 36 45 81 20 22 42 99 5 4 3 0 3 6 76 2 7 8 5 43 43 86 96 95 1 10 16 26 815 788 1,603
15 11 10 11 11 23 13 10 23 10 18 14 15 29 19
11 years old 2 5 267 51 55 6 17 18 35 6 5 1 2 5 7 3 78 1 1 2 3 39 35 74 94 98 2 12 18 30 857 789 1,646
10 10 11 11 23 13 22 10 17 13 15 28 19
12 years old 2 0 202 44 43 87 15 15 30 8 7 5 0
98
8 1 77 8 6 1 7 44 54 98 97 99 6 12 15 27 799 769 1,568
10 10 10 17 12 22 10 17 14 13 27 10 19
13 years old 5 0 205 50 54 4 17 18 35 96 82 8 8
92
0 5 68 3 7 2 9 46 50 96 94 2 6 11 13 24 799 711 1,510
12 10 19 13 21 10 17 14 15 29 10 19
14 years old 5 0 225 43 46 89 22 20 42 99 96 5 2
80
2 4 70 4 4 2 6 46 52 98 96 1 7 11 9 20 822 726 1,548
15 13 10 19 13 11 24 16 16 13 29 19
15 years old 0 5 285 49 47 96 17 12 29 6 88 4 0 4 4 84 76 0 5 4 9 40 39 79 92 98 0 5 14 19 838 757 1,595
11 11 17 12 11 24 15 15 15 30 10 19
16 years old 3 0 223 46 42 88 15 11 26 97 77 4 6 8 4 79 73 2 4 3 7 49 42 91 1 91 2 5 15 20 785 732 1,517
10 10 17 13 12 25 15 14 12 27 17
17 years old 2 99 201 47 53 0 19 13 32 85 88 3 2 2 4 81 73 4 3 7 0 48 39 87 86 90 6 16 9 25 759 713 1,472
28 27 559 82 84 16 37 36 73 19 18 38 23 21 44 19 15 35 29 29 59 94 84 17 23 22 46 21 24 45 16,82 15,88
TOTAL 76 20 6 4 9 73 5 0 5 92 88 80 01 10 11 58 90 48 95 94 89 2 6 88 45 86 31 3 5 8 1 8
32,709

Source; MPO - 1st Quarter 2018)


CASES OF CHILDREN BY CATEGORY

A. Children in Conflict with the Law

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte 13 13 1 1 4 4 8 8 2 2 4 15 1 16 5 2 7 7 1 8 4 0 4 2 1 3 6 1 7
Casinglot 2 2 3 3 13 13 4 4 5 5 5 1 6 12 14 26 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 8 2 2
Gracia 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 4 1 0 1 3 0 3 2 0 2
Mohon 1 1 2 2 2 0 2 14 8 22 0 2 2 0 0 0 5 5
Natumolan 1 1 3 3 7 1 8 7 7 1 1 3 3 2 0 2 1 0 1 4 0 4 1 1 2 7 1 8
Poblacion 6 6 3 3 10 10 29 29 6 1 7 15 1 16 3 5 8 5 1 6 4 1 5 2
Rosario 4 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sta. Ana 2 2 1 1 1 1 8 8 7 7 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 11 11
Sta. Cruz 3 3 7 7 6 6 3 3 2 2 4 3 3 6 17 3 20 5 0 5 2 0 2 7 1 8 2 1 3
Sugbongcogon 9 9 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 6 6 6 6 1 0 1 0 0 0 12 0 12 3 3
Outside Tagoloan 2 2 2 1 3 11 1 12 4 1 5 4 3 7 9 9 4 2 6 2 4 6 4 0 4 1 0 1 3 3
TOTAL 43 0 43 28 1 29 57 2 59 61 1 62 19 16 35 64 6 70 58 23 81 35 18 53 26 3 29 36 5 41 41 3 44

B. Child Abuse (Physical, Emotional, Sexual)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte 2 3 5 4 4 1 3 4 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 1 3 2 2 4 1 1 2 1 2 3 3 3
Casinglot 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 1 2 3 2 12 14 2 2 1 1 3 4 7 0 1 1 3 5 8 2 1 3
Gracia 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1
Mohon 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 4 7
Natumolan 3 3 2 2 4 1 1 2 2 2 3 2 5 2 2 1 2 3 3 5 8 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 1
Poblacion 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 3 5 1 1 0 5 5 4 1 5 0 1 1 1 1
Rosario 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Sta. Ana 3 3 6 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 3 4 1 1 2 1 3 4 3 5 8 0 2 2 1 1 2
Sta. Cruz 3 4 7 2 1 3 4 4 2 2 4 2 4 6 2 2 4 5 12 17 3 5 8 4 1 5
Sugbongcogon
2 2 4 1 1 3 3 6 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 4 4 1 3 4
Outside
Tagoloan 1 1 1 1 1 0 6 6 1 3 4 0 2 2
TOTAL 14 19 33 10 8 18 8 16 24 7 10 17 9 24 33 10 8 18 9 7 15 16 38 54 14 16 30 10 20 30 8 13 21
C. Street Children

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte 2 2 1 1 1 1
Casinglot 1 1 1 1 2 2
Gracia 1 1
Mohon 1 1
Natumolan 1 1 1 1 2 2
Poblacion 2 3 5 2 2 1 2 3 2 1 3
Rosario
Sta. Ana 1 1 2 1 1
Sta. Cruz 2
1 1 21 1
2
1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 3
Sugbongcogo
n
Outside Tagoloan 1
3 3 1 1 2 1 1 6 6 13
3
3 1 4 6 2 8 3 5 8 4 4
TOTAL 4 1 1
3 3 1 2 2 1 2 3 8 8 39 4
3
5 4 9 12 4
6
13 6
9
6 1 7

D. Child Trafficking

2008 2009 2010 2011 20112 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte 1 1
Casinglot
Gracia
Mohon
Natumolan
Poblacion 2 2
Rosario
Sta. Ana
Sta. Cruz
Sugbongcogon 1 1
Outside Tagoloan
TOTAL 3 3 1

E. Child Labor

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte
Casinglot
Gracia
Mohon
Natumolan
Poblacion
Rosario
Sta. Ana
Sta. Cruz 1 2 3 1 1
Sugbongcogon
Outside
Tagoloan
TOTAL 1 2 3 1 1

F. Abandoned/Surrendered

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte
Casinglot
Gracia
Mohon 2 2 4
Natumolan 1 1 1 1
Poblacion 1 2 3 2 2
Rosario
Sta. Ana
Sta. Cruz
Sugbongcogon
Outside Tagoloan 1 1
TOTAL 4 2 6 1 3 4 2 2

G. Adoption

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte
Casinglot
Gracia
Mohon
Natumolan
Poblacion 1 1 2 1 1
Rosario
Sta. Ana
Sta. Cruz
Sugbongcogon
Outside Tagoloan
TOTAL 1 1 2 1 1

J. Neglected

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Barangay
M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T M F T
Baluarte 1 1
Casinglot 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2
Gracia
Mohon 1 1
Natumolan 2 2
Poblacion 1 1
Rosario
Sta. Ana
Sta. Cruz 1 1
Sugbongcogon 1 1
Outside Tagoloan 1 1
TOTAL 2 2 4 1 1 2 2 1 2 3
Crimes Committed by Children

2018
Crimes Committed by Children
Male Female Total
Malicious Mischief 4 4
Physical Injuries/Serious Physical Injuries 5 5
Illegal Gambling 2 1 3
Theft/Robbery/Carnapping 25 1 26
Other forms of Child Abuse:
Physical Abuse (RA7610) 2 2
Sexual Abuse (RA 8353) 3 3
Anti-Bullying (R.A10620) 2 2
TOTAL 43 2 45
Source: PNP & MSWDO

Age and Sex of CAR and CICL

Ages of CICL

Below 12 yrs 13 yrs 14 yrs 15 yrs 16 yrs 17 yrs


Sex 12 yrs old old old Old old old old
Male 7 2 7 5 4 10 3
Female 2 1 1
Source: PNP, MSWDO & BCPC (2018)

Ages of CAR

Below 12 yrs 13 yrs 14 yrs 15 yrs 16 yrs 17 yrs


Sex 12 yrs old old old Old old old old
Male 1 2 2 1
Female 1
Source: PNP, MSWDO & BCPC (2018)
Educational Status of CICL

Sex/Status Never Grades Grades Grade Grade Grade Vocational


In School Been in 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10 11-12 training
School
Male: In-
2 8 12 2
School
Male: out
1 7 2 4 2
of school
Female:
1 1 1
In School
Female:
Out of
School
Source: MSWDO (2018)

Educational Status of CAR

Sex/Status Never Grades Grades Grade Grade Grade


In School Been 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10 11-12
in
School
Male: In-
School
Male: out
3
of school
Female:
In School
Female:
Out of 1
School
Source: MSWDO (2018)
Causes

Primary cause of CICL/CAR problem


Child is a victim of:
History of Witness to Peer

Abandonment
Witness to
Involvement parental family influences

Emotional
Substance/ Comm.

Physical
in Criminal Domestic

Neglect
Sexual
Alcohol Violence
Gangs behavior Violence

4 3 1 2 8 1 4 2 4 2 18
Source: MSWDO (2018)

B. Ordinances and Policies for Child Protection, CICL and CAR

From 1990 to 2017 the Sangguniang Bayan has crafted useful ordinances that champion
the rights of CICL and CAR. These range from regulatory ordinances to policies that promote
rights of children.
ORDINANCE TITLE
Ordinance No. Comprehensive Children and Youth Welfare Code of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental,
49, S 2017 creating the Local Council for the Protection of Children and its technical working
dated _____ group the inter-agency monitoring task force, appropriating funds therefore, providing
penalties and for other purposes
Ordinance No. Anti - Smoking Ordinance in the Municipality of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
02, S.2007
Ordinance No. Ordinance Establishing a College Institution in the Municipality of Tagoloan,
03, S.2007 Misamis Oriental to be known as Tagoloan Community College
Ordinance No. Ordinance adopting the implementing rules and regulations on RA 8976 or
13 known as Philippine Food Fortification Act of 2000
Ordinance No. Ordinance imposing curfew hour to all minors within the municipality of
398 Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
Ordinance No. Ordinance on Anti-Vagrancy and Prostitution of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
03
Ordinance No. Ordinance regulating the maintenance and operation of madjong; no minors
02 shall be allowed to enter and play madjong
Ordinance No. Ordinance adopting Republic Act 8172 or known as Salt Iodization
11 Nationwide Law
Resolution No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9262 known as Violence Against Women
8, S. 2007 and Their Children, providing protective measures for victims and prescribing
measures
Ordinance No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9208 or known Anti-Trafficking in Person
35, S. 2007 Act of 2003 and its implementing rules and regulation
Ordinance No. Resolution adopting Republic Act 9344 known as Comprehensive Juvenile
02, S.2007 Justice and Welfare Act.
Source: Sangguniang Bayan, Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental
C. Programs and Services for Child Protection, CICL and CAR

Types of social welfare programs, projects and services available

Service Provider (Please check the appropriate box):

Service Delivery Mode Others


Faith-based
LGU NGA NGO (Please
Organization
specify)

Center Based / / /

Community Based / / / /

Residential Care Services /

Protective services available

Service Provider (Please check the appropriate box):


Others
Protective Services Faith-based
LGU NGA NGO (Please
Organization
specify)
Women and Children
/
Protection Unit
Family Court /

Shelter-care institution / /

Free legal assistance


/
Others, please specify

D. Facilities for CICL & CAR

The Local Government Unit of Tagoloan has temporary detention home – a holding facility
for children in conflict with the law and or child-at-risk while assessment is going on for possible
long-term placement of the child. The facility provides daily living needs and round the clock
guard.
E. Community Mechanisms for the Protection of Children, CICL and CAR

The municipality has an institutionalized reporting and referral system from the barangay level
up to the 5 Pillars of Justice which are the community (BCPC), PNP, City Prosecution Office,
Court (Family Court) and BJMP (Correction).

F. Community Resources/Capabilities for Child Protection, CICL and CAR

 Financial Resources allocated for the activities of LCPC

Table below indicates allocation of funds for the Children

2016 2017 2018


PhP % PhP % PhP %

Local Council for the 40,000.00 40,000.00 40,000.00


Protection of Children
Source: Budget Office

 Expenses for the activities of LCPC

Table below actual expenditures for the Children activities

2016 2017 2018


PhP % PhP % PhP %

Local Council for the


Protection of Children
Source: Budget Office
 Number of Personnel and type of training received

MSWD Personnel
Number of personnel trained on:

Position Emergency Child


Case Psychosocial
preparedness Rights
Management Support
and response (CRC)
MSWDO 1 1 1 1
SWO III 1 1 1 1
SWO I 1 1 1
YDO 1 1 1
CDW 38 38 38
(Contractual)
Job orders 1 13 2
BSWDV 10 9 10
(honorarium)
Total 13 52 54 54
Source: MSWDO

PNP Personnel
Number of personnel trained on:

Position Emergency Child


Case Psychosocial
preparedness Rights
Management Support
and response (CRC)
(4) WCPD 4 4 4

Total 4 4 4
Source: PNP
Health Personnel
Number of personnel trained on:

Position Emergency Child


Case Psychosocial preparedness and
response/ BLS Rights
Management Support
Training (CRC)
MHO 1 1 1 1
PHN 1 1 1 1
RHMs 13 13 13 13

Total 15 15 15 15
Source: MHO

 Financial Resources allocated for social welfare programs, projects and services,
and actual expenses (MHO, MSWD, DA, DEPED, MNAO)

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs,
Projects and Services PhP % PhP %

Monthly Operation and


Overhead Expenses (MOOE) 1,107,000.00 1,186,000.00
Personnel Services (PS)
4,930,234.20 5,355,619.80
Capital Outlay (CO)
6,160,234,20 6,056,419.80
Projects, Programs, Projects
and Services 15,660,645.96 15,651,439.90
Source: Budget Office
 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS) 5,578,018.83
Capital Outlay (CO) 55,665.00
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Actual Expenses for protective services

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS)
Capital Outlay (CO)
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Municipal Health Programs,
Projects and Services PhP % PhP %

Monthly Operation and


Overhead Expenses (MOOE)

Personnel Services (PS)

Capital Outlay (CO)

Projects, Programs, Projects


and Services
Source: Budget Office
 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS) 5,578,018.83
Capital Outlay (CO) 55,665.00
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Actual Expenses for protective services

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS)
Capital Outlay (CO)
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office
2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs,
Projects and Services PhP % PhP %

Monthly Operation and


Overhead Expenses (MOOE) 1,107,000.00 1,186,000.00
Personnel Services (PS)
4,930,234.20 5,355,619.80
Capital Outlay (CO)
6,160,234,20 6,056,419.80
Projects, Programs, Projects
and Services 15,660,645.96 15,651,439.90
Source: Budget Office
 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS) 5,578,018.83
Capital Outlay (CO) 55,665.00
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Actual Expenses for protective services

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS)
Capital Outlay (CO)
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office
2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs,
Projects and Services PhP % PhP %

Monthly Operation and


Overhead Expenses (MOOE) 1,107,000.00 1,186,000.00
Personnel Services (PS)
4,930,234.20 5,355,619.80
Capital Outlay (CO)
6,160,234,20 6,056,419.80
Projects, Programs, Projects
and Services 15,660,645.96 15,651,439.90
Source: Budget Office
 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS) 5,578,018.83
Capital Outlay (CO) 55,665.00
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Actual Expenses for protective services

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS)
Capital Outlay (CO)
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office
2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs,
Projects and Services PhP % PhP %

Monthly Operation and


Overhead Expenses (MOOE) 1,107,000.00 1,186,000.00
Personnel Services (PS)
4,930,234.20 5,355,619.80
Capital Outlay (CO)
6,160,234,20 6,056,419.80
Projects, Programs, Projects
and Services 15,660,645.96 15,651,439.90
Source: Budget Office
 Financial Resources allocated for protective services, and actual expenses

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS) 5,578,018.83
Capital Outlay (CO) 55,665.00
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 Actual Expenses for protective services

2017 2018
Social Welfare Programs, Projects and
Services Percent Percent
PhP PhP
(%) (%)
Monthly Operation and Overhead
Expenses (MOOE)
Personnel Services (PS)
Capital Outlay (CO)
Projects, Programs, Projects and Services
Source: Budget Office

 List of NGOs, CSO’s, POs

Name of CSO, PO, Responsible Phone number


Youth/Children’s person and Address email (landlines &
Organizations designation mobile)
Sugbongcogon League of Rhyan V. Cuadra Sugbongcogon, 09755263021
Talented Youth (SLOTY) Tagoloan
Youth with Special Needs Aldrin L. Poblacion, 09056056845
Sumonod Tagoloan
Baluarte Youth Federation Williard L. Dal Baluarte, 09066724303
Organization Tagoloan
Core Group of Young Aboy Benjie Santa Ana, 093555404386
Advocates Ubal-Ubal Tagoloan
Youth for Reproductive Jetro G. Resonar Poblacion, 09352515272
Health Awareness Tagoloan
4H Club Novien Uldarico Sta. Ana, 09172464503
D. Sol Tagoloan
Youth of Iglesia Filipina Yani Nicole P. Sta. Ana, 09269865371
Independiente (YIFI) Nillama Tagoloan
Tagoloan Rover Circle Prensisme N. Casinglot, 09551673499
Allones Tagolaon

G. Community Structures for Protection of Children, CICL and CAR

Describe the functionality of the LCPC & BCPC

Rating and Number of LCPC/BCPC


LCPC
Basic Progressive Mature Ideal
LCPC /
Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC)
Baluarte
/
Casinglot
/
Gracia
/
Mohon
/
Natumolan
/
Poblacion
/
Rosario
/
Sta. Ana
/
Sta. Cruz
/
Sugbongcogon
/
Source: MLGOO
III. Analysis

Local Government Unit

1. CICL PPA’s need to be prioritized for implementation.


2. Walay ngipon ang Childrens Code to be implemented and CLJIP will be taken for granted
just like other ordinances and plans. (Compliance purposes only)

Descriptive Profile of CAR /CICL

Opportunities identified are:


(1) strong support from some barangays and other reporting units;
(2) strong support in designating responsible person for trainings but no action taken after
presentation;
(3) presence of trained personnel to handle CICL but not enough to handle increasing number of
cases;
(4) education of parents/effective parenting not enough ratio of personnel
(5) Education for all and should not be selective/ student handbook polished by stakeholders
(6) Facilities has never been prioritized for CICL/CAR/VAWC/CNSP

Ordinances and Policies

Programs and Services

Facilities

Community Mechanisms

Community Resources
1. We have plenty of resources (human, physical, economic, natural) but no directory and
reason to maximized

Community Structures

1. Plenty of structures but not structurized

IV. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

The Local Government Unity of Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental has limited budget allocation
and support for CICL programs and projects. Therefore there is need to increase budget
appropriation in order to attain the plan goals. The appropriation shall include project, activities
and human resource.

There is a strong collaboration between service providers from barangay to municipal level.
However a need to conduct trainings to personnel with regard to proper handling of children hence
not all duty bearers are properly trained examples are Barangay Auxiliaries who may be requiring
technical background on child laws and ordinances.

To counter the compartmentalized municipal hall departments and weak flow of


information across departments/offices and among municipal hall and partner agencies, periodic
sharing among municipal government departments/partner CSOs about their programs and
initiatives may be conducted.

The city government may be rich with programs and projects that champion the rights of
the child and CICL/CARs but a stronger monitoring and evaluation mechanism is needed to ensure
effectivity, efficiency and sustainability. This may be solved by conducting monitoring and
evaluation of children-related PPAs of the municipal government and its partner agencies.

Stronger program implementation may be realized by ensuring proper coordination between


parents and authorities. The parents may be further organized into groups to highlight their
participation in municipal programs and projects.

With regard to community mechanisms, linkages among duty bearers and stakeholders
may be strengthened by effective communication systems. With regular exchange of information,
services may be easily rendered.

Constant monitoring and follow-up of the case with administrative penalties or sanctions
may be observed to pressure duty bearers in delivering their mandates.
On Facilities, a Youth Detention Center – Bahay Pag-asa is needed to be established to
provide a center-based rehabilitation program. Center shall be equipped complete facilities and
manpower.

On Community Mechanism, a Child Protection Data Collection and Management System


should be established to maintain a database of CICL & CAR

On Community Structures, BCPC may become more functional by: (1) soliciting
commitment from members; (2) provision of incentives to members; (3) rotational venue of
meetings; (4) capability building; (5) re-orientation of BCPC functions and institutionalize annual
search for child-friendly barangay

On the municipal level, LCPC membership and attendance may be further enhanced
through (1) soliciting commitment from members; (2) maintenance of political neutrality; (2)
provision of incentives; (3) reorientation of LCPC functions.