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Time Day 1 – Skill Lesson/Main Selection Part 1

Stamps
Unit/Week Unit 6 - Week 5 - Atlantis: The Legend of a Lost City
Standard Rl.3.1
Skill Focus Generalize
I Can Statement I can make a generalization while reading a text.
Before Reading
Phonics & Fluency If students need fluency practice, see K-2 Handbook for Quick Drill Scope and
Quick Drill Sequence.

1 minute Introduce Text Say: Today, we’re going to read a legend called Atlantis: The Legend of a Lost City
written by Christina Balit. A legend is an old story passed by word of mouth that
tells about the great deeds of a hero. Many Native American stories are legends.
Often the events in a legend can’t really happen, but the legends are frequently
based on some historical truth.
Read the title with me. (students chorally read title)

7 minutes Skill Focus [Build an anchor chart]


Introduction &
Check for Say: (What) As we read this text today, we’re going to make generalizations about
Understanding what we are reading. A generalization is a statement that tells how things are
mostly alike or all alike. Making generalizations can help the reader better
understand the text.

Say: (How) To make generalizations:


1. Look for clue words such as most, many and all along with examples and
details from the text.
2. Form a general statement using those examples that tells how those things
are mostly or all alike.

Say: (Why) Good readers make generalizations as they read to better understand
the text.

Check for Understanding:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making
generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

5 minutes Teacher Modeling Say: This week we are going to practice the skill of making generalizations across
& Check for many different texts. When we think about making generalizations, we want to take
Understanding examples from the text and form a general statement about how those things are
- General mostly or all alike.
example
- Previous text Let’s review the following term:
• generalization: a general statement about how things are mostly or all alike.
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Teacher Model

Say: During our read aloud, we read a short story called The Famous Thinker,
Plato. As I read, I tried to make a generalization about the text.

Say: After reading this story, I wanted to make a generalization about Plato’s
writing. In the text it says that Plato wrote mostly letters and dialogues. A lot of his
writing can be found in schools. I can generalize that Plato’s writing has been in
education for hundreds of years.

Check for Understanding:


• What skill did I just use as a good reader? (You used the details in the text
to make a generalization.)
• How did I do that? (You took examples from the text and formed a general
statement about how those things are mostly or all alike.)

3 minutes Explicit Selection Words to teach:


Vocabulary Aqueducts: channels for carrying water long distances
Instruction (when Content: satisfied
appropriate) Crouched: stooped or bent down
Guidance: the act or process of guiding, or leading
Honor: treat with great respect; an expression of respect or affection
Pillar: an upright support for a building
Thermal: causing heat or warmth

Say: In our story today, we have some words that you may never have heard
before. Let’s learn them together to help us understand the story.

The first word is aqueducts. Say it. (Students chorally say the word).
Aqueducts are channels for carrying water long distances. (Show a picture).
What does aqueducts mean?
Turn to a partner and use aqueducts in a sentence.

Repeat this structure for the other words (as necessary).

During Reading
5 minutes Think Aloud & Say: Now we are going to read the first half of Atlantis: The Legend of a Lost City.
Check for (stop after page 511) I’m going to be looking for readers who follow along with their
Understanding tracking finger as I read. Remember to pay attention to the text and think, “What
generalization can I make using the clues in the text?”

[Stop reading after page 504]

Say: Make a generalization about what people think about the island. (The island
was important to few people. I know this because words such as few and most are
clue words that tell me a generalization is being made. Few people visited the
island so this tells me that it isn’t important to most people.)

Check for Understanding:

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• What skill did I just use as a good reader? (You made a generalization
using the details in the text.)
• How did I do that? (You looked for a clue words and formed a general
statement.)

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that the island was important to few people. (Have students
repeat that statement.)

10 minutes Guided Skill- [Stop reading after page 505]


Aligned
Comprehension Question: What generalization can you make about how Cleito treats others? (Her
Questions parents raised her to honor all creatures so I can generalize that she treats
creatures with kindness and respect.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What clue word did you find?
• What statement can we make based on the details around that clue word?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that Cleito is kind to all creatures. (Have students repeat that
statement.)

[Stop reading after page 509]

Question: What generalization can you make about how Poseidon improved the
island? (I can generalize that things were much better on the island because the
text said “all things flourished”.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What clue word did you find?
• What statement can we make based on the details around that clue word?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that all things improved on the island once Poseidon made
changes. (Have students repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after page 511]

Question: What generalization can you make about why Poseidon made changes
to the island? (I can generalize that Poseidon made changes to the island because
he wants to marry Cleito and he wants to make her happy.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• In what ways is the island becoming fit for a king and queen?
• Why did Poseidon divide the island into ten parts?

Closing the Loop:


Poseidon follows many traditions of kings. (Have students repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after page 511]


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2 minutes Spiral Review Inference
Questions
[Stop after page 506]

Question: How do you know that a god doesn’t usually look like a person? (The
words, “he took on human form” tells me that he normally has a different form.)

[Stop after page 508]

Question: How do you know if the changes that Poseidon made were good for
everyone? (People were happy with the addition of crops and resources but
Cleito’s family was happy when they had very little.)

After Reading
6 minutes Independent Say: Now you are going to practice making generalizations (provide CR template).
Practice You will write your constructed response on this piece of paper. As you respond,
remember to look for clue words in the text to help you make your general
statement (provide response time and circulate to provide feedback).

What generalization can you make about why Poseidon divided the island
into ten parts? (He gave each son their own part so that they wouldn’t argue.
Also, there are too many people for one person to be in charge. Each son would
be in charge of his own part and this would help them support their families.)
1 minute Closing Say: You did a fantastic job practicing our skill for the day! We will continue
working on this tomorrow.

Check for Understanding:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making
generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that
tells how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

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3-5 Constructed Response Writing

Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________


Directions: Using the space provided, answer the following question. Support your answer with evidence from
the text.

Day 1 Prompt: What generalization can you make about why Poseidon divided the island into ten
parts?

Restate & Answer ____________________________________________________


Restate the prompt and answer
the prompt in one sentence ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Cite ____________________________________________________
Give specific text evidence that
supports your answer ____________________________________________________
Sentence starters: ____________________________________________________
• In the text it said, “___.”
• The author wrote, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• An example in paragraph __
is, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• According to the text, “___.”
• The text explicitly states, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• In paragraph __, the author
states, “___.” ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Explain ____________________________________________________
Explain how your evidence
supports your answer
____________________________________________________
Sentence starters:
____________________________________________________
• This means ___.
• This is an example of ___. ____________________________________________________
• This shows that ___.
• This is because ___. ____________________________________________________
• This proves ___.
• This demonstrates ___. ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Time Day 2 – Main Selection Part 2
Stamps
Unit/Week Unit 6 - Week 5 - Atlantis
Standard Rl.3.1
Skill Focus Generalize
I Can Statement I can make a generalization while reading a text.
Before Reading
Phonics & If students need fluency practice, see K-2 Handbook for Quick Drill Scope and
Fluency Quick Sequence.
Drill
1 minute Introduce Text Say: Today, we’re going to finish reading our main selection for the week Atlantis: The
Legend of a Lost City. We are going to start by reviewing what we read yesterday.
Turn and tell your partner the main events from the first part of the story.

4 minutes Skill Focus Say: As we continue reading, we are going to practice the same skill(s) from yesterday.
Check for
Understanding Revisit previous day’s skills [revisit anchor chart]:
• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

During Reading
5 minutes Think Aloud and Say: Now we are going to read the second half of Atlantis: The Legend of a Lost City
Check for (start on page 512). I’m going to be looking for readers who follow along with their
Understanding tracking finger as I read. Remember to pay attention to the text and think, “What
generalization can I make using the clues in the text?”

[Stop reading after page 512]

Say: Remember, when authors use clue words such as most, many and all, they are
making general statements. I can generalize that Poseidon wrote the laws on stone
pillars so that everyone can see them.

Check for Understanding [after think aloud]:


• What skill did I just use as a good reader? (You used the details in the text to
make a generalization.)
• How did I do that? (You took examples from the text and formed a general
statement about how those things are mostly or all alike.)

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is all of the people in the new island lived in peace. (Have students
repeat that statement.)

13 minutes Guided Skill- [Stop reading after page 517]


Aligned
Comprehension
Questions
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Question: What generalization can you make about how Poseidon feels? (I can
generalize that Poseidon is not always sad. The text said that he is sometimes sad.
This means that there are moments where he is happy.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What clue word did you find?
• What statement can we make based on the details around that clue word?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that Poseidon is sometimes sad. (Have students repeat that
statement.)

[Stop reading after page 517]

Question: What generalization can you make about people disobeying Poseidon and
punishment? (When people broke Poseidon’s laws they were punished.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What clue word did you find?
• What statement can we make based on the details around that clue word?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that everyone who broke Poseidon’s laws were punished. (Have
students repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after page 519]

Question: Is the final sentence on page 519 a generalization? Why or why not? (It is a
generalization because it includes the clue words many and always to describe if
Atlantis existed.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What clue word did you find?
• What statement can we make based on the details around that clue word?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that many people will always believe Atlantis existed. (Have
students repeat that statement.)

[Finish reading the text]

5 minutes Spiral Review Inference


Questions
[Stop after page 515]

What inference can you make about the consequences of breaking laws or being
greedy?

[Stop after page 517]

What inference can you make about what became of the people of Atlantis?

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After Reading
10 minutes Independent Say: Now you are going to practice making generalizations (provide CR template). You
Practice will write your constructed response on this piece of paper. As you respond, remember
to look for clue words in the text to help you make your general statement (provide
response time and circulate to provide feedback).

What generalization can you make about the people in this story? (We can
generalize that all of the gods have great powers. At the beginning of the story, all of
the people of Atlantis lived in peace.)

2 minutes Closing Say: You did a fantastic job practicing our skill for the day! We will continue working on
this tomorrow.

Check for Understanding:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

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3-5 Constructed Response Writing

Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________


Directions: Using the space provided, answer the following question. Support your answer with evidence from
the text.

Day 2 Prompt: What generalization can you make about the people in this story?

Restate & Answer ____________________________________________________


Restate the prompt and answer
the prompt in one sentence ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Cite ____________________________________________________
Give specific text evidence that
supports your answer ____________________________________________________
Sentence starters: ____________________________________________________
• In the text it said, “___.”
• The author wrote, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• An example in paragraph __
is, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• According to the text, “___.”
• The text explicitly states, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• In paragraph __, the author
states, “___.” ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Explain ____________________________________________________
Explain how your evidence
supports your answer
____________________________________________________
Sentence starters:
____________________________________________________
• This means ___.
• This is an example of ___. ____________________________________________________
• This shows that ___.
• This is because ___. ____________________________________________________
• This proves ___.
• This demonstrates ___. ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
© Pearson Education

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Time Day 3 – On or Below Leveled Reader
Stamps
Unit/Week Unit 6 - Week 5 - Sweet Freedom
Standard Rl.3.1
Skill Focus Generalize
I Can Statement I can make generalizations while reading a text.
Before Reading
Phonics & Fluency If students need fluency practice, see K-2 Handbook for Quick Drill Scope and
Quick Drill Sequence.

1 minute Introduce Text Say: Today, we’re going to read a nonfiction text called Sweet Freedom written by Jeri
Cipriano and illustrated by Den Schofield and Judith Hunt.
Read the title with me (students chorally read title).

4 minutes Skill Focus Check Say: As we read, we are going to practice the same skill(s) from yesterday.
for Understanding
Revisit previous day’s skills [revisit anchor chart]:
• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

During Reading
7 minutes First Read Say: First, we will read the text silky-smooth by keeping a steady pace and briefly
pausing at commas and end marks. Remember to pay attention to the text and think,
“What generalization can I make using the clues in the text?”

Say: I will start reading while you follow along. When I say, ‘together,’ we will chorally
read as one super-strong voice.

[Teacher reads pages 3. Students join chorally for pages 4-19.]

3 minutes Think Aloud and Say: Flip back to page 3. Sometimes the text will not have a clue word to signal a
Check for generalization but instead we need to use the provided clues to make our own. On
Understanding page 3 the text tells me that Ellen and William were slaves. Using these clues, I can
make the general statement that all slaves were not free and were not treated fairly.

Check for Understanding [after think aloud]:


• What skill did I just use as a good reader? (You used the details in the text to
make a generalization.)
• How did I do that? (You took examples from the text and formed a general
statement about how those things are mostly or all alike.)

Closing the Loop:


All slaves were treated unfairly. (Have students repeat that statement.)

10 minutes Second Read Say: Now, you are going to independently read the story again.
Guided Skill-
Aligned [Stop reading after page 7]
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Comprehension
Questions Question: What generalization can you find on page 6? (I can generalize that all white
men knew how to read and write.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What is the clue word that helped you identify the generalization? (The clue
word I found is ‘most’.)
• What statement can we make based on the details?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that the Crafts were determined to get to freedom. (Have students
repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after page 9]

Question: What generalization can you make on page 9? (I can generalize that
people in Boston wanted to make sure the Crafts were safe.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What is the clue word that helped you identify the generalization? (The clue
word I found is ‘many’.)
• What statement can we make based on the details?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that many people helped hide the Crafts from danger. (Have
students repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after page 15]

Question: What generalization can you make on page 15? (I can generalize that
Brown was placed with other boxes but he had to be very still and quiet so no one
would know he was inside.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What led Brown to search for freedom?
• Would Brown be traveling for a long time?

Closing the Loop:


A generalization is that many Brown’s sadness led him to come up with an escape
plan. (Have students repeat that statement.)

[Finish reading the text]

3 minutes Spiral Review Inference


Questions
[Stop after page 5]

What can you infer about why Ellen pretended to be a man as she escaped?

[Stop after page 17]

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What inference can you make about why Brown did not moan, cough or sneeze
as he traveled in the box?

After Reading
10 minutes Independent Say: Now you are going to practice making generalizations (provide CR template).
Practice You will write your constructed response on this piece of paper. As you respond,
remember to look for clue words in the text to help you make your general statement
(provide response time and circulate to provide feedback).

What generalization can you make a life in the United States in the early 1800s?
(I can generalize that life was very hard for slaves. The text describes the dangerous
things that slaves went through in search for freedom. When I think about how
dangerous escaping was, I realize that life was really hard being a slave and it was
worth the risk to gain freedom.)

2 minutes Closing Say: Wow! You did awesome practicing our skill again! We will continue working on
this tomorrow.

Check for Understanding:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

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3-5 Constructed Response Writing

Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________


Directions: Using the space provided, answer the following question. Support your answer with evidence from
the text.

Day 3 Prompt: What generalization can you make a life in the United States in the early 1800s?

Restate & Answer ____________________________________________________


Restate the prompt and answer
the prompt in one sentence ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Cite ____________________________________________________
Give specific text evidence that
supports your answer ____________________________________________________
Sentence starters: ____________________________________________________
• In the text it said, “___.”
• The author wrote, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• An example in paragraph __
is, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• According to the text, “___.”
• The text explicitly states, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• In paragraph __, the author
states, “___.” ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Explain ____________________________________________________
Explain how your evidence
supports your answer
____________________________________________________
Sentence starters:
____________________________________________________
• This means ___.
• This is an example of ___. ____________________________________________________
• This shows that ___.
• This is because ___. ____________________________________________________
• This proves ___.
• This demonstrates ___. ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Time Day 4– Advanced Reader* or Sleuth
Stamps *If using Advanced Reader, refer to structure of Day 3 Lesson Plan.
Unit/Week Unit 6 - Week 5
Standard Rl.3.1
Skill Focus Generalize
I Can Statement I can make a generalization while reading a text
Before Reading
Phonics & Fluency If students need fluency practice, see K-2 Handbook for Quick Drill Scope and
Quick Drill Sequence.

1 minute Introduce Text Say: Today, we’re going to read a short text from our Sleuth book called Street
Games. This book is going to help us become text detectives as we learn to dig
deeper!
Read the title with me (students chorally read title).

4 minutes Skill Focus Check [Refer to anchor chart]


for Understanding
Say: As we read, we are going to practice the same skill(s) from yesterday.

Revisit previous day’s skills [revisit anchor chart]:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

During Reading
10 minutes First Read Say: Now we are going to read a short text called A Community Spring Break. I’m
going to be looking for readers who follow along with their tracking finger as I read.
Remember to pay attention to the text and think, “What generalization can I make
using the clues in the text?”

[Teacher reads sleuth selection out loud]

10 minutes Second Read Say: Now, let’s read it again together chorally. (read Sleuth)

Guided Skill- Say: Next, read it again with a partner. You will take turns reading each paragraph. Be
Aligned sure to follow along as your partner reads because when he/she finishes his/her
Comprehension paragraph, you will have to retell it back in your own words. (read Sleuth)
Questions
[Stop reading after paragraph 1]

Question: What generalization can you make about spring break? (I can generalize
that people take trips for spring break.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What does the first paragraph tell us about spring break?
• What statement can we make based on the details?

Closing the Loop:

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A generalization is that most people go on vacation for spring break. (Have students
repeat that statement.)

[Stop reading after the last paragraph]

Question: What generalization can you make about how people felt about what the
young people had done in the community? (I can generalize that people in the
community were proud and happy about what the young people did.)

Scaffolded Questions:
• What does the last paragraph tell us about what the people in the community
did for the young people?
• What statement can we make based on the details?

Closing the Loop


A generalization is that everyone was proud of the kids because they cheered for
them and put an article in the newspaper. (Have students repeat that statement.)

[Finish reading the text]

After Reading
10 minutes Independent Say: Now you are going to practice making generalizations (provide CR template).
Practice You will write your constructed response on this piece of paper. As you respond,
remember to look for clue words in the text to help you make your general statement
(provide response time and circulate to provide feedback).

After reading the text, what generalization can you make about the students in
Mr. Monroe’s class? (I can generalize that the students in Mr. Monroe’s class are
kind and care about their community. They sacrificed their spring break time to help
others in their community.)

2 minutes Closing Say: Well done! You’ve worked so hard to practice our skill for the week. Give yourself
a pat on the back!

Check for Understanding:


• What skill are we focusing on? (We are focusing on making generalizations.)
• What is a generalization? (A generalization is a general statement that tells
how some things are mostly or all alike.)
• How can you make a generalization? (To make a generalization, you take
examples from the text and form a general statement.)
• Why do good readers make generalizations? (Good readers make
generalizations to better understand the text.)

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3-5 Constructed Response Writing
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________
Directions: Using the space provided, answer the following question. Support your answer with evidence from
the text.

Day 4 Prompt: After reading the text, what generalization can you make about the students in Mr.
Monroe’s class?

Restate & Answer ____________________________________________________


Restate the prompt and answer
the prompt in one sentence ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Cite ____________________________________________________
Give specific text evidence that
supports your answer ____________________________________________________
Sentence starters: ____________________________________________________
• In the text it said, “___.”
• The author wrote, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• An example in paragraph __
is, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• According to the text, “___.”
• The text explicitly states, “___.” ____________________________________________________
• In paragraph __, the author
states, “___.” ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
Explain ____________________________________________________
Explain how your evidence
supports your answer
____________________________________________________
Sentence starters:
____________________________________________________
• This means ___.
• This is an example of ___. ____________________________________________________
• This shows that ___.
• This is because ___. ____________________________________________________
• This proves ___.
• This demonstrates ___. ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Best Practices for 3-5 Constructed Response Writing
Teaching, facilitating, & practicing

Constructed Responses are written responses to Reading Literature & Reading Informational text.
Students will read text and respond to a prompt. Constructed responses are valuable and should be a regular
practice because they support student comprehension and critical thinking about text.
Pacing
Best Practice
Guide
Build an anchor chart with your class that reflects the process they will take to complete a
constructed response. The anchor chart teaches the process and will aid in the successful
completion of daily constructed responses.
SAMPLE:
Tips:
• Make the anchor chart with the class
• Complete one letter of RACE on anchor
chart each day
• Add sentence starters to the anchor chart

Between
weeks 1-2 of
school

Model Tips:
Teacher models writing constructed • Teacher thinks aloud while modeling
• Teacher writes response using RACE anchor chart
responses using the RACE method with
Between & CR handout
each day’s prompt. The modeling assists • Students copy response on CR handout
weeks 2-4
students in understanding the process & • Students score one CR based on 2-point rubric
expectations for successful CR
completion.
Shared Writing Tips:
Teacher facilitates a shared write of • Teacher guides students through RACE method
• Teacher references RACE anchor chart for
constructed responses using the RACE
Between sentence starters
method with each day’s prompt. Shared • Teacher writes response on CR template for
weeks 4-7
writing allows the teacher to guide students to copy (everyone has same response)
student in successfully meeting • Students score one CR based on 2-point rubric
expectations.
Independent Writing Tips:
Students independently write • Teacher reads CR prompt to class
• Teacher reminds students of expectations
constructed responses.
Between • Students write on CR handout
weeks 7-10+ • Students write using RACE method
• Students score one CR based on 2-point rubric
• Teacher circulates to provide feedback

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Best Practices for 3-5 Constructed Response Writing
Teaching, facilitating, & practicing

Scoring:

Constructed Response Rubric


Score Response Features
2 Points • Valid inferences and/or claims from the text where required by the prompt
• Evidence of analysis of the text where required by the prompt
• Reasoning and analysis of evidence chosen to support the prompt
• Relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other information from the text to
develop response according to the requirements of the prompt
• Sufficient number of facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other information from
the text a required by the prompt
• Grammatical errors do not impact readability
1 Point • A mostly literal recounting of events or details from the text as required by the prompt
• Some relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other information from the
text to develop response according to the requirements of the prompt
• Grammatical errors begin to impact readability or written in bullets
0 Point • A response that does not address any of the requirements of the prompt or is totally
inaccurate
• A response that is not written in English
• A response that is unintelligible or indecipherable

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