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Weather Lesson Plans

3rd grade weather unit

By: Jennifer Lease, Brittany Trevaskis, Sasha VanderSchelden, Rikki


Beghtol, Carly Noyes

3/20/2012
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Sasha VanderSchelden Date: February 25, 2012


Cooperating Teacher: Grade: 3rd
School District: Pullman School:
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima
Unit/Subject: Weather and Water
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: The Phases of Water

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to understand that water has three phases: solid,
liquid and gas, and recognize each of the phases.

b. State Learning Standards:


EALR 4: Earth and Space Science
Big Idea: Earth Systems Structures and Processes (ES2)
Core Content: Water and Weather
Description: In prior years, students learned about Earth materials through their own observations. In
grades 2-3 students learn that water exists in various locations and plays an essential role in Earth systems,
including shaping land forms and weather. Weather changes from day to day, and weather conditions can be
described by measurable quantities, such as temperature and rainfall. Environments can be affected by natural
causes. Some of these changes are gradual and some are rapid. Water is essential for life, but it can also be
destructive when too much is deposited too rapidly.
Content Standard: 2-3 ES2B Water can be a liquid or solid and can go back and forth from one form to
another. If water is turned into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water will be the same as it
was before freezing. Water occurs in the air as rain, snow, hail, fog, and clouds.

EALR 2: Inquiry
Big Idea: Inquiry (INQ)
Core Content: Conducting Investigations
Description: In prior grades students learned that scientific investigations involve trying to answer
questions by making observations or trying things out. In grades 2-3 students learn to conduct different kinds of
investigations. Although students may not yet be able to plan investigations alone, they can carry out
investigations in collaboration with other students and support from the teacher. Actions may include observing
and describing objects, events, and organisms, classifying them and making and recording measurements.
Students should also display their data using various tables and graphs, make inferences based on evidence, and
discuss their results with other students.
Content Standard: 2-3 INQA —Question— Scientific investigations are designed to gain knowledge
about the natural world.

The Arts:
EALR: 2. The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and responding to
demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Component: 2.1 Applies a creative process to the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).
Identifies audience and purpose.
Explores, gathers, and interprets information from diverse sources.
Uses ideas, foundations, skills, and techniques to develop dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Implements choices of the elements, principles, foundations, skills, and techniques of the arts in a in a creative
work.
Reflects for the purpose of self-evaluation and improvement of the creative work.
Refines work based on feedback, self-reflection, and aesthetic criteria.
Learning Standard: 2.1.E Creates, experiences, and develops artworks and/or performances/presentations utilizing
the creative process structure.

EALR: 3. Visual Arts: The student communicates through the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).
Component: 3.1 Uses visual arts to express feelings and present ideas.
Grade Level Expectation: 3.1.1 Understands that visual arts are used to express feelings and present ideas
and applies this understanding when creating artworks.

EALR: 1. Visual Arts: The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
Component: 1.2 Develops visual arts skills and techniques.
Grade Level Expectation: 1.2.1 Understands and applies the skills and techniques of visual arts to create
original works of art in two and/or three dimensions.

c. Content Objectives:
Students will be able to list the 3 phases of water. (2-3 ES2B)
Students will be able to understand that heat contributes to the transition from one phase to another. (2-3 ES2B)
Students will be able to identify how different phases of water impact our life. (2-3 ES2B)
Students will be able to identify real world examples of the three phases that occur on earth. (2-3 ES2B)
Students will be able to communicate the three phases of water by drawing/painting. (2-3 ES2B, Arts- 3.1.1, 1.2.1)
Students will be able to list several uses of water. (2-3 ES2B)
Students will be able to record observations of activities in words and pictures. ( 2-3 INQA)

d. Language Objectives:
Students will be able to communicate with other students.
Students will be able to use vocabulary such as: solid, liquid, gas, melting, steam, heat, water vapor, in a way that shows
understanding when answering questions.

e. Previous Learning Experiences:


This lesson is the first lesson in Water and Weather. Students are not expected to have previous knowledge of the concepts
being used. Students will contribute knowledge that comes with everyday experiences.

Assessment Strategies

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


Students will be able to list the 3 phases of water. Formative: Teacher will observe during the recap discussion at the
end of the lesson.
Summative: Not applicable.
Students will be able to understand that heat Formative: This will be checked on each experiments worksheet as
contributes to the transition from one phase to well as during discussion and recap questions. Also, the teacher will
another. check for understanding from the experiment worksheet.
Summative: Not applicable.
Students will be able to identify how different Formative: Teacher will assess during discussion with the class.
phases of water impact our life. Summative: Not applicable.
Students will be able to identify real world Formative: Teacher will assess during discussions with the class.
examples of the three phases that occur on earth. Summative: Not applicable.
Students will be able to communicate the three Formative: Not applicable.
phases of water by drawing/painting. Summative: At the end of the lesson, the student will have shown
understanding of this if he/she includes one of each phase of water.
Students will be able to list several uses of water Formative: Teacher will asses during discussion with class.
Summative: Not applicable.
Students will be able to communicate with other Formative: Not applicable.
students. Summative: Each students will be evaluated at the end of the lesson
using the “Group Check” sheet .
Students will be able to record observations of Formative: Teacher will collect the experiment worksheets and make
activities in words and pictures. sure that they are completed.
Summative: Not applicable.

Student Voice:

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the learning targets and During the experiment, the teacher will ask the Students will show their comfort level
their progress toward them. students to show how they are feeling about on their progress of the learning
their comprehension of the activity so far by targets, and their general feeling
thumbs up, down, in the middle. toward the experiment.
2. Communicate the development and Group Check worksheet to reflect on the Students will reflect on their group
maintenance of a learning community. members of each group. work and the members of their group
and how the members worked together
to create a safe learning environment.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• Whole class- there will be class discussion for the introduction and recap.
 Group work- Students will work in groups of two, elbow partners, to brainstorm ideas for solid, liquid and gas examples. In
groups of 5-7 (depending on how many students are in the class) when doing the group experiments and worksheets.
 Individual- Reflection
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction:
Say: “Today we are going to talk about water! Water is something that every single person in this room needs every single
day. Did you know that water can change into different forms? Today, we will start exploring the three phases of water. We
will find out how water phases and changes between a solid, a liquid and a gas.

2. Questions:
 How many ways do you come in contact with water every day?
 How do the phases of water affect our world?
 How does temperature affect water?
 What is the difference between melting and evaporation?
 What are the different phases, and how do they come to be?

The methods of involving the students to take part in answering the question will be to pull names sticks from a can, allow
students to have time to talk to each other and then report back to the class, and raising their hand.

3. Learning Activities:
1. If student’s desks are not in groups, move into groups of 4-6 desks. Have worksheets for each station, prepared and at each
station before the lesson begins.

2. The teacher will have students come to carpeted area in the front of the room by the projector screen. Have students bring
with them their Science Journals and a pencil.

3. For class discussion, ask, “What do you know about water? What do humans use water for? Name some places where you
can find water.” Allow each student to contribute/give an example for this discussion.

4. Teacher will ask students to open their Science Journal and turn to the next free page and label the page: “Water Phases”.
Then tell students that they will be brainstorming. Have students create a table with three columns, labeled: Solid, Liquid and
Gas. First, students will brainstorm with an elbow partner items for each column and record it in their table. Allow three
minutes for this.

5. Next, have students come together, and create a master chart on the document camera. Have students draw a Line of
Learning, and then allow the students to add new ideas to their list. Ask, “Which phase was hardest to find for?” Discuss
why. This starting activity is a good place to find out what students know and also to familiarize students with water.

6. Ask, “Now, what do you think will happen if you have an ice cube, and add heat?” Allow a few students to answer, with
reasoning. Do not explicitly say the correct answer. Then ask, “What will happen if heat is added to liquid water?”

7. Explain that there will be two stations. It is suggested that it be set up this way so that all students are closer to the
experiment and have a better view, but can also be done with the entire class at once with the teacher leading. The more
stations with the same equipment, the better. The first experiment will be Solids to Liquids, where the students will melt ice-
cubes with a hairdryer. While doing this experiment, each student will fill in the worksheet at that table and then tape them in
their notebook. The other experiment will be Liquids to Gas, in which students will watch a hot water heater will come to a
boil, creating water vapor. Tell the students that there are directions at each station.

8. Describe each station. At the Solid to Liquids station, students will decide which student will hold the hairdryer over the
ice cube for two minutes. Teacher will demonstrate how to turn on the hairdryer and how to hold it six inches away from the
ice cube. While one students is holding the hairdryer, the rest of the group will record observations and answer the questions
on the “Solid to Liquid” worksheet. At the Liquid to Gas station, all the students will listen and write their observations of the
water heater on the “Liquid to Gas” worksheet. Teacher will demonstrate how to press the button of the water heater. Teacher
will empty and refill hot water between each group switch.

9. Then prepare for the Solid to Liquids experiment by asking, “What do you think will happen to the ice cube when you turn
on the hairdryer? Why?” Allow a few students to answer each question. Under the chart made previously, have students label
this part, “Solids to Liquids” and then write their personal prediction about what will happen to the ice when the hairdryer is
on, and why they think that.

10. Divide up class into four groups, (or the number of stations that you have) into groups that have previously been chosen,
putting different level students together so that there will be students to guide others.

11. Allow students to go to their first assigned station and allow experiments to commence. Teacher will walk around,
answering questions, guiding thinking and making sure students are using the materials correctly. Allow 7 to 10 minutes for
this station, allowing students to write/draw observations, and complete the “Solids to Liquids” worksheet. During the
activity, the teacher will ask students to show their comprehension using “thumbs up, down or sideways”.

12. Have students come back and sit in the front of the room to discuss what was just seen. Ask questions like, “Why did the
ice melt? Give me some examples of melting. How does temperature effect melting? What do we know about waters melting
point? Freezing point?” Make sure that they understand that waters melting and freezing points are the same.

13. Give directions for the next activity “Liquids to Gases”. Ask, “Where does the water go after it forms puddles on the
pavement? Where does the water go from the clothes you put in the dryer?”

14. Have students go back to their assigned stations and complete the “Liquids to Gases” experiment with the water heater.
Teacher will have to empty boiled water and put in new water, then she/he will walk around, answering questions, guiding
thinking and making sure students are using the materials correctly. Allow 7 to 10 minutes for this experiment, allowing
students to write/draw observations, and complete the “Liquids to Gases” worksheet. During the activity, the teacher will ask
students to show their comprehension using “thumbs up, down or sideways”.

15. Have students come back and sit on the carpet in the front of the room to discuss what was just observed. The teacher will
ask questions like, “What was came out of the water heater when it boiled? (Make sure students understand that it was water
vapor). Can you think of any examples of where we might see water vapor in our lives? (Shower, cold glass of water,
clouds…) Where does the water go after it forms puddles on the pavement? Where does the water go from the clothes you
put in the dryer? What are clouds? How are clouds made? What is fog?”

16. Have the students gather around a table that is set up in the front of the room (or somewhere where there is room) with a
hot plate and an ice cube. The teacher will say, “Now we are going to watch water go through all three phases right here with
this ice cube. What is ice, a solid, liquid or gas?” Allow students to answer. Then ask, “What do you think will happen when
I put this ice cube onto this hot plate?” Allow three students answer and ask why they think the way that they do. Take all
into consideration. Place the ice cube onto the hot plate and observe, pointing out when melting is taking place, and then
when evaporation happens. Have the students record observations in their Science Journals.

17. Clean up activity materials and space and put desks back in place if they were moved.

18. Have students take out art supplies which include markers, paper and glue. For this activity, students will create a mosaic
using torn paper. Each mosaic must include an example of a solid, liquid and a gas. Teacher will show an example of one that
she/he made previously. Post the finished products up around the room or in the hallway and then send them home.

19. Have students write a reflection in their journal about what they learned and what they liked and didn’t like about the
activity. Also have each student fill out the “Group Check” worksheet.

4. Instructional Considerations:
Instructional procedures:
 The teacher will facilitate a group discussion of water.
 The teacher will ask questions guiding students thinking and brainstorming.
 The teacher will facilitate a brainstorming activity.
 The teacher will demonstrate how to use materials for experiments.
 Teacher shows an example of art project before the students starts.

a) Multiple means of access


 The teacher will provide an experiment worksheet. The students will make observations of the experiments.
 The teacher will lead discussion and ask questions about the unit. The students will record brainstorming
session and ideas.
 The teacher will show the students visuals of water in the form of solid, liquid and gas. The students will
learn by seeing visuals, helping them make connections of concepts of this experiment to the real world.
 Teacher will demonstrate how to use materials for the experiment, helping students execute the
experiments safely.
 Teacher will show students an example of art project that has been completed before class. This will gives
students an idea of what is expected so that they start the project with a good understanding of the product.

b) Multiple means of engagement


 The students will participate in individual, partner and group discussions and work.
 The students will participate in the experiment by observing and recording data.
 The students will learn by answering the worksheet questions.

d) Multiple means of expression


 The students can show learning by participating in the class, group and partner discussions.
 The students can show learning by observing the experiments.
 The students can show learning by creating a mosaic that fit the criteria of including a solid, liquid and
gaseous form of water.
 The students can show learning by completing the worksheet.

c) Methods of differentiation:
For ELL students (depending on condition of course), I will have a shortened and simplified version of the
worksheet.
For higher learners, I will also have a separate worksheet with more written questions.

d) Language learning objectives:


Students will be able to show their learning by responding to the experiment worksheets as well as through
discussions with the class using the unit vocabulary introduced throughout the lesson. Students will show
overall learning by creating a paper mosaic representing the three different phases of water.

e) Cultural responsive pedagogy:


For students who need extra help with understanding, teacher will speak individually to each of these students
while group and partner discussions are going on. Listening to how these students are doing and readdress
during this time, the information that these students may not understand yet.

f) Remedial activities:
Students who need extra help will be scaffolded by the teacher during the lesson by being prompted to speak or
having help creating ideas and encouraged to participate during discussions. If the student does not show
understanding at the end of the lesson, the teacher will re-teach to a group that may not fully understand while
the rest of the class moves on to a new activity.

g) Extension activities:
The students who finish their worksheet early, may color in their drawings on their observation sheet, or begin
reading silent reading book. Students who finish their mosaic, may begin reading or writing silently.

5. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
 As a review, let us make a definition of a solid. A liquid. A gas. On poster board, record definition. Then introduce
the art part of the lesson. Students will create a mosaic using torn paper and glue and markers.
 Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons.
“Do you think that water vapor can be turned back into liquid or solids? Why?” Allow a few students to answer with
reasoning. “A big example of water vapor, are clouds. This water vapor comes down, or precipitates, when water
vapor collects and makes clouds. Let’s take this glass of cold water. (Pour a glass of very cold water and wait until
condensation appears on the outside of the glass.) When the temperature cools, the water vapor condenses, or
particles sticks together and form a droplet. When it weighs too heavy for the cloud to hold, it comes down to earth
in…” Allow students to answer, making sure that they answer: snow, ice, sleet, rain, or solid and liquid. “In the next
lesson we do, we will be talking about the water cycle, and in that lesson, you will see how precipitation is a part of
this cycle.”

6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
Students will take home their art work and give a show to their parents explaining their understanding about the
phase changes that occur to water.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology


 Document camera
 Desks or tables
 Brain storming template
 Pictures of examples of solids, liquids and gases of water
 Science Journal
 Pencil
 Plate(s)
 Hair dryer(s)
 Hot water boiler(s)
 Solids to Liquids worksheet (and accommodations worksheets)
 Liquids to Gases worksheet (and accommodations worksheets)
 Group Check
 Art activity directions

Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas:
Other content areas that this lesson is covering is art and writing. Students will be communicating what they learned about
water through mosaic art. Students will be communicating their findings by writing on the experimental worksheet.

 Acknowledgements:
This instructional plan was created by Sasha VanderSchelden with the follow up questions adapted from http://www-
k12.atmos.washington.edu/k12/pilot/water_cycle/teacherpage.html website.
Material for the Document Camera

Pictures of solid, liquid and gas:

http://www.jokeroo.com/pictures/nature/arctic-ice-cave.html
http://aquatecuk.wordpress.com/2011/11/10/water-purification-systems-to-become-as-common-as-mobile-phones/
http://ed101.bu.edu/StudentDoc/current/ED101fa10/jenmks/

Lab Name: ________________________________________ Date: ___________________

Brainstorming Template
Solid Liquid Gas

Phases of Water Art Activity Instructions:


You will create a mosaic using torn paper and a black
permanent marker if you like. This mosaic must include at
least one example of water as a solid, a liquid and a gas.
Ideas:
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________

Group Check
Assignment/Lesson Name: ____________________

Name: _________________________________ Date: ________________

Classmate #1: Name: _________________________


Grade of involvement (1-5): _______________________
Reason: ___________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
How did this student positively add to your experience? _______________
_________________________________________________________

Classmate #2: Name: _________________________


Grade for involvement (1-5): _______________________
Reason: ___________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
How did this student positively add to your experience? _______________
_________________________________________________________

Classmate #3: Name: _________________________


Grade for involvement (1-5): _______________________
Reason: ___________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
How did this student positively add to your experience? _______________
_________________________________________________________
Classmate #4: Name: _________________________
Grade for involvement (1-5): _______________________
Reason: ___________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
How did this student positively add to your experience? _______________
______________________________________________________

Name _________________________________________________________ Date ________________________________

Solids to Liquids Worksheet


At this station, you will place one ice cube on the plate, and one
student will hold the hair dryer 6 to 12 inches over the ice cube for
two minutes. Record your observation of what happens to the ice in
writing and in pictures.

Draw your observations here: Record your observations here:

_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
1. How do you think the temperature of the air _________________________
from the hair dryer affects the ice cube? _________________________
_________________________________________ _________________________
_________________________________________ _________________________
_________________________________________ _________________________
2. Would the ice have changed without the heat from the hair dryer?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
3. Why do you think the ice melted?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
4. What do you think needs to happen for the liquid water to freeze again?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
Name: _____________________________________________________ Date _________________________________

Liquids to Gases Worksheet


At this station, you will press the “Start” button on the hot
water boiler until the water boils. Record your observation of
what happens to the ice in writing and in pictures.

Draw your observations here: Record your observations here:

_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
1. How do you think the temperature affected
_______________________
the water? _______________________
____________________________________________ _______________________
____________________________________________ _______________________
____________________________________________ _______________________
2. What comes out of the water heater when it boils?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
3. Where does this material go after it is released?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
4. What is an example of where you would find this material?
Instructional/Lesson Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Carly Noyes Date: 2/23/12


Cooperating Teacher Grade: Third
School District: _______________________ School: ______________________
University Supervisor: ______________________________________________
Unit/Subject: Music/Arts
Instructional/Lesson Plan Title/Focus: Weather Cheer Song

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional/Lesson Plan Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to incorporate the song “Weather
Cheer” into the weather unit.
b. State Learning Standards:
Grade Level: 3 Music
EALR 2: The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and responding to
demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Component 2.2: Applies a Performance process to music
Grade Level Expectation: 2.2.1 Understands and applies a performance process when preparing and performing
music.
c. Content Objectives
 Students will be able to participate actively while the song is being sung using an instrument of
their choice
 Students will be able to identify different noises that are associated with words in the story by
using the different instruments
 Students will be able to connect the song to the unit they are learning about
 Students will be able to sing in rhythm to the song with one another
d. Language Objectives
 Students will be able to explain which weather is associated with each season
 Students will be able to explain what the tambourine, shakers, drums, and sticks are
e. Previous Learning Experiences
This lesson will be during the weather unit. This section involves the season and the weather associated.
Before learning this song the class will have already learned about the weather changes that occur
throughout the year and which weather each season brings.

Assessment Strategies
Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies
Students will be able to participate actively Formative: Teacher will keep a tally of those
while the song is being sung using an students that are actively participating and
instrument of their choice trying their best.

Summative: Teacher will make sure the


students are participating the whole time and
take notes on those who are not.
Students will be able to identify different Formative: Students will write in journal which
noises that are associated with words in the instrument they thinks should go with each
story sound word. Through this the teacher should
be able to see the students thought process.
Summative: Teacher will make sure each
student participate in the journal writing and
then respond so the student receives
feedback.
Students will be able to connect the song to Formative: Have students form small groups
the unit they are learning about and talk about why they think the instrument
they have works best with the sound word.

Summative: During this the teacher will walk


around and make sure students are actively
engaged in discussion.
Students will be able to sing in rhythm with Formative: Teacher will keep a tally of those
one another that participate and try their best to sing in
rhythm.

Summative: Teacher will assess the complete


song as a whole class depending on how in
rhythm the class sounds. Students will all
receive the same score.

Student Voice:
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how students
collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning
students: journals, work
examples, projects, papers,
etc.)
1. Communicate the support Journal Students will write in their
and resources that can be journals how feel about the
accessed to help them song and playing instruments
achieve learning targets. and express if there is
anything they want to know
more about and do not
understand.
2. Communicate the learning Exit Slip After the lesson the teacher
targets and their progress will give students a number
towards them. line 1-10 (10 indicating they
highly enjoyed) showing how
much they enjoyed the
lesson.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


 The class will be divided into four different groups. There are four different instruments the students can
play. Each student will grab an instrument of their choice (tambourine, shaker, drum, sticks). Depending
on which instrument the student grabbed they will then sit with the other members of the same
instrument.

Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction: The song will be on a poster in the front of the class. Before going over the rhythm and
instruments the teacher will read the song to the class. Then the teacher will ask the class which words in
the song look like sound words. The class will then have a discussion of what sound words are
(example, “drip, drip, drip” makes the sound of the rain). The class will then connect the sounds to the
season and discuss how it connects to the weather unit.

2. Questions:
 What instrument sounds the most like the “dripping” of the rain?
 What instrument sounds the most like the “sizzling” of the sun’s heat?
 What instrument sounds the most like the “falling down” of the leaves?
 What instrument sounds the most like the “burr” from the snow?
 What ways can we make sure that we sing in rhythm?

For getting students to actively participate in these questions the teacher can call on volunteers from the class
and let them share what they want to do for the sounds. If there are no volunteers the teacher can randomly call
on a student to get them to participate.

3. Learning Activities
 Say: “Since we are in our weather unit and are learning about the different weather conditions connecting to the
seasons we are going to sing a song called “Weather Cheer” and play some instruments.”
 Read the song to the class once, and then have the class read it with you again.
 Sing the song clapping to the rhythm and have the class clap with you. Then sing the song with the class again as
many times as needed so they are in tune together with each other and the beat.
 Have the same amount of tambourines, shakers, drums, and sticks all equally divided by class size. (Example: if
you have 20 students have 5 of each instrument).
 Once each student has an instrument, have each group play the instrument one at a time while the class listens.
 Say to the class “now that you have heard each instrument what sound so you think sounds the most like a
“dripping” sound?” Repeat the same question asking the class to choose which sound they like the best with each
word sound.
 Explain that when the class is singing the song they will all be clapping the beat unless it is their turn to play the
instrument.
 Explain that when the poem says “drip, drip, drip, down the lane” the chosen instrument will play a beat of 3 for
the “drip, drip, drip” part.
 Explain that when the poem says “sizzle, sizzle, sizzle, let’s have some fun” the chosen instrument will play a
beat of 3 for the “sizzle, sizzle, sizzle” part.
 Explain that when the poem says “down, down, down, the leaves and all” the chosen instrument will play a beat
of 3 for the “down, down, down” part.
 Explain that when the poem says “burr, burr, burr, everywhere glows” the chosen instrument will play with a beat
of 3 for the “burr, burr, burr” part.
 Practice saying the sound words first while the group associated with the word plays. Do this to all four sounds
until you feel like the class understands.
 Next read through the song slowly and practice with the class while conduct by pointing to the group whose turn
it is to go.
 Once you feel the class has it down pick up the pace to make the song a steady beat with and clapping, playing of
instruments, and the singing in tune.

4. Instructional Considerations
a. Instructional procedure:
 Read and sing the song to the class
 Clap to the beat of the song to show the class
 Conduct the class playing instruments by pointing to them when it is their turn
 Lead the discussion for which instruments the students want for each sound, offer
suggestions if they need it.
b. Multiple means of access
 The teacher will show present each instrument to the class
 The teacher will present the song to the class
c. Multiple means of engagement
 Students will clap to the beat
 Students will sing along as a class in tune
 Students will play instruments at their instructed time
d. Multiple ways of expression
 The class will be able to hear the progression of the song as they keep practicing
 Students will be able to talk about the music playing and learning in their journals.
e. Language learning objectives:
 Before the class assigns instruments to the words they will talk about what instrument will go
best with each sound.
f. Cultural responsive pedagogy:
 Students will be playing different instruments. Many instruments come from different
cultures. The students can look into where the instrument they are playing originated from.
g. Extension activities
 Since this is a whole group lesson everyone will be working together so no students will
finish early.
Closure:
 This activity will end once the class has the song completed and are satisfied with the way it sounds.
This song can also be brought back as the unit goes on as a time filler or if the class wants to sing it for
fun.
 After this ask the class (1) How did you feel about this activity we did and (2) What did you like about
this activity and what didn’t you like.
These are good questions for the teacher to gauge and alter for the next time they do the lesson.
 At the end of the lesson the class will be given exit slips that they will circle 1-10 (10 being highest) on
how much they enjoyed the activity.

Independent Practice
 Students can always go back to the song and sing to themselves throughout the weather unit to remind
themselves.
 Students can sing the song to their family and share the song at home.
 Family Interaction: Encourage the students to go home and teach the song to their parents or siblings.
Ask the students to have their parents send in instruments if they have any that they want to share with
the class.

Additional Requirements
Integration with other content areas:
 Science: The song is associated with the weather science unit
 Social Studies: The students can learn where the instrument they are playing originated from

Acknowledgements:
Song “Weather Cheer” written by Carly Noyes
Weather Cheer
By: Carly Noyes

There are four seasons every year


Let’s sing a song of weather cheer

In the spring comes the rain


Drip, drip, drip, down the lane

Then comes summer with the sun


Sizzle, sizzle, sizzle, let’s have some fun

After summer comes the fall


Down, down, down, the leaves fall

Then winter comes with the snow


Burr, burr, burr, everywhere glows

Now that’s an end to the year


And a wrap to our weather cheer!
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____ ______Jennifer Lease______ Date: 2/28/12______


Cooperating Teacher: ______________________ Grade: 3___________
School District:____Pullman_________________ School: _________________
University Supervisor: Tariq Akmal ______
Unit/Subject: Science weather/Art ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Tornado Formation/Safety Procedures

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


f. Instructional Plan Purpose: Students will understand the importance of tornado safety and how to protect themselves if
they are ever in a place where a tornado hits. They will also understand how tornadoes form and where they are most
common.
g. State Learning Standards:
o Science EALR’s:
 2-3 ES2C Weather changes from day to day and over the seasons. Weather can be described by measurable
quantities, such as temperature and precipitation.
o Art EALR’s:
 1.1.1 Remembers characters, plot, setting, and conflict in theatre texts (stories) and/or performances.
 1.2.1 Creates facial expressions, gestures, body movements/stances, and stage positions for characters in a
performance.
 1.2.6 Creates a scene that portrays a relationship between characters in a given setting.
 1.2.9 Applies appropriate audience behavior for audiences for different venues/locations.
 3.1.1 Creates works of theatre to express feelings and present ideas.
 3.2.1 Understands and applies the elements of theatre to communicate for a specific purpose and to a
specific audience.
h. Content Objectives:
a. SWBAT: Understand how tornadoes form. (Science 2-3 ES2C)
b. SWBAT: Understand the importance of tornado safety. (Science 2-3 ES2C)
c. SWBAT: Communicate how to protect themselves from a tornado through the use of theater. (Art 1.1.1, 1.2.1, 1.2.6,
1.2.9, 3.1.1, 3.2.1)
i. Language Objectives:
a. SWBAT: Communicate about tornado formation using the correct science vocabulary, for example, eye, tornado
alley, etc.
b. SWBAT: Express the importance of tornado safety with the use of the correct vocabulary (shelter, duck and cover
etc.).
j. Previous Learning Experiences: Students should already be in the process of learning about different types of weather,
including many extreme weathers. Students should also already know how to from a skit and effectively communicate
through theater.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT: Understand how tornadoes form. Formative: A class discussion will be given about the formation of
tornados. Students will be expected to participate, and as they do
participate a check mark will be placed next to their names on a
clipboard. A check mark will result in full participation credit.
Summative: Students will be expected to write in their science
notebooks explaining how tornadoes are formed. They will be
expected to write at least one paragraph. They will receive a plus, a
check, or a minus. A plus is full credit a check is half credit, and a
minus means that the student did not complete the assignment.
SWBAT: Understand the importance of tornado Formative: Throughout the discussion on tornado safety, I will be
safety. asking questions to check for understanding. I will have a jar of
popsicle sticks with every students name on it. After I ask a question
I will draw three names and ask each student to answer the question
before revealing the right answer. Every name will be called through
this process and all students will receive full credit for participation.
Summative: Students will write a reflection in their science journals
about why it is important to know how to protect themselves from a
tornado. The grading will be the same as the above journal entry.
SWBAT: Communicate how to protect themselves Formative: I will be walking around listening to the students
from a tornado through the use of theater. creating their skits and ask questions about why they are doing
certain things. I will have a clipboard and will be keeping track of
students who are participating and not participating.
Summative: Students will collaborate with four other class
members and form a skit acting out what it is that they are supposed
to do to protect themselves from a tornado in specific situations. The
situations that they will be acting out will be provided (attached).
Students will be graded based on the correctness of their protective
skits and will receive the plus, check, minus, grading system that is
applied on their journal entries as well.
Add rows to chart as needed.

Student Voice:

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
3. Review their performance and set All graded material will be collected including Students will discuss with the teacher
personal learning goals based on those journals and skits. what their goals for learning were and
assessments. how they felt they did based off of
their assessments. If the students are
not happy with their learning, then a
plan will be set up individually about
how it can be changed.
4. Use a variety of learning strategies and Students’ journals will be collected as well as Students will reflect on how writing in
explain the effectiveness of their their mapping of their protection skits. their journals, participating in class
choice. discussions, and performing in a skit
allows them to better grasp the idea of
tornado formation and safety. This
will be done through a one on one
discussion with the teacher.
Grouping of Students for Instruction
• The information will be taught through whole group instruction and discussions. The students will work on their science
journal entries individually. The students will be divided into groups of five to come up with skit based on different tornado
protection scenarios and they will be divided into groups by numbering students off with the numbers 1 through 5. The ones
will all work together; the twos will all work together, and so on. With this division of students, it is guaranteed that students
will be able to work with peers that they do not have much experience working with.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
7. Introduction: “Has everyone heard of a tornado? Well today we are going to talk about where tornados come from and how
we can protect ourselves from tornados. While tornados can form anywhere, they are the most common in the United States.
It is very possible that one day any of us could be around when a tornado strikes. This means that we all need to know how
tornados form and what we can do in multiple scenarios to keep ourselves, our family, and our friends safe.”
8. Questions:
 Where do you think tornados are most common and why?
 What do you think is the best way to protect yourself from a tornado?
 If confronted with a tornado what would you do?
 Do you think it is important to learn about tornado formation and safety even if you never see one? Why or why
not?
 How do tornados affect millions of people’s lives?
These questions will all be posed in the beginning of the lesson. The students will be sitting in their chairs and I will be walking
around the room facilitating a discussion. In order to get the kids to answer every question, I will be drawing popsicle sticks with the
students names on them.

9. Learning Activities:
1. Students will be gathered for a whole group discussion. Students will be taught how tornadoes form through
drawings on the white board.
2. While I am discussing how tornados form, the students will be expected to take notes in their science
notebooks.
3. I will be asking questions along the way for formative assessment and to check for understanding. I will be
asking questions after the formation is explained. For example: “I just told you which directions the air comes
from that forms a tornado, can anyone remind the rest of the class?”
4. After I am done explaining the tornado formation I will ask the students to write a paragraph in their journals
explaining tornado formation.
5. Once the students are done writing in their journals they will be done for the day.
6. The next day I will begin to direct the discussion into tornado safety.
7. During this time students will be expected to continue to take notes in their notebooks.
8. Just as students are expected to answer questions throughout the class discussion on tornado formation, they
will also be answering questions on tornado safety throughout the discussion.
9. While I am talking I will stop enough times throughout the lecture to ask about 9 questions relating to the
discussion. In order to ensure that every student answers at least one question, I will be drawing names from a
jar of Popsicle sticks. Three students will be answering each question before the correct answer is given.
10. Once the discussion is over, the students will write another paragraph in their science notebooks talking about
what they felt the most important aspect of tornado safety is.
11. When the students are finished writing in their journals, they will be brought back together and explained to that
they will be making a skit to help their other classmates remember tornado safety procedures.
12. The students will be numbered off with the numbers 1 through 5 and will be working with students that were
assigned the same numbers as themselves.
13. Students will be instructed to write a skit portraying tornado safety in a scenario that is assigned to their group.
14. After students have all performed their skits, the class will be brought back together to discuss what they
learned from each other.
10. Instructional Considerations:
h) Instructional procedures:
 For steps 1-3 the discussion will be given by me standing in the front of the room and drawing diagrams
and writing notes on the whiteboard.
 For step 4 I will be walking around the room making sure the students are on task, no outside technology or
resources will be used.
 For steps 6-9 I will be using the whiteboard as an instructional tool as well as a jar of Popsicle sticks with
students’ names on them to be asking questions.
 During step 10, I will be walking around the room making sure students are on task.
 For step 11 I will show the students a list of requirements for their skits (Attached).
 For step 12 I will be walking around the room numbering off students.
 For step 13 I will be sitting at a desk that is unoccupied observing and taking notes on the student’s skits.
 During step 14 I will have the student’s sit in a large group on the floor as we talk about everything we
learned.
i) Multiple means of access:
 The material will be presented on the whiteboard, over the projection, and on sheets of paper handed to the
students.
j) Multiple means of engagement:
 Students will participate through answering questions that are asked during the whole class
instruction/discussion.
 Students will also learn through their use of note taking and journal reflections.
 Students will be engaged during their skit performance.
 Finally, students will be engaged through the discussion after the skits recapping what we have learned
about tornadoes.
d) Multiple means of expression:
 Students will show what they learned through their journal writing.
 Students will also show their learning through their skits.
 Finally, students will show their through their answering of questions during the discussions.
e) Methods of differentiation:
 If a student is absent for one or both of the days of tornado formation/safety procedures, they will be able to
make up what they missed by talking to me. I will fill them in on anything they missed in a lecture.
 If a student is unable to participate in the making of a skit due to a disability or absence, they will be able to
draw a cartoon explaining their scenario.
f) Language learning objectives:
 These objectives will be included in the students’ science journal entries as well as the discussion following
the skits.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
 Students are learning the effects of weather on different parts of the earth and therefore the effects of
weather on a specific culture.
h) Remedial activities:
 Students will be writing in their science notebooks based on a prompt that I will be giving them.
i) Extension activities:
 Any students who finish constructing their skits early will be told to draw a picture of a tornado, or coloring
in a United States map and labeling the tornado belt.

11. Closure: After the skits, the students will be gathered around sitting on the floor discussing what they learned through the
skits and the discussions. “Now that we have seen all the different ways to protect yourself during a tornado and now that we
have learned about how tornados form, let’s talk about what we have learned.”
 Students will all be given the opportunity to share what they learned in the lesson through our class discussion. Each
student’s name will be pulled from the Popsicle stick jar.
 “What did you all find to be the most interesting thing in our discussions and skits?”
 “How is this information important for our lives?”
 This last question will allow students to connect this lesson to their own lives through their own knowledge. This
lesson will also be connected to further lessons by me informing them that we will continue to learn about extreme
weather in the next week.
12. Independent Practice:
a. Possible Family Interaction: I will be sending the students home with a list of instructions on how to form a tornado
in a bottle and encourage them to make one with their family.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: This lesson plan involves both art and science. However, it also indirectly involves
reading and writing. Students will be encouraged to read about tornadoes in their theme books. Also while students are
writing in their science notebooks they will be working on their effective writing skills.
 Acknowledgements:
o Lesson plan adapted by an idea from Rikki Beghtol. Edited by Jennifer Lease.
You are in a house with a basement when a tornado strikes.

You are outside when a tornado strikes.

You are in school when a tornado strikes.

You are in an unknown building when a tornado strikes.

You are in a house with no basement when a tornado strikes.


Skit Requirements:

 Must involve every member of your group in some way.


 Each student must have at least one spoken line.
 Should show a way to protect yourself from a tornado.
 Should show what not to do during a tornado.
Rubric for journal entries:

+ Check -
Content The student completely The student has learned The student did not
understands the material some information and complete the
and was able to wrote it down in their assignment. It is unclear
communicate the material journal. They may not whether the student
with the use of the correct have written a full learned anything.
vocabulary. Even if the paragraph or used
student did not grasp the incorrect or weak
entire content that was vocabulary to describe
trying to be taught but was themselves.
able to communicate
thoroughly what it is they
did learn they will still
receive full credit.
Completion There is a sufficient The student wrote in their The student did not
amount of writing journal but not enough to complete the
completed in the journal fully communicate what assignment.
for the student to they have learned.
successfully communicate
what they have learned.
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Rikki Beghtol Date: March 18, 2012 Cooperating Teacher:
Grade: 3rd
School District: Pullman School District School: Jefferson Elementary School
University Supervisor: Traiq Akmal
Unit/Subject: Science – Clouds and Art – Visual Art
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Types of Clouds

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


k. Instructional Plan Purpose: This lesson will help students understand the characteristics of the 4 main types of clouds, as
well as the weather that is associated with each type of cloud.
l. State Learning Standards:
 EALR 4: Physical Science. Big Idea: Matter: Properties and Change (PS2). Core Content: Properties of
Materials
o GLE 2-3 PS2A Objects have properties, including size, weight, hardness, color, shape, texture, and
magnetism. Unknown substances can sometimes be identified by their properties.
 EALR 1: Visual Arts The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and
visual
arts.
o EALR 1.1 Understands and applies visual arts concepts and vocabulary.
 GLE 1.1.1 Understands, applies, and creates the elements of visual arts when producing a work of
art. Elements of Visual Arts: Line, Shape, Form, Color, Value, Texture, Space.
o EALR 1.2 Develops visual arts skills and techniques.
 GLE 1.2.1 Understands and applies the skills and techniques of visual arts to create original works
of art in two and/or three dimensions.

m. Content Objectives:
1. SWBAT identify different characteristics of the 4 main types of clouds.
2. SWBAT identify the types of weather associated with each type of cloud.
3. SWBAT draw 4 main types of clouds.
n. Language Objectives:
1. SWBAT label their cloud drawings with the scientific name
2. SWBAT describe the different characteristics of the 4 main types of clouds.
o. Previous Learning Experiences: The students will already have noticed that clouds are in the sky and these clouds
sometimes bring weather. Therefore, the students will be expanding on their life experiences through science.

Assessment Strategies
Content Objectives Assessment Strategies
SWBAT identify the different characteristics of the Formative: After the teacher is done reading the poems about each
4 main types of clouds. different type of cloud, the teacher will ask the students what
characteristics they know about the cloud from the poem by pulling
names out of a cup. For the students who answer the questions after
their name is drawn, they will receive participation points. Since not
all students will have an opportunity to answer the questions at this
time, they will not receive any points against them because there will
be more opportunities later on in the lesson to gain participation
credits.

Summative: None for this objective.


SWBAT identify the types of weather associated Formative: After the teacher is finished reading the poems about
with each type of cloud. each type of cloud, the teacher will ask the students what type of
weather is associated with each cloud, by drawing names out of a
cup. The students whose names are drawn will receive a check mark
next to their name to receive participation points. Since not all of the
students will have the opportunity to answer questions during this
time, those who do not answer will not receive any marks against
them because there will be more participation opportunities later in
the lesson.

Summative: None for this objective.


SWBAT draw the 4 main types of clouds. Formative: As the students are working on their cloud drawings, the
teacher will walk around and make sure everyone is on track. For
those students who are actively drawing each type of cloud, the
teacher will give a check mark next to their name for participation
points. The teacher will also answer any questions and assist those
who need it.

Summative: The teacher will grade the students’ projects based on


how accurately the students draw each type of cloud, as well as if the
children use the correct color and texture of the cotton balls for each
cloud. The children will receive a 5 if they draw each cloud’s
accurate outline, if they use the correct color, and if they use the
correct texture of cotton ball. The children will receive a 3 if they
have the outline for each cloud, however they do not use the correct
color or cotton ball texture for the cloud. The children will receive a
1 if they have rudimentary outline, incorrect use of color as well as
incorrect texture. (See Rubric).
SWBAT label their cloud drawings with the Formative: As the last poem Clouds is read by the teacher, the
scientific name. teacher will ask the students to hold up the correct drawing as each
cloud name is read. The teacher will make a note on whether the
majority of the class held up the correct drawing at the correct time.
If about half of the class or more do not hold up the correct drawings
at the correct time, then the teacher will need to re-teach the
scientific names of each cloud.

Summative: Once the students have handed in their cloud projects,


the teacher will grade based on how accurately each student named
each cloud. The students will receive a 5 if they name each cloud
with the correct scientific name, a 3 if the names are close to the
correct scientific name or if the majority are named correctly, but a
couple are incorrect. Lastly, the students will receive a 1 if the
majority or all of the clouds are incorrectly labeled. (See Rubric).
SWBAT describe the characteristics of the 4 main Formative: After the first 4 poems are read, (Cumulus, CURLY,
types of clouds. SWIRLY, WISPY, CIRRUS CLOUDS, CUMULONIMBUS, and
Stratus), the teacher will give a name of one of the 4 clouds and then
have the remaining students who have not participated yet give
examples of characteristics of each type of cloud. The teacher will
know which students these are because they are going to still have
name sticks left in the can. This ensures everyone participates in
class discussion.

Summative: After the students have turned in their cloud projects,


the teacher will grade each student based on if they provide all the
correct information for each cloud, or if they are lacking information
about each cloud. The students will receive a 5 if they provide all the
correct information for each type of cloud, a 3 if the students give
most of the characteristics but are lacking important details, and a 1
if they give little to no details on the characteristics of each cloud.
(See Rubric).

Add rows to chart as needed.

Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or communicate on their
learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not being addressed.

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the learning targets and The teacher will collect each student’s project After the students have finished and
their progress toward them. which will be an example of what they have handed in their projects, the class will
learned, along with an exit slip. have discussion about the lesson. Once
the discussion is over, the students will
write an exit slip explaining what they
think the purpose of this activity was.
They will also explain what they knew
about clouds before the lesson, and
how they gained more knowledge as
the lesson progressed.
2. Communicate the relationship between An exit slip. After the class discussion, the students
the assessment and the learning will write on their exit slip how they
targets. think the project helped them learn the
different types of clouds and
characteristics.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• The teacher will begin with whole group instruction to read the poems and to have a class discussion about each type of cloud
along with their characteristics. By having the whole group discussion, the students will be able to hear others’ thoughts on
the characteristics of the 4 main types of clouds and some students may learn from their peers if they were not able to pick up
on what the poems were explaining. After the discussion, the children will be released to work individually on their cloud
projects. If the students have trouble with remembering characteristics, shape, texture, or weather associated with each cloud,
they can collaborate with their elbow partners. This allows peer help and allows for more resources of information other than
the teacher. Lastly, when the students are finished with their projects, the class will come together one last time for whole
group instruction. By bringing the lesson to a close as a group allows the students to discuss what they have learned and ask
any further questions they might have which will benefit the entire group.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
13. Introduction: Who can tell me where rain comes from? How about where lightning comes from? Clouds are what bring
weather, and today we are going to learn about the different types of clouds, what they look like, and what types of weather
each type of cloud brings.
 The teacher will begin by asking the students what they know about clouds. Then the teacher will ask what clouds
look like to them and if they have noticed what clouds look like in different types of weather, such as rain, lightning
storms, sunny days, and snow storms. These questions make the students think about what they have seen in their
everyday life and connect it to the information they are learning during the lesson. After the lesson is done, the
teacher will tell the students to observe the clouds when they are outside later on that day or after school and see if
they can tell what type of clouds are in the sky that day.
14. Questions:
 What are the 4 main types of clouds?
 Can a cloud bring more than one type of weather? If so, what cloud brings multiple types of weather? Explain.
 Which two clouds look similar and how do they look? How are they different?
 What is the weather types associated with each type of cloud?
 What are the main characteristics of each type of cloud?
 The teacher will involve the students by pulling their names out of a cup. This will make the process random
therefore no one feels picked on. Furthermore, if a student is unsure of an answer, this gives the entire class an
opportunity to help their peer with the answer.
15. Learning Activities:
 The teacher will begin by asking the students what they already know about clouds and will write their answers up
on the board for everyone to see.
 After the discussion, the teacher will explain that today, they are going to learn about the 4 main types of clouds,
what they look like, and what type of weather they usually bring. In order for the students to get an idea of each
cloud, the teacher will introduce each cloud with a poem and a picture.
 The teacher will begin by reading the poem “Cumulus,” which will be pasted on the back of the example picture
provided.
 Then poem will be followed by the teacher explaining what types of weather is associated with cumulus clouds. The
associated weather will also be pasted on the back of the example picture.
 The teacher will also discuss the characteristics of the cloud by asking the students what they know about the
cumulus cloud from the poem. Characteristics will also be pasted on the back of the example picture to help guide
the discussion.
 The teacher will then proceed to do the same thing for “Curly, Wispy, Cirrus Clouds,” “Cumulonimbus,” and
“Stratus” poems to get the students familiar with each type of cloud.
 After the students have an understanding of each type of cloud, the teacher will explain that the students will be
making their own clouds using cotton balls and construction paper.
 The teacher will explain that the students will need to draw the outline of their cloud before gluing the cotton balls to
ensure the students are not just randomly placing the cotton balls.
 During the project, the students will be able to color the cotton balls grey if necessary with the grey marker.
 Then the teacher will explain that the students will need to label their cloud on the front of their construction paper
and then write the characteristics and the weather types associated with each cloud on the back of their construction
paper.
 Before the teacher lets the students begin, he/she will show the students an example of the project. Then the students
will be released to work.
 As the students work, the teacher will walk around helping those who need it and answering any lingering questions.
 After everyone finishes, the teacher will gather the students and read the poem “Clouds.” As the poem is being read,
the teacher will ask the students to hold up their cloud drawing that corresponds to each stanza.
 The teacher will end the lesson by having a group discussion, asking the students what they learned and what they
thought of the project.
 After the groups’ discussion, the students will go back to their desk and fill out an exit slip answering what they
think the purpose of the lesson was, and how they gained knowledge as the lesson progressed. Then the students
would answer the question on how the project helped them solidify the information in their minds.
16. Instructional Considerations:
k) Instructional procedures:
a. Step 1 will be whole group instruction with ideas being written on the white board.
b. Steps 2-6 will be a whole group instruction and the teacher will show a picture of each type of cloud.
During this time, the teacher will also read poems, give characteristics, and give weather types
associated with each type of cloud.
c. Steps 7-11 will be whole group instruction and the teacher will use an example of the project to show
the students what is expected of them.
d. Step 12 will be working individually on the project. However they will be able to go to elbow partners
to answer any questions.
e. Step 13 will be a whole group discussion and the teacher will be using a poem and the students will be
holding up their corresponding pictures as visuals.
f. Step 14 will be whole group discussion and the teacher will be writing the student’s ideas on the white
board.
g. Step 15 will be individual work.
l) Multiple means of access
 The teacher will provide a picture of each cloud and read poems, characteristics, and weather
associated with each type of cloud. The pictures will provide a visual aide for visual learners, and the
poems will provide an example for auditory learners, and provide an example for more creative
students. Furthermore, the project will be beneficial to kinesthetic learners because they are doing
something with their hands. Lastly, the teacher will model by showing the students an example of the
project to the students. By presenting the information in multiple ways, the information becomes more
accessible to more students.
m) Multiple means of engagement
a. The students will be engaged through whole group instruction and discussion, which gives them a
chance to give their existing knowledge about clouds, as well as learning new information through the
whole group instruction. Then the students will be engaged through individual and peer assistance
because they have the opportunity to put into action what they have just learned. Lastly, the students
will be able to collaborate with others in the ending group instruction and reaffirming the information
they have been presented with that day through the closing poem.
n) Multiple means of expression
a. The students will be able to draw the clouds and the characteristics of each cloud, and then they will be
able to write down the characteristics and weather types associated with each cloud. Lastly, the
students will be able to identify each type of cloud through reading and holding up their own drawings.
Also, the students will be able to express their understanding through answering the questions on their
exit slip.
o) Methods of differentiation
a. Students who are absent will be given time to complete this project during free time, with brief
instruction from the teacher.
b. If a student needs extra help, the teacher will be walking around the classroom and will be able to
assist anyone who needs it.
c. The teacher will need to pay special attention to IEP students, and talk to them once the students are
released for individual work to ensure they understand the assignment. The teacher could leave one
example at those students desk as a reminder.
d. While students will be able to collaborate with their elbow partners, they will not be allowed to get up
and collaborate with someone across the room, which will help avoid distraction, therefore the teacher
will need to make sure each student has someone nearby that they work well with.
p) Language learning objectives:
a. The students will be learning the scientific names of the 4 main types of clouds, which will build the
students’ vocabulary.
b. The students will also be able to describe each cloud in words, therefore they need to use specific
vocabulary.
q) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
a. The teacher can explain that clouds are found all over the world, but also that there are different
weather types all over the world. Therefore, the teacher can discuss different areas of the world and
their weather patterns, which can be connected to the different types of clouds.
r) Remedial activities:
a. At the end of the unit, the students will be given a review sheet where they can answer questions about
each cloud. They will also be provided a sheet with each poem and characteristics attached for
reference.
s) Extension activities:
a. If a student finishes early, the student can either draw the weather associated with each cloud on the
paper, or the students can cut out different colored construction paper to show the different weather
types associated with each cloud.
b. Another activity the kids could do is to make a mobile out of their pictures. They can punch a hole in
the top of all of their pictures, tie a string through each picture, and tie them to a hanger.
17. Closure: To end the lesson, the teacher will read the poem Clouds and have the students hold up their picture that
corresponds to each stanza. After the poem, the teacher will have a discussion with the students about what they have learned.
Then the students will go back to their desk and answer the questions on the exit slip about the purpose of the lesson and how
the project helped them learn the information.
 The students will share what they have learned by going around the room during the full group discussion and tell
everyone what they have learned during the lesson.
 Did you all know there were different types of clouds?
 What was the most helpful part of the lesson?
 I will use the project to connect with the students by discussing what their favorite type of weather.
18. Independent Practice: I will ask the students to go outside once a day and record the different type of clouds they see and
type of weather is present. Then, at the end of the week, the students will write a short summary of what they learned.
a. The family can get involved by having them research the weather from where their ancestors come from and write a
page about what they find.
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas:
o This lesson can be integrated into writing by having the students write either a creative story or a poem about clouds
and their weather.
o This lesson can also be integrated into Social Studies by looking at different areas of the world and the weather that
takes place there. From the more common types of weather, the students can infer what kinds of clouds are most
commonly found in that region.
5 3 1
(Awesome (Almost There!) (Needs some
Opossum!) Work…)
Did you draw the There is an outline for each You almost had it but There is no outline, the
4 main types of type of cloud and they are something isn’t quite color is wrong, and the
given the correct shape, there. It is missing an texture is incorrect.
clouds? color, and cotton ball outline, or the color is
texture. wrong, or the cotton ball
texture is not correct.
Did you give each All of your pictures are The majority of the names All of the clouds are
cloud the correct labeled with the correct are correct but a couple incorrectly labeled.
name. are incorrect.
name?
Did you give all You have provided all of the Most of the characteristics There is little to no detail
the characteristics of each type are given, but there are given about each cloud.
of cloud, including weather. some important details
characteristics of that are missing.
each type of
cloud?
Name:___________________________________ Date:________________________

Its all about the clouds!

1) Draw what a cumulus cloud looks like and give three characteristics of the cumulus cloud. (One characteristic
must be a type of weather).

2) What is a nickname given to the cirrus clouds? Why is that its nickname?

3) What color is a stratus cloud? What is a stratus clouds weather type?

4) Which other type of cloud does a nimbus cloud look like? How are they different?
Cumulus Cloud Characteristics Cumulus Cloud Weather
 Puffy, white (sometimes light grey)  Associated with fair weather.
 Look like floating cotton balls  If the cumulus cloud is grey, this could
 They have a flat base (bottom of the mean heavy showers are coming.
cloud)
 A single cumulus cloud is about the size
of your fist or a little larger when you
hold up your hand at arm’s length.

Cirrus Cloud Characteristics Cirrus Cloud Weather


 They look like feathers in the sky.  Predict fair weather.
 They are made up of bits of ice because
they are so high in the sky.
 Commonly called ‘Mare’s Tails’ (Mare is
a female horse) because of the wispy
streamers.
 White in color.
Stratus Cloud Characteristics Stratus Cloud Weather
 They are flat and thick like a blanket.  Fog is associated with stratus clouds.
 Stratus means sheet or layer of clouds  Light mist or drizzle is sometimes
that cover the sky. associated with stratus clouds.
 They are grey in color.

Nimbus Cloud Characteristics Nimbus Cloud Weather


 They are usually grey in color.  Rain
 They are puffy.  Hail
 Snow
 Thunderstorms
 In some cases, tornados
CUMULUS CURLY, SWIRLY, WISPY, CIRRUS CLOUDS

Clouds are thick layers of soft sheep wool. Floating up high


Clouds are fat, fluffy friends.
Up in the sky
Clouds are giant Pillsbury Dough Boys.
Clouds are like popcorn. Are the cirrus clouds
Clouds are like bubbles in a bathtub.
Clouds are swirls of vanilla ice cream. Those really curly clouds

They make such a really swirly pattern

The appearance is a wispy pattern

This is a natural fascinating sight

Really is a sky watcher's delight

By: Stephen W. Pollard


Unknown

CUMULONIMBUS Stratus
Sinking to the earth’s surface, forming a protective fog
I am a thunderhead Traveling around and covering us in a grey blanket.
I smell rain
I hear the crack of thunder Revealing a misty like quality
I feel the charge of lightening Awakening the senses in us all
I taste the icy hail
I see the jet black sky Thwarted the sun out of view
I am a thunderhead Unsurpassed by any other cloud

Stratus clouds sinking to the earth’s surface, forming


a protective fog.

By: Jennifer Lease

Unknown

Clouds
Cumulus clouds, fly puffy and white.
Some look like cotton balls, fluffy and light

The nimbus clouds fly dark and low.


When you see them, it means rain or snow.

Cirrus clouds are the wispy ones, and they sure can fly.
Life icy mare’s tails, high in the sky.

Stratus clouds have a layered look.


Stacking clouds as if a book.

Fog is the lowest cloud you see.


Maybe a cloud that got cloud that got caught in a tree.

We thank Luke Howard for their name.


Cloud identification is an easy game.

By: Michael J. Doherty


Instructional Plan
Revised 3/10/2012

Teacher Candidate: Brittany Trevaskis Date: March 10, 2012


Cooperating Teacher: None Grade: Third grade
School District: Pullman School District School: Pullman School District
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima
Unit/Subject: Water and Weather
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: The Wonderful Water Cycle

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


p. Instructional Plan Purpose:
Students will be learning about how water progresses from solid, liquid, and gas form in the environment.
q. State Learning Standards:
EALR 2: Inquiry
Description: In prior grades students learned that scientific investigations involve trying to answer questions by
making observations or trying things out. In grades 2-3 students learn to conduct different kinds of
investigations. Although students may not yet be able to plan investigations alone, they can carry out
investigations in collaboration with other students and support from the teacher. Actions may include observing
and describing objects, events, and organisms, classifying them and making and recording measurements.
Students should also display their data using various tables and graphs, make inferences based on evidence, and
discuss their results with other students.
GLEs:
2-3 INQB —Investigate— A scientific investigation may include making and following a plan to accurately
observe and describe objects, events, and organisms; make and record measurements, and predict outcomes.

EALR 4: Earth and Space Science


Description: In prior years, students learned about Earth materials through their own observations. In grades 2-3
students learn that water exists in various locations and plays an essential role in Earth systems, including
shaping land forms and weather. Weather changes from day to day, and weather conditions can be described by
measurable quantities, such as temperature and rainfall. Environments can be affected by natural causes. Some
of these changes are gradual and some are rapid. Water is essential for life, but it can also be destructive when
too much is deposited too rapidly.
GLEs:
2-3 ES2B: Water can be a liquid or a solid and can go back and forth from one form to another. If water is turned
into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water will be the same as it was before freezing.
Water occurs in the air as rain, snow, hail, fog, and clouds.
2-3 ES2C: Weather changes day to day and through the seasons. Weather can be described by measurable
qualities such as temperature and precipitation.

EALR 4: COMMUNICATION The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of communication
Component 4.2: Sets goals for improvement.
GLE 4.2.1: Applies strategies for setting grade level appropriate goals and evaluates improvement in
communication.

EALR 3: WRITING: The student writes clearly and effectively.


Component 3.1: Develops ideas and organizes writing.
GLE 3.1.2: Organizes writing with a beginning, middle, and end.

EALR 4—Visual Arts: The student makes connections within and across the arts (dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts) to other disciplines, life, cultures, and work.
Component 4.2: Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between the arts and other
content areas.
GLE 4.2.1: Applies arts knowledge and skills to reinforce what he/she learns in other content areas.

r. Content Objectives:
SWBAT:
1. describe the various steps of the water cycle. [EALR 4 Science, GLE ES2B]
2. apply the law of conservation of mass. [EALR 4 Science, GLE ES2B]
3. conduct a confirmation inquiry experiment proving evaporation of water through the presence of
condensation. [EALR 2 Science, GLE 2-3 INQB]
4. express scientific terminology. [EALR 4 Science, GLE ES2C]
5. demonstrate writing ability with a beginning, middle, and end. [EALR 3 Writing, GLE 3.1.2]
6. gauge their learning relative to the learning targets to see what they need to improve on. [EALR 4
Communication, GLE 4.2.1].
7. use visual arts to depict the water cycle. [EALR 4 Visual Arts, GLE 4.2.1]

s. Language Objectives: What grammar, language skills, language functions, and task language should students
know or be able to use after instruction? Use SWBAT format with an action verb that matches the cognitive
domain.
SWBAT:
1. Comprehend vocabulary associated with the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, melting, water vapor)
t. Previous Learning Experiences:
Students will have just finished a unit on water having three distinct phases: solid, liquid, and vapor. They will
also have had experience with watercolor visual arts expression.
Assessment Strategies

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


Students will be able to describe the various Formative: N/a
steps of the water cycle. [EALR 4 Science, GLE
ES2B] Summative: In the art project and also the essay project I will
use summative assessment for this content objective. For the
art project I will use a simple check list that all the steps are
labeled and for the writing assessment I will use the rubric for
written assessment that I have attached.
Students will be able to apply the law of Formative: N/A
conservation of mass. [EALR 4 Science, GLE
ES2B] Summative: This will be checked in the student’s writing
assessment, this in an element in the rubric for written
assessment that is attached.
Students will be able to conduct a Formative: Check that all students are participating by reading
confirmation inquiry experiment proving their observations of the Ziploc bag (both pre and post) in their
evaporation of water through the presence of science journal. There needs to be a sentence describing
condensation. [EALR 2 Science, GLE 2-3 INQB] water’s phase change from a liquid to a gas. (Evaporation)

Summative: N/A
Students will be able to express scientific Formative: N/A
terminology. [EALR 4 Science, GLE ES2C]
Summative: This is assessed in both the art project by the form
titled Formative assessment 1 and the written narrative
response (via form titled rubric for written assessment).
Students will be able to demonstrate writing Formative: N/A
ability with a beginning, middle, and end.
[EALR 3 Writing, GLE 3.1.2] Summative: the final writing evaluate with a form titled rubric
for written assessment. Details on the grading content are
found in this form attached.
Students will be able to gauge their learning Formative: This is assessed by students writing in their
relative to the learning targets to see what reflection journal and also their ‘target’ response on the board
they need to improve on. [EALR 4 with their post it notes [Student Voice].
Communication, GLE 4.2.1].
Summative: N/A
Students will be able to use visual arts to Formative: N/A
depict the water cycle. [EALR 4 Visual Arts, GLE
4.2.1] Summative: I will use a check list to be sure all elements are
included in their painting. Important elements are: water in all
of its three phases, four transitions of phases with scientific
terminology labeled accordingly, and clouds.
Students will be able to comprehend Formative: N/A
vocabulary associated with the water cycle
(evaporation, condensation, melting, water Summative: This is assessed in both the art project (via
vapor). Checklist) and the written narrative response (via rubric).

*All formative assessments use the attached sheet title formative assessment 1
Student Voice:

Grouping of Students for Instruction


K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how students
collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning
students: journals, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
3. Communicate the learning Learning Target Check On the board, there will be a
targets and their progress target. The inner circle
toward them. represents complete
understanding, the middle
circle is somewhere in
between, and the outer circle is
complete confusion. Students
will write their name on the
back of a post it note and go to
the board and stick their note
where they feel in relation to
the objectives for the lesson.
4. Review their performance and Student Reflective Journal At the end of the lesson
set personal learning goals students will compose a
based on those assessments. response in their reflection
journal. They will look back at
the objectives and reflect on
their understanding of them
now. They will also set goals
for the next unit of study by
choosing a personal and
academic goal to achieve.
Grouping of Students for Instruction:
To begin, the class will be in a large group setting for a whole class discussion and some direct instruction from
the teacher. They will then work in their table groups (four or five students that have been grouped by ability and
also by their ability to socially interact) on their art project. They will be sharing supplies and cooperatively
working with their peers to paint a picture of the water cycle. Homework will be done individually away from
school.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
19. Introduction:
To gain the students attention I will have them all gather at the reading rug for a read aloud activity. I will read the
Magic School Bus Book titled The Magic School Bus: Wet All Over which covers the water cycle. Throughout
the book I will make observations about the water cycle and facilitate a teacher think aloud. This will help
introduce the scientific vocabulary associated with the unit.
Students will return to their desks and we will make a chart based off the book about the steps the book in the
water cycle. It will be in a Know, Want to know, and Learned (KWL) chart type style so that the class can return
to it throughout the unit to add more detail.

20. Questions:
1. What are some places liquid water may be in the environment? (Critical thinking and drawing on previous
experience)
2. If you can’t see water when it’s a vapor, how come we can see clouds? (Critical thinking and the introduction
of the vocabulary term: condensation nuclei.)
3. Remember in the book how the sun evaporated the liquid water? It’s sunny outside right now, how come the
water isn’t all evaporated now? (Problem solving, working towards temperature’s effect on water’s phase)
4. Why do you think the top of the bag is cloudy and has water droplets? (Asked after the observation of the
plastic bag)
5. Is there the same amount of water in the Ziploc bag now as there was before? (Critical thinking skills to
introduce the Theory of the Conservation of Mass)
6. Where are you thinking of starting your painting of the water cycle? Remember that your painting needs to
have four phase changes and labels of those transitions but it can start anywhere you want, like a rainforest,
mountain or a desert.(Integrating art and critical thinking about choosing a setting for their art)
7. Compose a narrative essay where you are a drop of water. Choose one of these four areas to start your
journey: rainforest, desert, mountain, or ocean. Keep in mind that you can start this journey in any phase.
Explain at least four steps in the water cycle where water undergoes a distinct phase change. When writing
your narrative response, be mindful of our scientific vocabulary (use a minimum of 5) and how temperature
affects water’s location and phase. Remember to use correct spelling and grammar as well. (Essay homework
prompt)
Student involvement in actively answering the questions:
Students will be called on randomly in the large group discussion so that everyone is paying attention and
ready to answer the question. To do this the teacher will draw from the class sticks so that it truly is random,
this also gives equal opportunities to every student for speaking. For questions that require deeper cognition,
like numbers two, three, four and five for example, students will have an opportunity to discuss it first with
their table groups before someone is called on to answer the question in a large group. This way, students can
collaborate with their peers.

21. Learning Activities:


Introduction:
1. To begin this lesson, gather the children in at the reading rug and have them listen to the story read aloud.
(The Magic School Bus: Wet All Over)
2. As you read the story do a think aloud to introduce the vocabulary terms like evaporation, melting, and
condensation for example.
3. After reading the story have the students return to their seats and as a small group, have them come up with
some steps in the water process, where water can be found as a liquid, and where water can be found as a
solid.
4. After about seven minutes of small group discussion, transition back into large group discussion and make a
master class chart about the water cycle. Organize the chart with three columns: what the students know, what
they are interested in, and after the unit, what the student’s learned.
5. Next the class will do a quick confirmation inquiry science experiment

Experiment:
1. Give each group one Ziploc bag, one plastic soda cap, an eye dropper, and some water in a small cup.
2. Instruct the students to place the cap inside the bag so that it is face up on one of the sides of the bag. This
way the bag can lie on its side without the water spilling out of the cap.
3. Put approximately five drops of water in the cap.
4. Instruct the students to leave the bags by the window.
5. At the end of the day, return to the bags and make observations on its appearance. After sitting in the sun all
day, the bag should have some condensation above the bottle cap.
6. This experiment confirms that water goes from a liquid to a gas phase and shows evidence of evaporation
through the presence of condensation.

Art Project:
1. Since we have our science bags assembled, we are going to begin our art project. Have the ‘getter’ student
from each table grab one large sheet of paper for each group and three sets of water color paints.
2. The students will now work collaboratively on painting the water cycle. The art must include: water in all of
its three phases, four transitions of phases with scientific terminology labeled accordingly, and clouds.
Students are free to paint the landscape and the setting for their wonder water cycle painting.
3. When the students are finished, the paintings will be hung in the hallway.

Homework:
1. For homework I want you to begin drafting a narrative story. Here is the prompt: Compose a narrative essay
where you are a drop of water. Choose one of these four areas to start your journey: rainforest, desert,
mountain, or ocean. Keep in mind that you can start this journey in any phase. Explain at least four steps in
the water cycle where water undergoes a distinct phase change. When writing your narrative response, be
mindful of our scientific vocabulary (use a minimum of 5) and how temperature affects water’s location and
phase. Remember to use correct spelling and grammar as well.
2. You can start writing now before we head to lunch.

22. Instructional Considerations:


a. Instructional procedures:
Teacher will:
Facilitate a read aloud a Magic School Bus: Wet All Over
Give time for a small group discussion on the water cycle.
Facilitate a large group discussion the water cycle.
Construct a KWL on the water cycle.
Provide an opportunity for a confirmation inquiry science experiment.
Provide time for a group art project.
Provide time for a written assessment of student understanding.
b. Multiple means of access
The teacher will:
Facilitate a read aloud on the water cycle
Demonstrate evaporation and condensation in a simple confirmation inquiry experiement
Write class generated ideas on a list that all students will have access to
Display the completed art projects of the water cycle to remind students of the steps
c. Multiple means of engagement
Students will:
Listen to a teacher read/think aloud.
Participate in large and small group about the water cycle.
Assist in making a KWL chart on the water cycle.
Conduct a science experiment.
Work collaboratively on an art project.
Write a narrative response on the water cycle.
d. Multiple means of expression
Students can show their learning through:
Their participation in large and small group activities.
The responses in their science journal.
The product from the art project on the water cycle.
Their written narrative response of a water molecule.
e. Methods of differentiation:
Students will have an opportunity to learn this same concept in many different ways. They will
use auditory learning skills, kinesthetic/hands on learning, artistic expression, and also written
response.
f. Language learning objectives:
I will be teaching language objectives during the read aloud and also during the discussion of the
water cycle.
g. Cultural responsive pedagogy:
This lesson plan is culturally responsive because it allows the student choice in the setting of their
art and written response. This choice lets student’s draw on their own cultural experiences.
h. Remedial activities:
If student’s needs extra help then I will re-teach the lesson in a small group setting and provide
them with some work sheets to take home that would provide some extra scaffolding on
terminology and phase changes.
i. Extension activities:
Students who finish early can have silent reading time. This first day the students should not
finish early because they are working on a science experiment, an art project, and beginning a
writing response in which they pre-write, have multiple drafts, and writing groups.
Students also will have access to creating a water cycle mobile. Instructions for this can be found
under the attachment titled “The Wonderful Water Cycle”.

23. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
 Explain how students will share what they have learned in the lesson. Identify 2 questions that you can
ask students to begin the conversation.
1. After observing the Ziploc bag and seeing that the same amount of water is still present after evaporation
and condensation, we learned that was the Theory of the Conservation of Mass right? Well if we know
that is true, does that mean that dinosaurs could have drunk the water in the cup in front of you? What do
you think?
2. Many of you set your art in different settings; I see a rainforest and a desert. How are those environments
different in the water cycle? What types of water will you find in each?

 Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons.
1. Tomorrow we are going to learn about clouds, what role do you think water plays in cloud formation?
Isn’t a rain cloud different from a fluffy white cloud?
(This connects to prior experience with their knowledge of clouds and water while introducing
tomorrow’s topic of discussion.)

24. Independent Practice:


Possible Family Interaction:
At the end of our earth science unit on water and weather students will have a multi faceted art walk. This includes
their visual arts produced in this lesson and other art produced in future lessons too. Parents have also previously
attended a six trait writing work shop so that they are better equipped to assist students with their writing homework.
Parents are also encouraged to ask their students questions outside of class. A list of good discussion questions is
provided in each new unit’s family news letter.
25. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
1. Book: The Magic School Bus: Wet All Over written by: Bruce Degen and Joanna Cole
2. One large sheet of blue butcher paper for the class KWL list on the water cycle.
3. Experiment: 5 Ziploc bags, 5 bottle caps, 5 droppers, 5 small cups of water.
4. Art: five large pieces of paper for painting, 15 (3 per group) of water color paints, 5 larger cups of water.
5. Homework: “A Day in the Life of a Water Molecule” prewriting and prompt sheet
6. Rubric for Written Assessment
7. Formative assessment 1

26. Additional Requirements


 Integration with Other Content Areas:
1. Science: confirmation inquiry experiment on condensation and evaporation.
2. Visual arts: using painting to convey their knowledge on the water cycle.
3. Writing: As a summative assessment of knowledge of the water cycle.
 Acknowledgements:
Instructional plan created by Brittany Trevaskis.
Science instructional lesson plan adapted from Scholastic: The Magic School Bus: Wet All Over.
Link: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/magic-school-bus-wet-all-over
A Day in the Life of a Water Molecule
By: ___________________

Hello wonderful third graders! Today in class we learned about the wondrous water cycle, water terminology,
and the different phases water can transition between. Your task is: to compose a narrative essay where you are
a drop of water. Like our art project, choose one of these four areas to start your journey: rainforest, desert,
mountain, or ocean. Keep in mind that you can start this journey in any water phase. Explain at least four steps
in the water cycle where water undergoes a distinct phase change. When writing your narrative response, be
mindful of our scientific vocabulary (use a minimum of 5) and how temperature affects water’s location and
phase. This page is for prewriting, for tomorrow you should have this and your first draft finished for writing
groups. Save all pre writing and drafts and be creative!!!

Pre-Write Section: Get those ideas “Flowing”


__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________
Beginning Middle End
Rubric for Written Assessment:

Mastery Developing Needs Improvement Needs Revision


10 7 5 0
Objective 1: Provides a Describes three Describes two Describes or lists
describe the thorough distinct phase distinct phase one or none of
various steps of description of the changes in the changes in the water the phases.
the water cycle four distinct phase water cycle, or cycle, or just lists the
changes in the incomplete phases.
water cycle. description of four
phase changes.
Objective 2: apply Demonstrates (There is no Conveys partial Does not
the law of complete chance for seven understanding of the provide
conservation of knowledge that points on this law in their writing. evidence of their
mass mass does not objective) understanding
fluctuate when of the law.
phase changes.
Mastery Developing Needs Improvement Needs Revision
5 4 2 0
Objective 3: Use 5 scientific Use 4 scientific Uses 2-3 scientific Uses 0-1
express scientific terms correctly. terms correctly, terms correctly, but scientific terms
terminology but may have used may have used some correctly, may
one incorrectly. incorrectly. have used some
incorrectly.
Objective 4: Narrative essay Narrative essay a Narrative essay is The essay is not
demonstrate has a distinct satisfactory missing a beginning, narrative in
writing ability beginning, middle, beginning, middle, middle or end- but form with no
and end. The and end- but it is some elements are beginning
student used not perfectly included. Prewriting middle or end.
prewriting distinct. Used is not used Prewriting is not
strategies. Spelling prewriting effectively. Have 5+ used at all. Have
and grammar may strategies. Has errors in spelling and 5+ errors in
have one error. between 2-5 grammar. spelling and
spelling or grammar.
grammar errors.
Score: /30
The Wonderful Water Cycle

Grade level: 3
Final product:
Time: 40 minutes

Purpose:
Students will construct a mobile that shows the progression of water through its phases- solid, liquid, and gas. On the
back of the mobile: students will name these phases, write the name of process needed to change phases, and write
three facts about that phase. This activity fits into the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements
(EALRs) for water and weather in third grade science.

Materials: (this is enough for 20 lesson plans)


For the beginning: an ice cube, a cup of water, and a Ziploc bag of air.
For the lesson: 20 metal coat hangers, 60 yarn strands, 30 pieces of paper, scissors, water color paints, and a hole punch.
If available, read The Magic School Bus: Wet All Over to introduce the water cycle in more depth.

Procedure:
1. Look at the ice, water, and bag of air. What do they all have in common? It’s water in all three phases. In the
environment, water moves through all three of these phases and that’s called the water cycle.
2. Water may start as snow, which is frozen crystals of water, on a mountain and melt into a stream. The stream
could run down to a lake and on a hot day, the sun could excite a water molecule and cause it to evaporate.
3. Stress that evaporation is the process of water moving from a liquid to a gas. Show the students the water in the
cup and the bag of air to show the difference.
4. That water that evaporated from the lake to the air now can change back into a liquid in a process called
condensation. The sun’s heat made the water excited enough to evaporate, so as the air gets colder around the
water, it turns back into a liquid. This is called condensation.
5. This liquid water stays in the cloud and can go back to that same mountain, freeze, and snow down again.
6. This concept is called the Theory of the Conservation of Mass- all the water is conserved, or kept, in every phase
change.
7. Now you guys can make your own mobile of the water cycle. Start with the snow and label the back with the
phase change that takes it to liquid water. (Remember what that’s called when water moved from snow to the
stream? Melting.) To make the snow, use one piece of paper and make a paper snow flake.
8. Now do the same for liquid form and gas forms. Use a piece of paper and cut out a water drop for liquid. Use a
piece of paper and cut out a cloud for the gas form.
9. After you finished painting the pieces and labeling them with the phase, process to change phases, and some
facts, hang them on your coat hanger with the yarn.
10. Now you have a mobile about the three water phases and some scientific terms to remember them!
Formative Assessment 1:
3: above expectations, excellent
2: at expectations, on target
1: below expectations, may need individual assistance
0: did not participate at all

Student name: Student Voice: Did the Art project Science journal
student respond in their requirements: water responses: Pre
journal? Did the student in all of its three observations and
participate in the post it phases, four transitions post observations
note target application of of phases with with some sentence
student voice? If yes, then scientific terminology describing the phase
labeled accordingly,
this is a 3, if no then this is change of water from
and clouds
a 0. a liquid to a gas.
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Dinosaurs
W H AT Y O U ’L L F IN
D

Dinosaur Unit By...

1) Nikki Cleary
2) Chelsea Enbody
3) Megan Tollefson
4) Kayla Reed
5) Amanda Long
6) Philip Arnold
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

T eacher C andidate: __Nikki Cleary_________________ Date: 3/20/2012 ____________


Cooperating T eacher : Robyn Biglow________________ G rade: 1st____________
School District:_WVSD_____________________ School: __Apple Valley___________
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Science/Dinosaurs ______
Instructional Plan T itle/Focus: Dinosaurs and Art

L earning T argets/Purpose/Previous L earning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose:
a. During this lesson, students will hear a read aloud story read by the teacher. While the teacher is reading the story,
students will be quietly paying attention and listening to what is read. After the story is read, students will get a
work packet where they will complete a few different things. F irst, students will draw their favorite character that is
a dinosaur from the story. Then students will finish a word search that is equipped with dinosaur na mes. Students
will then get with a partner and complete the fill in the blank story. Students will then finally use their artistic
abilities and color a brown sandwich bag that will become a puppet.
b. State L earning Standards:
a. E A L R: Reading 2 The student understands the meaning of what is read.
i. Component: 2.1 demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension
ii. G.L . E . 2.1.2. Understand how to create mental imagery.
b. E A L R: Reading 3 The student reads different materials for a variety of purposes.
i. Component: 3.1 Read to learn new information
ii. G. L . E . 3.1.1 Understand that resources answer questions and solve problems.
c. E A L R: Visual Arts 3 The student communicates through the arts.
i. Component: 3.2 Uses visual arts to communicate for a specific purpose.
ii. G. L . E . 3.2.1 Remembers that visual artworks communicate for a specific purpose and applies this
understanding when creating and considering artworks.
c. Content O bjectives:
a. SWBAT effectively draw a picture of their favorite dinosaur using mental imagery from the text.
b. SWBAT describe that some texts solve problems and answer questions.
c. SWBAT articulate artistic abilities to create a hand puppet.
d. L anguage O bjectives:
a. SWBAT describe that texts may answer questions and bring up new questions.
b. SWBAT inform others of new information.
c. 6:%$7VKDUHZLWKRWKHUVDVWRU\WKH\¶YHZULWWHQ
e. Previous L earning E xperiences:
Prior to this lesson, students will have been introduced to various types of literacy. With knowing different types of
literacy, students will understand that learning about dinosaurs is a new topic and comprehend new information.
Assessment Strategies

Content/L anguage O bjectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT effectively draw a picture of their favorite Formative: While students are drawing their pictures, I will wander
dinosaur using mental imagery from the text. around the classroom with a checklist checking off if they have been
working on their drawings or not.

Summative: at the end of the lesson I will give students credit for
finishing their drawings.
SWBAT describe that some texts solve problems Formative: At the beginning of the lesson I will ask students to write
and answer questions. down a question that they have about dinosaurs.

Summative: at the end of the lesson, students will turn in a piece of


paper that has their question on it and write if the book I read
answered their questions or not. Class with then share with a buddy
their question and answers.
SWBAT articulate artistic abilities to create a paper Formative: While students are creating their puppets, I will wander
bag dinosaur puppet. around the classroom with the same checklist.

Summative: At the end of the lesson, students will receive credit for
turning in their puppets.
SWBAT inform others of new information. Formative: While students are working with partners for their fill in
the blank stories, I will walk around the class and monitor their
progress. While monitoring I will use the checklist as an assessment.

Summative: When lesson is over, students will turn in a piece of


paper telling me one thing that they had learned from the lesson.
6:%$7VKDUHZLWKRWKHUVDVWRU\WKH\¶YHZULWWHQ Formative: While students are working with partners for their fill in
the blank stories, I will walk around the class and monitor their
progress.

Summative: When lesson is over, students will turn in a piece of


paper telling me one thing that they had learned from the lesson.

Student Voice:

K -12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
wor k samples, projects, papers, etc.)
!" #$%%&'()*+,-+.,-/,*0'('1-+*01,+2-*'3- Worksheets will be collected. When students are finished with their
+.,(0-40$10,22-+$5*03-+.,%"- work packets and puppets, they will
all turn in pieces of paper to me to tell
me what they learned during this
lesson. They will also say if they liked
the read aloud, worksheets etc.
6" #$%%&'()*+,-+.,-2&44$0+-*'3- Papers. When students are finished with their
0,2$&0),2-+.*+-)*'-7,-*)),22,3-+$-.,/4- work packets and puppets, they will
+.,%-*).(,8,-+.,-/,*0'('1-+*01,+2"- all turn in pieces of paper to me to tell
me what they learned during this
lesson. They will also say if they liked
the read aloud, worksheets etc.

G rouping of Students for Instruction


‡ W hole class- during the read aloud, students will be grouped as a whole class.
Individually- for most of the lesson, students will be working individually on their drawings, word searches and coloring
worksheets.
Partners- VWXGHQWVZLOOZRUNZLWKSDUWQHUVWRFRPSOHWHD³VLOO\VWRU\´
L earning/T eaching E xperiences
1. Introduction:
x I will begin with playing sounds from the computer of what noises dinosaurs made. I won¶t talk or anything I will
just play the sounds so that the students will quiet down and so that I can catch their attention.
2. Q uestions:
x Which movies have you seen that have dinosaurs in them?
x Do you know what a dinosaur is?
x Do dinosaurs still live?
x Do you know what a fossil is?
x What other books have you read that are related to dinosaurs?
x Have you ever made a puppet before? If so, What kind?

In order to answer these questions, students will participate in a think-aloud before I conduct the read-aloud. I will ask
these questions out loud and have students raise their hands quietly to answer the questions. There will be no penalty for
not answering the question, but I a m expected class participation in this part of the think-aloud.
3. L earning A ctivities:
1.) I will go onto www.Youtube.com and play sounds that are made by dinosaurs.
2.) While still being on this website, I will search for dinosaur videos and we will watch them.
3.) Students will then become engaged in what I am about to introduce.
4.) I will then gather students up at the rug and they will listen to me do a start a think-aloud, and students will
actively participate. During the think-aloud is where I will ask questions from above.
5.) After the think-aloud, I will then start a read aloud with the students.
6.) While I am reading the dinosaur book, I will ask interesting questions to the students that will stop and make
them think critically as well as involve them in the read aloud.
7.) After the read aloud, I will have students return to their seats.
8.) I will then pass out the student work packets.
9.) Students will start with the first page, drawing a picture from their mental images from the story I read.
10.) Once students are working on their drawings, I will walk around with a checklist measuring VWXGHQWV¶ progress.
(Formative assessment.)
11.) When students are finished with their drawings I will instruct them to then go onto work on their word searches.
12.) When students are finished with their word searches, I will then instruct them to find a partner and finish the
³VLOO\VWRU\´WKDWLVLQWKHLUSDFNHWRIZRUN
13.) While students are working on their silly stories with a partner, I will wander around the classroom with my
checklist again and measure their progress as a formative assessment.
14.) After students are done with their sill stories, students will then switch and chose a different partner and share
with each other their stories.
15.) While students are sharking their silly stories with a partner, I will wander around the classroom with my
checklist again and measure their progress as a formative assessment.
16.) Once students have finished sharing their stories they will return to their seats.
17.) Once students have returned to their seats, I will instruct students to create a dinosaur puppet.
18.) I will inform students that the dinosaur puppet may be the same type of dinosaur from their mental image
worksheet.
19.) Once students have completed their puppets, students will have five minutes of ³free´ time and perform and
share their puppets with a partner.
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures:
a. Overhead projector: introducing YouTube sounds and music.
b. Book: read aloud.
b) Multiple means of access
a. Overhead projector, I will pull up YouTube from my computer and play sounds from dinosaurs, then
we will watch some short videos of dinosaurs.
b. I will then perform a think aloud with my students.
c. I will then perform a read aloud with my students.
d. I will then pass out work packets for students.
e. While students are working on their packets and puppets, I will wander around classroom with a
checklist that acts as a formative assessment.
c) Multiple means of engagement
a. Students will participate in a think aloud.
b. Students will participate in a read aloud.
c. Students will construct a dinosaur puppet out of a paper lunch sack.
d. Students will turn in pieces of paper stating what they have learned.
d) Multiple means of expression
a. Students will turn in completed work packets
b. Students will also turn in pieces of paper stating what they have learned from the lesson.
c. While students are working with partners, I will monitor that they are participating.
d) Methods of differentiation
a. While performing a think aloud, I will ask different types of questions that will accommodate to
different learning styles.
b. While performing a read aloud, the questions that I will ask students will help them think critically.
c. With using YouTube, reading a story, and constructing puppets, all different learning styles will be
met. Auditory, visual, and kinesthetic.
e) Language learning objectives:
a. After students have participated in both the read aloud and think aloud, they will write the answer to
their original question if it was answered before sharing with a partner and turning in the question and
answer to me.
b. While students are working with partners, they will be sharing their silly stories.
c. With partners, students will also share what they have learned during that lesson.
f) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
a. Learning about dinosaurs is important in the early grades. Learning about them is important because
dinosaurs are a large part of our planet¶s history. Also, the way that they became extinct is a cultural
fact because many different cultures believe different things.
g) Remedial activities:
a. There will be other dinosaur lessons that will follow. But at the end of the lesson when I collect all of
the VWXGHQW¶V packets, puppets, and student voice papers, these will act as review sheets because they
have reflected on their learning. Ie: saying what they learned.
h) Extension activities:
a. Students who finish early will be able to read or work on other in class work they have yet to finish.

5. C losure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
x What was the favorite thing that you learned today?
x Which part of the lesson was your favorite? Why?

x $IWHUWKLVOHVVRQ,ZLOOWHOOVWXGHQWVWKDWGLQRVDXUVDUHDELJSDUWRIWKH(DUWK¶VKLVWRU\I will also tell students that


knowing about dinosaurs is very crucial because they are a large part of our history. Because of dinosaurs, I will tell
students that scientists are able to measure how old the world is.
6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
a. ,ZLOOLQYROYHVWXGHQWV¶IDPLOLHVLQWKLVOHVVRQE\VHQGLQJKRPHDQHZVOHWWHUWRSDUHQWVLQIRUPLQJWKHPDERut this
upcoming lesson. I will then send students home with the same packet they completed in class to complete at home
for fun.
Instructional M aterials, Resources, and T echnology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
A dditional Requirements
x Integration with O ther Content A reas: Identify content areas/other subjects that are integrated into this lesson and explain
how these are addressed.
! Social studies
! Reading
! W riting

x A cknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources. Give credit to the person who created the idea for the instructional plan,
LQFOXGLQJ\RXUVHOI<RXPLJKWXVHODQJXDJHVXFKDV,QVWUXFWLRQDO3ODQDGDSWHGIURPBBBBB´ ³,QVWUXFWLRQDO3ODQ&RQVXOWDQWV
QRWUHVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHFRQWHQWRIWKLVLQVWUXFWLRQDOSODQ BBBBBBB´DQGRU³,QVWUXFWLRQDO3ODQ&UHDWHGE\BBBBB´ Cite
scripted materials/curriculum if appropriate.

x Instructional Plan adapted from: http://www.teachervision.fen.com/childrens-book-


characters/printable/57302.html

x Instruction Videos adapted from: www.YouTube.com

x http://www.k12.wa.us/
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
Is student working on their drawing of a dinosaur from mental imagery?

Is student working effectively on dinosaur puppet?

Is student working with a partner on their silly stories?

Is student sharing their story with a partner?


Instructional Plan

Teacher Candidate: Chelesa Enbody Date: February 28, 2012__


Cooperating Teacher: __Jill Sollbrack___ Grade: 1st -2nd ______
School District:_Pullman______________________ School: Franklin Elementary School
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Science, The Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Dinosaurs

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


Instructional Plan Purpose:
In this lesson students will create a dinosaur diagram that represents dinosaurs and their surrounding
environment. Through this, students will learn the importance of habitats and how they help their
inhabitants to survive.

State Learning Standards:


Grade level: 1 The Arts
EALR: 1. The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre,
and visual arts.
Component: 1.2 Develops arts skills and techniques.
Grade Level Expectation: 1.2.E Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in
dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.

Grade Level: 1 Science


EALR: 4. Students learn that all plants and animals live in and depend on habitats. Earth has many
different habitats and these different habitats support the life of many different plants and animals,
including humans. People have the ability to make rapid changes in natural habitats and to keep a habitat
healthy so that living conditions can be maintained.
K-1 LS2A There are different kinds of natural areas, or habitats, where many different plants and
animals live together.
K-1 LS2B A habitat supports the growth of many different plants and animals by meeting their basic
needs of food, water, and shelter

Content Objectives:
SWBAT identify parts of a dinosaur habitat. (Science 4. K-1 LS2A)
SWBAT recognize how environments allow certain animals to survive. (Science 4. K-1 LS2B)
SWBAT practice basic art skills and techniques to make their dinosaur diorama. (The Arts 1.2.E)
Language Objectives:
SWBAT describe a dinosaurs habitat using specific vocabulary such as fossils, volcano, climate, fern,
pine forest, venus fly trap, vegetation, etc.
SWBAT explain the importance of habitats.
Previous Learning Experiences:
Students know how to cut and color. Students know basic information about a variety of dinosaurs.

Assessment Strategies
Content Objectives Assessment Strategies
SWBAT identify parts of a dinosaur habitat. Formative: Will informally assess what students already
know about habitats by having a whole group discussion.
A checklist may be used to mark whether they know about
aspects of vegetation, climate, and terrain.

Summative: At the end of the lesson I will have students


present and explain their diorama. They will be graded on
accuracy and presentation. (Correct representation of
climate, vegetation, terrain, and neatness) Rubric is graded
on pass or fail.

SWBAT recognize how environments allow Formative: I will informally assess what students already
certain animals to survive. know about how habitats allow certain animals to live by
having a whole group discussion. I will have a checklist
with more specific learning objectives to go along with
Science 4. K-1 LS2B.

Summative: At the end of the lesson students will record in


their journals how environments allow animals to live.
They will be graded on accuracy using a rubric and scale of
1 to 4. (4= Student reached learning targets, 3= Student
reached most learned targets, 2= Student reached few
learning targets, 1= Student reached no learning targets.)

SWBAT practice basic art skills and Formative: I will observe students ability to use basic art
techniques to make their dinosaur diorama. skills as they work on their dioramas. A check list will be
used to mark whether they can cut, color, and paste neatly.

Summative: I will grade students on their visual


representation of a dinosaur habitat. “Neatness” is one of
the criteria represented in the summative assessment rubric
for content objective Science 4 K-1 LS2A

Student Voice
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how students
collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning
students: journals, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the In their journals, students will rate Students will self assess their
learning targets and how they feel about each learning progress toward the learning
their progress toward target. targets. 1= I know how to do
them. this. 2= I need a little review
before I can do this. 3= I’ve
been taught this information,
but never really knew how to
do this. 4= I do not know how
to do this.

4. Review their Students will present dioramas to the Students will describe what
performance and set class. they would do differently next
personal learning goals time.
based on those
assessments.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


Students will gather as a whole-group to discuss habitats and how they are important. Students will then
work independently at their small group tables to create their dioramas. At the end of the lesson students will
gather as a whole group again to discuss what they learned and present their dioramas.

Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction:
As an introduction I will read a book about dinosaurs. We will then discuss what we know about
dinosaurs and their habitats. This is a nice relaxing activity to get our “thinking caps” on.

2. Questions:

1) What do you know about dinosaurs?


2) What do you know about habitats?
3) Is there anything special about dinosaur habitats?
4) What do dinosaurs eat?
5) How do our environments help us to survive?

These questions will be discussed as a whole group before, during, and after the lesson. To get everyone
participating, they may first discuss a question as a small group.

3. Learning Activities
1) I will first read the dinosaur book to the class.
2) We will discuss the above questions as a whole group using previous knowledge and what was learned
through the reading.
3) I will guide the questions and provide the correct answers when necessary.
4) Then I will provide students with the tools needed for the activity (dinosaur print-out, shoe box, scissors,
markers, glue).
5) Students will decorate the inside of their shoe box diorama with a dinosaur habitat.
6) Students will color the dinosaurs, then cut and paste them in the box.
7) Students will present their dioramas when finished.
8) Students will record their answers to “how environments allow animals to live,” in their journals.
9) Students will also rate what they now know using the scale listed under student voice.

4. Instructional Considerations:
Multiple means of access:
Teacher will model how to decorate the inside of the shoe box.
Teacher will model how to color, cut and paste the dinosaurs in to the shoe box.
Teacher will lead discussion using the questions listed under #2.
Teacher will formatively and summatively assess students on each learning objective.

Multiple means of engagement:


Students will watch/listen as teacher models how to decorate the inside of the diorama.
Students will watch/listen as teacher models how to color, cut and paste the dinosaurs in to the shoe box.
Students will listen/participate during discussion.
Students will create their own dioramas.
Students will write what they’ve learned in their journals.
Students will present their dioramas.

Multiple means of expression:


Students show learning through group discussion.
Students show learning through writing in their journal.
Students show learning by using student voice.
Students show learning by presenting their projects to the class.

Methods of differentiation:
If students are unable to use scissors, the dinosaurs will be pre-cut.

Integration of language learning objectives:


I will integrate the language learning objectives and specific vocabulary words when demonstrating how to
make the diorama. I will also integrate language learning objectives during discussion. I will write the
specific vocabulary words on the board as I use them so that I can further explain them.

Cultural Connections:
To make cultural connections I will display a map of what the continents looked like when dinosaurs existed. I
will then show what it looks like now and point out the different countries that classmates may come from.

Remedial activities:
Review sheets will be provided to see what information was retained.

Extension activities:
Students can pick a dinosaur and write a story about it using the vocabulary they learned through the diorama
lesson.

Closure:
The lesson will end with the sharing of the dioramas. I will ask each student who shares two questions about
their diorama. For example, “why did you choose those plants?” or “how would you describe the climate?”.
Class discussion will arise throughout the presentations because I can use them to spark questions. This activity
will connect to a discussion and lesson on how even humans need our environments to survive.

Independent practice:
Students can use what they learned about dinosaur habitats to describe their own habitats and environments.
They may write down new vocabulary words that can be used to describe different environments.

Possible Family interaction:


Students can make a diorama that represents their own environment using their parent’s help.

Materials:
Shoe box
Markers
Glue
Dinosaur print-outs
Additional but not necessary items include: glitter, pipe cleaners, tape, etc.
Book about Dinosaurs
Student voice rubric
Formative assessment check-lists
Summative assessment rubrics

Integration with other content areas:


This lesson can be adapted to fit other content areas such as social studies.

Acknowledgements:
Instruction plan adapted by Chelsea Enbody from Enchanted Learner’s Software: Dinosaur Diorama.
http://www.enchatedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/activities/diorama/
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Teacher Candidate: Megan Tollefson Date: Spring 2012


Cooperating Teacher: Science Center Grade: 1st grade
School District: Pullman School District School: Science Center
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima
Unit/Subject: Dinosaurs/Science
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Dinosaur Body

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning Experience:


a.. Instructional Plan Purpose:
The purpose of this lesson is for students to recognize how dinosaur bodies are built.
When students learn how different dinosaurs are built, they will discover how gravity
and body build affects balance. Students will practice these concepts through an activity
in which they will build dinosaur models (using straws and marshmallows).
b. State Learning Standards:
Grade Level: K-1
EALR 1: Systems
Big Idea: Systems (SYS)
Core Content: Part-Whole Relationships
Description: In grades K-1, students gain fluency in using the concept of part-whole
relationships. They agree on names for the parts that make up several types of whole
objects, including plants and animals. They learn that objects can be easily taken apart
and put back together again, while other objects cannot be taken apart and reassembled
without damaging them. Removing one or more parts will usually change how the object
functions. Fluency with the part-whole relationship is essential for all of the sciences and
is an important building block for more sophisticated understating of how systems
operate in natural and designed environment.
Content Standard: K-1 SYSA Living and nonliving things are made of parts. People give
names to the parts that are different from the name of the whole object, plant, or animal.
K-1 SYSB Some objects can easily be taken apart and put back together again while
other objects cannot be taken apart without damaging them (e.g., books, pencils, plants,
and animals)

Grade Level: K-1


EALR 3: Application
Core Content: Tools and Materials
Description: Students learn to use simple tools (e.g., pencils, scissors) and materials (e.g.,
paper, tape, glue, and cardboard) to solve problems in creative ways. Though students
have a natural inclination to use tools and materials to make things, guidance is required
to channel these interests into solving a practical problem. Although students are not
expected to make a distinction between science and technology at this age, they can and
should develop the idea that tools and materials can be used to solve problems, and that
many problems can have more than one solution.

1
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Content Standard: K-1 APPA Common tools can be used to solve problems. K-1 APPB
Different materials are more suitable for some purposes than for other purposes.
Grade Level: 1
EALR: 1. The student uses listening and observation skills and strategies to gain
understanding.
Component: 1.1. Uses listening and observation skills and strategies to focus attention
and interpret information.
Grade Level Expectations: 1.1.2. Applies listening and observation skills to recall and
interpret information.

Grade Level: 1
EALR: 4. Visual Arts: The student makes connections within and across the arts (dance,
music, theatre, and visual arts) to other disciplines, life, cultures, and work.
Component: 4.2 Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between
the arts and other content areas.
Grade Level Expectations: 4.2.1 Remember skills, concepts, and vocabulary that the
discipline of visual arts has in common with other content areas.
c. Content Objectives:
1. Students will be able to explain how gravity affects balance. (Science EALR 1)
2. Students will be able to predict how balance affects the build of an animal (dinosaur).
(Science EALR 1)
3. Students will be able to make connections between balance and gravity. (Science
EALR 1)
4. Students will be able to develop a strategy to build self-standing dinosaur model.
(Science EALR 3, Visual Arts EALR 4)
d. Language Objectives:
1. Students will be able to recognize associated vocabulary words.
e. Previous Learning Experiences:
Students have had previous learning experiences in labs concerning gravity and balance.

Assessment Strategies:
Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies

1. Students will be able to explain how Formative: Class discussion on how gravity
gravity affects balance. affects balance.

Summative: Check-up quiz in which


students will describe how gravity affects
balance & end quiz.

2
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies

2. Students will be able to predict how Formative: Class discussion on how balance
balance affects the build of an animal may affect the build of an animal.
(dinosaur).
Summative: Graded journal entry with
written predictions of how balance affects the
build of an animal.

3. Students will be able to make connections Formative: Students will practice with
between balance and gravity. balance by finding the center of gravity when
balancing a ruler on their fingers.

Summative: Students will build models of


dinosaurs (using straws and marshmallows) to
practice the connections they made between
balance and gravity.

Student Voice:
K-12 Students will: Student-based evidence Description of how
to be collected students will reflect on
their learning

Communicate the learning Check-up quizzes Each student will write a


targets and their progress reflection in their journals at
towards them. the end of the activity
explaining whether or not
they liked this activity.

Communicate the Journal entry Each student will turn in their


development and journal entry with their
maintenance of a learning predictions for the activity. At
community. the end of the journal entry
they will let me know their
level of understanding by
putting a :) - I understand the
purpose, :/ I need some more
clarifying, OR :( I don’t
understand the purpose

3
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Grouping of Students for Instruction:


To explain the activity, students will be in a whole group setting. Predictions for the activity will
be made and written on the white board. The students will then return to their table groups to
construct their dinosaur models individually. We will re-group as a class and discuss the findings
and compare them to the initial predictions. Working individually and in groups allows the
students to both build independence, and build relationships with one another.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
1. Introduction:
To begin this lesson, we will briefly go over gravity and balance by having the students
tell me everything they know about the topics (I will their write ideas on the board as
they give input). This is when the students will practice balance and center of gravity by
balancing rulers on their fingers. The class discussion will lead into a presentation of the
activity, where the teacher will give the class their materials and a brief description of
what to do. Then students will participate in activity.
Purpose statement: “Today we are going to practice center of gravity and
balance.”
Focus: “One way that we can practice with gravity and balance is to find a
relationship between them.”
Follow up: “Has anyone ever considered how the build of animals, specifically
dinosaurs, are affected by balance and gravity?”
2. Questions:
1. How could we build a dinosaur model using marshmallows and straws? (Application)
2. Why is it important to understand how gravity and balance correlate? (Knowledge)
3. How does practicing with gravity and balance relate to building models? (Knowledge)
4. What are other ways you can demonstrate the relationship between gravity and
balance? (Synthesis)
5. Why would we build models to practice these concepts? (Analysis)
Students will be actively engaged in responding to these questions through class discussion and
journal entries.
3. Learning Activities:
In this lesson, the teacher will lead a class discussion about gravity and balance. The students
will be responsible for making predictions and building their dinosaur models. The teacher will
walk around the classroom and scaffold the students during work time, when they are building
their models.
1. Class discussion on gravity and balance. As a group, we will practice these concepts by
finding the center of gravity when balancing a ruler on our fingers.
2. Check-up quiz on balance and gravity.
3. The class discussion will continue and students will be introduced to the activity, and make
predictions.
4. During work time, students will be in groups working individually (with the freedom to
discuss with table mates) on their dinosaur models.
5. As a whole class, students will report their findings and compare them to initial predictions.

4
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

6. Students write in their journals and reflect their student voice.


7. Instructional Considerations:
a. Instructional procedures:
Class discussion
individual practice
Scaffolding
b. Multiple means of access:
Lead class discussion
Model project in front of class
Scaffold students by roaming classroom and helping as needed
c. Multiple means of engagement:
Class discussion
Check-up quiz
Dinosaur model
Journal entries
d. Multiple means of expression:
Check-up quiz
Building models
Through journal writing
Student voice
e. Methods of differentiation:
Some students may need additional time/resources
Some students may need special access to movies/equipment
Provide a variety of learning options - models, DinoMazes, check-up quizzes, journal
entries, etc.
Varying levels of difficulty (Low - DinoMazes, Medium - Dinosaur Model, High -
Check-up quizzes)
f. Cultural response pedagogy:
Some students may continue to investigate dinosaurs and cultural comparisons
Map of where the dinosaurs previously lived
Compare diversity of dinosaurs to diversity of people
g. Remedial activities:
Scaffolding plan incorporated
Extra time for struggling students
Review sheet day before (Language Objective - sheet will review vocabulary)
h. Extension activities:
DinoMazes, the students will do mazes when they are finished with their activity early
http://www.mothergoosecaboose.com/dd.html
8. Closure:
This lesson will be concluded with a review of the objectives and learning targets. How
do gravity and balance relate? Why are gravity and balance important for the structure of
a dinosaur? This lesson will connect to students as the over stretching concepts of gravity
and balance occur within and affect their everyday lives. As practice, students can find

5
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

the center of balance using different household items, and recording them on scratch
notebook paper. This is something that can be done with the help of family members.
Finalize by letting the students know that their next science lesson will be a further
exploration of gravity and balance, with connections to structural buildings.
9. Independent Practice:
This lesson leads into several other lessons relating to dinosaurs, or a dinosaur unit as a
whole. The students may visit a museum and apply their learning even further.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology:


Paper, pencils/pens, marshmallows, straws. No additional materials, resources, or technology
needed. Handouts, check-up quizzes, model, and journal entry prompts attached.

Additional Requirements:
✓Integration with other Content Areas:
Fine-arts - building dinosaur models with other materials besides straws and
marshmallows. This can also be connected to history lessons.
✓Acknowledgements:
Learning Standards: http://standards.ospi.k12.wa.us/
Lesson Plan adapted from: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Wixom3.html
DinoMazes: http://www.mothergoosecaboose.com/dd.html

6
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

DinoMaze

7
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Journal Entry Prompts

1. Predict what you will need to do when building your dinosaur in order for it to
stand on its own.

2. Will you use all of the supplies when building your dinosaur model?

3. Describe why balance and gravity have to do with building your dinosaur model.

After we are finished with this activity, let me know your level of understanding.
(This will be kept private!)

Circle:

:) :/ :(

8
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Check-up Quizzes

Check-up Quiz #1

Briefly define the following vocabulary words:

Balance:

Gravity:

Model:

Supplies:

Check-up Quiz #2

1. Briefly describe center of balance.

2. What is the relationship between balance and gravity? How do they affect each
other?

End Quiz

Briefly define the following vocabulary words:

Balance:

Gravity:

Model:

Supplies:

1. Briefly describe center of balance.

2. What is the relationship between balance and gravity? How do they affect each
other?

3. Did you experience any difficulties when building your model?

9
Megan Tollefson T&L 390.1! Lesson Plan

Rubric

(for models)

0 Points 3 points 5 Points

The student did not attempt to The student only completed a The student fully completed
build a model. portion of the model. the model successfully.

TOTAL POINTS:

(for journal entries)

0 Points 3 points 5 Points

The student did not complete The student only responded The student thoughtfully
a journal entry. to a portion of the journal responded to all parts of the
entry. journal entry.

TOTAL POINTS:

10
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Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Amanda Long Date:2/23/2012


Cooperating Teacher: Amanda Long Grade: 4th Grade_____
School District:_District 81______________________ School: __Mullan Road Elementary_
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima
Unit/Subject: Dinosaurs
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Dinosaur/Fossil Unit

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose:
a. Through this instructional plan students will be able to create ‘o-saurus’ using many different types of materials. The
‘o-saurus’ will relate to the previous information that was learned in the previous class.
b. State Learning Standards: 3.2.1 = 3rd EALR, 2nd component, 1st = GLE.

Art Standards
1. 1.1- Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
• Grade Level Expectations 1.1.1- The student understands and applies arts
knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
1.1.2-Develops arts skills and techniques
• Grade Level Expectations 1.1.2-The student understands and applies arts
knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.

Science Standards
2.4.LS3E- Biological Evolution
• Given pictures of animals that are extinct (e.g., dinosaurs,
mammoths), describe how these animals are different from animals that live
today.
2.4.LS3D-Biological Evolution
• Observe fossils and compare them to similar plants or animals that live today
(e.g., compare a fossil fern with a similar fern that grows today, a dinosaur leg
bone with the leg bone of a reptile that lives today, a mastodon and an elephant

c. Content Objectives:
a. Students will be able to observe fossils and compare them to similar plants or animals that live today.
b. Students will be able to give pictures of animals that are extinct.
d. Language Objectives:
a. Students will be able to understand the different types of dinosaurs and what they look like.
b. Students will be able to create a reflection of a dinosaur using different types of materials.
e. Previous Learning Experiences:
a. Students have an understanding on what dinosaurs look like and the different types of dinosaurs.

Assessment Strategies
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


Students will be able to observe fossils and compare Formative: I will monitor the students by walking around the classroom
them to other animals. to see if they can compare different types of dinosaurs.

Summative: I will have a check list that has every students name on it
and I will then mark their name off if I believe they understand how to
compare two different animals.
Students will be able to create pictures of animals that Formative: I will make sure the students are provided with many
are extinct. different types of materials. I will walk around to see the progress of
the students. I will be looking for on task pictures that are using the
materials that were provided.

Summative: I will have a discussion with the students to see if the


students have a good understanding on how to make a picture of a
dinosaur that is extinct. I will then check their names off for a second
time on my check list to confirm I know they understand.

Add rows to chart as needed.

Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or communicate on their
learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not being addressed.

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Review their performance and set Students will look back at their own art Students will go back to their art
personal learning goals based on work to see what they created and they will work and compare the difference of
those assessments. compare the difference between both of materials.
their collages.
1. Communicate how the learning from Give students pieces of examples of Students will reflect either in groups
a series of lessons connects with different collages that demonstrate different about what materials are better to
communities within and outside of the types of materials. create a collage and how their
school.(5.3) collages could maybe be improved.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• Students will be working individually.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction:
• I will introduce this lesson by reading a read aloud about the different types of dinosaurs.
• I will then have a class discussion reiterating the different types of dinosaurs and I will provided pictures of each
dinosaur.
• I will then show the students examples of how to create different images of a dinosaurs using different materials
(collage).
• I will explain to the students the directions of creating their images.
i. Use any type of material that you want that is given
ii. Try to reflect your image on your ‘favorite’ dinosaur or any dinosaur we have learned in class.

2. Questions:.
• I will involve students actively in responding to these questions by having a class discussion and writing their
answers on the whiteboard.
i. What are some different types of dinosaurs?
ii. What is your favorite dinosaur?
iii. What is one thing you have learned about dinosaurs?
iv. What materials can you use to make a collage?
v. How else can you use collages?
3. Learning Activities:
1. I will introduce this lesson by reading a read aloud about the different types of dinosaurs.
2. I will then have a class discussion reiterating the different types of dinosaurs.
3. I will then show the students examples dinosaur images.
4. I will explain to the students the foundations of creating their images.
5. I will introduce the materials that are provided for this lesson; tissue paper, newspaper, magazines, colored paper, shapes,
paint, noodles etc.
6. I will dismiss each table one at a time to get the materials they need in order to make their collages. Tell the students that
they will be demonstrating two collages (images) with two different materials.
7. I will then allow the students to have work time.
8. I will then let the students show their collages to the class
9. I will wrap up this lesson by asking closure questions about collages.
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures:
a. Trade book will be read about the different types of dinosaurs.
b. Examples will be given of the images.
c. Materials will be shown.
b) Multiple means of access (list ways the teacher will present the materials)
a. Explaining the materials thoroughly

b. Visually giving a representation of the materials

c. Showing the materials on the overhead


c) Multiple means of engagement (list ways the students will participate in the learning)-This activity requires
participation. The students will be required to be actively involved in the lesson.
a. Working with their groups
b. Reflection on their own work
c. Participating in our class discussions
d) Multiple means of expression (list ways the students can show their learning)
a. By participating in the class discussions

b. By following the directions of the activities

c. By helping their peers

d. By communicating with their peers about dinosaurs and the different types.
e) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
a. I will adjust the level of comprehension to fit the student’s needs.
b. I will provide a range in the reading/writing levels such as the paragraphs and worksheets.
c. I will work with the students hand on hand if necessary or I will have an assistant signed to this
student.
f) Language learning objectives: (Where will you integrate these?)
a. I will integrate the learning objectives throughout this lesson. Each activity does not hit a particular
objective but they all are covered.
b. I will integrate the learning objectives during introduction.
c. I will integrate the learning objectives during the closure.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
a. I will make connections by using both the arts and science into this lesson.
b. I will also explain to the students where the materials came from that they are using.
h) Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet , scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
a. Students will be provided with extra coloring pages and worksheets that are related to dinosaurs.
b. I will also provided previous sketches of dinosaurs if needed for students who can’t create one on their
own.
c. Students will also be provided with extra materials if needed to create more ‘o-saurus’
i) Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)
a. The students will be provided with extra trade books about dinosaurs. If students are finished early
they are required to read these books.
b. Students will also have access to extra coloring pages of dinosaurs.
5. Closure:
• Students will show what they have learned in the lesson by completing a well crafted and creative ‘o-saurus’ that
reflects a dinosaur we have previously learned about as a class.
i. What did you learn from this lesson?
ii. What are you still confused about?
• I will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons by…
i. Incorporating different types of dinosaurs.
ii. Showing how we can use different materials to create things.
6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
a. Possible Family Interaction (Identify at least one way in which you might involve students’ families in this
instructional plan.)
! Students will be sent home with extra materials to make a. They can make this on their own time or with a
family member.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology

• List of Materials
• Check Lists

• Extra Materials- Coloring Pages, Dinosaur Sketches

Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas: Identify content areas/other subjects that are integrated into this lesson and explain
how these are addressed.
o The arts- Collage (one of the Elements of Arts)
o Science - The unit is based on our previous unit about dinosaurs.
o Math- Using different geometric shapes
• Acknowledgements:
o Amanda Long
Materials:

• Butcher Paper
• Paint
• Brushes
• Noodles
• Different types of paper
• Geometric shapes
• Dinosaur trade books
• Extra handouts
Check List-Dinosaur Unit

Student Name: Observe/Compare: Create images of Extinct


Animals:
(extra dinosaur sketch)
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____ ___Philip Arnold_______________Date:____2/28/2012________


Cooperating Teacher: ______________________ Grade:
__2__________
School District:_______________________ School: _________________
University Supervisor: ______
Unit/Subject: Dinosaurs ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Playdough
Fossil

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: This lesson is going to help students understand how art and science are not
completely separate from each other. This lesson is also going to help students understand the process of
putting fossils together.
b. State Learning Standards:
• Arts: EALR 1: The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in
dance, music, theatre, and visual arts
i. EALR 1.2: Develops arts skills and techniques.
1. EALR 1.2.E: Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills
and techniques in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
• Arts: EALR 3: The student communicates through the arts (dance, music, theatre,
and visual arts)
ii. EALR 3.2: Uses the arts to communicate for a specific purpose.
1. EALR 3.2.E Creates and/or performs an artwork to communicate
for a given purpose in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
• Science EALR 4: Earth and Space Science. Big Idea: Earth History
c. Content Objectives: SWBAT explain why scientists put fossils together.
SWBAT create their own model of a fossil with each bone in the correct place.
d. Language Objectives: SWBAT define fossil and other related science terms (attached is a vocab list.)
SWBAT communicate what they are doing and why they are doing it.
e. Previous Learning Experiences: Previously students have been learning about dinosaurs, fossils, and
paleontology.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also
attach appropriate marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT explain why scientists put fossils Formative: The teacher will observe the students putting
together. together the “fossil” and make sure they are doing it
correctly.
Summative: The students will present their fossil to the rest
of the group, explaining how they approached putting the
fossil together.
SWBAT create their own model of a fossil with Formative: The teacher will observe the students creating
each bone in the correct place. the fossil.
Summative: The teacher will look at each fossil and see if
every bone is in the correct place.
SWBAT define fossil and other related science Formative: The teacher will talk about the fossils and ask
terms. what the definition is every time a new word comes up.
Summative: The students will define vocab words (attached)
and incorporate the words in their presentation.
SWBAT communicate what they are doing and Formative: The teacher will ask students what they are
why they are doing it. doing and why during the process of making the fossils.
(Have a name list and check off everyone that you have
asked).
Summative: Students will present their fossil when they are
done with them and explain what they did.

Add rows to chart as needed.

Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or
communicate on their learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not
being addressed.

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected (things Description of how students will reflect
produced by students: journals, work samples, on their learning
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the learning targets and The fossil will be collected. Students will present their fossil when
their progress toward them. everyone has completed their fossil.
1. Communicate the development and Students will write a reflection that will be The students will write a reflection on
maintenance of a learning community. collected. how they thought the process and
presentations helped or didn’t help them
learn.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• Students will work individually on this project.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction: The teacher will say “Today we are going to be artists and scientists at the same time. We
are going to create a model of a fossil. Scientists make a model putting bones that they craft in the correct
places and figuring out how a dinosaur is supposed to look before they put the actual fossils together to
create an entire dinosaur. They don’t use playdough, but that’s what we are going to use today.”
• I will make connections to their lives by using playdough. Also, I am telling them that they are
going to be scientists and artists, which they will all already have a notion of what these are.
2. Questions: What is a fossil? Why do scientists make models before putting the actual fossils together?
Why do scientists put fossils of dinosaurs together? What is the most that we could possibly know about
dinosaurs? Why are fossils important to scientists?
• The teacher will ask the questions in a large group and the students will raise their hands if they
have something to contribute. There isn’t one answer, thus the questions becomes a conversation
among the class. Tell everyone that they need to respond to at least one question. Have a name
list and check off everyone that contributes to the conversation.
3. Learning Activities:
1. The teacher will introduce the lesson as specified above. (3 minutes)
2. The teacher will ask the students the above questions and have a class
conversation. (7 minutes)
3. The teacher will hand out a picture of a dinosaur made of fossils and some
playdough to each student.
4. The students will then make and put together their fossils. (40 minutes)
5. The teacher will then hand out the vocab list for the students to define.
6. The students will present their fossils that they put together to the class. (15
minutes)
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) The teacher will make a bone out of playdough to show what they are supposed to be making.
Then the students will make their own fossil. Then the students will define the words on the
vocab list (attached). Then the students will practice their presentation with partners. The last
thing the students will do is present.
b) The teacher will explain what to do, then demonstrate what to do, then go over the voacab words.
After this the students will make the models with their playdough. When they are done the
teacher will hand out the vocab list.
c) Students will be using their hands to make the fossils. The students will then define the words on
the vocab list. The students will then present their fossil explaining their thought process.
d) Students can show their learning by making their model of a dinosaur using separate fossils
correctly. Also, they will be writing the definitions of the vocab words. They can also show their
learning in their presentation of their dinosaur.
e) This lesson can be drawn instead of molded. Also, a student who can’t write can verbally define
the vocab words to demonstrate their knowledge.
f) Learning language objectives are incorporated in the class discussion at the beginning and in the
presentation at the end. It is also incorporated in the vocab list.
g) There are Cultural connections when they describe how scientists work on things because science
is universal and people from all over the world collaborate with each other.
h) When they get done with their fossil and vocab worksheet they can explain and practice their
presentation with a partner that is also done with their dinosaur and vocab worksheet.
i) When they get done with their fossil they can explain and practice their presentation with a partner
that is also done with their dinosaur. They may also get some more playdough to mold different
dinosaurs with it.
5. Closure: I am going to bring closure to this lesson by giving a brief overview of what they did and what
they were supposed to learn from it. This is going to be after everyone has presented.
• Students will share what they have learned in their presentations. I can ask them what they think
the purpose of this activity was and how this is going to affect how they think about science and
art.
• This will connect to students lives because they will start to understand that there is a process to
everything. In future lessons we can talk about the importance of planning in advance.
6. Independent Practice: Students can make models with fossils made of playdough at home because it
doesn’t take a lot of materials to do this project.
a. Family members can help with making these and make models themselves at home with their
children.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas: This lesson integrates science and art. It can also be integrated
with the history of the world.
• Acknowledgements: This lesson plan is completely original.
Vocab list
1) Fossil

2) Fossilization

3) Trace Fossil

4) Mold

5) Cast

6) Index Fossil

7) Dinosaur

8) Paleontologist

9) Paleontology

10) Excavate
Presentation Checklist

___ The fossil is put together correctly.

___ The student uses scholarly language (i.e. incorporates vocab in presentation)

___ The presentation is between 3-5 minutes.

___ The student explains their thought process.


African Savanna

Fourth Grade
Cassidy Cuthill, Bethany Downard, Katie Hutton,
Lauren Krippaehne, & Madelyne Lawrence

1
African Savanna
Fourth Grade
Science
Cassidy, Bethany, Katie, Lauren, and Madelyne

Our unit focuses on the African Savanna. There are five


different science lessons designed for the fourth grade level
that focus primarily the African savanna and the animals
that inhabit it. These lessons are entitled African Safari
Vacation, Animal Adaptations, African Animals, Animals of the
Savannas, and African Animals and Habitats. The lessons are
fairly similar in content, but vary in that they focus on
different aspects. These lessons all incorporate other subject
areas other than science, and are great cross-curricular lesson
plans.

2
Table of Contents

Pages 4-12 Lesson 1: African Safari Vacation

Pages 13-18 Lesson 2: Animal Adaptations

Pages 19-23 Lesson 3: African Animals

Pages 24-29 Lesson 4: Animals of the Savannas

Pages 30-33 Lesson 5: African Animals and Habitats

3
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: _Cassidy Cuthill______________________Date: February 23rd, 2012 __


Cooperating Teacher: Carol Myers_________________Grade: 4th ____________
School District:__Colfax School District_______________ School: _____Jennings Elementary School____
University Supervisor: Lori White ______
Unit/Subject: African Animals ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: African Safari Vacation

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to allow students to understand facts about African animals (living
environment, diet, coloring, etc.) and the importance of planning when going on vacation.
b. State Learning Standards
Grade Level: 4
Communication EALR 1: The student uses listening and observation skills and strategies to gain understanding.
Component 1.1: Uses listening and observational skills and strategies to focus attention and interpret
information
GLE 1.1.1: Applies a variety of listening strategies to accommodate the listening situation
GLE 1.1.2: Applies a variety of observation skills/strategies to recall and interpret information
Communication EALR 2: The student uses communication skills and strategies to interact/work effectively with others.
Component 2.2: Uses interpersonal skills and strategies in a multicultural context to work collaboratively, solve
problems, and perform tasks
GLE 2.2.2: Understands how to show respect for others’ input
GLE 2.2.2: Applies skills to contribute responsibly in a one-to-one conversation or group setting
Science EALR 4: Life Science
Big Idea: Structures and Functions of Living Organisms (LS1)
Component: Structures and Behaviors
GLE LS1A: Plants and animals can be sorted according to their structures and behaviors.
GLE LS1B: Plants and animals have different structures and behaviors that serve different functions
GLE LS1C: Certain structures and behaviors enable plants and animals to respond to changes in their
environment
GLE LS1D: Plants and animals have structures and behaviors that respond to internal needs
GLE LS1E: Nutrition is essential to health. Various kinds of foods are necessary to build and maintain
body structures. Individuals have responsibility for their own health and food choices.
The Arts EALR 1: The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts
Component 1.2: Develops arts skills and techniques
GLE 1.2.E: Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in dance, music, theater, and
visual arts.
The Arts EALR 2: The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and responding to
demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theater, and visual arts
Component: 2.2: Applies a performance and/or presentation process to the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual
arts)
GLE 2.2.E: Creates, experiences, and develops artworks and/or performances/presentations utilizing the
performance process structure.
c. Content Objectives: Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work together in their group (Communication 2.2)
Students will be able to explain how to successfully plan for an African safari (Communication 1.1)
Students will be able to clarify the difference between multiple African animals (Science LS1)
Students will be able to produce an African animal via craft project (see attached page for instruction) (Arts 2.2)
d. Language Objectives: Students will be able to use specific language that relates to the animals
Students will be able to discuss with the class the important details their group researched about the safari
e. Previous Learning Experiences: Students should be aware of what the different animals that live in Africa are.

Assessment Strategies
Content Objectives Assessment Strategies

4
Students will be able to clarify the difference Summative: Students will be quizzed on animal facts after we are
between multiple African animals (Science LS1) done with the safari. (Quiz is attached)

Students will be able to produce an African animal Formative: I will walk around the room with a checklist (see
via craft project (see attached page for instructions) attached) and make sure students are making progress on their
(Arts 2.2) animals

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to Summative: I will have students fill out a group participation
work together in their group (Communication 2.2) worksheet (see attached) where students grade their peers on how
much work they did
Students will be able to explain how to successfully Formative: I will ask each group to write what the hardest part to
plan for an African safari (Communication 1.1) plan was. I will hand this paper out with the group participation
worksheet

Students will be able to use specific language that Summative: Students will have a vocabulary check after the safari to
relates to animals make sure they know all of the terms (see attached sheet)

Students will be able to discuss with the class the Formative: I will ask students for a list of ideas that they are going to
important details their group researched about the present to the class (Students will write this on their own sheet of
safari paper)

Student Voice

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the learning targets and Students will write down two things they Students will answer the question
their progress toward them. learned how to plan for an African Safari “Why is it important to plan ahead
when you are going on vacation?”
2. Use a variety of learning strategies and Students will record their favorite activity Students will be asked to give a
explain the effectiveness of their from this unit (craft, researching, safari, etc) “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” about
choice. the overall activity
Grouping of Students for Instruction
• Students will be randomly divided into 5 groups of 5.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
Introduction: Students will get with a partner and discuss their favorite animal and why it is their favorite. Then, I will call on
partners and we will have a class discussion about everyone’s favorite animals.
1. Questions: What kind of climate do you think Africa has?
What do wild animals eat?
What time of year would it be best to go on a safari? Why?
What kinds of items would you need to bring on a safari?
Why would it be important to plan ahead if you were going on a vacation to Africa?

2. Learning Activities:
1. Begin by explaining what a safari is and that we are going to plan one in Africa
2. Ask students what they think they would need to do to plan for a safari. Write their ideas on the whiteboard and group
similar ideas together. Form 5 or 6 categories that students can research in groups (lodging, meals, travel, animals, etc).
3. Students will plan their portion of the safari in their group and present the information to the class.
4. Have students stay in their groups and make an elephant and/or a lion (see attached instructions for craft project) These
will be used to decorate the room for the safari.
5. Once students understand what is necessary for a safari, they will actually go on one!
6. Encourage students to dress up as if they are going on a safari and decorate the room in a jungle theme (Use student work
to decorate)
5
7. I will act as the safari guide, leading them through the terrain and informing them with animal facts along the way
8. At the end of the day, we will go back to camp and read Slowly, Slowly, Slowly Said the Sloth by Eric Carle and each
child will have a banana for a snack.
Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures: I will introduce the lesson through various forms of instruction including partner practice,
group work, class discussion, class activity, and at home application.
b) Multiple means of access: The teacher will introduce the crafts, guide the safari, and read the book Slowly Slowly
Slowly Said the Sloth
c) Multiple means of engagement: The student will make the crafts for the safari, research their section un order to plan
the safari vacation with their group, present their research and ideas to the class, go on the safari, and take a quiz
after the safari
d) Multiple means of expression: Students will present their research about what part their group had to plan to the
class and take a quiz after they participate in the safari.
e) Methods of differentiation: I will ask students to apply their best knowledge when working in their groups and work
with them one-on-one if they are struggling. Keep in consideration any learning difficulties while grading.
f) Language learning objectives: Students will be expected to use the new animal vocabulary that was taught on the
safari in their homework assignment and will be expected to formally present their knowledge gained on the
part they researched in order to plan the safari.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy: Students will gain knowledge about African culture and traditions while on the safari
h) Remedial activities: A list of vocabulary words will be handed out for students to use as a review sheet.
i) Extension activities: Read a book silently about an animal and draw a picture of that animal and share with someone
else who is also done early.
3. Closure: After I have read Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, Said the Sloth, I will ask students where else they could go on a safari to
and if any of the animals they saw today also live in other environments besides Africa.
4. Independent Practice: Students will be asked to pick their favorite animal they saw today on the safari and research it more
thoroughly and present the knowledge they gained with the class the next day.
5. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Butcher paper
Safari themed decorations
Slowly Slowly Slowly Said the Sloth by Eric Carle
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: This lesson plan integrates communication skills, writing components, science
components, and the arts.
 Acknowledgements: Lesson inspired and created by Cassidy Cuthill

6
Vocabulary

Please define or draw a picture of the terms listed below on a separate sheet of paper:

Desert
Binoculars
Carnivore
Grassland
Camouflage
Grazer
Herbivore
Mammal
Nocturnal
Omnivore
Prey
Pride
Savanna
Predator
Extinction

7
Craft Checklist: Formative Assessment

✔+ Student is performing above expected level


✔ Student is performing at expected level
✔- Student is performing below level

Students Name Using the Paint Mixing colors Gluing Can efficiently
brush properly to create Macaroni on cut out
orange/red for Plate in Orderly Elephants body
the Lion Fashion and ears

8
Project Participation Evaluation Forms

Students in project:

Student 1
(Evaluator):
Student 2:

Student 3:

Student 4:
Complete the following evaluation for each student in the project including yourself as student 1. Circle your
response to each question. The maximum points for the project (in question 5) corresponds to the grade given
prior to incorporation of the comments on this evaluation form. If you wish, you may make additional
comments on the last page.

*************************************************************************************

Student 1
(Evaluator):
1=strongly agree, 2=slightly agree, 3=no opinion, 4=slightly disagree, 5=strongly disagree
1 Participated and attended any group
1 2 3 4 5
. meetings.
2
Participated in conducting the research. 1 2 3 4 5
.
3 Participated in the preparation of the
1 2 3 4 5
. written portion of the project.
4 Participated in the preparation of the
1 2 3 4 5
. oral presentation.
What percentage of the maximum
5
project points should this student 100%
.
receive? 90% 80% 70% 60%
*************************************************************************************

Student 2:
1=strongly agree, 2=slightly agree, 3=no opinion, 4=slightly disagree, 5=strongly disagree
1
Participated and attended any group meetings. 1 2 3 4 5
.
2
Participated in conducting the research. 1 2 3 4 5
.
3 Participated in the preparation of the written
1 2 3 4 5
. portion of the project.
4 Participated in the preparation of the oral
1 2 3 4 5
. presentation.
5 What percentage of the maximum project points 100%
. should this student receive? 90% 80% 70% 60%
9
*************************************************************************************

Student 3:
1=strongly agree, 2=slightly agree, 3=no opinion, 4=slightly disagree, 5=strongly disagree
1
Participated and attended any group meetings. 1 2 3 4 5
.
2
Participated in conducting the research. 1 2 3 4 5
.
3 Participated in the preparation of the written
1 2 3 4 5
. portion of the project.
4 Participated in the preparation of the oral
1 2 3 4 5
. presentation.
5 What percentage of the maximum project points 100%
. should this student receive? 90% 80% 70% 60%
*************************************************************************************

Student 4:
1=strongly agree, 2=slightly agree, 3=no opinion, 4=slightly disagree, 5=strongly disagree
1
Participated and attended any group meetings. 1 2 3 4 5
.
2
Participated in conducting the research. 1 2 3 4 5
.
3 Participated in the preparation of the written
1 2 3 4 5
. portion of the project.
4 Participated in the preparation of the oral
1 2 3 4 5
. presentation.
5 What percentage of the maximum project points
. should this student receive? 100% 90% 80% 70% 60%
*************************************************************************************

http://www.ansci.wisc.edu/jjp1/ansci_repro/misc/project_participation_eval.html

Please answer the following questions:

1. What was the hardest part thing you encountered your part of the safari to plan?

2. What was the hardest thing about working with your group to plan the safari?

10
African Animal Quiz
Name:________________________________________________
Date:________________________________

1. Define extinction

2. Please classify the following animals by stating whether they are a herbivore or a carnivore

- Elephant

- Cheetah

- Lion

- Alligator

- Hyena

3. What is prey?

4. Where do hippos spend most of their time? How long can they stay under water for?

5. How much water can an elephants tusk hold?

11
Quiz Answer Key
1. The end of a species
2. Elephants- herbivores
Cheetah- carnivore
Lion- Carnivore
Alligator- Carnivore
Hyena- Carnivore
3. Prey is an animal hunted and killed for food by another animal
4. Hippos spend most of their time in the water and can stay underwater for as long as 30
minutes
5. An elephants tusk can hold up to 4 liters of water.

12
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: _Bethany Downard______________ Date: __March 20, 2012________


Cooperating Teacher:_Mrs. Patera__________________ Grade: __4th Grade_____________
School District:___Pullman________________ School: ___Jefferson Elementary_____ __
University Supervisor: Lori White ______ ______
Unit/Subject: Science, Art, Writing_______________________ ____________
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: _Animal Adaptation ______

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


e. Instructional Plan Purpose: Explain how this instructional plan develops students’ conceptual understanding of content
goals.
a. By completing this activity, students will gain a better understanding of why animals live in a specific environment.
They will review, specifically, how certain species of animals have adapted to the African Savanna and why they
thrive in that environment. They will also find other animals and how they have adapted to their own habitats.
f. State Learning Standards: Identify relevant grade level standards and GLEs from the WA State Content Learning
Standards. Please note that the number of the GLE indicates the EALR (first number), the component (second number), and
the GLE (third number); for example: 3.2.1 = 3rd EALR, 2nd component, 1st = GLE.
a. Grade Level: 4-5
EALR 4: Life Science
Big Idea: Structures and Functions of Living Organisms (LS 1)
4-5 LS 1C Certain Structures and behaviors enable plants and animals to respond to changes in their
environment.
4-5 LS 1D Plants and animals have structures and behaviors that respond to internal needs.
b. Grade Level: 4-5
EALR 4: Life Science
Big Idea: Biological Evolution (LS 3)
4-5 LS3A In any ecosystem, some populations of organisms thrive and grow, some decline, and others do
not survive at all.
4-5 LS3B Plants and animals inherit many characteristics from their parents. Some inherited characteristics
allow organisms to better survive and reproduce in a given ecosystem.
4-5 LS3C Some characteristics and behaviors result from an individual plant’s or animal’s interactions with
the environment and are not passed from one generation to the next by heredity.
c. Grade Level 4 (Writing)
EALR: 2. The student writes in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes.
2.3. Writes in a variety of forms/genres.
2.3.1. Uses a variety of forms/genres.
d. Grade Level: Elementary (The Arts)
EALR: 1. The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
1.2 Develops arts skills and techniques.
1.2.E Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
g. Content Objectives: What should the students know or be able to do after the instruction? Use SWBAT format with an
action verb that matches the cognitive domain of the standard/GLE.
a. SWBAT identify which animals live in the African Savanna. (Life Science LS3A, LS3B, Writing 2.3.1, Arts 1.2.E)
b. SWBAT describe the habitat in which the animal lives. (Writing 2.3.1)
c. SWBAT create a visual representation of animals from the African Savanna. (Arts 1.2.E)
h. Language Objectives: What grammar, language skills, language functions, and task language should students know or be
able to use after instruction? Use SWBAT format with an action verb that matches the cognitive domain.
a. SWBAT describe the African Savanna and what makes it suitable for animals to live there.
i. Previous Learning Experiences:
a. This activity will take place at the end of the unit on the African Savanna. Students will have the knowledge of what
the climate is like, what animals are native to the area, how they have adapted to their habitats, and what animals
don’t belong to this environment. This activity will combine all of their knowledge learned in this unit and will serve
as a creative review assessment.

13
Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


Formative:
SWBAT identify which animals live in the African
Savanna. (LS3A, LS3B, Writing 2.3.1, Arts 1.2.E) Summative: Students will turn in their finished collage of animals
found in the African Savanna along with an information sheet. This
will be graded according to the rubric students will receive.
Formative: Students’ work will be monitored while they’re working
on their project. I will walk around to check that students are
SWBAT describe the habitat in which the animals working on their projects and using time wisely.
live and how they have adapted over time.
(Writing 2.3.1) Summative: With the finished product, students will also turn in an
information sheet for each animal. This will be graded according to
the rubric.

Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or communicate on their
learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not being addressed.

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
3. Communicate the learning targets and The finished collage project will be a physical In a journal entry, students will reflect
their progress toward them. representation of the students’ learning they on their finished product and how it
gained in this unit. It is showing how they tie represents what they have learned.
their science knowledge into an art project. After they have graded themselves,
they will see where they are how close
that compares to the learning
projects/where they should be.
4. Review their performance and set Students will grade themselves based on the By grading themselves and critiquing
personal learning goals based on those rubric and find two areas in which they can their own work, students will find
assessments. improve on for next time. They will turn in the ways in which they can improve and
rubric with their comments and grades on it. see what their strengths and
weaknesses are. A short journal entry
will be done after the grading so
students can further their thought
processes.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


 Describe how students will be divided into groups, if applicable (random, ability, interest, social purposes, etc.)
-For this activity, students will be working individually. They will each create their own collage of animals with an
attached information sheet with descriptions.

Learning/Teaching Experiences
6. Introduction: Identify how you are going to introduce the concept, skill or task in a way that gains students’ attention and
gets them involved.
 The teacher will introduce the lesson by reminding the students that they have been learning about the African
Savanna, native animals, and the habitats in which the animals live. They will be doing an activity that will act as a
review for this unit. This activity will consist of making a collage of animals native to the Savanna and the students
will also write a short description for each animal. The teacher will remind the students that they are moving on to a
new unit and this is a conclusion unit to tie it to other subjects. The teacher will facilitate a brief class discussion
about what they have gone over during this unit. The activity will then be introduced to the class and the teacher will
explain the procedures and expectations of the lesson.

14
7. Questions: Identify at least five questions that will drive student learning. Be sure that higher-level thinking questions are
included and framed in open-ended ways that elicit students’ curiosity, critical thinking, problem-solving, and build on their
prior experiences and knowledge. These questions should show that you can scaffold students’ learning.
 How have these animals adapted to their environment?
 Would they be able to thrive elsewhere?
 What’s your favorite animal found on the Savanna? Why?
 How have animals found in the Northwest adapted to their environment?
 How did these changes happen? Was it hereditary?

These questions will be asked in a group setting and act as an introduction/ice-breaker to the activity. They will get the
students thinking about what we’ve learned and prepare them for the lesson. Depending on time, this could be done in small
groups to ensure that each student is actively participating in the discussion.
8. Learning Activities: Give detailed, step-by-step instructions on how you will implement the instructional plan.
Describe exactly what students will do during the lesson. Please use a numbered list.
1. The teacher will get the students’ attention and tell them what they will be doing.
2. The teacher will introduce the lesson by reminding the students that they have been learning about the African Savanna,
native animals, and the habitats in which the animals live. They will be doing an activity that will act as a review for this
unit. This activity will consist of making a collage of animals native to the Savanna and the students will also write a
short description for each animal. The teacher will remind the students that they are moving on to a new unit and this is a
conclusion unit to tie it to other subjects.
3. The teacher will ask, “What are some animals that are native to the African Savanna?” This will lead into a quick class
discussion to get the students thinking about the assignment.
4. The teacher will give the students their needed supplies (scissors, paper, writing prompts, old magazines, pictures, glue,
and tape) and explain how to make the collage.
5. Once the students have cut out pictures of animals and made their collage, the teacher will then hand out the writing
prompts. These will give the students an idea of what to write about the animal (habitat, appearance, adaptations, etc.).
6. Once the students have completed their collage and writing, students will share their piece with the class. This will allow
for students to hear about all types of different animals and review for the test.
9. Instructional Considerations:
j) Instructional procedures: List the teaching approaches/modes you will use to teach each step (ppt, demonstrate
example, graphics, partner practice, etc.) List in chronological order.
a. Discussion, graphics (picture cut-outs), writing, oral communication/presentation
k) Multiple means of access (list ways the teacher will present the materials)
a. Class discussion, thought questions, written descriptions & prompts, artistic collage
l) Multiple means of engagement (list ways the students will participate in the learning)
a. Students will learn and review through class discussion, hearing peers share, and creating their own
collage & written descriptions
m) Multiple means of expression (list ways the students can show their learning)
a. Students will express their learning through class discussion, creating their collage and writing about it,
and through their presentations of collage
n) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
a. This activity can easily be modified for students with special needs. Writing prompts could be
simplified (or eliminated, if needed), graded only on the collage portion, or anything else needed to
help the student.
o) Language learning objectives: (Where will you integrate these?)
a. Language learning objectives will be integrated in the student’s written description of the animal. They
will have to describe the animal, their habitat, and how it has adapted to the Savanna.
p) Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
a. Cultural connections can easily be made because this unit focuses on Africa and the Savanna. Students
can compare and contrast life on the African Savanna and their own lives here in United States. This
activity will not only show students how animals live, but it can also go further and explore the way of
life in Eastern Africa.
q) Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet, scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
a. Once the students are done with their project, they will give a short presentation to the class to share
what they’ve learned and help teach their peers. This activity is a review; it takes all of the information
they have learned over the course of the unit and combines it into one activity.
r) Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)

15
a. Students who finish early and have their collage and descriptions done can trade with another student
and edit the others’ work. Depending on time, they could even start their presentations before all of the
students are done with the project.
10. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
 Explain how students will share what they have learned in the lesson. Identify 2 questions that you can ask students
to begin the conversation.
i. Students will share what they have learned through a short presentation. They will share with the rest of the
class what animals they found and some interesting facts about them.
1. How have these animals adapted to the Savanna?
2. Why do these animals live in environment they’re in?
 Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons.
i. This is practical information that can be applied when they encounter animals locally.
11. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
a. Possible Family Interaction (Identify at least one way in which you might involve students’ families in this
instructional plan.)
 Students can have knowledge of animal adaptation that they can apply to other environments. Not only can
they share this with their families, but they can also apply it when camping, hiking, at the zoo, or wherever
they are. They can identify local animals and why they thrive here in their natural habitats.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology


Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
-writing prompt/template (1/animal each student identifies), old magazines, pictures of animals, glue, tape, scissors,
paper, and rubric

Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: Identify content areas/other subjects that are integrated into this lesson and explain
how these are addressed.
o Science- using their knowledge of environment (African Savanna) and how animals have adapted/thrive in said
environment.
o Art- Creating a collage of cut-out pictures
o Writing- For each animal identified, the student will write a short description of the animal
 Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources. Give credit to the person who created the idea for the instructional plan,
including yourself. You might use language such as "Instructional Plan adapted from _____”; “Instructional Plan Consultants
(not responsible for the content of this instructional plan): _______”; and/or “Instructional Plan Created by _____” Cite
scripted materials/curriculum if appropriate.
o Instructional Plan adapted from http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview?LPid=11351

16
Animal Adaptation
*These prompts will be cut out into smaller chunks and then glued/taped onto the back of the student’s collage*

Name of Animal:________________________

Appearance:___________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________

Adaptation(s):__________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________

Good & Bad Habitats:____________________


_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________

Name of Animal:__________________________

Appearance:______________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________

Adaptation(s):_____________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________

Good & Bad Habitats:______________________


_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
17
Collage Rubric
(Animal Adaptation)

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Quality of The collage shows The collage shows The collage shows The collage was put
Construction considerable attention attention to some attention to together sloppily.
to construction. The construction. The items construction. Most Items appear to be just
items are neatly are neatly trimmed. All items are neatly \\\"slapped on\\\".
trimmed. All items are items are carefully and trimmed. All items are Pieces may be loose or
carefully and securely securely attached to the securely attached to the hanging over the
attached to the backing. A few barely backing. A few barely edges. Smudges,
backing. There are no noticeable stray marks, noticeable stray marks, stains, rips, uneven
stray marks, smudges smudges or glue stains smudges or glue stains edges, and/or stray
or glue stains. Nothing are present. Nothing is are present. Nothing is marks are evident.
is hanging over the hanging over the hanging over the
edges. edges. edges.
Time and Effort Class time was used Class time was used Class time was not Class time was not
wisely. Much time and wisely. Student could always used wisely, used wisely and the
effort went into the have put in more time but student did do student put in no
planning and design of and effort at home. some additional work additional effort.
the collage. It is clear at home.
the student worked at
home as well as at
school.
Titles and Text Titles and text were Titles and text were Titles and text were Titles and/or text are
written clearly and written clearly and written clearly and hard to read, even
were easy to read from were easy to read were easy to read when the reader is
a distance. Text went close-up. Text covered close-up. Student did close. Did not go into
into detail about the the material, but not not write enough any detail, simply just
animal and their thorough enough or detail; bare minimum wrote animal\\\'s name.
habitat and included only covered some of of what was asked.
adaptations. the questions.
Design Graphics are trimmed Graphics are trimmed Graphics have been Graphics are
to an appropriate size to an appropriate size trimmed to an untrimmed OR of
and interesting shape and interesting shape appropriate size and inappropriate size
and are arranged well, and are arranged with shape, but the and/or shape. It
some in front and some some items in front arrangement of items is appears little attention
behind. Care has been and others behind. The not very attractive. It was given to designing
taken to balance the canvas, however does appears there was not a the collage.
pictures across the not appear balanced. lot of planning of the
canvas. item placement.

18
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____ Katie Hutton_____________ Date: 2/28/12____________


Cooperating Teacher: ______________________ Grade: K-1____________
School District:_______________________ School: _________________
University Supervisor: ______
Unit/Subject: Art ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: African Animals

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


j. Instructional Plan Purpose: Explain how this instructional plan develops students’ conceptual understanding of content
goals.
a. The purpose of this lesson explore the world of giraffes. The students and I will read and look at pictures of giraffes
on National Geographic for Kids and then the students will be able to create their own giraffe.We are doing a unit on
African animals so this is just a small part of the overall lesson. By the end of the unit, students will be extremely
familiar with many African animals, not just giraffes.
k. State Learning Standards: Identify relevant grade level standards and GLEs from the WA State Content Learning
Standards. Please note that the number of the GLE indicates the EALR (first number), the component (second number), and
the GLE (third number); for example: 3.2.1 = 3rd EALR, 2nd component, 1st = GLE.
Art: 1.2.2: Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in dance, music, theatre, and visual
arts.
Art: 3.2.2: Creates and/or performs an artwork to communicate for a given purpose in dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
Art: 4.2.3 Demonstrates and applies the skills, concepts, and vocabulary common among and between the arts
disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) and other content areas at beginning levels.
l. Content Objectives:
SWBAT gain a better understanding of giraffes (their habitat, nature, appearance, etc). (Art 4.2.3)
a. SWBAT construct their own giraffe using the template and materials provided. (Art 1.2.2 and 3.2.2)
m. Language Objectives: What grammar, language skills, language functions, and task language should students know or be
able to use after instruction? Use SWBAT format with an action verb that matches the cognitive domain.
a. SWBAT participate in group discussions while learning about giraffes
b. SWBAT understand vocabulary pertaining to this lesson (what a habitat is and how to recognize a giraffe).
n. Previous Learning Experiences:
a. The students have already been learning a lot about African animals. While they have not gone into detail with facts
about the giraffe, they have about other animals so they should know the basic concept of what we are doing in this
lesson.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT gain a better understanding of giraffes Formative: There is no formative assessment for this lesson

Summative: The teacher will check this simply by asking students


questions and listening to their participation in class discussions.
SWBAT construct their own giraffe using the Formative: The teacher will check for participation to see if the
template and materials provided. students have complete their giraffes by going out around the
classroom with a checklist to check off if the student is on task or
not.

Summative: The teacher will walk around the classroom as the


students work to make sure they are following directions. Again, the
teacher will put a check by the students name if they ARE following

19
directions.

SWBAT participate in group discussions while Formative: The teacher will mark on the check list which students
learning about giraffes are actively engaged in group discussions and which are
participating less.

Summative: There is no summative assessment for this lesson


Formative: The teacher will simply check to make sure the students
SWBAT listen attentively as I read to them. are listening as they are being read to.
Summative: There is no summative assessment for this lesson

Student Voice:

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
5. Communicate the support and National Geographic for Kids provides the Students will be asked if they liked
resources that can be accessed to help article and pictures. Giraffe template using these alternative resources and
them achieve the learning targets. how they felt these recourses
enhanced or took away from their
learning.
6. Articulate the thinking strategies used I will collect evidence verbally through the After students have finished their art
to achieve the learning targets.(5.1) class discussions we will have after reading. projects, we will hold a class
discussion on what we have learned
and if there are still any questions.
Students will also write down
anonymously whether they liked this
activity and why or why not.
7. Use a variety of learning strategies and Listening skills when listening to the article As a class, we will talk about
explain the effectiveness of their and also by their art of the giraffes. constructing the giraffe. If it was hard
choice. for some and easy for others so that
students can become more aware of
their learning abilities.
Grouping of Students for Instruction
 The teacher will read aloud to students as a class, then the students will work individually on their giraffes.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
12. Introduction:
 To get students interested I will start to show pictures of giraffes and maybe even a short youtube clip of giraffes
interacting in their environment.
 Describe how you will help students make connections to their lives and prior experiences.
i. I will ask students if they have ever seen giraffes or any other type of African animals at the zoo or on TV,
movies, etc.
13. Questions:
 Have any of you ever seen a giraffe in person before (zoo)?
 What do you already know about a giraffe’s habitat/where they live?
 Can you describe the appearance of a giraffe?
 What questions do you have about giraffes?
 Do you think giraffes can be harmful? Why or why not?
 Briefly explain how you will involve students actively in responding to these questions.
i. We will hold a class discussion in which the students will be encouraged to answer these questions as well
as come up with any questions they might have.
ii. During the discussion I will toss a soft ball after I ask a question for a certain student to answer.
14. Learning Activities: Give detailed, step-by-step instructions on how you will implement the instructional plan.
Describe exactly what students will do during the lesson. Please use a numbered list.

20
1. Gather students together on the rug.
2. Read the facts from the website, http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/animals/creaturefeature/giraffe/, as students
listen.
3. Show students the pictures from the websites
4. Hold a class discussion over what was just read. Any questions? What did you find the most interesting? Why?
5. Have students go back to their desks
6. Look at the pattern (attached)
7. Color the giraffe and then cut it out. Fold the giraffe in half from the tail end to head. With the giraffe still folded in
half fold down the neck at both slanted lines both backward and forwards as shown in the picture.
8. Unfold the giraffe and fold up the neck as shown in the picture.
9. Press down on the middle fold and up on the slanted fold to fold up the neck as show in the picture.
10. Crease the knobbed horns along the sides so they stick out. Glue on the ears. Glue the top of the head together just
above the eyes. Glue on the tail and spread out the legs so the giraffe stands up.
11. Tell students to put clean up the materials
12. Display the giraffes wherever you can in your classroom
13. Come back together as a class to ask students what they have learned, what they liked, and what they disliked about
this lesson.

15. Instructional Considerations:


s) Instructional procedures:
a. I will read aloud to the students
b. While reading the online article, I will show the students pictures and model my own thinking out
loud.
c. I will start/lead a class discussion on giraffes
d. I will have students share their thinking with the class.
e. I will have students share their connections and questions with the class.
t) Multiple means of access
a. I will first introduce the topic and give a hook question to get the students interested.
b. I will hold multiple class discussions at both the beginning and end of the lesson.
c. I will give instructions on all parts of the lesson
d. I will read the article to present them with information about giraffes
e. Students will work independently to construct their giraffes, sharing their work with their neighbors if
desired.
u) Multiple means of engagement
a. Students will listen to the article as the teacher reads aloud
b. Students will learn through group discussion, making connections
c. Students will participate in class discussions
d. Students will construct meaning and as they share their ideas with the class
e. Students will complete an art project
v) Multiple means of expression
a. Students will show their learning through participation in class discussions
b. Students will show their learning of following directions by completing their art project
w) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
a. As far as class discussions go, students can choose to contribute as much or as little as they want to the
conversations. So this activity supports multiple access levels.
b. All students will be invited to participate in class discussions.
c. If there are any children with special needs, they may have the opportunity to take this assignment to
their specialist so that they can have extra help they need.
x) Language learning objectives:
a. The language learning objectives are incorporated in this lesson. As I read out loud, the students will
be making connections and creating new ideas they may not have had before.
b. We will also discuss vocabulary the students should learn by the end of the lesson (habitat and giraffe).
y) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
a. This lesson and unit as a whole could be related to African culture by showing a map of the world.
Pointing out where Africa is located and noting that this is where a giraffes habitat is, not in America.
z) Remedial activities:

21
a. There will be a template the students will be give of the giraffe so that they can construct their own.
aa) Extension activities:
a. Students who finish early will be invited to find a spot in the classroom to display the giraffes. They
can also help other students with their art projects if desired and help with cleanup. As always if they
finish early, they can take out their personal trade book and read.
16. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
 Explain how students will share what they have learned in the lesson. Identify 2 questions that you can ask students
to begin the conversation.
i. After clean up, we will come back together as a class and share what we have learned. I will ask the
students what was the most interesting thing you learned today? What is your favorite thing/feature about a
giraffe? Do any of you have things you dislike about giraffes or are still confused about?
 Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons
i. This will easily be connected into future lessons as we continue our unit on African animals.
ii. I will connect this to students lives by encouraging them to find giraffes if they are at the zoo and to
identify them if they ever see them while they are watching TV or a move.
17. Independent Practice
b. I would invite families to see their students art either when they are in the students classroom or during conferences
c. Before this unit, I will send home a letter to parents to let them know what their children will be working on and
why. I will also encourage any questions and say that they are more then welcome to help their student with any take
homework they may have.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: Identify content areas/other subjects that are integrated into this lesson and explain
how these are addressed.
o This lesson could also be integrated into a geography unit for the location of Africa as well as the other six contents.
 Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources. Give credit to the person who created the idea for the instructional plan,
including yourself. You might use language such as "Instructional Plan adapted from _____”; “Instructional Plan Consultants
(not responsible for the content of this instructional plan): _______”; and/or “Instructional Plan Created by _____” Cite
scripted materials/curriculum if appropriate.
o Instructional Plan created by Katie Hutton. Directions for creating the giraffes were found on daniellesplace.com.

22
Check List:
(Print one for each student in class)

Was the student on task, only needing two or fewer reminders to stay on task and work on their art project?
Yes______ No______

Was the student actively participating in class discussions? Yes_______ No_______

*Also include a list of student names and put a check by their name if they are listening as the teacher reads
aloud.

23
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____ _Lauren Krippaehne_____ Date: February 27, 2012


Cooperating Teacher: _____N/A____________ Grade:_4th Grade
School District:_____________N/A_____ School: _____________N/A
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Art ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Animals of the Savannas

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


o. Instructional Plan Purpose: Explain how this instructional plan develops students’ conceptual understanding of content
goals.
Students will be able to create and describe an animal that they made up that will live in the savannah following all the
characteristics of wildlife that is in the savannah
p. State Learning Standards: Identify relevant grade level standards and GLEs from the WA State Content Learning
Standards. Please note that the number of the GLE indicates the EALR (first number), the component (second number), and
the GLE (third number); for example: 3.2.1 = 3rd EALR, 2nd component, 1st = GLE.
Art: 1.1 Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary
1.2 Developed art skills and techniques
1.3 Understand and applies arts genres and styles of various artists, cultures, and times
2.1 Applies a creative process to the arts
3.1 Uses the arts to express feelings and present ideas
Science: EALR 1 Systems
EALR 4 Life Science: Structures and Functions of Living Organisms, Biological Evolution

q. Content Objectives: What should the students know or be able to do after the instruction? Use SWBAT format with an
action verb that matches the cognitive domain of the standard/GLE.

SWBAT look at pictures of the savannah to determine what kind of animal they will draw
SWBAT put together an animal that has the characteristics of savannah wildlife
SWBAT look at a map to determine where the location of there animal will live
r. Language Objectives: What grammar, language skills, language functions, and task language should students know or be
able to use after instruction? Use SWBAT format with an action verb that matches the cognitive domain.
SWBAT to write out a description of their animal using the right words of the savannah
SWBAT check over their work to make sure that there is not misspellings in their description
SWBAT know vocabulary words of the Savannah (Savannah, Safari, Food sources)
s. Previous Learning Experiences:
Looking at animals and understanding what kind of environment the African Savannah is.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT put together an animal that has the Formative: Asking questions about the environments of the savannah
characteristics of savannah wildlife and why the students think they live the way they do? (Come from
Question Section in Learning Experiences)

Summative: Making sure the students are aware of the different


cultures by finishing art assignment (Yes or No if finished)
Formative: Check list to go around the room and check up on the
students work (expectations)

24
Summative: If student followed art project from the check list they
have completed the full assignment
Add rows to chart as needed.

Student Voice:
1. Students will reflect on their work to make sure their animal fits the criteria of the savannah
2. Students will communicate with others to help or make positive remarks to fellow students about their
animal and why it does or doesn’t work with the savannah.
3. Did you enjoy making your own animal, and share why with the class

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
8. Communicate the learning targets and Sharing will help reflect students project with Share
their progress toward them. if the students enjoyed making their own
animal
9. Communicate the support and Communicating with fellow students about Remarks, advice
resources that can be accessed to help their art work
them achieve the learning targets.
10. Articulate the thinking strategies used Reflection of learning targets to see if they Reflect
to achieve the learning targets.(5.1) followed
Grouping of Students for Instruction
• Describe how students will be divided into groups, if applicable (random, ability, interest, social purposes, etc.)
Students will be randomly in groups to share their ideas and drawings of their animals. At the end of the project they will be put
in another group to share their finished product.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
18. Introduction:
Show the students a picture of my animal to begin with to see what they think about my animal and why. They
will be able to see different characteristics of animals from the Savannah in my animal.
19. Questions: Identify at five questions that will drive student learning. Be sure that higher-level thinking questions are
included and framed in open-ended ways that elicit students’ curiosity, critical thinking, problem-solving, and build on their
prior experiences and knowledge. These questions should show that you can scaffold students’ learning.
 Briefly explain how you will involve students actively in responding to these questions
PARTNERS will discuss and write on the board some of the answers to THESE questions as well as right down their
OWN answers to turn in as a formative assessment. By asking some of these questions it gets the students to begin to
have a class discussion:
1. Why did you pick to draw that animal?
2. What environment did you choose to have your animal live in?
3. What types of food does your animal eat?
4. What colors did you use for your animal and why?
5. Did you like picking your own animal to draw?
20. Learning Activities: Give detailed, step-by-step instructions on how you will implement the instructional plan.
Describe exactly what students will do during the lesson. Please use a numbered list.
1. We will describe what an African savannah is ask if they have seen the lion king
2. Help explain what kind of animals live on the savannah
3. Discuss the food sources in the savannah
4. Explain what kind of people live in the savannah and what they do, eat, etc.
5. Tell the student to create an animal with the characteristics of what they learned from above.
21. Instructional Considerations:
bb) Instructional procedures: List the teaching approaches/modes you will use to teach each step.. (ppt, demonstrate
example, graphics, partner practice, etc.) List in chronological order.
I will have used the website of the savannah to show the animals and the environment of the savannah. I will then
demonstrate to them the animal I picked and why. I will explain to them that this animal belongs in the savannah
because of the key characteristics. This will be done by Lecturing to the students
cc) Multiple means of access (list ways the teacher will present the materials)

25
I will present the materials at the end of the lesson so that they children pay attention to the lesson. I will explain
to what they will be doing and show them the materials that they will be working with. I will read over all the
animals from my lecturing and website that I used.
dd) Multiple means of engagement (list ways the students will participate in the learning)
Students will participate in learning by paying attention to the lesson and asking questions when they need to.
Students will then create their animal and explain what they drew.
ee) Multiple means of expression (list ways the students can show their learning)
Students will show their learning by the animal that they pick and how they describe it. If the animal belongs in
the savannah then the student followed the lesson and did it correctly. If students are struggling with their
writing they can explain to me what they wanted to say so I can help them write it out.
ff) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
To accommodate to each student I will be walking around the classroom to make sure each student understands
what they should be doing. The students will be working independently at their desks and if they have to look up
more about the savannah they will look at the website and find keywords to help them with writing and picking
their animal
gg) Language learning objectives: (Where will you integrate these?)
This will be in the description of the animal. I will correct or help the students edit their description to make sure
that it is error free.
hh) Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
Students are learning about another country and that is a cultural connection itself.
ii) Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet , scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
There will not be a review sheet. There will be a map of Africa and the savannah on the map. Students will mark
the map of the area in which their animal will be from. This will be a guide to where different animals from in
Africa.
jj) Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)
If the students finish early they can go back and edit their work or even make another animal if they would like
to. They can explore more in the animal world by creating another animal and explaining its characteristics.
22. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
 Explain how students will share what they have learned in the lesson. Identify 2 questions that you can ask students
to begin the conversation.
 Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons
1. What did you learn from the assignment (as they show their picture and explain their animal).
2. What made you pick the area you did in which your animal will live?
3. Will their be people in the area of your animal?
4. In what ways is the savannah different then where we live?
23. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
d. Possible Family Interaction (Identify at least one way in which you might involve students’ families in this
instructional plan.)
Students families can be involved by a means that they can take their child to the zoo (if they can) to show them
where the animals came from and what types of environments they live in. They can also rent movies with
different types of animals in it.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets. (attached is map, check list for the guidelines).

WEBSITES:
http://www.ahsd25.k12.il.us/curriculum/Africa/svanimals.htm

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Map+of+the+Savannah+in+Africa&hl=en&gbv=2&biw=1440&bih=809
&tbm=isch&tbnid=uDiSjxEtVvlsYM:&imgrefurl=http://www.calacademy.org/exhibits/africa/discover/nath
istory/veg.htm&docid=WQ4pn4w1UAmtrM&imgurl=http://www.calacademy.org/exhibits/africa/discover/
nathistory/veg.gif&w=350&h=389&ei=msBnT-
HpK6jjiALF0dHkBg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=178&vpy=135&dur=24&hovh=237&hovw=213&tx=126&t
y=131&sig=113236243041949052402&page=1&tbnh=142&tbnw=128&start=0&ndsp=30&ved=1t:429,r:0
,s:0

26
Materials Needed: Construction paper, scissors, glue, markers, crayons.
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: Identify content areas/other subjects that are integrated into this lesson and explain
how these are addressed.
 Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources. Give credit to the person who created the idea for the instructional plan,
including yourself. You might use language such as "Instructional Plan adapted from AFRICA: Animals of the African
Savannahs_____”; “Instructional Plan Consultants (not responsible for the content of this instructional plan): _______”;
and/or “Instructional Plan Created by _Lauren Krippaehne____” Cite scripted materials/curriculum if appropriate.

27
MAP OF AFRICA – Savanna
Students will determine the region where there animal will be from and circle it.

Vocabulary Words Students should know:

a. Savanna
b. Safari
c. Weather and Climate
d. Region
e. Food source
f. Wildlife
g. All Animals in the Savannah (from lecture)
h. Forest
i. Dessert
j. Environment/Geography

28
STUDENT and TEACHER Check-list

Expectations Circle: 1 meaning succeed and 5 meaning


failing
Picked an animal to create 1 2 3 4 5
Drew, colored, painted, etc the animal 1 2 3 4 5
(used color to express and create).
Picture and description show that the 1 2 3 4 5
students followed directions and paid
attention to the lecture to help create and
describe the animal
Used descriptive vocabulary words to 1 2 3 4 5
describe their animal
Finish animal has a description of what 1 2 3 4 5
they did and how the animal belongs in the
Savannah. Thorough description makes
sense and corrected work.

29
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate:_Madelyne Lawrence___Date:February 28, 2012


Cooperating Teacher: ________Grade:_4_______
School District: ______ School: _________
University Supervisor:______
Unit/Subject: African Animals and Habitats ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Learning about African animals and their habitat. Learning
Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning
Instructional Plan Purpose: By learning about African animals and their habitat, the students can expand
their new knowledge to explore animals from all over the world and make connections between animals
and the environment in which they live.
State Learning Standards:
4-5 LS1A Plants and animals can be sorted according to their structures and
behaviors. 4-5 LS1D Plants and animals have structures and behaviors
that respond to internal needs. 4-5 LS2E All plants and animals change
the ecosystem where they live. If this change reduces another organism's
access to resources, that organism may move to another location or die.

4-5 LS2A An ecosystem includes all of the populations of living organisms and nonliving
physical factors in a given area. Living organisms depend on one another and the nonliving
physical factors in their ecosystem to help them survive.

4-5 LS2C Plants and animals are related in food webs with producers (plants that make their
own food), consumers (animals that eat producers and/or other animals), and decomposers
(primarily bacteria and fungi) that break down wastes and dead organisms, and return nutrients
to the soil.

2.1.E Creates, experiences, and develops artworks and/or


performances/presentations utilizing the creative process structure.

4.2.E Demonstrates and applies the skills, concepts, and vocabulary common
among and between the arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual
arts) and other content areas at beginning levels.

Content Objectives:
SWBAT understand the connection between animals and their environment.
SWBAT be familiar with characteristics of African animals.
SWBAT be familiar with the diet of African animals.
Language Objectives:
SWBAT communicate to one another what they have learned about African animals.
SWBAT inquire about other animals and habitats.
Previous Learning Experiences:
Previous to this lesson, the students will be familiar with animals in the environment which they
live in and with be knowledgeable about them.

Assessment Strategies
30
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies.
Also attach appropriate marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT understand the connection Formative: Do daily worksheets and
between animals and their activities to teach one area of African
environment. animals at a time. Summative: Take a
multiple choice/short answer test at the end
of the unit covering main topics and
important points.
SWBAT be familiar with characteristics Formative: Each student will be assigned an
of African animals. SWBAT be animal and write fun facts about their
familiar with the diet of African characteristics and diet. Summative:
animals Each student will make a poster based on
their animal and present it to the class.

Quiz:
1. What types of foods to elephants eat?
2. How does an elephant's diet affect their lives?
3. How has the evolution of elephants changed their living habits?
4. What habits do elephants have that is similar to humans?
5. What surprised you most about the life cycles/habits of elephants?

Formative Assessment Checklist:


__The student fully understands main concepts.
__The student fully understands important details.
__Student can explain what they know to another student.
__Student understands how art can be integrated into learning about African animals.
__Student can think of another creative way to integrate art into learning about animals.

Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or
communicate on their learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not
being addressed.
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how students
collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning
students: journals, work
samples, projects, papers,
etc.)
Review their performance This will be evaluated through Students will have an
and set personal learning their daily work and fun facts opportunity to give written and
goals based on those collected about their African oral feedback focused on how
assessments. animal. this experience has helped them
to understand more about the
topic.
Use a variety of learning By completing both traditional Through written and oral
strategies and explain the assessments and an artistic, assessment, the class can give
effectiveness of their creative assignments, the feedback on how they
choice. students can express how liked/didn't like the types of

31
different learning strategies help learning strategies and wether
them retain information through or not they benefitted from it.
their performance.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• All of the assessments will be done individually, but the students will get time to discuss with each other
the animal they are researching to learn from each other.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
Introduction: A clip from The Lion King will be shown to entice the class and get them curious about what
they will be doing. Then discussions will be prompted about how the animals in The Lion King are different
than those we are used to seeing.
Questions:
1. Are we affected at all by other habitats?
2. What has expanded in your previous knowledge of animals and their environments?
3. What can we do to learn more about animals around the world and be aware of their impact on the earth?
4. What are similarities you've seen between African animals and those living in North America?
5. What other environments are you interested in learning about?
Learning Activities:
1. Watch 10 min clip from The Lion King, featuring many African animals.
2. Discuss what the students noticed about the animals and the environment they were in and what was unique
about it.
3. Begin lesson focusing on one African animal at a time and going over what it eats, what type of terrain it
lives on, and its natural animal instincts.
4. The class will all review the recent information to clarify what they have learned and ask any questions they
have at this point.
5. Each student will then be assigned one animal to research more about than what the class has learned as a
whole.
6. They will have two days to put together a list of fun facts about their animal and what makes it unique.
7. They will then have a week to put together an information and interesting poster about their animal. The
poster should include a clear picture of the animal and any other creative illustrations.
8. The students will then present their poster to the class in a short presentation describing in their own words
what they found unique about their animal.
Instructional Considerations:
Multiple means of access (list ways the teacher will present the materials)
-The teacher will present the materials through a movie clip, power points and discussion.
Multiple means of engagement (list ways the students will participate in the learning)
-The students will participate in multiple discussions.
-The students will participate by sharing with other students what they have learned.
Multiple means of expression (list ways the students can show their learning)
-The students can show their learning through the assignments and final assessment.
-The students can show their learning through their poster and how they share it.
Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
-Accommodations can be made for students with learning disabilities by giving them more time and assistance
in completing the assignment and encouraging them to do the best work they can do in their own time.
-Accommodations can be made for ELL students by having someone help them work on the assignment and
letting them use whatever recourses they can to express their information.
Language learning objectives: (Where will you integrate these?)
-Language learning objectives will be integrated through the research the students do on their African animals
32
and and how much they push their research to inquire further.
-Language learning objectives will be integrated in the presentations based on their knowledge, presentation
skills and enthusiasm about what they have learned.
Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
-This lesson relates culturally to learning about other environments and how different other places in the world
are from what we are used to. This can lead to discussions about how different other cultures around the world
must be.
Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet , scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
-A review sheet will be given to assess how well all of the information was processed in a non-test way to get
an honest view of what the kids have learned.
Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)
-Students who finish early will get the opportunity to expand on any animal they want and find fun facts about
that animal or read silently.
Closure:
1. Do you feel more knowledgeable than before about your specific animal as well as those of your classmates?
2. Would you like to do an activity like this for animals from another part of the world?
-Students will show what they have learned through their poster and the final multiple choice test.
Independent Practice:
-Students families will hopefully be involved in the making of their poster and helping them find their
information.
-Students will be encouraged to take their posters home at the end and present their information to their parents
as well.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
-The Lion King
-Power point of information
-Quizzes and final test
-Materials for posters
Additional Requirements
Integration with Other Content Areas:
-The students could write about how cultures are different around the world.
-The students could relate the differences in habitats to science and how the earth is different all over.
Acknowledgements:
-The Lion King: Disney
-http://africa.mrdonn.org/animals.html
-Madelyne Lawrence

33
Picture Sources (Left to right): http://mail.colonial.net/~hkaiter/astronomyimagesC/155854main_solar-
system-montage-browse.jpg, http://0.tqn.com/d/space/1/0/s/6/1/PIA03149.jpg
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Peter Anderson Date: 3/17/2012___


Cooperating Teacher: Pauline Sameshima Grade: 5th Grade__
School District: Pullman School: _____Franklin Elementary_
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Space Science/Dance_________________________
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: “As The World Turns” Earth’s Orbit__________

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: In this lesson, the students play the parts of the Sun and the Earth. The act
out what they believe the Sun and the Earth do to create days and nights. Then after researching the
topic, the students reenact the how they believe days and nights are created with the Sun and the Earth.
Allowing them to role play the situation and be the pieces in the model, the students can learn and get
their whole body engaged in the learning. The learning becomes a part of their body which is a great
way of learning in a variety of subjects. This lesson addresses science and dance. Students will try to
answer the question of how the Earth revolves or orbits by acting out the motions. They will ask
questions about it and then do research on the subject. After discovering information, they will re-enact
their new information and compare their findings to the original beliefs through dance.

b. State Learning Standards:


SCIENCE EARLs
EARL 1: Systems
Core Content: Complex Systems
Content Standards:
 4-5 SYSA Systems contain subsystems
 4-5 SYSB A system can do things that none of its subsystems can do by themselves.
EARL 2: Inquiry
Core Content: Planning Investigations
Content Standards:
 4-5 INQA —Question— Scientific investigations involve asking and answering questions and
comparing the answers with evidence from the real world.
 4-5 INQB —Investigate— Scientists plan and conduct different kinds of investigations, depending
on the questions they are trying to answer. Types of investigations include systematic observations
and descriptions, field, models, and open-ended explorations as well as controlled experiments.
 4-5 INQF —Models— A scientific model is a simplified representation of an object, event, system,
or process created to understand some aspect of the natural world. When learning from a model, it is
important to realize that the model is not exactly the same as the thing being modeled.
 4-5 INQG —Explain— Scientific explanations emphasize evidence, have logically consistent
arguments, and use known scientific principles, models, and theories.
 4-5 INQH —Communicate— Scientists communicate the results of their investigations verbally and
in writing. They review and ask questions about the results of other scientists' work.
 4-5 INQI —Intellectual Honesty— Scientists report the results of their investigations honestly, even
when those results show their predictions were wrong or when they cannot explain the results.
EARL 4: Earth and Space Science
Core Content: Earth in Space
Content Standards:
 4-5 ES1B: Earth's daily spin relative to the Sun causes night and day
DANCE EARLs

EARL 1: The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual
arts.
Component 1.1: Understands and applies dance concepts and vocabulary.
GLE 1.1.1: Understands and applies the elements and vocabulary of dance.
Elements of Dance: Space, Time, Energy/Force

EARL 2: The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and responding to
demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Component 2.2: Applies a performance and/or presentation process to dance. (Identifies, selects,
analyzes, interprets, rehearses, adjusts, refines, presents, produces, reflects, and self-evaluates)
GLE 2.2.1: Applies a performance and/or presentation process to dance.

EARL 3: The student communicates through the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).
Component 3.1: Uses dance to express feelings and present ideas.
GLE 3.1.1: Uses dance to express feelings and present ideas.
Component 3.2: Uses dance to communicate for a specific purpose
GLE 3.2.1: Analyzes how dance communicates for a specific purpose.

EARL 4: The student makes connections within and across the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) to
other disciplines, life, cultures, and work.
Component: 4.2 Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between the arts and
other content areas.
GLE: 4.2.1 Applies and analyzes skills, concepts, and vocabulary that dance has in common with
other content areas.

c. Content Objectives:
 SWBAT express their ideas on the Earth’s rotation through dance.
 (Science EARL1, EARL 4 and Dance EARL 1, EARL 2, EARL 3, EARL 4).
 SWBAT construct information on the two ways that the Earth moves through the sky.
 (Science EARL 1, EARL 2, EARL 4 and Dance EARL 2, EARL 4)
 SWBAT perform their learning through dance.
 (Science EARL 1, EARL 2, EARL 4 and Dance EARL 1, EARL 2, EARL 3, EARL 4)
 SWBAT evaluate their learning by analyzing their dance videos.
 (Science EARL 2 and Dance EARL 2, EARL 3, EARL 4)

d. Language Objectives:
SWBAT define the science vocabulary for the Earth’s rotation. (axis, tilt, rotation, spin, orbit,
revolution).
SWBAT choose dance terminology to describe their orbit models. (spin, twirl, rotate, space, move)

d. Previous Learning Experiences: Students demonstrate their own personal knowledge on how they
think day and night occur and how the sun appears to move across the sky. Whatever schema or
conceptions students have on this topic will be their previous learning experiences. Then they will
research the Earth’s orbit to learn how it moves and correct any misconceptions they had in their first
dance. The corrections will be shown in their second dance. However, students will have already talked
about the scientific process and are familiar with how investigations are carried out.
Assessment Strategies
Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies
SWBAT express their ideas on the Earth’s Formative: Students will be videotaped in their groups
rotation through dance. before any research. This allows students to do a dance
model of what their ideas on the Earth’s orbit are.
Observation of each pair's demonstration will give teacher
feedback on their understanding of this concept by filling
out the “Dance Observation Checklist” (see attached). Also,
technology used to record performances will be either a
video or picture of student understanding for students and
teachers to reference.
SWBAT examine the two ways that the Formative: Students will keep notes in their journals as
Earth moves through the sky. evidence of research by using the “Research Tool Info”
sheet (see attached). The teacher will go around to each
group and quickly see what the group has researched by
looking over this sheet. This gives the teacher a snapshot on
how students are doing and if they are understanding or are
lost. The teacher records these observations in personal
notes on the “Dance Observation Sheet” (see attached) as a
formative assessment.

Summative: Students will show their learning in their


modified second dance. The two video recordings give both
the teacher an assessment on how the student’s
understanding was affected by what they knew before and
after research. They can see the changes in their dance
reflect the research they collected.
SWBAT perform their learning through Formative: Students will have performed their first dance,
dance. researched the Earth’s orbit and rotations, and reviewed
their first dance video. They will then write a small to
medium sized reflection in their science notebooks on what
they need to change in their dance to make it accurate. The
teacher then collects the science notebooks and reads the
reflections. The teacher can assess the student’s changes
they are going to make to see if they have corrected any and
all mistakes before the final dance. These changes can be
recorded using the “Revision Sheet” (see attached). This
sheet goes in the science notebooks the teacher will collect.

Summative: The students will complete their dance in their


groups of two for the second time. This is after their
research and reviewing their first dance. They should have
made changes based on their research and new
understanding of the Earth’s orbit. The teacher can
videotape each group to get feedback on their understanding
of this concept using the “Dance Evaluation Rubric” (see
attached).
SWBAT evaluate their learning by Summative: Students will write a conclusion on what they
analyzing their dance videos. learned and how their second dance shows their improved
understanding. Students will be able to use their space
science and dance vocabularies to evaluate and analyze their
dances. Students that struggle with the vocab can reference
the “Vocab Sheet” (see attached) during this time. This will
show what they learned. The students use the “What I
Learned” sheet (see attached) to write this conclusion. The
teacher then reads these conclusions. The overall grade is
then based on the “Dance Evaluation Rubric” (see attached)
and the “What I Learned” sheet to check for student
comprehension. The teacher makes comments on the “What
I Learned” sheet in the science notebooks. The teacher can
see which students got it and understand and which students
may need further instruction.
Student Voice:
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will reflect
(things produced by students: journals, on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the “Research Tool Info” page After a discussion in class about the
support and in science notebooks (see attached) various resources that they could use to
resources that investigate how the Earth rotates around
can be accessed the sun, the students will create a list of
to help them the resources they plan to use in for
achieve the researching their project. These notebook
learning targets. entries would be expected to include
specific titles of books, websites, and/or
videos they plan on using. While they do
not have to include all three kinds, they
must use two different kinds of research
tools (books, movies, websites) with at
least a minimum of three resources total.
The students will talk about why they are
using the source and what information
they plan to get out of it. After using the
source, they will reflect on the resource
and write about if it was useful to their
research or not. This is also the section
they describe what is helpful or difficult
about the sources and if they would use
them again. Since the student is doing
their own research on the subject, they
are reflecting on their self-chosen
resources. This helps them begin to
critically analyze the resources they use
to research and what was easy or hard in
the process. The teacher then collects the
science notebooks and reviews the
students filled in research page. The
teacher then gets a feel for how each
student is feeling about the research
process involved in science.
2. Review their Written reflection in science notebook: After the students have completed the
performance and “Reflection Guide” (see attached) entire investigation, they will be asked to
set personal write a reflection on the process of the
learning goals investigation in their science notebooks.
based on those This is reflection should be about one to
assessments. two paragraphs long. There will be a
reflection guide to help guide their
writing about the investigation (see
“Reflection Guide” attached below). The
students will reflect on what they liked,
disliked, found confusing, or thought was
interesting about the investigation. They
should also support these claims with
specific things they liked or would have
liked more instruction with. Another part
of the reflection consists of how their
dance improved from the first dance to
the final dance. The notebooks are then
turned in to the teacher. The teacher then
reads the reflections and sees how the
class felt about the investigation. This
gives the teacher an insight into how
their students learn and what their needs
are to better improve future instruction.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


 Students will complete this lesson in groups of two. During the dancing, one student will be the sun and
the other will be the Earth. Then they will research the topic in these same groups of two. Based on what
they learn from their research, the same two students will change their dance to correctly model the
Earth’s orbit.
 After the investigation, the students will come together as a class to do a results share-out. This gives
students the opportunity to share what they learned. The whole class then learns from the discussion.
Learning/Teaching Experiences

Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction: I will bring in large inflatable models of the sun and the Earth. While I am holding them
up I then ask, “Did you know that our Earth moves in two different ways?” After taking a few comments
from different students about their thoughts on the question, I would then ask, “What do you think
would happen if we didn’t have days and nights?” Again, after taking a few comments I would then say,
“Do you know that you can figure out the answers to these questions through dancing? We are going to
do a science experiment on how the Earth moves in relation to the sun to create day and night.”
 Describe how you will help students make connections to their lives and prior experiences.
As part of the introduction, I would ask students to help create a class brainstorm list on
things in their life that are dependent on what time of day it is. I would then ask them how
they might be affected if there was no day or no night. After this list is generated, I will
discuss how the Earth and sun’s relationship affects everyone on the planet everyday of our
lives. This would lead to interest in figuring out the investigation question.
2. Questions: These are the questions that students will use throughout the investigation to constantly push
them to think deeper and make sure they are getting good information. By trying to answer these
questions in the investigation, the students will gain the knowledge necessary to meet the desired
objectives. The questions include:
1. What are the two ways that the Earth moves across the sky?
2. Does the sun move across the sky? Why or why not?
3. How is night and day created? How about a year?
4. What do I already know about the Earth’s movement? How can I expand and add to that
knowledge?
5. How am I going to improve my dance to accurately represent the Earth’s movement?
 This investigation is dependent on the students doing their own research and investigating to
improve their dances. Their dances are their way of sharing their research findings. In order
to complete the investigation and complete the dance the students must respond to these
questions to help guide their investigation.

3. Learning Activities:
1. Students should sit so they can see the teacher. Walk around the class with the inflatable sun and
Earth. Go over the introduction to the lesson and review what the students know about space.
Accept any other information that they might share about space. Give an overview of the lesson
and what students will be doing.
2. Review the science and dance vocabulary that is needed in this lesson. The science vocabulary
includes: axis, tilt, rotation, spin, orbit, and revolution. The dance vocabulary includes: spin, twirl,
rotate, space, and move. Each of these can include a brief demonstration or term. Do not give too
much away because you want to see the students preconceived notions in comparison to how
research has influenced their final dance.
3. Show students the name tags you have that either say "Sun" or "Earth." Tell them that you will
divide them into groups of two. Each pair will be working together to decide how best to show
Earth and Sun's movement in the sky by creating a dance. They will spread out in the room and
practice their dances. After 5-10 minutes, everyone will regroup and share their movements.
4. Have pairs move to various locations and work together. Observe what each group is doing, so
you will have an idea of how knowledgeable they are regarding this concept. Use the observation
checklist (see attached at the end of plan) to get a sense of where student knowledge is on the
subject. When you have all students back together, tell them that you will put some music on, and
each group will have 30 seconds to perform their actions. Number each group so that they know
when it is their turn. Video or take digital pictures if possible, and show to the students.
5. After each group has an opportunity to share their dance, discuss some of the questions below.
 Did groups show different ways that the Earth and Sun move?
 Why do you think that groups had different ideas?
 What do we call the movement of a planet?
 Why do we have the day/night cycle of Earth?
6. Tell student that each pair will be responsible for doing research to the investigation question
which is “WHAT ARE THE TWO WAYS THAT THE EARTH MOVES THROUGH THE
SKY?” (You may need to give them a hint that one way is the way it moves in relationship to the
sun and the other way is the cause of the day/night cycle of the Earth.). They will be able to use
materials in the classroom, library, or on the computer. They might also want to ask their parents.
They will then need to practice these movements to demonstrate for the class what they have
learned.
7. Before they begin their research, allow students to review their videotaped dance. Allow the
student pairs to come up to the computer as a pair and review their dance. Tell them to pay
attention and make observations on what their dance looks like. Each group should have about 3
minutes to review their short video tape.
8. Pass out the “Research Tool Info” worksheet. Go over how they will fill out the worksheet and to
review the expectation of the entries. Each student in the pair must complete their own sheet, but
it is okay if they share similar responses to the resources. There needs to be at least a minimum of
three resources. The student groups must use at least two different kinds of research methods.
This sheet is then inserted into the each student’s science notebook. Allow the students to
research the investigation question. After their research is done, students should review their
observations from their first dance and take the time to revise their dance based on the new
information. This improved dance should include the new information the students gained
through their research.
9. Return to the large area after everyone has had an opportunity to do research, watch videos, and
read books on this subject. Have each group take 30-45 seconds to perform their improved
dances. Video their performances again. Next, turn out the lights, put on the music, and let
everyone act out their examples of the earth rotating around the sun.
10. Group students together to discuss this activity. Share the video or pictures with students and
discuss the performances.
 Did all groups show the same idea? (If not, you will need to stress the correct model and
have someone act it out again.)
 Did some groups change from their original ideas?
 What was different about the movements?
 Did anyone discover what it is called when the earth revolves around the sun? (Orbit)
11. Explain to them that the Earth revolves around the sun. This is called an orbit. The Earth also
spins on its axis. This is called a rotation. The Earth's rotation is why we have night and day. (You
may want to explain and/or use student models to demonstrate the night/day cycle or you may
want to save this concept for another lesson.)
12. Have groups stand again. Put a chair or something stationary in the middle of the room. Tell
students that they will all become the earth this time. Have them orbit the sun while spinning on
their "axis". As they orbit the sun, they can chant together. "Orbit is a revolution; spinning is a
rotation" again and again. Practice together to a steady drum or clapping beat.
13. Have students begin this activity and orbit the sun in a large circle, chanting their sentence.
Repeat for about a minute. Put music back on and have them continue to orbit the sun and
chanting to their space music.
14. As a wind-up for this activity, read Me and My Place in Space, by Joan Sweeney.
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures: List the teaching approaches/modes you will use to teach each step
1. Inflatable object presentation while walking around the classroom. The teacher will
be holding the objects while introducing the investigation. Students will be sitting at
their desks.
2. Vocabulary review as a class. Write the vocab words on the white board or under a
document camera. This is a class discussion.
3. Show the name tags to the class by holding them up.
4. Group students into pairs by letting the students pick their research partner. If the
class is not able to do this, assign partners that you know will work well together.
5. Students create their own dance on the two ways that they believe the Earth moves.
The teacher goes around the room and sees what each group is coming up with.
6. Video tape the dance performances of each pair. Download these videos to the
computer for student viewing.
7. Class discussion on their observations using the question from step five of the
learning activities section (listed above).
8. Allow each pair of students to come and review their dance on the computer.
9. Student work time. Let the students research the investigation question by allowing
them to use books or the computer.
10. Students fill out the “Research Tool Info” sheet and place them in the science
notebooks.
11. Students revise their dance based on the research.
12. The students perform their final dance in front of the class. Videotape these
performances. Download these onto the computer.
13. Share student videos with the class by projecting them on the screen.
14. Class discussion guided by the questions from step 10 in the learning activities
section (shown above).
15. Turn off lights and put on space music and create a class model of the Earth and Sun.
16. Class reading of Me and My Place in Space by Joan Sweeney.
b) Multiple means of access (list ways the teacher will present the materials)
The teacher will introduce the investigation to the class by starting with a class discussion
and review of vocabulary. The teacher will explain what the students will be expected to do
in this investigation and taking questions while explaining to ensure students have a clear
understanding of what they are going to do. While the students are performing their dance,
the teacher circulates around the room and observes the dances of each pair. The teacher uses
the observation checklist (attached below) to assess where the students are on their
knowledge of the subject. The teacher then leads a group discussion and guides them with the
questions listed in step five of the learning activities section. The students will then go off to
research the investigation question. The teacher will provide students with assistance as
needed. The students perform their final dance and the teacher videotapes and assesses the
students using the rubric (attached below). Then the teacher leads a class discussion using the
questions from step 10 of the learning activities section. Finally, the teacher collects the
science notebooks and looks at the “Research Tool Info” and reflection to see student voice.
The teacher provides some comments for feedback on the reflection.
c) Multiple means of engagement (list ways the students will participate in the learning)
The students will complete this investigation by working in pairs. In this pairs, students will
create a dance to answer the investigation question. This should show their existing schema
on the subject. After the teacher video tapes their dance, the students will review their
recording and make observations in their science notebook. Then the student will engage in
class discussions about what they noticed in their dances. Next, as a pair the students will do
research using books and computers to help them answer the question. Using this knowledge,
the pair must revise their dance to make it accurate of how the Earth rotates and revolves in
its orbit around the sun. The students will then review these dances as a class and have a
discussion on what they seen in the dances. As a class, the students will all be rotating and
revolving Earths orbiting around the teacher standing on the chair as a sun. Finally, the
students will listen to a story to conclude the lesson.
d) Multiple means of expression (list ways the students can show their learning)
The students will express their learning through working in pairs as collaborators, dances,
class discussions, self-monitored researching, making observations and notes in their science
notebooks, reviewing the video tapes of their dances to reflect and improve on their dances,
and finally through student voice reflections.
d) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
The teacher can modify this lesson to meet all kinds of learners. For students will physical
disabilities that are unable to dance, the students can draw a picture with labels as a substitute
for the dance. For ELL students, the teacher will pair students with native speakers to expose
them to rich language opportunities and to better comprehend the content with their partner.
The students are also free to choose what credible resources they will use in their research.
The research can happen from books and websites or another source they would like to
explore.
e) Language learning objectives: (Where will you integrate these?)
Language learning objectives are integrated when discussing the vocabulary terms at the
beginning of the lesson. The students will need this academic vocabulary to be able to
express their learning in detail. The academic language used in this lesson include: spin,
twirl, rotate, space, move, axis, tilt, rotation, spin, orbit, and revolution. The students will be
exposed to this language throughout the discussions and research in the topics. This vocab is
crucial to understand and participate in the discussions. You can check for student
comprehension on these terms based on the dance movements of the teams dance
movements.
f) Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
All people on the Earth are part of the Earth’s orbit around the sun. Everyone experiences
night and day in the world. Dance allows for communication without speaking. This means
that these dances can overcome any language obstacles and still be understood by people
around the world that understand the Earth’s rotation and orbit. This would be a great point
to bring up in the discussion about how everyone is impacted by the Earth’s orbit and
rotation. As an extension activity or possible social studies unit, you could look into the
different creation tales of night and day from different cultures around the world and through
time.
g) Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet, scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
The students reviewing their own videos allows for students to observe their learning and
growth. After every pair has reviewed their videos, students who would like to review the
videos again can do so. The students who struggle with the academic vocabulary can receive
a definition sheet (attached at the end) to fill in the definitions and place in their science
notebooks for future reference. Students are also given the “Research Tool Info” to make
sure they are choosing credible sources.
h) Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)
If students complete their research early they can update their science notebooks and its table
of contents, work on other work they need to complete, or silently read their personal reading
book. The teacher can also ask the students who finish early some of the discussion questions
and ask them to think about them so they can provide some comments during the discussion
time. The students can think about these questions with their partner and write down their
ideas.

5. Closure: At the end of the lesson, students will come together as a class and share their findings. A
couple groups may volunteer to show their video as an example for the class of what they thought before
and after the investigation. The results can be written down on the white board. This serves as a class
conclusion. Two questions that can encourage discussion and student participation are:
1) Did some groups change from their original ideas? What was different about the movements?
2) What are the two ways that the Earth moves across space? What are these movements called?
In future lessons, students will explore experiments that have some personal interest value. This lesson
helps students correct their own misconceptions by researching the information for themselves. This is a
great skill for students to learn how to do. Future lessons will empower students to discover and learn
through their own knowledge and research.
 Independent Practice: Students will be encouraged to do some personal research outside of
class. They can also select another space science question they are curious about to study and
research. This could involve how other planets rotate around the sun and how their orbits
compare to the Earth’s. They could also explore other relations between the Earth and the sun
such as how much bigger is the sun than the Earth? Or they could find out what materials make
up each of these solar bodies. Then they could find a fun way to communicate their findings
(dance, drawing, poem, song, etc.).
Possible Family Interaction: Parents can help students navigate the internet and find great
resources for research. However, parents are NOT to do the project and research for the student
and their group. As always, parents should ask their student to explain their research. This makes
students notice how to explain and make their findings presentable to an audience. Sharing your
results is a huge part of science.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology


 Digital camera or video camera to record student groups
 Nametags
 Computers for research
 Science notebooks
 Trade/reference books on space science
 White board
 “Research Tool Info” page (see attached below)
 Observation checklist (see attached below)
 Grading rubric (see attached below)
 Definition sheet (see attached below)
 Space themed music
 Document camera or white board

Additional Requirements

 Integration with Other Content Areas: This lesson integrates science and dance. Students are
covering common science misconceptions about how the Earth orbits around the sun. The content
covered in this lesson is science, but they perform the experiment by dancing the planets orbit. They
perform a dance to create a physical model of the Earth’s rotation around the sun. The students will also
be using technology for researching and recording their groups.
 Acknowledgements:
Instruction plan adapted from:
Edwards, J. (2002, September 17). As the World Turns. Retrieved from Utah Education
Network: http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview?LPid=2351
Attachments created by Peter Anderson
Name:_____________________________________________________________________________
Date:______________________________________________________________________________
Subject/Topic:______________________________________________________________________

RESEARCH TOOL INFO


Source (at least 3) Why I am using it My thoughts on the resource

***GLUE OR TAPE IN SCIENCE NOTEBOOK***


VOCAB SHEET
Just a helpful reminder…
Vocab Word Definition (Fill in the ones you need and use words or pictures)
Axis

Tilt

Rotation

Spin

Orbit

Revolution

Spin

Twirl

Space

Move

***GLUE OR TAPE IN SCIENCE NOTEBOOK***


Dance Observation Checklist
Understands Beginning to Needs Extra
Student Pair Concept Understand Struggling Guidance
Dance Evaluation Rubric
Student Pair:__________________________________________________________________

Area of interest 3- Accurately portrayed 2- Somewhat accurately 1- Not correctly


in the dance portrayed in the dance portrayed in the
dance/missing
Rotation of Earth The person portraying The person portraying The person portraying
Earth is clearly rotating Earth is rotating, but not at Earth does not rotate,
on a tilted axis. a tilt. but just moves around
the sun.

Revolution around the sun The Earth orbits around The Earth orbits around The Earth does not
the sun at an appropriate the sun, but moves too fast orbit the sun or the sun
speed (not too fast) to be an accurate model orbits the Earth.

Comments:
Reflection Guide
Name:_______________________________________________________________________
Partner:_____________________________________________________________________
Date:________________________________________________________________________
As the investigation comes to a close, please reflect on what you liked, disliked, found confusing, or thought
was interesting about the investigation. Support these claims with specific things you liked or would have liked
more instruction with. Finally, include how you and your partner’s dance improved from your first dance to
your final dance. Use this page to start your reflection.

***GLUE OR TAPE IN SCIENCE NOTEBOOK***


Revision Sheet
Name:_______________________________________________________________________
Partner:_____________________________________________________________________
Date:________________________________________________________________________
After reviewing the video and/or pictures of your first dance, discuss with your partner the changes you are
going to make to your dance as you prepare and create your final dance. Record these differences on this sheet
using words, pictures, and labels.

***GLUE OR TAPE IN SCIENCE NOTEBOOK***


What I Learned
Name:_______________________________________________________________________
Partner:_____________________________________________________________________
Date:________________________________________________________________________
Write a few short paragraphs to explain what you have learned from this science investigation experiment. In
your response include an answer to our investigative question “What are the two ways that the Earth moves
through the sky?” Use the vocabulary words we have learned in your answer. You may use labeled pictures to
support your written answer if you want.

***GLUE OR TAPE IN SCIENCE NOTEBOOK***


Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____Allison Erwin Date: February 26, 2012


Cooperating Teacher: _Pauline Sameshima_____________Grade:____5th________
School District:______WSU _________________ School: ____WSU_____________
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Earth Science: Space Science ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Classroom Planetarium

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: Students will learn about the 9 planets of our solar system. Students will
be asked to create their own planets, based on research. Students will understand properties of the
different planets and their relationship with one another.
b. State Learning Standards: This lesson plan satisfies several EARLs and GLEs.

Science: 4th& 5th Grade


EARL 1: Systems (Complex Systems)
Description: In prior grades students learned to think systematically about how the parts of objects,
plants, and animals are connected and work together. In grades 4-5 students learn that systems contain
smaller (sub-) systems, and that systems are also parts of larger systems. The same ideas about systems
and their parts learned in earlier grades apply to systems and subsystems. In addition, students learn
about inputs and outputs and how to predict what may happen to a system if the system's inputs are
changed. The concept of a hierarchy of systems provides a conceptual bridge for students to see the
connections between mechanical systems (e.g., cities) and natural systems (e.g., ecosystems).
Content Standard: 4-5 SYSA Systems contain subsystems.
EARL 2: Inquiry (Planning Investigations)
Description: In prior grades students learned to conduct different kinds of investigations. In grades 4-5
students learn to plan an investigation, which involves first selecting the appropriate kind of
investigation to match the question being asked. One type of investigation is a controlled experiment (a
"fair test"). Others include systematic observation, field studies, and models and simulations. Students
can also collect, display, and interpret data; summarize results; draw conclusions from evidence; and
communicate their findings. Students are aware that scientific explanations emphasize evidence, involve
logical arguments, and are consistent with scientific principles and theories. Students are also expected
to communicate their findings and to critique the investigations of others with respect and intellectual
honesty. These capabilities are essential in preparing students for the more extensive and rigorous
investigations that they will be planning and conducting in middle school.
Content Standard: 4-5 INQF (Models) A scientific model is a simplified representation of an
object, event, system, or process created to understand some aspect of the natural world. When
learning from a model, it is important to realize that the model is not exactly the same as the
thing being modeled.
EARL 4: Earth and Space Science (Earth In Space)
Description: In prior grades students learned that observing and recording the position and appearance of
objects in the sky make it possible to discover patterns of motion. In grades 4-5 students learn the full
implications of the spherical-Earth concept and Earth's place in the Solar System. The upper elementary
years are an excellent time for study of the Earth in space because students have the intellectual capacity
to grasp the spherical-Earth concept and the relationship between the Earth and Sun. This major set of
concepts is a stepping-stone to a later understanding of all concepts in astronomy and space science and
an essential element to further understanding of how the Earth and other planets formed.
Content Standards:
4-5 ES1A Earth is approximately spherical in shape. Things on or near the Earth are pulled
toward Earth's center by the center of gravity.
4-5 ES1B Earth's daily spin relative to the Sun causes night and day.
4-5 ES1D The Sun is a star. It is the central and largest body in our Solar System. The Sun
appears much brighter and larger in the sky than other stars because it is many thousands of
times closer to Earth.

Arts: Elementary
EARL 1: The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
Component 1.1: Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
GLE 1.1.E: Creates and experiences artworks and/or performances in dance,
music, theatre, and visual arts using arts concepts and vocabulary.
Component 1.2: Develops arts skills and techniques.
GLE 1.2.E: Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in
dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
EARL 4: The student makes connections within and across the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual
arts) to other disciplines, life, cultures, and work.
GLE 4.1.E: Demonstrates and applies the skills, concepts, and vocabulary
common among the arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) in
personal artworks, presentations, and/or performances at beginning levels.
Component 4.2: Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between the arts
and other content areas.
GLE 4.2.E: Demonstrates and applies the skills, concepts, and vocabulary common
among and between the arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) and other
content areas at beginning levels.

Communication: 5th Grade


EARL 4: The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of communication.
Component 4.1: Assesses effectiveness of one's own and others' communication.
GLE 4.1.1: Applies established criteria to guide analysis of strengths and weaknesses in
own communication.
GLE 4.1.2: Analyzes and evaluates others' formal and informal communication using
established criteria.
Component 4.2: Sets goals for improvement.
GLE 4.2.1: Applies strategy for setting grade level appropriate communication goals.

c. Content Objectives:
SWBAT explain the relationship of the nine planets in our solar system and the sun. (Science: EARL 1, 4-5
SYSA, EARL 4, 4-5ES1A, 4-5 ES1B, 4-5ES1D).
SWBAT apply visual art concepts to create a three-dimensional representation piece of the solar system.
(Elementary Arts: EARL 1, Component 1.1, GLE 1.1.E, EARL 4. GLE 4.1.E, Component 4.2, GLE 4.2.E,
Science: EARL 2, 4-5 INQF).
SWBAT classify planets based on their properties. (Science: EARL 4, 4-5ES1A, 4-5 ES1B, 4-5ES1D).
SWBAT analyze collaboration skills. (Communication EARL 4, Component 4.1, GLE 4.1.1 & Component
4.2, GLE 4.2.1)

d. Language Objectives:
SWBAT define vocabulary words associated with space and the solar system: rotation, revolve, three-
dimensional, orbit, planet, system, sub-system and gravitational pull.
e. Previous Learning Experiences: Students will have a basic understanding that we live in a solar
system, but no further information is required for this lesson. Students should have knowledge of
technology and appropriate resource use.

Assessment Strategies

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT define vocabulary words Formative: These vocabulary words will be written on
associated with space and the solar system. the board when students begin lesson (example of the
words written on the board is attached). The teacher will
ask them to write each word down in their science
journals and come up with their own definitions
throughout the lesson. After researching and developing
facts, students should have working definitions of each
word. The teacher will come to each group and see if
each member has defined the words. The teacher will
keep a progress sheet to make note of which groups are
on track with the vocabulary words. Assessment sheet is
attached.

Summative: Students will be given a vocabulary quiz the


day after the lesson. This will be in their science
notebooks/journals. They will be asked to define and
draw (if able) the vocabulary word. The words will be
reviewed during the lesson so students are aware of the
correct definitions. (Examples of correct quiz words is
attached).
SWBAT explain the relationship of the Formative: During group work time, students will be
nine planets in our solar system and the given discussion questions to talk about with their group.
sun. (Science: EARL 1, 4-5 SYSA, EARL 4, The teacher will go around to each group twice and listen
4-5ES1A, 4-5 ES1B, 4-5ES1D). to their discussion. Groups will be assessed on a progress
sheet to track student progress. Progress sheet is
attached.

Summative: After completing worksheet and three-


dimensional projects, students will be asked to present
their creative representations to the class. Their
presentation will be assessed on a rubric where they will
be asked to discuss the characteristics of the planet
assigned to their group and the relationship in regards to
other plants. The rubric is attached.
SWBAT analyze collaboration skills. Formative: While students are working in groups, each
(Communication EARL 4, Component 4.1, student will be given a specific job. The jobs are:
GLE 4.1.1 & Component 4.2, GLE 4.2.1) recorder, researcher and artist. Descriptions and duties of
each job are specified on an attached sheet. The
assessment will occur when the teacher tracks the
progress of the group. If all students are on task, they are
collaborating successfully. If students seem to be off-
task, they will be talked to in a small group.

Summative: At the end of this lesson, students will be


given a group collaboration form asking them to analyze
the effectiveness of working together as a group. Each
member will evaluate their own collaboration skills as
well as the other group members. A group evaluation
form is attached entitled “How Did We Do?”

Student Voice

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how


collected (things produced by students will reflect on
students: journals, work their learning
samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the support Student reflection journals In their personal reflection
and resources that can be journals, students will be
accessed to help them achieve asked to respond to
the learning targets. questions regarding the
lesson plan and how the
activities helped with their
personal learning. The
questions are: What
resources/support was
helpful when working on
your presentation? Did you
enjoy the hands-on activity
and do you think it helped
you achieve our learning
goals? These questions will
be written on the board at
the end of the lesson and
students will be given class
time to respond. Learning
targets and questions are
attached.
2. Articulate how proper and Student reflection journals At the end of this lesson,
efficient use of technology students will be asked to
enhances learning.(5.2) complete a
worksheet/questionnaire
regarding the technology use
in the classroom. They will
answer the following
questions in their journal:
What is the proper way to
use technology in the
classroom? (This question
will pertain to research on
the computer because that’s
the technology students
used.) Did technology assist
or hurt learning? The
questions will be included
on the attachment for the
above question.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


At the beginning of the lesson, the teacher will instruct the entire class. Once the lesson/content has been
introduced, students will be moved into eight groups of three. Each group will be given a planet to
research and create. Students will stay in their groups while the research and create planets. When
students are finished with projects, the class will come together for presentations. Each group of three
will present their planet to the rest of the class. Once each planet has been presented, students will create
a live representation of the solar system, with one student from each group representing their planet.
Students will revolve around a sun placed in the middle of the system. Each student will have the chance
to hold the planet they created. Students will be rotated in until all three have held their planet in the
system. Once the presentation is over, students will work individually at their desks, responding to
reflection questions.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction: The teacher will begin the lesson by asking students to predict how many planets there
are in our solar system. Students will be asked to write down their answers on a piece of paper. Once
everyone has an answer, the teacher will ask several students to share an answer. These will be written
on the board. The teacher will explain that there were 9 planets originally- Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars,
Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. But Pluto has been removed because they changed the
definition of a planet so it doesn’t fit anymore. But why? The teacher then will lead discussion about
what characterizes a planet. The class will come up with a list of their own ideas. Once we have a
working list, the teacher will give the correct definition of a planet according to International
Astronomical Union. Definition: A “planet” is an object in orbit around the Sun that is large enough
(massive enough) to have its self-gravity pull itself into a round (or nearly round) shape. In addition a
“planet” orbits in a clear path around the Sun – there are no other bodies in its path that it must sweep up
as it goes around the Sun. Students will write this definition in their science journals.
 In order to have students make a connection to their lives, I will ask students where do we get
our warmth? Students should have a small understanding that the Sun gives us light and warmth,
but allowing them to understand where the Earth fits in regards to the solar system will give
them connection to this lesson. The teacher would explain how the being too close to the Sun
would burn up the Earth but being too far away would freeze us! All of the planets work together
in a system that is aided by gravity. We are also part of systems and sub-systems in our society.
What are some examples of systems and sub-systems within our own lives? This will be a short
class discussion to get them thinking about systems.
2. Questions:
1. How do the planets stay in a circle around the sun?
2. What are the characteristics of a planet?
3. Is the sun a planet?
4. What is the order of the planets?
5. Why is Earth the best planet to live on?
 Before beginning the activity in this lesson plan, the whole class will engage in discussion of
these questions. Students will be asked to write responses as well as discuss them as a class
before moving on to the activity. Science journals will be checked to track where students are in
regards to these topics. This is not assessment, but just a check to see how students progress in
their understanding of planets and the solar system.
3. Learning Activities:
1. Vocabulary words associated with this lesson plan will be written on the white board. Students are
required to write these words down in their science journals. The teacher will have the students come up
with their own definitions of these words while they are working. The words are: rotation, revolution,
three-dimensional, orbit, planet, and gravitational pull.
2. When students are done writing down definitions, they will be split into eight groups of three. Each
group will be assigned a planet (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune).
3. Each member of the group will be given a job. There will be a Researcher, Recorder, and Artist. Each
student is given a nametag with a job title on it. These jobs are randomly given. Description of jobs is
attached.
4. Students are given a “Planet Information Sheet” to fill out. They will use this sheet to research their
planet for specifics about their own planet. The researcher and recorder will fill this sheet our while the
Artist begins to create the planet.
5. Give each group a balloon. The teacher will explain that the planets are different sizes, so the balloons
will be different sizes as well. Once each group discovers the size of their planet, they may begin
creating it.
6. Each group will be given a fishing line that will be tied around the end of their balloon.
7. Each group will be given a supply of space paste (made before the lesson by the teacher) and newspaper
strips. The teacher will instruct the students to dip each strip into the paste, gently pull it through their
fingers to wipe off extra clumps, and then paste it onto the balloon. Students should use many layers,
working until the balloon is covered completely. The teacher will allow students to work on their own,
but if all groups seem to be having problems, a demonstration would help them understand.
8. While students are working in their groups, the teacher will circulate the room, tracking progress of
groups and making sure each group is on task. This is the time for discussion questions with each group.
The teacher will ask students to explain about their planet. Would the students want to live there? Is it
close to the Sun? As the teacher asks these questions, they will make notes on the progress sheets
(attached). At this time, the teacher will also look at their list of working definitions for the vocabulary
words. This will be tracked on the progress sheet as well.
9. Allow the balloons to dry. While they are drying, students should decide how they are going to paint the
surface of their balloons. Which colors will really bring out the physical landscape? When balloons are
ready, students will paint them. (The drying process will take some time. This lesson may need to be
spread out over the day or a weekend, to ensure the balloons are completely dry. If planets don’t dry in
time, the teacher will tell students they will hold off until their planets are ready for paint.)
10. Once the balloons have been painted, the teacher will meet with each group to determine where the
planets should hang in relation to the Sun. The teacher will write these approximate values on the board
(distance from the Sun):
Mercury: 58.9 million km
Venus: 108.2 million km
Earth: 149.6 million km
Mars: 227.8 million km
Jupiter: 778 million km
Saturn: 1,427 million km
Uranus: 2,870 million km
Neptune: 4,500 million km
If students do not understand the order of the planets, the teacher can have a class discussion about this.
11. Once students have decided on a distance from the Sun, they will have the chance to present their planet
to the class. They will explain about their planet and it’s characteristics. The presentation will be graded
on a rubric. Students who are listening to the presentation will be required to write notes about each
planet.
12. When all the groups have presented, it’s time for to simulate the solar system. One person from each
group will hold their planet at a distance from the Sun that has been previously decided. Students will
orbit the Sun (created beforehand and placed in the middle of the classroom) and be part of the solar
system. If time allows, each student from the group can take a turn at holding their planet.
13. Students will end this lesson by answering questions in their science journals. They will be asked to
reflect on the activity and explain how it helped/hindered their learning. These questions will be written
on the board. The questions are:
What resources/support was helpful when working on your presentation?
Did you enjoy the hands-on activity and do you think it helped you achieve our learning goals?
What is the proper way to use technology in the classroom?
Did technology assist or hurt learning?
The teacher will read the journals in order to check understanding and effectiveness of using art to
enhance learning experience.
14. The correct definitions to the vocabulary words will be written on the board as well. Students will copy
these into their journals. The correct definitions are attached.
15. Students will be given a vocabulary quiz the next day to check understanding of words and meanings in
this lesson. Students will write their answers in their science journals. The example of a correct
vocabulary entry is attached.

4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures:
1. Attention hook with discussion of Pluto being removed from the list of planets.
2. Give correct definition of the word “planet” on the whiteboard.
3. Explain where Earth gets its warmth from and why distance is important.
4. Ask questions that allow students to begin thinking about the solar system.
5. Write vocabulary words on the white board for students to copy their notebooks.
6. Divide class into 8 groups of 3 and assign each group a planet.
7. Assign each member in the group a job (Researcher, Recorder, Artist).
8. Explain that the planets are different sizes so balloons should be different sizes.
9. Give students supplies: fishing line, space paste and newspaper strips.
10. Explain the process of space paste and strips. Demonstration is necessary.
11. Track progress of groups and individual understanding by engaging in discussion with
students.
12. Instruct students to let balloons dry before painting them.
13. Write correct values of each planet’s distance from the Sun on the board.
14. Presentation of planets and characteristics.
15. Simulation of solar system.
16. Reflection about learning achievement and using technology.
17. Assessment of learning with a quiz of vocabulary words.
b) Multiple means of access:
a. Whole-class discussion in which the teacher will instruct students about the solar system.
b. Teacher will explain/demonstrate proper technique to create the planets.
c. Teacher will distribute materials.
d. Teacher will circulate classroom, engaging students in discussion about the planets and
tracking their progress as a group and individually.
e. Teacher will write important information on the board.
f. Teacher will facilitate discussion and scaffold student thinking in order to encourage
exploration.
c) Multiple means of engagement:
a. Students will be engaged in whole-class discussion as the lesson is introduced.
b. Students will work individually in their science journals before sharing work.
c. Students will work in a group with a specific job to ensure on-task behavior.
d. Students will present their work to the class, working on presentation skills.
e. Students will listen to presentations and take notes.
f. Students will be part of an active representation of the solar system.
g. Students will reflect on their learning experience.
d) Multiple means of expression:
Students will show their learning through proper research techniques, working in a group,
student-teacher discussion time, self-assessment of group collaboration and personal reflection
about the learning activity.
d) Methods of differentiation:
The teacher will interact with students while they are working, taking note on a progress sheet of
student learning. If students are struggling to find appropriate research or cannot use the correct
procedure while creating the balloons, the teacher can demonstrate and re-teach these methods.
When students are choosing the distance from the Sun, the teacher can scaffold learning and
explain that a larger distance means that planet is further from the Sun. Teacher will instruct or
re-teach based off of student need and understanding. If some students finish their project earlier,
they can work online with games to enhance their learning of space concepts. Students will be
given the option to play on the computer or write a story about living on another planet.
e) Language learning objectives:
Students will be asked to create definitions for the vocabulary words connected to this lesson.
They will be quizzed on these words after learning the correct definitions for them. As students
create their three-dimensional models, these vocabulary words will be used to explain what’s
going on in the solar system.
f) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
In this lesson plan, students will understand that our world is full of systems and those systems
are full of sub-systems. Students need to understand how big the world is and look outside their
small world and assess their surroundings. In order to connect this culturally, students can
discuss other systems and subsystems they see in the world around them (family, business,
school, etc.). This can be a short discussion at the beginning of the lesson to help students make a
connection to their culture and way of life.
g) Remedial activities:
When students are working in their groups, they will be filling out a “Planet Information Sheet”
for their specific planet. This will scaffold their thinking because it outlines what
areas/characteristics they need to cover. Students will also write vocabulary words from the
board into their own notebooks. They will also be given an outline for the quiz that will be glued
into their notebooks.
h) Extension activities:
If students finish early, they can read their personal reading book. They will also have the option
to play interactive games online pertaining to the solar system. The appropriate website for them
to use will be included in the Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology section.
5. Closure: To end this lesson, we will review the vocabulary words written on the board. The teacher will
provide the correct definitions for the words and students will be required to write these in their science
notebooks. Lastly, students will reflect about their experience with the solar system and using art to
enhance learning. They will reflect in their science journals. The questions for reflection will be written
on the white board. This is their exit slip.
 In order to show their learning process, students will give a presentation about their planet to the
entire class. Each student will be required to talk about the planet that was assigned to his or her
group. Students will be asked to report the characteristics that are on the Planet Information
Sheet. At the end of their presentations, we will end class with a discussion. The class will be
asked the following questions in order to further their thinking:
1. What would life be like on your planet?
2. How does gravity play a role in the solar system?
 Lastly, the teacher will remind the students that systems and sub-systems play a very important
role in our lives. As homework, students need to make a list of the sub-systems and systems they
experience in daily life.
6. Independent Practice: In writing, students will be given an essay assignment in which they create their
own planet and describe life there. They will be required to come up with the same characteristics that
are used in this lesson plan. Students will also be required to create a system that their planet resides in.
Students must be creative and use the knowledge they know about planets and the solar system to write
their story. The writing prompt is attached.
a. Possible Family Interaction: When discussing systems and sub-systems, the teacher will point
out that our families are a large system with sub-systems within it. Students will be asked to
write about their family in their homework, outlining the various systems and sub-systems within
the family tree. Students will be encouraged to talk to their parents about the homework because
it involves them directly.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
 Round balloons, different sizes
 Tempera paint and paint brushes
 Fishing line
 Newspaper torn into strips about one inch wide
 Space paste (flour and water; one part flour, ¾ part water)
 Nametags
 Computers
 “Planet Information Sheet” (attached)
 Vocabulary words with definitions (attached)
 Progress Sheet (attached)
 Example of quiz entry in notebook (attached)
 Rubric for presentation (attached)
 Discussion Questions (attached)
 Explanation of jobs (attached)
 “How Did We Do” group collaboration form (attached)
 Student Reflection Questions (attached)
 Learning Targets (attached)
 Distances from the sun (attached)
 Writing Prompt (attached)
 “The Systems I live In” homework assignment (attached)
Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas: Students are writing about their planets in the extended portion
of this lesson plan. They are also required to write in their science notebooks during the project and
during reflection time. This lesson plan also incorporates art into the project. Students are using visual
art to become engaged with the planets. They also interact with the solar system by dramatizing the solar
system. Students are also learning about the history of the solar system because the definition of a planet
has evolved over time and thus excluded Pluto from the original nine planets.
 Acknowledgements: Instructional Plan adapted from
http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/classroomplanetarium/index.html or
Discovery Education. Changes to this lesson plan were made by Allison Erwin.
 Definitions from google.com
Vocabulary Words

Rotation: The action of rotating around an axis or center.

Revolve: Move in a circle on a central axis.

Three-dimensional: Involving or relating to three dimensions or aspects; giving the illusion of depth.

Orbit: The curved path of a celestial object or spacecraft around a star, planet, or moon, esp. a periodic
elliptical revolution.

Planet: An object in orbit around the Sun that is large enough (massive enough) to have its self-gravity pull
itself into a round (or nearly round) shape. In addition a “planet” orbits in a clear path around the Sun – there
are no other bodies in its path that it must sweep up as it goes around the Sun.

Solar: Relating to or denoting energy derived from the sun's rays.

System: A set of connected things or parts forming a complex whole, in particular.

Sub-system: A smaller component of a large system

Gravitational Pull: Gravitation, or gravity, a non-contact force, is one of the four fundamental interactions
of nature.

Example of Correct Quiz Entry:


Word:

Definition: ________________________
_________________________

Picture
Progress Sheet
Student Name Vocabulary Discussion Job

Key: On Task (OT)


Needs improvement (N)
Off Task (Off)
The Questions (questions to be asked during the lesson plan)
Small Group Discussion Questions (during group work time- ask each small group & track progress on sheet)
1. Would you (the student) want to live on your planet?
2. How close is it to the Sun?
3. Where does it fit in the system?

Whole-Class Discussion Questions (during whole-class discussion, follow the instructional plan)
Beginning of lesson:
1. How do the planets stay in a circle around the sun?
2. What are the characteristics of a planet?
3. Is the sun a planet?
4. What is the order of the planets?
5. Why is Earth the best planet to live on?
End of the lesson:
1. What would life be like on your planet?
2. How does gravity play a role in the solar system?

Reflection Questions (at the end of class, in science notebooks)


1. What resources/support was helpful when working on your presentation?
2. Did you enjoy the hands-on activity and do you think it helped with achievement of learning goals? Why or
why not?
3. What is the proper way to use technology in the classroom?
4. Did the use of technology assist or hurt learning?
Explanation of Jobs (assigned to each student)

Recorder: The recorder is responsible for filling out the “Planet Observation Sheet” with the
correct answers, found by the researcher.

Researcher: The researcher is responsible for finding the characteristics outlined on the “Planet
Observation Sheet.”

Artist: The artist is responsible for gathering materials needed for the project and completing the
balloon while the others work on the information sheet.

*The artist is not the only member of the group who can work on the balloon. They are only
responsible for getting the materials and getting started on the balloon while the other students
work on finding information for their planet.
_______________
How Did We Do?
Time to evaluate group work! Please give comments about how each person in your group did on this project
(including yourself). Give them a score out of 5, with 5 meaning that they did excellent and 1 meaning they
were off-task and caused the group to be dysfunctional. Take your time and be thoughtful! No rushing.

Job/Name of Person On-Task? Worked well with Contributed to group


others? effort and presentation?

Researcher
Name

Artist
Name

Recorder
Name
Group Presentation Rubric

Student Prepared? Knowledgeable about Appropriate


(5 points) subject? (5 points) Information (5 points)

Name
Job

Name
Job

Name
Job

Total Points:

Comments:
Distance from the Sun (to use when students create the system)
Mercury: 58.9 million km
Venus: 108.2 million km
Earth: 149.6 million km
Mars: 227.8 million km
Jupiter: 778 million km
Saturn: 1,427 million km
Uranus: 2,870 million km
Neptune: 4,500 million km

Learning Targets (written on board during lesson)

Students will:
1. Understand the relationship of the nine planets in our solar system to the sun by
creating a three-dimensional representation.
2. Understand the meaning of system and how it relates to our lives.
The Systems I Live In

We are all active in living systems in the world around us. What systems do you live in? What
about a sub-system you are part of? Please write all the systems you can think of in your own
life and the sub-systems that go along with them. Be creative! Systems are everywhere!

System: A set of connected things or parts forming a complex whole, in particular.

Sub-system: A smaller component of a large system.

Examples of systems in my life:_________________________________________________


_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________

Examples of sub-systems in my life:


_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
My Very Own Planet

Hello fourth graders! Over the past few weeks in science, we’ve been learning about the solar
system and the eight planets. Now, it’s your turn to be creative and take what we’ve learned in
class to write about your own planet. That’s right! You get to create a planet to call your very
own. You need to write a five-paragraph essay about your future planet. Get creative! Here are
some things to consider when writing your essay.

Who lives on your planet?

 What shape is your planet?


 What galaxy is your planet in?

 How do people survive on your planet?


 What do the life forms look like?

The most important thing to remember when writing your essay is to have fun! Let your
imagination soar when you write this essay. You need at least 3 characteristics of your planet
that you will elaborate on within each paragraph. Happy writing!
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Gabrielle Bracco Date:February 28th 2012


Cooperating Teacher: Mrs. Kirchmeier Grade: 4th
School District: Lake Washington School District School: Carson Elementary
University Supervisor:Dr. Pauline Sameshima
Unit/Subject: The Solar System
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Planet Plates!

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose:
a. This instructional plan will familiarize students with the planets in the solar system. Throughout
the lesson they will be able to articulate with proper academic language, properties of the
planets. Integrated throughout the lesson, students will be exposed to musical influences as well
as art.
b. State Learning Standards:

a. 4-5 ES1D The Sun is a star. It is the central and largest body in our Solar System. The Sun
appears much brighter and larger in the sky than other stars because it is many thousands of
times closer to Earth

b. 4-5 ES1A Earth is approximately spherical in shape. Things on or near the Earth are pulled
toward Earth's center by the force of gravity.

c. 2. Music: The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and
responding to demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
 2.3 Applies a responding process to a music performance and/or presentation. (Engages,
describes, analyzes, interprets, and evaluates)
o 2.3.1 Understands and applies a responding process when experiencing music.

c. Content Objectives:
a. Students will be able to identify that our Solar System contains only one star, the Sun.
b. Students will be able to explain that the Sun appears brighter and larger than any other star
because it is very close to us.
c. Students will be able to draw the Earth and other planets relative to their spherical shape.
d. Students will be able to create/re-create (respond) a song presented to them.

d. Language Objectives: What grammar, language skills, language functions, and task language should
students know or be able to use after instruction? Use SWBAT format with an action verb that matches
the cognitive domain.
a. Students will be able to provide the proper name for each of the planets in the solar system.

e. Previous Learning Experiences:

a. Students should have prior knowledge to the existence of planets and their properties.
Assessment Strategies
Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies
Students will be able to identify that our Solar Formative: I will ask the students to discuss
System contains only one star, the Sun. amongst each other what they know about stars
and the sun. Will monitor the discussion and be
sure that they are coming to the correct
conclusion. I will scaffold questioning if they
seem as though they are not on the correct path.

Summative: The planet plate will be the


summative assessment.
Students will be able to explain that the Sun Formative: This objective will be reached through
appears brighter and larger than any other star the previous discussion that the students had.
because it is very close to us.
Summative: The planet plate will be the
summative assessment.
Students will be able to draw the Earth and other Formative: The students will be learning
planets relative to their spherical shape. properties of planets; I will be facilitating the
transfer of information to their planet plate.
Through the facilitation I will be checking for
accuracy of portrayed properties such as shape.

Summative: The planet plate will be the


summative assessment.
Students will be able to create/re-create a song Formative: As a group we will be going over
presented to them. “The Family of The Sun” song where I will be
checking that the students are on the right track.

Summative: The summative assessment will be


the student’s ability to re-create the song with
limited teacher interaction.

Student Voice:
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how
collected (things produced by students will reflect on
students: journals, work their learning
samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the support I will have the students write down Through writing down the
and resources that can be what best helped them connect to ways that they were able to
accessed to help them the planets and their properties as connect allows the students
achieve the learning targets. an exit slip. time to really sit down and
reflect on what they did
instead of brushing it off as
another activity.
2. Use a variety of learning Another question to be answered Through writing down the
strategies and explain the on the exit slip with be “what ways that they were able to
effectiveness of their choice. helped you best understand the connect allows the students
planets and their position; the song time to really sit down and
or the planet plates?” reflect on what they did
instead of brushing it off as
another activity.
Grouping of Students for Instruction
 The students will be in one group
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction:
1. The concept will be introduced by playing music to the group. I will draw connections between
songs and their presence in their lives. I will also bring to light that fact that songs can be
modified to help students remember information that would have otherwise been difficult for
students to grasp.
2. Questions:
1. Why do you think we (humans) can live on Earth and not on Venus?
2. Which planet do you think is most unique? Why?
3. In what ways does the atmosphere of a planet affect that planet?
4. What do planets need to make them inhabitable by humans?
5. Knowing what we know about planets, why aren’t moon considered planets?

i. Throughout this activity students will be presented with facts about each planet that will
add onto the knowledge they already have. I will be sure to include facts that pertain to
these questions and ask students about them. I will push them reflect upon the new
knowledge as well as the prior. They will be able to recount the information either within
a song or on their planet plates.

3. Learning Activities:

Making Planet Plates!


a) If you would like to introduce with a song: Listen to solar system songs throughout the first
part of this lesson
a. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQfJ7j2UGGk&feature=fvwrel
b) Ask the students opening questions about planets. What are the eight planets? What do we
know about them?
c) Show the students pictures of each planet and share with them their characteristics, and ten
facts about them.
d) Allow the students to pick their favorite planet
e) Have them decorate a “planet plate” where they recreate their planet on the plate and on the
back list the order of the planet as well as three-four facts or characteristics.
f) Allow kids to share their planet plates within the group
g) Hand out sheet music for the solar system sing along
h) Let the students listen to the song:
a. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bzj6UEbIvKA
i) Go through each of the lines have the students echo you
j) Once the students get a hang of the song allow them to collaborate and create their own solar
system song.
k) If there is a large group break up into group of four or five
l) If students wish to share allow time at the end of the lesson

4. Instructional Considerations:
m) Instructional procedures: List the teaching approaches/modes you will use to teach each step
(ppt, demonstrate example, graphics, partner practice, etc.) List in chronological order.
a. I will show an example of the work as well as allow the students to work in groups.
n) Multiple means of access
a. Material will be presented in order, the music will be listened to at the beginning of
the lesson as well as at the end.
b. The planet plates will be laid out for the students to pick materials from
o) Multiple means of engagement
a. The students will participate through the creation of the planet plates as well as
through the integrated music.
d) Multiple means of expression
a. Singing
b. Group discussion
c. Final planet plates
p) Methods of differentiation, (list accommodation or differentiation strategies)
a. If students are uncomfortable with singing they can simply recall the planets using
paper and pen.
b. If students are uncomfortable with making planet plates they are able to recall facts
about a chosen planet using paper and pen.
q) Language learning objectives:
a. Throughout the whole activity students will be exposed to the language and during
discussions they will be assessed on the use.
r) Cultural responsive pedagogy: (List the cultural connections)
a. Student will be able to connect what they know from this lesson do other cultures
views on space, whether it be through creation stories or other means.
s) Remedial activities:
a. Worksheets attached
t) Extension activities:
a. If students are to finish early they are able to make more planet plates for planets
other than the one they have completed one for.
5. Closure:
1. Students will be able to show what they have learned through their planet plates as well as
echoing back the songs that they have either made on their own or one that we have practiced
together.
1. What was one thing you learned about planets that you did not know before
today?
2. Have you ever used songs to learn something new or remember something
before?
2. I will explain the different times where they have used music in a learning environment where it
has helped them better remember/understand material: The ABC song.

6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and
demonstrate understanding beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.

1. I will encourage students’ families to participate in the songs as well as helping their students
pick out facts that are most fitting to their planet.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology

Additional Requirements
 Integration with Other Content Areas:

o Art:
 The integration of music
 Music was integrated throughout this lesson through the solar system song and the array
of songs presented to the students in the beginning of this lesson.
o Science
 The integration of the physical solar system
 Science was an obvious portion of this lesson through the teachings of the physical solar
system.
 Acknowledgements:
"Instructional Plan adapted from k6 EDU and Instructional Plan Created by Gabrielle Bracco

http://www.k6edu.com/4thgrade/science/planets-solar-system.html

http://www.nasm.si.edu/etp/ss/ss_fots.html
Assessment Checklist: (One Star)

Name of Student Understand? What Student Need Clarification On:


Yes: No:
Assessment Checklist: (Appears Brighter and Larger)
Name of Student Understand? What Student Need Clarification On:
Yes: No:
Assessment Checklist: (Planet Plates)
Name of Student Understand? What Student Need Clarification On:
Yes: No:
Assessment Checklist: (Planet Song)

Name of Student Understand? What Student Need Clarification On:


Yes: No:
Exit Slip:

What part of this activity best helped you connect to the planets and their properties?:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
What helped you best understand the planets and their position; the song or the planet plates?:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: Christine Johnson Date: 2/29/12


Cooperating Teacher: ______________________ Grade: 5th Grade
School District:_______________________ School: _________________
University Supervisor: ______
Unit/Subject: Science/Solar System
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Your Planet

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose
a. Your Planet is a lesson designed to get kids to think about the earth by relating it to their own creativity. The
students will create their own planet and creature. Before they begin the class will discuss why the earth is shaped
the way it is, why humans can survive on earth, and other questions about the earth and its ecosystem. From this
conversation students will color and describe what they drew. Relating the activity back to what they learned in the
discussion will help students to better understand the characteristics of earth that make it possible for us to live here.
b. State Learning Standards
a. Visual Arts EALR 3 Grade 5
i. 3.2.1 Analyzes visual artworks that communicate for a specific purpose and applies his/her understanding
when creating artworks.
ii. 3.3.1 Analyzes how personal aesthetic choices are influenced by and reflected in visual artworks
b. Science EALR 4 Grade 4-5
i. 4-5 ES2A Earth materials include solid rocks and soil, water, and gases of the atmosphere. Materials have
different physical and chemical properties, which make them useful in different ways. Earth materials
provide many of the resources that humans use.
c. Content Objectives
a. SWBAT identify at conditions that made the earth habitable for life. (4-5 ES2A)
b. SWBAT explain the reasons for differences in habitability between Earth and their own planet. (4-5 ES2A)
c. SWBAT integrate artistic expression and science knowledge. (3.2.1& 3.3.1)
d. Language Objectives
a. SWBAT explain the characteristics that make their planet habitable.
b. SWBAT define habitat
c. SWBAT define climate
d. SWBAT define planet
e. Previous Learning Experiences:
a. Students have been learning about space throughout their schooling. This assignment draws from their previous
knowledge of the habitability of earth and other planets. At the beginning of this lesson students will discuss these
characteristics and discover what makes their planet unique enough to have life.

Assessment Strategies

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


Formative: The teacher will be using a checklist (Checklist #1).
During the discussion the teacher will have a clipboard and mark off
when a student talks about this topic. Some of the expectations are
that they are contributing to the conversation, are their contributions
appropriate, and are they relating to the class discussion. For those
students who do not participate the teacher will walk around and talk
to them and see if they are able to tell me some information and were
just too shy to talk in front of the group. By completing all of the
SWBAT identify at conditions that made the earth
aspects of the checklist the students will get a 3 out of 3 for
habitable for life
participation and will receive one less mark for every part they do
not do.

Summative: There will not be a summative assessment for their


objective. The results of the discussion will be shown in the final
product.
Formative: The teacher will also be using a checklist for this
assessment (Checklist #2). As students are creating their creature and
planet the teacher will walk around the classroom and ask students
about how their planet is similar or different from Earth and why.
When they demonstrate that they understand the subject the teacher
will mark them off. The students will be expected to discuss how the
habitat directly affects the planet and creature. By doing so they will
SWBAT explain the reasons for differences in
receive full credit. If they do not fully explain both the planet and
habitability between Earth and their own planet
creature they will lose points.

Summative: On the back of the worksheet students will list three


ways their planet is similar or different from Earth. This will be
turned in at the end of the lesson. The three responses will need to be
relating to the topic. If they do not write three or do not relate to the
topic they will lose a point (Rubric #1).
Formative: I will have the students do a practice presentation to a
partner before it is time to share. The teacher will give guided
questions for the students to follow as they discuss their artwork as a
pair. The teacher will make not of the student being on task or not
(Checklist #3). All students are expected to be on task during the
practice presentations.
SWBAT integrate artistic expression and science
knowledge
Summative: At the end of the lesson the students will turn in their
completed worksheet to the teacher for grading. It will be based off
their effort and how they conveyed the characteristics of the planet
in their drawing. The students will have needed to complete the
entire assignment and have items described thoroughly in order to
receive full points (Rubric #2).

Student Voice
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate
the
relationship
between
 The student response on the back of the The response on the back is a
the
assessment
and
the
learning
 worksheet. reflection of their learning of one
targets.
 of the objectives.
2. Use
a
variety
of
learning
strategies
and
 Students will raise their hands on what After that I will ask them to tell
explain
the
effectiveness
of
their
choice.
 was their favorite part of the lesson their elbow partner why they liked
(discussion, drawing writing, etc.) that particular aspect of the lesson.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


The students will be sitting at their table groups. When it is time to talk in pairs and present their work they choose from the
people they sit next to.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction
• The teacher would begin by discussing with her class about Earth and what makes it habitable. After this the teacher
will talk about how the students get to create their own planet. The teacher will get the students to think about what
characteristics their planet has to make it hospitable for life. What traits do the creatures on their planets have that
make them be able to live there?
2. Questions
• Why are we able to live on earth?
• What’s the shape of the earth?
• What is earth’s climate?
• How are humans designed to fit the climate?
• Why can people live on earth and not other planets?
The participation in the answering of these questions is part of the formative assessment. The students know that they
need to participate in order to receive full points. I will also call on students randomly to get their opinions on the
question. This way it will involve everyone, even the shy people.
3. Learning Activities
1. Discuss the earth and how we live here (10 min.)
a. Why are we able to live on earth?
b. What’s the shape of the earth?
c. What is earth’s climate?
d. How are humans designed to fit the climate?
e. Why can people live on earth and not other planets?
2. Introduce the lesson (5 min.)
a. Pass out one paper to each students and hand out crayons
b. Instruct students that the circle is where you draw your planet. Their planet does not have to be round, get
creative!
c. The rectangle is for their creature. Think about what characteristics it needs to be able to survive on their planet.
d. The bottom portion is for them to get creative. They can be as vague or as detailed as they want.
3. Monitor the students as they create. Ask them questions about why they chose the shape or color. You’ll be surprised
what they come up with! (25-30 min.)
4. With extra time ask students to share. Find similarities and differences among the presented designs. Ask questions and
discover what they made. (10 min.)
5. Clean Up!
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures
a. I will ask introduce the questions to the class and write them on the white board.
b. I will use a document camera to show the assignment during explanation.
c. I will assist students in using the document camera during their presentation.
b) Multiple means of access
a. I will introduce questions to the class.
b. I will call on students randomly to give opinions.
c. I will pass out the assignment and crayons to each student.
d. I will describe to the student what is expected in the assignment.
e. I will monitor the students using my checklist.
f. I will ask individual students to describe their creation to me.
g. I will have students share their designs.
h. I will instruct students to clean up.
c) Multiple means of engagement
a. The students will respond to the questions presented.
b. The students will listen to instruction on the assignment.
c. The students will use crayons to complete assignment.
d. The students will listen to peers present on assignment.
e. The students will compare share their creations with a partner.
f. The students will clean up the classroom.
d) Multiple means of expression
a. The students will articulate their answers to the questions.
b. The students will complete the drawing portion of the assignment.
c. The students will complete the written portion of the assignment.
d. The students will present their assignment to a partner and/or the class.
e) Methods of differentiation
a. This assignment includes verbal, written, and drawn expression in completing this assignment. ELL
students or Special Ed students will be able communicate through their artistic expression. Gifted
students can go into more depth about their planet or creature.
f) Language learning objectives
a. These learning objectives will be addressed during the introduction and discussion. The students will
talk about the habitat of the earth, and what makes a planet a planet. Through this discussion they
should create a basic understanding of the objectives.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy
a. Planets are universal since every person lives on Earth. By creating their own planet and creature
students can integrate their cultural background.
h) Remedial activities
a. The remedial activities in this lesson are the three responses on the back of the sheet. These responses
tie together what they discussed in the beginning and how it relates to what they created.
i) Extension activities
a. Students who finish early have lots of options. They can create more creatures and planets or expand
off the ones they already have. Some students may choose to write more about the creature or planet
they created earlier. The more creative they get with the assignment the better.
5. Closure:
• The closure will begin by students writing three responses to, “how is your planet similar or different to earth?” on
the back of their paper. I will then ask students to share what they learned and to explain their drawings.
• By teaching the lesson and then having the students create their own planet the students will have made a personal
connection to space and what makes planets habitable. Every student lives and survives on Earth so they can all
relate to the topic.
6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
• Students are able to learn more about what makes the earth habitable so they are more thorough in their description
of their planet. They can also keep creating creatures for their planet and present them in class on a later date.
a. Possible Family Interaction
 In order to incorporate families the students could draw a family portrait of their family and of their
creature’s family and compare those aspects with their parents. Together they can decide what makes their
family special and how does that relate to the creature. Having everyone involved will help to build a
discussion.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas
o Science: Science is integrated with the lesson on planets. The discussion and assignment are all based on this topic.
o Art: Students draw their planet and creature during the assignment.
o Writing: Students describe different aspects of their creature and planet. They also give responses on the back of the
assignment.
• Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources. Give credit to the person who created the idea for the instructional plan,
including yourself. You might use language such as "Instructional Plan adapted from _____”; “Instructional Plan Consultants
(not responsible for the content of this instructional plan): _______”; and/or “Instructional Plan Created by _____” Cite
scripted materials/curriculum if appropriate.
o This instructional plan was created by Christine Johnson (myself).
Checklist #1

Contributing to Appropriate Relating to Class


Name
Conversation Contribution Discussion

Checklist #2

How Does Habitat Affect


Name
Planet Creature

Rubric #1

Does not meet Meets Achieves

Has two or more responses Has one response blank or


All responses relate to the
that are left blank or do not one that does not relate to
topic and are complete.
relate to the topic. the topic.

Checklist #3

Name On Task Not On Task

Rubric #2

Does not meet Meets Achieves

Parts of assignment are not


All aspects of the
completed and parts that are All aspects are completed
assignment are completed
completed do not show full but shows lack of effort.
and relate to topic
effort.
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Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: _Elly Angell________________________Date: 2/28/201____________


Cooperating Teacher: Amy Wellsandt_______________Grade: K ____________
School District:___Pullman____________________ School: ____Franklin Elementary_______
University Supervisor: Tariq Akmal ______
Unit/Subject: Science and Art ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Butterfly Life Cycle

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: The objectives of this lesson are that the children will discover through reading and discussion,
the life cycle of the butterfly.

b. State Learning Standards:


a. Science EALR 4. Life Sciences-Plants and Animal parts.
i. Component: K-1 LS1B All plants and animals have various external parts.
b. Art EALR 1. The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
i. Component: 1.2 Develops arts skills and techniques.
1. GLE 1.2.E Applies, experiences, and practices basic arts skills and techniques in dance, music,
theatre, and visual arts.

c. Content Objectives:
SWBAT:
• Identify the four parts of a butterfly’s life cycle. (Science EALR 4)
• Draw each part of the butterfly’s life cycle. (Art EALR 1.2E)
• Understand what a life cycle is. (Science EALR 4)

d. Language Objectives:
SWBAT:
• Know the words that identify a butterfly’s life cycle.
• Loosely define egg
• Loosely define caterpillar
• Loosely define chrysalis
• Loosely define butterfly

e. Previous Learning Experiences:


a. This will be the first time we have introduced butterflies to the class, but they will be used to the routine of listening
to the teacher read a book, then having a coloring worksheet about the book.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


Identify the four parts of a butterfly’s life cycle. Formative: Walk around the room while students are working on
(Science EALR 4 K-1 LS1B) their coloring sheets and record progress.
See Checklist Attached

Summative: Check the “Butterfly Life Cycle Coloring Sheet”


students turned in, and the drawing of the butterfly life cycle.
Draw each part of the butterfly’s life cycle. (Art Formative: Walk around the room while students are working on
EALR 1.2.E) their coloring sheets and record progress.
See Checklist Attached

Summative: Check the “Butterfly Life Cycle Coloring Sheet”


students turned in, and the drawing of the butterfly life cycle.
Understand what a life cycle is. (Science EALR 4 Formative: Walk around the room while students are working on
K-1 LS1B) their coloring sheets and record progress.
See Checklist Attached

Summative: Check the “Butterfly Life Cycle Coloring Sheet”


students turned in, and the drawing of the butterfly life cycle.

Student Voice:

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning.
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
!" #$%%&'()*+,-+.,-/,*0'('1-+*01,+2-*'3- Students will draw a happy or sad face on the This will help students reflect on their
+.,(0-40$10,22-+$5*03-+.,%"- back of their coloring sheet to articulate if they learning because if students have a sad
understood the assignment. face, they will know they didn’t grasp
the idea, and if they have a happy face
they know that they understood it.
6" 70+()&/*+,-+.,-+.('8('1-2+0*+,1(,2-&2,3- Students will write “book” or “strategy” by This will help students to understand
+$-*).(,9,-+.,-/,*0'('1-+*01,+2":;"!<- their happy or sad face to show which thinking if they are better hands on, or auditory
strategy helped them understand better. learners.

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• While reading the book students will all be in one group, sitting on the reading carpet. Then for the activity student will be at
their desks working on their own, so they can fill out their individual worksheets.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction: I am going to introduce the activity by asking students to raise their hand if they have ever seen a butterfly or
a caterpillar, then I will ask students to raise their hands if they knew a caterpillar and a butterfly were the same insect. Then I
will tell them we will start the activity by reading Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

2. Questions:
I will ask each of these questions after students are done working on their worksheets and we will have a class discussion
about what we think the right answers are. Students will respond by getting the talking stick from the teacher, answering the question,
then passing the talking stick to the next student that raises their hand.
1. How do caterpillars turn into butterflies?
2. Why do caterpillars have so many feet?
3. Why are the eggs laid on a leaf?
4. How do the caterpillars know when to turn into a chrysalis?
5. Why do butterflies have wings?

3. Learning Activities:
1. Students will be sitting on the reading carpet and I will be on the teacher’s reading stool.
2. I will introduce the lesson as listed above.
3. I will read Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
4. After reading the book we will talk about what happened in the story, and how the caterpillar became a butterfly.
5. I will introduce the life cycle terms for a butterfly, egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, and butterfly and write them down on
the board.
6. Students will go to their desks and be handed the Butterfly Life Cycle Color Sheet.
7. Students will color in the sheet, as students are coloring I will walk around the classroom and talk about what the
different parts of the life cycle are, reviewing with individual students.
8. After the coloring sheet, students will draw their own images of a butterflies life cycle.
9. When students are done I will ask the 5 questions listed above and we will have a short discussion about their
answers.
10. Students will put a happy or sad face on the back of their paper to show if they understood the assignment and write
down “book” or “color” to show which thinking strategy helped them understand better.
11. Students will turn the worksheet into the “turn in” bin.

4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures:
a. The life cycle of a butterfly will be demonstrated for them as I read the book.
b. I will use discussion to talk about the life cycle.
c. I will write the life cycle down on the board so they can see the words that the pictures represent.
d. I will explain how to color the worksheet, and draw the life cycle.
e. I will use discussion to talk about the 5 questions.
f. I will explain how to fill out the student voice section on back.
b) Multiple means of access: I will present the materials in different ways by reading the book aloud, while turning
pages so students can see the book. I will write some of the information down on the board and I will have
worksheets for the students to color.
c) Multiple means of engagement: Students will participate in the learning by answering the questions in the
introduction, engaging in the discussion after we read the book, coloring their worksheets and participating in
the discussion at the end of the activity.
d) Multiple means of expression: Students can show their learning by participating in the discussions, coloring their
worksheet, and filling out the student voice section on the back of their paper.
e) Methods of differentiation: Students with difficulty paying attention can have their own copy of the book, where
they can flip the pages on their own and follow along as I read. We will have different mediums and tools for
students to use. We will have a completed worksheet and drawing of the stages if a student doesn’t understand
the assignment so they can look at the final product and get an idea of what to do.
f) Language learning objectives: The language learning objectives will be integrated when I list the terms on the board,
and they will be on the student’s worksheets.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy: We will talk about how different and special all of the butterflies are, like how
different and special all of the students in class are. We will also talk about how all of the butterflies are from
different places, and we will look at a map in the classroom, and then find out where some of the butterflies we
have been studying are from and put a pin on the map to show where the butterflies are from and students can
see how they are from all over the world.
h) Remedial activities: We will have a verbal review the next day before continuing our butterfly unit. I will ask the
class if anyone remembers the life cycle, then I will write them on the board.
i) Extension activities: Students who finish early will be able to start the butterfly puzzles we have in the room during
the butterfly unit.

5. Closure:
1. I will bring the lesson to a close by getting the attention of the entire class when students are done with their
worksheets. I will ask students what their favorite part of a butterfly’s life cycle is, the I will ask the 5 inquiry
questions from above to expand on their new knowledge.
2. I will connect this lesson to student’s lives by asking to look for butterflies or caterpillars outside, and try to guess
which stage they are in. I will connect it to future lessons by reminding them of the life cycle of the butterflies
before we start the next part of the butterfly until the next day.

6. Independent Practice:
1. Outside of class students can go to the website http://www.monarch-butterfly.com/ and look at pictures and videos
of monarch caterpillars becoming a chrysalis, and the butterflies hatching from the chrysalis.
2. Families can interact in the instructional plan by taking their kids outside after school and looking for butterflies or
caterpillars.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology


Butterfly Life Cycle Coloring Sheet
The Very Hungry Caterpillar, By Eric Carle
Checklist

Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas: This lesson plan’s main focus is science, but it also addresses art, with the coloring
in of the butterfly worksheet, and it addresses reading, when we read the book, and writing when students fill in the blanks on
their worksheets.
• Acknowledgements: Instructional Plan created by Elly Angell. Butterfly worksheet adapted from www.docstoc.com
Student Name Can student identify the Can student draw each Does student understand
four parts of a butterfly’s part of the butterfly’s life what a life cycle is?
life cycle? cycle?
Shannon McFadden
T&L 390 Sec 02
Professor Sameshima
18 March 2012

G rade: Kindergarten or First grade


Unit/subject: Science: Insects
Instructional Plan T itle: Ladybug Paper Plate Puppets
Focus: Learning about Ladybugs while integrating art
______________________________________________________________________________

L earning T argets/ Purpose/ Previous L earning

Instructional Plan Purpose:


The purpose of this lesson is to teach students about some important characteristics of ladybugs
such as their diet, anatomy, life stages, and habitat. Once the students have learned about
ladybugs, they will then get to learn some basic aspects of art and participate in a fun activity
that is focused on ladybugs.

State L earning Standards:


Grade Level: Kindergarten- first grade Science
EALR 4 LS1: Life Science. Big Idea: Structures and Functions of Living Organisms (LS1).
Core Content: Plant and Animal Parts.
-­‐ Students learn that all living things have basic needs, and they meet those needs in
various ways. Just as humans have external body parts that perform different
functions to meet their needs, animals and plants also have body parts that perform
different functions to meet their needs.
EALR 4 LS2: Life Science. Big Idea: Ecosystem (LS2). Core Content: Habitats

-­‐ Students learn that all plants and animals live in and depend on habitats. Earth has
many different habitats, and these different habitats support the life of many different
plants and animals, including humans. People have the ability to make rapid changes
in natural habitats and to keep a habitat healthy so that living conditions can be
maintained.
EALR 4 LS3: Life Science. Big Idea: Biological Evolution (LS3). Core Content: Classifying
Plants and Animals
-­‐ Students learn that some objects are alive and others are not, and that many living
things are classified as either plants or animals based on observable features and
behaviors. Plants and animals are further classified into smaller groups such as insects
and trees.

Grade Level: Elementary Arts


EALR: 1. The student understands and applies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre,
and visual arts.
Component: 1.2 Develops art skills and techniques.

EALR: 2. The student uses the artistic process of creating, performing/presenting, and
responding to demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Component: 2.1 Applies a creative process to the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).

EALR: 2. The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and
responding to demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
Component: 2.2 Applies a performance and/or presentation process to the arts (dance, music,
theatre, visual arts).

Content O bjectives:
Students will be able to understand the structure and functions of a ladybug. (Science 4LS1)
Students will be able to understand the habitat a ladybug lives in. (Science 4LS2)
Students will be able to decipher whether or not a ladybug is a living organism and classify it as
an insect. (Science 4LS3)
Students will be able to apply a creative process to the visual and theatrical arts. (Arts 2.2.1)
Students will be able to perform/present their visual art in a theatrical form. (Arts 2.2.2)

L anguage O bjectives:
Students will be able to talk about the different characteristics of a ladybug and discuss what they
think their ladybug puppet might look like (color, size, shape, etc.). Students will also be able to
present their visual arts using words and actions based on what they learned an actual ladybug
typically does.

Previous L earning E xperiences:


Students should have the knowledge of the different art forms (dance, music, theatre, visual arts).
They should also have a good understanding of basic art concepts, (cutting, coloring, gluing,
taping). Finally, students should have been introduced to theatre, and how to conduct a puppet
show.

Assessment Strategies:
Content O bjectives Assessment Strategies
Students will be able to understand the structure Formative: I will walk around and observe my
and functions of a ladybug. (Science 4LS1) students as they work on their beginning
worksheets to make sure that they are on the
right track while labeling the simple anatomy
of a ladybug.
Summative: I will give the students a picture
of a ladybug, and will have them label a few of
the parts on that ladybug. This will allow me to
check that the student understands the where
each body part is located.

Students will be able to understand the habitat a Formative: After they have labeled the simple
ladybug lives in. (Science 4LS2) anatomy of the ladybug (head, wings,
antenna), they will color the background to put
the ladybug in the correct habitat. During this
time I will walk around the room and observe
to make sure that students are coloring the
right habitat. I will ask them questions about
what they are drawing.
Summative: Once the student has labeled the
different body parts on the picture of the
ladybug, I will then have them color the
background of the habitat the ladybug would
be living in.

Students will be able to apply a creative process Summative: I will give students the
to the visual and theatrical arts. (Arts 2.2.1) opportunity to present their ladybug in front of
the group, but if they do not wish to do so, I
will allow them to write about what they
would do if they were to perform a puppet
show with the ladybug. This allows me to
assess whether or not the student is able to
think creatively about the lesson they
completed.

Checklist for formative assessment:

Understanding basic body parts of L adybug


Can students label the head?
Can students label the wings?
Can students label the legs?
Can students label the antenna?

Understanding the cor rect habitats of a ladybug


Do students color the correct habitat that a ladybug inhabits? (there are several correct habitats,
just make sure the student has justification for where their ladybug is living)

Student Voice:
K -12 Students will: Student-based evidence to Description of how students
be collected (things will reflect on their learning
produced by students:
journals, wor k samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the Students will keep a science At the end of each week, the
learning targets and journal about each of the students will be able to reflect on
their progress toward insects they learn about what they have learned and give
them. throughout the year. During feedback about what they liked
this lesson, the students will or did not like. The focus will be
write guided sentences about ³:K\LVWKLVLPSRUWDQWDQGZKDW
5 characteristics they learned did you learn from WKLV"´
about ladybugs. What makes
a ladybug a living organism,
what are their eating habits,
what is their habitat? I will
model the writing in front of
them on the board, but they
will write it themselves.

2. Assess the students ,ZLOOFROOHFWWKHVWXGHQW¶V After reflecting on their work


wor k and wor k with journals to see whether or from two different times in the
them to set personal not they are comprehending unit, they can write about how
learning goals based and understanding the they feel they have evolved as
on where they are. information being given to scientists/observers, and set goals
them about the different for themselves about where to
living organisms (insects) head next.
they are learning about. At
the end of the life science
unit, I will have students
look back at the beginning
insects they wrote about and
make connections between
those and more recent ones
they learned about.

G rouping of Students for Instruction:


When I instruct the class and initially teach them about ladybugs, I will teach them as a whole
class. However, when they actually begin working on their ladybug paper plate puppets, they
will work on their own, but they can talk and collaborate with their classmates. Finally, when it
is time to present/perform their puppets, they can work in self-selected groups of up to 5
students, or they will write in their journal individually about how they would perform it if they
did.

L earning/T eaching E xperiences:

Introduction:
I will get the students attention and introduce this lesson by UHDGLQJWKHVWXGHQW¶VDVKRUWSLFWXUH
book. I will read them The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle because it has great illustrations and
the students will be able to relate to the level the story is written. Once I have read them the
story, we will discuss the book, and then I will move into my lesson about the ladybug¶VGLHW
anatomy, life stages, and habitat.

³7RGD\ZHDUHJRLQJWROHDUQDERXWODG\EXJV&DQDQ\RQHWHOOPHVRPHWKLQJWKH\NQRZDERXWD
ODG\EXJ"´
-give them time to answer, and discuss as a large group.
³%HFDXVHLQVHFWVDUHVXFKDKXJHSDUWRIRXUOLIHDQd they are all around us, we are going to learn
DERXWVRPHLPSRUWDQWFKDUDFWHULVWLFVRIODG\EXJV´

Q uestions:
1. What is an insect?
2. Why are insects important to human beings?
3. What are some examples of insects?
4. What kind of animals do you think eat insects?
5. Even though insects can be gross and scary, could we survive without insects?
After I have informed the students of what we will be learning during this lesson, I will ask these
questions and allow students to raise their hands to respond as they wish. I will guide them in the
right direction so that they are actually getting something out of the questions and not just
answering them to answer them. I want them to really get thinking about why they are doing this
step of the writing process and the impact it will have on their writing.

L earning A ctivities:
1. %HJLQE\GLVFXVVLQJLQVHFWVDQGZKDWWKHVWXGHQW¶VPLJKWDOUHDG\NQRZDERXWODG\EXJV
2QFHZHXQGHUVWDQGWKHVWXGHQW¶VSUHYLRXVNQRZOHGJHRILQVHFWV,ZLOOWKHQEHJLQWR
focus solely on ladybugs. I want to make sure that my class and I are all on the same
page, so as a class we will discuss the ideas they have about important characteristics of
ladybugs.
2. I will read the students the book, The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle. After I read the
book, I will take my class through a discussion about what they heard or saw in the book.
What did the ladybug look like?
Where did the ladybug live?
What did the ladybug eat?
3. From the Enchanted Learning website, I will then go into detail about the diet, anatomy,
life stages, and habitat of a ladybug.
4. Now that I have read them a story about ladybugs, and taught a lesson about important
characteristics associated with lady bugs, it is now time for them to have some fun with
it. Before they get to make their paper plate ladybug puppets, I want them to demonstrate
what they now know about ladybugs. Each student will get a paper with an outline of a
ladybug. The students should label the body parts of the ladybug, and color the
background as if the ladybug were in its habitat.
5. Once the students have finished their worksheets, it is now time for them to start their arts
and crafts lesson. Each student will be given two paper plates, a red crayon, pipe
cleaners, and black squares of paper in which they can cut out circles/spots to glue on
their paper plates to complete the appearance of a ladybug. I will put together a sample
paper plate ladybug puppet in front of the students so they can have a visual of how to
complete their project.
6. The students will now work on their projects individually as I circulate the classroom to
help if they need it. Once they are finished with their projects, they have the option to
perform/present their puppets in front of each other, or if they do not want to perform it,
or if they do not want to, they can write a sentence about their ladybug.
7. Finally, I would have all students write a sentence about their ladybug or something they
learned about ladybugs during this lesson in regards to habitat, life stages, diet, and
anatomy. They can also reflect about what they liked about this lesson, and why it was
important to them.
8. Finally, since not all students are going to want to perform with their puppets, I will teach
them this ladybug song, and we can sing it together as a class.

Five Little Ladybugs

Five little ladybugs, climbing on some plants,


Eating the aphids, but not the ants!
The first one said: "Save some aphids for me!"
The second one said: "These are tasty as can be!"
The third one said: "Oh, they're almost gone!"
The fourth one said: "Then it's time to move on!
The fifth one said: "Come on, let's fly!"
So they opened their wings and flew through the sky.

Website: http://www.kellyskindergarten.com/songs/songs.htm

Instructional Considerations:
Multiple means of access: I will read them a trade book to introduce the information, and I will
also use music, and create an art project so the students are learning the information in many
different ways.

Multiple means of engagement: The students will be creating an art project, singing and dancing,
working on a worksheet for individual practice, and also be read to in order to understand the
characteristics of a ladybug.

Multiple means of expression: They will be able to demonstrate their understanding of ladybugs
through art, drama, writing, and music. The most important way they will show their
understanding is through the labeling worksheet and the art project (ladybug puppet).

Methods of differentiation strategies: Once the entire unit is over, it will accommodate many
different types of learning styles because the students will have learned about many different
insects in a variety of forms. In this particular lesson they learned about ladybugs through music,
reading, art, and direct instruction from the teacher. By doing this, we are not leaving out any
students and they all have the opportunity to learn/understand the information.
Language Learning objectives: I will make sure that I introduce all prevalent vocabulary from
WKLVOHVVRQVRWKDW(//VWXGHQWVDUHQ¶WOHIWEHKLQGLIWKH\GRQ¶WXQGHUVWDQGWKHPHDQLQJRI
something I am talking about.

Cultural Connections: This lesson will be culturally responsive because over the whole life
science unit, I will choose insects that are prevalent in different places around the world so that
more students will develop a connection with them. Also if an insect has significance in a
particular culture, I will address that during my instruction.

Remedial Activities: ,IDVWXGHQWGRHVQ¶WXQGHUVWDQGthe anatomy, life cycle, habitat, or diet of a


ladybug, I will sit down and review with that child while the rest of the students begin their art
projects. We will work quietly together so that I can re-teach some of the information the student
may not have understood or retained.

Extension Activities: If students finish their project early, they can use a piece of construction
paper to create a background (habitat) for their ladybug puppet.

C losure:
1. Now that I have taught the students about ladybugs and they have put the information to
use in many different activities, it is now time to discuss. During circle time I will ask the
students if they can tell me 5 new things they learned about ladybugs, and what was their
favorite activity we did with ladybugs?
2. I will ask students to really keep their eyes open on their way home from school today, or
when they are playing outside this week to observe some insects they. They might even
see a ladybug in their backyard! Finally, we will sing our ladybug song with our paper
SODWHSXSSHWVRQHPRUHWLPHDQGWKHQWKH\ZLOOEHSXWLQWKHLUFXEE\¶VXQWLOLWLVWLPHWR
go home.

Independent Practice:
The students could try to think of a story with their ladybug as the main character. Since they are
in Kindergarten and may not be able to write a story on their own, they could draw and color
pictures about where the ladybug lives, what they eat every day, how they travel, etc. This would
be fun for kids because they could be extremely creative and come really use their imagination to
put their new knowledge into practice.

Possible F amily Interaction:


I could type up a little note home telling the parents about the lesson we did with ladybugs and
encourage them to ask their child what they learned about ladybugs today in class. It could also
be fun for the student to perform a puppet show with their paper plate ladybug for their family.

Instructional M aterials, Resources, and T echnology:


-­‐ Student writing journals.
-­‐ The book The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle.
-­‐ Worksheet to label basic anatomy on the ladybug.
(http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/insects/ladybug/Ladybugcoloring.shtml)
-­‐ Instructions for puppet.
(http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/puppets/paperplateladybug/)
-­‐ Crayons, paper plates, glue, scissors, pipe cleaners, staples, black construction paper
-­‐ The ladybug song (http://www.kellyskindergarten.com/songs/songs.htm)

Integration with O ther Content A reas:


This lesson could be integrated with other content areas by:
-­‐ The ladybug song counts the ladybugs, so this integrates math and basic counting
skills.
-­‐ The students are writing about ladybugs, so this is practicing their writing skills.
-­‐ I am reading them a story, so this is helping their reading comprehension.
-­‐ Some insects have caused diseases, so we could talk about that and incorporate
history.

A cknowledgements:
-­‐ http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/insects/ladybug/Ladybugcoloring.shtml
-­‐ http://www.kellyskindergarten.com/songs/songs.htm

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name:_____________________________________  
Directions:  On  this  ladybug,  label  the  head,  antenna,  wings,  and  legs.  

 
Enchanted  Learning  Software's  
Paper  Plate  Ladybug  Puppet  Craft  
More  Crafts    

A simple-to-make paper plate ladybug puppet.


More  puppets  to  
  Each ladybug is made from two paper plates,
make  

paint, and construction paper.


Supplies  needed:    

x Two  paper  plates  for  each  ladybug    


x Scissors    
x Stapler  or  tape  (colored  tape  looks  really  nice  but  is  not  necessary)    
x Red  and  black  paint,  markers  or  crayons    
x Glue    
x Black  construction  paper    
x Pipe  cleaner    
x Hole  punch    
x Optional  -­‐  googly  eyes    
 

Using  black  construction  paper,  cut  out  the  ladybug's  


legs  (cut  two  sets  of  three  legs).  
 

Staple  (or  tape)  two  paper  plates  


together  (put  the  eating  surfaces  of  the  
plates  on  the  inside)  -­‐  make  sure  to  staple  
the  legs  between  the  plates.  Don't  staple  
 
the  plates  all  the  way  round  -­‐  leave  one  
end  of  the  ladybug  unstapled.  
Cut  off  the  rim  of  the  plates  
where  they  were  not  stapled  
(or  taped)  -­‐  this  is  where  you  
will  put  your  hand  to  move  
the  ladybug.  
   

Paint  the  top  of  the  ladybug  red  (except  the  


head,  which  is  black).  Paint  the  bottom  of  the  
ladybug  black.  Either  paint  some  black  dots  on  
the  ladybug  or  glue  some  black  circles  on  its  
  back.    
Either paint eyes or glue on googly eyes.

Punch  two  holes  at  the  top  for  the  antennae.  


Thread  a  pipe  cleaner  through  the  holes.    
You now have a really cute ladybug puppet.
 

 
Instructional Plan
Teacher Candidate: Ricci Peters _________ Date: 2-27-2012
Cooperating Teacher: Mrs. Mincks ___________ Grade: Kindergarten
School District: Pullman School District___________________ School: Jefferson Elementary
University Supervisor: Pauline Sameshima Unit/Subject: Butterflies Science Unit/Art
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Butterfly Life Cycle Mobile

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


• Purpose: Students will be able to learn about the life cycle of a butterfly by designing a mobile with the
different stages of metamorphosis.
• State Learning Standards:
Art:
EALR 1: The student understands and plies arts knowledge and skills in dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
Component 1.2: Develops arts skills and techniques.
GLE 1.2.E: Applies, experiences, and practices basic art skills and techniques in dance, music,
theatre, and visual arts.

EALR 4: Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between the arts and other
content areas.
Component 4.2: Demonstrates and analyzes the connections among the arts and between the arts and
other content areas.
GLE 4.2.E: Demonstrates and applies the skills, concepts, and vocabulary common among and
between the arts disciplines and other content areas at beginning levels.
Science:
EALR 1: Systems
Core Content: Part-Whole Relationships
GLE K-1 SYSA: Living and nonliving things are made of parts. People give names to the parts that
are different from the name of the whole object, plant, or animal.
• Content Objectives:
SWBAT create representations of the life stages of a butterfly (Art 4.2.E)
SWBAT assemble a mobile. (Art 1.2.E)
SWBAT interpret the different stages of a butterfly’s life. (Science K-1 SYSA)
• Language Objectives:
SWBAT classify the different terminology related to a butterfly’s stages of metamorphosis
including egg, larva, pupa, adult, caterpillar, chrysalis, life cycle and metamorphosis. (Science
K-1 SYSA)
• Previous Learning Experiences: Students learned earlier on in the year how to do cutting and drawing
techniques needed for designing the objects in this lesson.

Assessment Strategies

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT create representations of the life stages Formative: While students are working on the activity, the teacher will
of a butterfly (Art 4.2.E) walk around with a checklist assessing that the student knows what
each object represents as well as helping the students who need a little
extra assistance. (Checklist attached)
Summative: Students will turn in mobile. Teacher will make sure that
all parts of the assignment were completed. (See attached grade sheet)
SWBAT assemble a mobile. (Art 1.2.E) Formative: While students are working on the activity, the teacher will
walk around with a checklist assessing that the student knows what
each object represents as well as helping the students who need a little
extra assistance. (Checklist attached)
Summative: Students will turn in mobile. Teacher will make sure that
all parts of the assignment were completed. (See attached grade sheet)

SWBAT interpret the different stages of a Formative: While students are working on the activity, the teacher will
butterfly’s life. (Science K-1 SYSA) walk around with a checklist assessing that the student knows what
each object represents as well as helping the students who need a little
extra assistance. (Checklist attached)

Student Voice:
K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how students will
collected (things produced by reflect on their learning.
students: journals, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
!" Communicate the learning targets and Mobiles Students will be able to give a brief
their progress toward them.# presentation on their mobile
expressing what they now know and
teacher can jot down side notes and
comments on the checklist sheet.
(See attached)
$" Review their performance and set Exit Slip Students will give thumbs up,
personal learning goals based on those thumbs in the middle, or thumbs
assessments.# down for how they felt they did on
the project. (See attached)

Grouping of Students for Instruction


• Students will sit on the carpet for the story and discussion part of the class. Then students will work
independently at their tables to put together the mobiles. At their tables students can discuss the different
life stages and ask each other questions to make sure that they are doing the assignment correctly.
Learning/Teaching Experiences
• Introduction: “Class what do you think is going to happen to the caterpillar in this book?” (Call on a
handful of students) “Well we will just have to wait and see.” Begin the lesson by reading to the class
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. While reading, point out what demonstrates the different
stages a caterpillar goes through in order to become a butterfly: the egg, larva, pupa, and adult. When
finished reading, write each of the vocabulary words on the white board. Ask the students to define the
word and help them to develop the correct definition, write answer on the white board. Make sure to
include words such as metamorphosis, life cycle, and chrysalis. After the book is finished, the teacher
will have a discussion with the students about the metamorphosis process and how it helps a caterpillar
to turn into a beautiful butterfly. Make sure to add in questions to have students start to come up with
and discover the answers. While listening and answering questions pull up on the computer these
websites http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/animals/creaturefeature/monarch-butterflies/ and
http://www.kidsbutterfly.org/image/tid/15 “Where do you think monarch butterflies live in our world?”
Show the students the different regions where monarch butterflies live by going to the National
Geographic website pulling up the MAP tab. Ask the students if they know of any other kinds of
butterflies. Show students a glimpse of different kinds of butterflies on the kidsbutterfly.org website.
• Questions:
• What do you think is going to happen to the caterpillar?
• How do you think a caterpillar goes from being an egg to turning into a butterfly?
• What other insects do you think go through metamorphosis?
• Where do you think monarch butterflies live in our world?
• What do you think each of these (the different stages created for the mobile) resemble?
Make sure all students can get involved by using all of the name sticks in the jar for all parts of this
lesson making sure to mix them up every time all of the sticks are used.
• Instructions: To teach this lesson the teacher will need to show the different materials to the students
and walk through each step in order to create a visual for the students. Using the pre-made mobile as an
example the teacher will create another mobile step by step so students can begin to follow along and
see how the mobile needs to be put together.
! Teacher begins, “Now we are going to make mobiles of the life cycle of a butterfly, it will be
very similar to what changes looked like for the very hungry caterpillar. Each object we create to
hang on the mobile is a stage in which the caterpillar goes through in order to become a butterfly
as we just went over.” Holding up the pre-made mobile pointing to each of the dangling pieces
the teacher asks, “What do you think each of these resemble?” The teacher then begins to
assemble a new mobile showing the students step by step what they need to do with pre-
decorated pieces. Make sure to think aloud while putting it all together. “We will need to follow
the instructions carefully in order to make each stage before we attach it to the paper plate. The
plate will be the support that holds all of the pieces together so it can hang in the air.” Attach all
the pieces to the plate. Instruct students to pick up their materials and begin working. Teacher
says, “If you need any help make sure to ask your table mates first and then if you still are unsure
raise your hand and I will be around to help you.”
• Learning Activities:
1. Read The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle aloud to the class.
2. Have a discussion on the stages of complete metamorphosis.
3. With students define egg, larva, pupa, butterfly, caterpillar, chrysalis, life cycle, and metamorphosis.
• Egg: the first stage in the life cycle of an insect
• Larva: the second stage of metamorphosis, during which an insect is wormlike and has new wings
• Pupa: the third stage of metamorphosis; encased by a chrysalis
• Adult: The stage when it has wings, finds a mate, and reproduces (repeats life cycle)
• Caterpillar: the larval stage of a butterfly or moth
• Chrysalis: the hard shell covering the pupa; shaped like an upside down teardrop
• Life cycle: a series of stages an organism passes through between recurrences of a primary stage
• Metamorphosis: a series of developmental stages often marked by body changes
4. Ask the students some questions pertaining to the different stages.
5. Discuss and show where monarch butterflies live and what other types of butterflies there are.
6. Show students pre-made mobile and ask what stages each piece represents.
7. Show students step by step how to put mobile together with pre-made pieces.
8. Have students collect materials in order to create the mobile.
9. Review directions with the students as to what they should be doing.
10. Students begin by decorating the paper plate using markers, crayons, or paint.
11. Draw a large spiral on the paper plate.
12. Cut along the drawn line on the paper plate.
13. Using green construction paper, draw a leaf shape and then cut it out.
14. Decorate the leaf.
15. Glue hole punched paper yellow or white dots onto the leaf. These dots resemble the eggs.
16. Draw a caterpillar on any color of construction paper, cut out the caterpillar and decorate it. This
represents the larva stage.
17. Draw a triangular shape in brown colored construction paper. This represents the butterfly in its pupa
stage.
18. Cut out the pupa and decorate it.
19. Fold a piece of paper in half and cut out half a heart. Repeat.
20. Attach the two ends of the hearts together slightly overlapping them. Glue the two pieces together.
21. Decorate the wings.
22. Draw an elongated oval on a piece of construction paper and cut it out.
23. Draw a small circle using the top of the glue cap. Cut it out.
24. Cut out two curved small lines (2 inches long) to make antennae.
25. Glue the elongated oval to the wings, glue the circle to the top of the elongated oval, and glue the
antennae to the circle.
26. Cut out four different size strings.
27. Attach the leaf to the shortest string and staple or tape it to the paper plate.
28. Attach the caterpillar to the next shortest string and staple or tape it to the plate.
29. Attach the butterfly to the longest string and staple or tape it to the plate
30. Attach the pupa to the second longest string and staple or tape it to the plate.
31. Poke a hole in the middle of the center of spiral, making sure to not be too close to the edges. Push a
string through it and tie it on the inside part of the spiral so that the plate can hang as a mobile.
32. Write name on the plate.
33. If done early begin working on homework from earlier in the day, do butterfly coloring pages, or
help out classmates.
• Instructional Considerations
! Instructional Procedures:
• Read aloud Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar
• Explain about the butterfly life cycle
• Collaborative learning putting together vocabulary list
• Graphics – showing maps and pictures of butterflies
• Demonstrate how to put mobile together.
• Teacher explains the rest of the directions to putting mobile together.
• Teacher walks around assisting and observing students.
• If students finish early, possible learning by teaching if students help peers
! Multiple Means of Access:
• Students listen to teacher read the story and interact when questions are asked.
• Collaborative learning putting together vocabulary list.
• Answer questions and ask questions about the butterfly life cycle.
• Students put together mobiles independently or with some help.
• Students present their mobiles to the class.
• Students fill out exit sheets.
! Multiple Means of Engagement: Students will be able to ask questions if hand is raised or
have a chance to answer a question by having stick drawn depending on the question.
Students will be able to help teacher to define the new vocabulary words. In creating the
mobiles students will have hands on learning while developing the stages in a caterpillar’s
life. Lastly the students will have an opportunity to present their mobile and tell their
classmates something about it.
! Multiple Means of Expression: Students will show their learning by answering questions.
The students will also be able to show what they are learning and comprehending by
correctly assembling the mobile. At the end students will be given the chance to present their
mobile sharing something that they learned or liked about the butterfly life cycle and making
their mobile. Lastly, student will have a chance to express how they like the project through
how they answer their exit slip.
! Methods of Differentiation: Students will be provided with visuals from the book, images,
writing on the white board, and an actual demonstration. Students will have an opportunity
for applied hands-on learning. There will also be time allotted for students to share their
creations so that they can tell peers what they have done and what they have learned if they
do not feel comfortable presenting in front of the class they can present it to me by their self.
For those learners who need assistance the teacher will be able to provide that when they are
walking around. There are also instructional worksheets with pictures of what steps need to
happen when. Some pre-made packets are already put together for some of the students who
may need them. For those students who need a little extra work that will be provided as well
through having the chance to assist peers or work on extended work.
! Language Learning Objectives: The language learning objectives will come into play
during the discussion after reading the book. When going over the vocabulary the teacher
will post them on the white board for everyone to be able to see.
! Cultural Responsive Pedagogy: Show the students online via the document camera where
the monarch butterfly lives showing the different places on a map. Also show a handful of
different kinds of butterflies so that students can see that there are several different species of
butterfly.
! Remedial Activities: Students have a worksheet that will go home for homework that asks
them to define the different stages of the butterfly with pictures provided. Also on the board
is a sheet stating how kindergartener’s properly cut things out as well as color things in.
! Extension Activities: Students who finish early can finish other homework from earlier on
in the day, can color the butterfly-coloring page or hungry caterpillar-coloring page, or can
help out other students in finishing their mobiles.
• Closure: Students will share their mobiles with the class including any specific details of what they
learned. Students will then help pick up the classroom. All materials must return to where they belong.
The teacher will hang up the mobiles either on the wall or from the ceiling. The teacher will ask how
each student thinks they did on their project with a response of thumbs up, thumbs in the middle, or
thumbs down.
! What are the three stages that a butterfly goes through in its life?
! Why do butterflies go through these changes?
! Discuss with students what other kinds of animals go through metamorphosis. Explain to the
class what other lessons will be completed in class that also deal with metamorphosis such as
with mealworms.
• Independent Practice: Students will complete the Butterfly Worksheet (attached) at home and return
the next day. The students will cut out the pictures and then glue each one to its corresponding number
for the order of the butterfly life cycle.
! Family Interaction: Students will complete the Life Cycle Worksheet (attached) at home and
return the next day answering questions relating to the material covered in class. Students will
label and identify the different stages of the butterfly by cutting out and pasting the word that
goes to each picture. Parents are encouraged to assist the students on completing the worksheet
for some students may need help identifying the difficult words.

Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology


The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
Construction paper
Pencils
Scissors
Yarn or string
Glue stick
Sturdy paper plate
Markers, crayons, or paint
Stapler or tape
Paper clip
Model mobile
Prepared pieces for second mobile
White board and markers
Document Camera
Computer
Butterfly coloring sheet - 25 copies
Hungry Caterpillar coloring sheet – 25 copies
Exit Sheet – 6 copies
Butterfly Life Cycle Checklist – 1 copy
Butterfly Worksheet – 25 copies
Life Cycle Worksheet – 25 copies
Mobile Grade Sheet – 13 copies
Instructional Guide: Butterfly Life Cycle Mobile– 25 copies
Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas: Science and art are both content areas used in this lesson.
Creativity in developing this visual art project of a mobile allows students to work on their artistic
abilities as well as learn the information in the science unit on butterflies.
• Acknowledgements: Instructional Plan adapted from Enchanted Learning.
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/butterfly/lifecyclemobile/
o http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/animals/creaturefeature/monarch-butterflies/
o http://www.kidsbutterfly.org/image/tid/15
o coloringpages.blog138.fc2.com
o http://images.scholastic.co.uk/assets/a/94/3e/very-hungry-caterpillar-colour1-314987.pdf
o Butterfly Worksheet adapted from bry-backmanor.org

Other Attachments Include:


The book
Monarch Butterfly Coloring Page

Name: ____________________
EXIT SLIPS:
Name:__________________ Date:___________________

Directions: Circle the face that matched how you liked this assignment.

Name:__________________ Date:___________________

Directions: Circle the face that matched how you liked this assignment.

Name:__________________ Date:___________________

Directions: Circle the face that matched how you liked this assignment.

Name:__________________ Date:___________________

Directions: Circle the face that matched how you liked this assignment.
Butterfly Life Cycle Checklist:
Knows Material
• Understands the different stages
Fix It or Didn’t Try or
STUDENT • Knows vocabulary words
Needs to Finish Needs Review
• Cuts and colors carefully
• Follows directions
Bailey
Camryn
David
Ethan
Garrett
Haydan
Matthew
Nathan
Sara

Jotted Notes on Presentations:


Name: __________________ Date: ___________________

BUTTERFLY WORKSHEET
Directions: Cut out each one of the pictures below the cut line. Glue each
picture onto right number to show the life stages of the butterfly.

Cut
Here--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name: ________________ Date: ___________________

LIFE CYCLE WORKSHEET

Directions: Cut out the words below. Glue next to the picture it matches.

Cut here _________________________________________

LARVA EGG

ADULT PUPA
Mobile Grade Sheet

Name: _______________

4 WOW – Excellent work


Attached egg, pupa, larva, and adult stages to mobile
Cut and colored stages
3 Name on it
Followed directions
Presented to class
2 Fix it or Needs finished
1 Didn’t try or Needs review

Mobile Grade Sheet

Name: _______________

4 WOW – Excellent work


Attached egg, pupa, larva, and adult stages to mobile
Cut and colored stages
3 Name on it
Followed directions
Presented to class
2 Fix it or Needs finished
1 Didn’t try or Needs review
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

T eacher C andidate: Courtney Bosman Date: 3/19/12 ___


Cooperating T eacher : _Mrs Baumgartner ___ G rade: kindergarten or first__
School District:__Pullman________________ School: _Franklin Elementary___
University Supervisor : Pauline Sameshima ______
Unit/Subject: Art and Science ______
Instructional Plan T itle/Focus: This lesson plan focuses on Science, the lifecycle of a butterfly, with the
integration of art. This lesson plan will allow students to begin to learn about lifecycles and that living
organisms go through cycles as they grow, in this case butterflies go through metamorphosis.

L earning T argets/Purpose/Previous L earning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: This lesson plan will allow students to understand the lifecycle of a
butterfly and begin to see that things grow in stages. Also the students will understand that some animals
look very different at the beginning of their life compared to the later part of their life/
b. State L earning Standards:
Art Standards
E A L R 3 T heatre: The student communicates through the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).
Component 3.2 Uses theatre to communicate for a specific purpose.
G L E 3.2.1 Remembers that theatre communicates for a specific purpose.

E A L R 3 T heatre: The student communicates through the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts).
Component 3.1 Uses theatre to express feelings and present ideas.
G L E 3.1.1 Creates works of theatre to express feelings and present ideas.

Science Standards

Grade Level: K ± 1
EALR 1: Systems
Big Idea: Systems (SYS)
Core Content: Part-Whole Relationships
Content Standard - K -1 SYSA Living and nonliving things are made of parts. People give names to the
parts that are different from the name of the whole object, plant, or animal.

Grade level: K ± 1
EALR 3: Application
Big Idea: Application (APP)
Core Content: Tools and Materials
Content Standard: K -1 A PPA Common tools can be used to solve problems.

c. Content O bjectives:
6:%$7LGHQWLI\WKHIRXUVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIH> K -1 SYSA]
SWBAT understand what metamorphosis is [ K -1 SYSA]

d. L anguage O bjectives:
SWBAT use scientific vocabulary when describing the four stages of a butterfly¶s lifecyle
SWBAT use grammar correctly in sentences
I understand this is a kindergarten/first grade lesson so grammar might not be perfect but it should be
understandable on more or less correct.
e. Previous L earning E xperiences:
Student should be able to listen cooperatively and follow directions.
Students should be able to work together cooperatively and independently as well.
Students should be able to use appropriate tools such as scissors, etc. [K-1 APPA]

Assessment Strategies
‡ Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
‡ Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content O bjectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT identify the four stages of Formative: I will use a checklist system. In the class
DEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIH> K -1 SYSA] discussions I will see who is providing correct
information and put a check by their name. I will do the
same for the rest of the lesson. If students are actively
participating and correctly using the information I will
put a check by their name. If students seem lost I will
come by and help explain the concept to them
individually and proceed with other modes of
differentiation.

Summative: at the end of the lesson I will copy four


coloring pages with a picture of an egg, caterpillar,
chrysalis and butterfly. I will have the students arrange
the picture in the order of the stages from the beginning
of a butterfly¶s lifecycle to the last stage, the butterfly
stage.
SWBAT understand what Formative: I will use a checklist system. I will come
metamorphosis is [ K -1 SYSA] around to all of the students throughout the lesson and
have them briefly tell what metamorphosis is and what it
means. If they know I will but a check by their name. if
they GRQ¶W I will explain it to them and come to them
later during the lesson and ask again.

Summative: At the end of the lesson when the students


turn in their books that they completed as an assessment I
will again ask the students to briefly explain to me what
metamorphosis is. If they still GRQ¶W know I will sit down
with the students and explain it another time and ask
them to go through the stages flashcards and complete
other means of differentiation.

Student Voice:

K -12 students will: Student-based evidence to be Description of how


collected (things produced by students will reflect on
students: journals, work their learning
samples, projects, papers, etc.)
1. Communicate the learning Thumbs up, Thumbs sideways or At the end of the butterfly
targets and their progress Thumbs down discussion I will ask the
toward them. students to rate whether they
understand what the four
stages or a butterfly¶s
lifecycle. A thumbs up will
be if they completely
understand metamorphosis,
thumbs sideways is that they
understand it pretty well but
could use some more
practice, and thumbs down is
that they are a little lost and
need more help to
understand the information
better.
2. Review their performance Journals At the end of the lesson I
and set personal learning will have students write in
goals based on those their journals what they
assessments. liked about the lesson and
what they GLGQ¶W like. This
will allow me, the teacher to
see what was successful with
the student s and what I need
to change the next time I
teach this lesson. T

G rouping of Students for Instruction

‡ The lesson will consist of whole class discussion, and individual work. At the beginning, The teacher
will read to the class and ask questions for student participation and interaction. Next there will be a
whole class discussion where students will raise their hands and participate. After the discussion the
teacher will demonstrate the acting activity and the students will participate, each acting out the stages
RIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH1H[WFRPHVWKHDVVHVVPHQWZKHUHWKHVWXGHQWVZLOOZRUNLQGLYLGXDOO\
L earning/T eaching E xperiences
1. Introduction: I am going to introduce this topic by showing the class a picture of a caterpillar and ask
then what do they think this animal grows up to be. I will call on students to give me their answers and
explain their thinking. This will engage the students by allowing them to guess and use their critical
thinking skills.
x I will help students make prior connections by reminding them that they have probably seen
these animals when they have been outside usually in the spring time. This will allow the
students to connect their previous knowledge with this new lesson.
2. Q uestions:
i. What is a life cycle?
ii. What is metamorphosis
iii. How many stages are in a butterfly¶s lifecycle?
iv. What are the stages of a butterfly¶s lifecycle?
v. What happens in each stage of a butterfly¶s lifecycle?

x I will involve students actively in responding to these questions by passing around the talking
stick. When the student has the talking stick they can state a fact about the butterfly¶s lifecycle to
contribute to the discussion or ask a question that they are confused about. This way I can see the
students actively participating. These questions will be addressed throughout the discussion area
after the read aloud. These are key components to the lesson so I will addresses any questions the
students have as well.
3. L earning A ctivities:

1. Lesson
Show students the cover of The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Tell students that it is the
story of a very hungry caterpillar that has something very special happen to him.
2. After reading the story, explain that there are four stages that a caterpillar goes through to
become a butterfly. These stages are called metamorphosis, which means change. Show the
students the four laminated pictures in order as you explain the life cycle. The egg becomes a
larva which is the caterpillar. The caterpillar then becomes a pupa and wraps itself in a chrysalis
where it grows into a butterfly. Tell students that sometimes a chrysalis can be found hanging
from the underside of a leaf. When it is ready to fly, the butterfly chews its way out. After drying
its wings in the sun, the butterfly flies away.
3. Activity
The students will use their bodies to demonstrate what metamorphosis looks like. First, tell them
they will become an egg. Have them sit on the floor, grasp their knees, and tuck their head under.
Demonstrate the position. Next, tell the students they will change into caterpillars by stretching
out on the floor and wriggling. After that, they will stand very still and cross their arms tightly
across their chest to look like the chrysalis. Finally, demonstrate how a butterfly gently stretches
its wings and begins to flutter. Allow the students to fly around the room as butterflies in the rain
forest.
4. Assessment
Give each student the four coloring pages from Children's Butterfly Site. Depending on the grade
level and writing ability, have students write or copy an explanation of the process of
metamorphosis below the illustration on each page. After creating a cover, the students will
arrange their pictures in the correct order and staple them together with the cover to make a
booklet of the life cycle of a butterfly.

4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures: Read aloud, teacher facilitated discussion, group discussion, teacher
demonstration.
b) Multiple means of access - The teacher will read The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle to
WKH&ODVVDVWKHWHDFKHUUHDGVKHVKHZLOOGLVFXVVWKHVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHDVWKH\
appear throughout the story. The teacher will then ask questions to the students to stimulate
critical thinking. In a whole class setting the teacher will explain to the students explicitly the
IRXUVWDJHVRIWKHEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHDQGWKHQFRQGXFWDFODVVGLVFXVVLon. Next, the teacher
ZLOOGHPRQVWUDWHWKHDFWLYLW\ZKHUHWKHVWXGHQWVDFWRXWWKHVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH
He/she will demonstrate each stage to the class to ensure student clarity. Next the teacher will
conduct the assessment and explain to the students that they will be creating a book and that
they will have to arrange the pages in the correct order.
c) Multiple means of engagement ± Students will begin by listening to the teacher read aloud. As
he/she reads the students will actively listen and answer the questions asked throughout the
UHDGDORXG1H[WWKHVWXGHQWVZLOOOLVWHQWRWKHWHDFKHUGLVFXVVWKHIRXUVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶V
lifecycle and participate in a discussion afterwards to ensure student comprehension and to
answer any student questions. Next the students will participate in an acting activity where
WKH\DFWRXWWKHIRXUVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH7KH\ZLOOIROORZWKHWHDFKHU
demonstration. They will activity participate which will engage them in learning. Next the
students will copy down the explanations for each stage on the 4 worksheets that they
received from the teacher. Once they copy the explanations down they will order the pages
IURPZKLFKVWHSRFFXUVILUVWLQWKHEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHWRZKDWRFFXUVODVW
d) Multiple means of expression ± The students participate in class discussion about the lifecycle of
WKHEXWWHUIO\ZKLFKVKRZVWKHLUOHDUQLQJ7KH\DOVRDFWRXWWKHVWDJHVRIWKHEXWWHUIO\¶V
lifecycle which shows learning. And finally they create a book at the end of the lesson which
shows that the students understand what the stages are and that they understand the sequence
in which they occur.
e) Methods of differentiation ± If students are struggling I will have activities ready for them which
will allow them to learn the information better. I will have books for them to read or for a
volunteer helper to sit down with them to help them read. This will allow for another
resource that they can access to help them absorb the information. I will also have a video
whLFKZLOOVKRZWKHVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH7KLVZLOOKHOSWKHYLVXDOOHDUQHUV
allowing them to take in the information visually and see what is happening throughout a
EXWWHUIO\¶VOLIH)RUVWXGHQWVWKDWDUHH[FHOOLQJZLWKWKLVOHVVRQ,ZLOOKDYHthem write in their
journal. I will have a couple prompts for them to write on if they want or they will have the
RSWLRQWRZULWHDVWRU\DERXWDEXWWHUIO\DQGLW¶VMRXUQH\WKURXJKOLIHIURPWKHEHJLQQLQJRI
life to the last stage of the lifecycle. These methods will keep all students learning and
actively engaged in the classroom.
f) Language learning objectives: At the beginning of the lesson, after The very Hungry Caterpillar
read aloud, I will introduce the class to the vocabulary of the lesson and throughout the
lesson I will re-state it to allow students to really absorb the meaning of the new words.
Throughout the lesson I will ask the class and see if they know the meaning to the
vocabulary words. By doing this it will allow me to track my students learning and see
what we need to work on as a whole class.
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy: I will connect this lesson to different cultural concepts by
showing a map of Africa and showing to the class where other species of butterflies exist.
This will allow the students to understand that butterflies exist in other parts of the world
besides just in the United States.
h) Remedial activities: I will have a video for students to watch if they are struggling with grasping
the concepts of the different stages RIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH7KLVZLOODOORZYLVXDOOHDUQLQJ
WRUHDOO\VHHWKHGLIIHUHQWVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHDQGPDNHWKHFRQQHFWLRQWKDW
EXWWHUIO\¶VFKDQJHDVWKH\JURZ,ZLOODOVRKDYHIODVKFDUGVIRUVWXGHQWVWRDUUDQJHWKH
different steps RIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHLQFRUUHFWRUGHUIURPEHJLQQLQJWRWKHODVWVWDJH,
will have big pictures of butterflies showing the steps in order so that students can again see
visually how a butterfly progresses throughout life.
i) Extension activities: I will have the students write in their journals if they finish early. I will have
a couple prompts for them or I will give them the option to write a story about a butterfly and
its journey throughout life. The students will have to incorporate the different life cycle
stages into their stories. I will also give the students the option to have reading time if they
finish early as well.

5. C losure:
x I will close this lesson by allowing students to present their journal entries or their books that
they created for the end of the lesson assessment. By presenting something of their choosing the
students will be able to show the class as well as they teacher what they learned.
x What was your favorite parWDERXWWKLVOHVVRQ":KDWVWDJHRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHGR\RXWKLQN
is most interesting and why?
x ,ZLOOFRQQHFWWRVWXGHQWV¶OLYHVDQGWRIXWXUHOHVVRQE\VWDWLQJWKDWOLYLQJDQLPDOVDQGSODQWV
grow and have lifecycles that makes the world what it is today. I will explain to the students that
EXWWHUIO\¶VJURZLQWRDGXOWVMMXVWOLNHZHJURZLQWRDGXOWV7KLVZLOOFRQQHFWWRIXWXUHOHVVRQVE\
showing students that things grow and I am sure that we will have lessons dealing with the
human body or plants or other animals that will connect nicely with a main point that this
butterfly lifecycle lesson touches on nicely.

a. Independent Practice: Possible Family Interaction (Identify at least one way in which you
PLJKWLQYROYHVWXGHQWV¶IDPLOLHVLQWKLVLQVWUXFWLRQDOSODQ I will encourage parents and
JXDUGLDQVWRUHDGVWRULHVDERXWOLIHF\FOHVWRWKHLUFKLOGUHQ,ISDUHQWVDQGJXDUGLDQVFDQ¶WILQG
stories pertaining specifically to butterflies they can read really anything that has to do with
growing up and transforming as time passes. The concept of growing is really what is important
in this lesson.

Instructional M aterials, Resources, and T echnology


Attached to the instructional plan.
A dditional Requirements
x Integration with O ther Content A reas: Art and science is incorporated into this lesson. The arts are
incRUSRUDWHGE\KDYLQJWKHVWXGHQWVDFWRXWWKHGLIIHUHQWVWDJHVLQDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH7KLVDOORZVIRU
students to express their learning through the arts and acting. Another way this lesson incorporates art is
that the students get to color their worksheets that they get at the end of the lesson. This allows them to
decorate their sheets and book how they want which will represent a butterfly and its lifecycle. This
lesson incorporates science because overall it is addressing the lifecycle of a butterfly which is a science
concept. It follows the science standard K-1 SYSA which is living and nonliving things are made of
parts. People give names to the parts that are different from the name of the whole object, plant or
animal. In this case the different VWDJHVRIWKHEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH7KHOLIHF\FOHFRQFHSWLVDGGUHVVHG
throughout the whole lesson beginning with the read aloud of The Very Hungry Caterpillar to the
assessment where the students organize the stages sheets into the right order and create their own
personal book.

x A cknowledgements

Instructional Plan materials adopted from Joy Lewallen of Houston Museum of Natural Science,
http://www.kidsbutterfly.org/life-cycle/lesson

Additional information and explanation by Courtney Bosman


Butterfly lifecycle Stage flashcards created by Courtney Bosman

Video explaining metamorphosis - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYPGl17Ip9g


Butterfly lifecycle coloring pages ±
(flashcards)

Stage 1 ² EGG
Stage 2 -­
Caterpillar
Stage 3 ²
Chrysalis
Stage 4-­ Butterfly
(Checklist 1)

Formative Assessment Checklist for learning objective: 6:%$7LGHQWLI\WKHIRXUVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶V

life [ K -1 SYSA]

Student is actively listening and participating in class discussion and shows understanding of the

information (four stages of a butterfly¶s lifecycle)

Student Name

Student Name

Student Name

(Continues for all students)


(checklist 2)

Formative Assessment Checklist for learning objective: SWBAT understand what metamorphosis is

[ K -1 SYSA]

Student shows understanding of what metamorphosis means and can clearly explain his/ her ideas.

Metamorphosis is the changes that occur in a butterfly¶s lifecycle.

Student Name

Student Name

Student Name

(Continues for all of students)


Journal Entry Prompts
x Write a story about a butterfly and its journey through life from the beginning of life to the last stage of

the lifecycle.

x ([SODLQWKHIRXUVWDJHVRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOHDQGDQLQWHUHVWLQJIDFWDERXWHDFKRQH

x :KDWLV\RXUIDYRULWHVWDJHRIDEXWWHUIO\¶VOLIHF\FOH"Explain why.
(Coloring pages to create book at the end of lesson and for assessment)

The Egg

___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
&KLOGUHQ¶V%XWWHUIO\6LWH‡ www.kidsbutterfly.org
The Larva

___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
&KLOGUHQ¶V%XWWHUIO\6LWH‡ www.kidsbutterfly.org
The Chrysalis (Pupa)

___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
________________________________________
______________________________
&KLOGUHQ¶V%XWWHUIO\ Site ‡ www.kidsbutterfly.org
The Butterfly

___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
&KLOGUHQ¶V%XWWHUIO\6LWH‡ www.kidsbutterfly.org
Instructional Plan
Revised 3/2/2011

Teacher Candidate: ____ Colleen Gravelle______________________ Date: _Spring 2012___


Cooperating Teacher: ___Mrs. Baumgartner________________Grade: Kindergarten____
School District:____District 81___________________ School: ___Mullan Road
University Supervisor: ______
Unit/Subject: Science ______
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Communicating Bees!

Learning Targets/Purpose/Previous Learning


a. Instructional Plan Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to be able to identify the different parts of a bee.
Students will also be able to understand the different types of bees as well as understand that bees communicate through
pheromones. Students will be able to act like bees and direct themselves through a maze using just their sense of smell and
help from other “bees” (students) buzzing through the maze.
b. State Learning Standards:
• EALR 1: Systems. Big Idea: Systems (SYS). Core Content: Part-Whole Relationships
o In grades K-1, students gain fluency in using the concept of part-whole relationships. They agree on names for
the parts that make up several types of whole objects, including plants and animals. They learn that objects can
be easily taken apart and put back together again, while other objects cannot be taken apart and reassembled
without damaging them. Removing one or more parts will usually change how the object functions. Fluency
with the part-whole relationship is essential for all of the sciences and is an important building block for more
sophisticated understanding of how systems operate in natural and designed environments.
• EALR 4 LS1: Life Science. Big Idea: Structures and Functions of Living Organisms (LS1). Core Content: Plant and
Animal Parts
o Students learn that all living things have basic needs, and they meet those needs in various ways. Just as humans
have external body parts that perform different functions to meet their needs, animals and plants also have body
parts that perform different functions to meet their needs. A magnifier is a tool that reveals further details of
plant and animal parts that are not easily seen with the unaided eye. Learning about the diverse needs of plants
and animals and the various ways they meet their needs will help to prepare students to understand more
detailed structures beginning at the 2-3 grade band.
c. Content Objectives:
• SWBAT: Identify the different body parts of bees
• SWBAT: Identify how bees are different (drone, worker, queen)
• SWBAT: Direct themselves through a maze using their sense of smell
d. Language Objectives:
• SWBAT: use bug body part vocabulary (head, thorax, abdomen, stinger, antennae, legs), type of bee vocabulary
(drone, worker, queen) and be able to use kindergarten vocabulary to discuss how bees use their sense of smell to
communicate with one another.
e. Previous Learning Experiences:
• Students should have some type of insect knowledge. Students should have had some experience with bees outside
of the classroom and know that bees are an insect with a stinger.

Assessment Strategies
Attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to your assessment strategies. Also attach appropriate
marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
• Formative: measures process/progress toward mastery of target(s)
• Summative: measures outcomes/achievement of target(s)

Content Objectives Assessment Strategies


EALR 1: Systems. Big Idea: Systems (SYS). Core Formative: Following the class list, have students point to the part of
Content: Part-Whole Relationships the bee that will kill them if they use it (the stinger).
Summative: Have students draw a bee with all of the different parts
that a bee needs to stay alive.
EALR 4 LS1: Life Science. Big Idea: Structures Formative: Walk through the classroom to ask students the different
and Functions of Living Organisms (LS1). Core body parts of the bee. Use a class list to mark of if each student is
Content: Plant and Animal Parts able to identify the different parts of the bee.
Summative: Have students match the different parts of a bee on a
worksheet.
Student Voice: Select two components of student voice and identify how students will reflect and/or communicate on their
learning or progress toward meeting the goals. You may eliminate the components not being addressed.

K-12 students will: Student-based evidence to be collected Description of how students will
(things produced by students: journals, reflect on their learning
work samples, projects, papers, etc.)
!" #$%&$'()*$&+(,$+-.+/012$(013(4$)( Class will have a discussion on the tricks that Students will write a sentence on what
,$+4.105(5$0+1&16(6.054(704$3(.1()*.4$( they used that really helped classmates get they did well and what they could
044$44/$1)4"( through the maze and the things that didn’t have improved on to help their
work. List will be written on the board by the classmates in their journal.
teacher.
8" 9.//:1&20)$()*$(3$%$5.,/$1)(013( Students will draw a picture of how their Students will draw a smiley face on
/0&1)$1012$(.-(0(5$0+1&16(2.//:1&);"( classmates helped them get through the bee the back of their picture that shows
maze. how helpful they think their
classmates were at directing others
through the maze.
Grouping of Students for Instruction
• Students will work as a class or in table groups for different parts of the lesson. Going through the maze students will be in
groups of four (by table group)/
Learning/Teaching Experiences
1. Introduction:
• Read the story Bee Wigged by CeCe Bell to students. Talk with students about why everyone was scared of the bee.
Then start to ask students the questions below.
2. Questions:
• Have you ever been stung by a bee? What were you doing at the time?
• As a class, list situations in which a bee might sting
• How can you avoid being stung by a bee?
• What should you do if a bee stings you?
• Do bees always die after they have stung you?
i. Teacher will have a think aloud and provide an example of a time they were stung by a bee or saw someone
who was stung by a bee to help trigger students memories. Teacher can ask students what they have seen
their parents do when a bee is around to help trigger knowledge as well.
3. Learning Activities: Give detailed, step-by-step instructions on how you will implement the instructional plan.
Describe exactly what students will do during the lesson. Please use a numbered list.
1. Read Be Wigged by CeCe Bell to students
2. Discuss with students why everyone in the story was scared of the bee.
3. Ask students the five open-ended questions about bees (make a class list on the document camera when necessary).
4. Show students pictures of bees so they are able to learn the different body parts of the bee
5. Have students color the different parts of the bee template
6. Cut out the bee template pieces and glue them to the toilet paper roll so each student has there own model bee.
7. Show students video clip from the bee movie (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16SMpTXpuuY)
8. Talk with students about the different kinds of bees they saw in the clip (drone, queen, workers) make a list with the
students how the duties of the different types of bees
9. Teach students about how bees communicate through different types of smells
10. Turn classroom into a maze (do this while students are at a recess or lunch so students are not waiting around for the
maze to be created)
11. Discuss with students what the different smells mean (vinegar = go back, flowers = go right, oranges = go left, honey =
go straight)
12. Have students smell all the different smells so they know what each on is
13. Blindfold groups of four have students use their sense of smell to find the honey at the end of the maze (each person in
the group will have an unblindfolded buddy so they don’t run into each other or other objects in the maze). Welcome
students to carry their bee project with them so they are really able to get into their “bee personality.”
14. As a closing activity have students draw a bee and them write a sentence about what did to help their classmates through
the maze
15. Have students complete matching worksheet to match up the different bee parts to their name
4. Instructional Considerations:
a) Instructional procedures:
a. Read aloud: teacher will read Bee Wigged to students
b. Discussion: teacher will lead discussion about bees and different experiences students have had with
bees
c. Project: Lead class in art project to create their own bee
d. Video: Show bee movie clip
e. Discussion: discuss the different types of bees with students and discuss how bees use their sense of
smell to communicate
f. Activity: have students use their bee senses to go through a maze to find the honey at the end
b) Multiple means of access
a. Teacher will have the book Bee Wigged for students to look though
b. Teacher will have pictures of bees for students to look at
c. Teacher will have an example of what the bee project will look like when completed
c) Multiple means of engagement
a. Students will create their own bee
b. Students will act as a bee and find their way through the class maze uses their “bee seneses”
c. Students will reflect on their learning
d) Multiple means of expression
a. Students can show their learning through class discussion
b. Students can show their learning through creating their bee
c. Students can show their learning through formative assessment done by teacher
d. Students can show their learning through their reflection at the end of the day
e) Methods of differentiation
a. Students will be able to go to the resource room for help if needed to work on their project
b. Parent/student volunteers will be utilized to help facilitate learning
f) Language learning objectives:
a. The bee movie clip can be found in another language on youtube
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iGTtAcSUE4&feature=related)
g) Cultural responsive pedagogy:
a. Show students pictures of bugs from different countries or environments. Discuss with students that
bees are different depending on where they are located (geography).
h) Remedial activities: (Do you have a review sheet , scaffolding worksheet or plan?)
a. After the activities, teacher will see where students need help on gaining knowledge. Worksheets for
different types of bees and different bee parts may be used to help students relearn if they are needed.
i) Extension activities: (What will students who finish early do?)
a. Students who finish early will have coloring sheets to work on if they are finished with their bee
project early
5. Closure: Explain how you are going to bring closure to the lesson.
• Explain how students will share what they have learned in the lesson. Identify 2 questions that you can ask students
to begin the conversation.
• The lesson will be brought to a close through a class discussion
i. Ask students what their favorite fact about bees is
ii. Ask students what they thought was fun about the activity and what they could work on to make the
activity better
• Describe how you will connect again to students’ lives and to future lessons
i. Discuss with students how they will be able to look for bees on their nature walk that will be coming up
later in the week!
6. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and demonstrate understanding
beyond the scope of the lesson outside the class.
• Discuss with students how they can look for bees on the playground but make sure they know not to disrupt a
beehive because it will make them angry
a. Possible Family Interaction: Students’ families may be able to get involved by having students talk about what to do
if a bee at home stings someone. Have students and families come up with a plan for bee stings that they can share
with the class.
Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology
Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, questions to answer,
overheads, powerpoint slides, worksheets.
Additional Requirements
• Integration with Other Content Areas: Art is integrated into this activity because students will be making their own
version of a toilet paper role bee.
• Acknowledgements: Lesson plan adapted by Colleen Gravelle. Sources for the lesson plan from
http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/agesubject/lessons/newton/beesting07.html and http://www.dltk-
kids.com/animals/mbee.html
Student Name: Abdomen Thorax Stinger Wings
X (if they know it) 0 (if they don’t)