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Adamson University – College of Architecture

Building
Technology 04
Standard Specifications

Table of Contents

Specification

Definition 1
Purpose 1
Format 1
Types 4
Division 6
References 7
Summary and Conclusion 8

Sample of Specificiatons

(07)-201513410
2/27/2018
Arch. Christopher Coma
Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

Specifications
Specifications describe the nature and the class of the work, materials to be used in
the work, workmanship etc. and is very important for the execution of the work. The
cost of a work depends much on the specifications. Specifications should be clear.

Purpose of giving Specifications


 The cost of an unit quantity of work is governed by its specifications.
 Specification of a work is required to describe the quality and quantity of different
materials required for a construction work and is one of the essential contract
documents.
 This also specifies the workmanship and the method of doing the work. Thus
specification of a work serves as a guide to a supervising staff of a contractor as
well as to the owner to execute the work to their satisfaction.
 A work is carried out according to its specification and the contractor is paid for
the same. Any change in specification changes the tendered rate.
 As the rate of work is based on the specification, a contractor can calculate the
rates of various items of works in tender with his procurement rates of materials
and labour. Thus tender rate without specification of works is baseless,
incomplete and invalid.
 Specification is necessary to specify the equipment tools and plants to be engaged
for a work and thus enables to procure them beforehand.
 The necessity of specification is to verify and check the strength of materials for a
work involved in a project.

Requirements Specification Document Format


This template is a modified version of the IEEE 830-1998 standard. Please read that
document for a general discussion of how to prepare a requirements specification.

Cover Page
Team Name, Logo (optional), Deliverable name, Date, Course-Section.

Credits Page
Follow these guidelines.

Table of Contents (if necessary)

1.0 Introduction

1.1 Scope
Give a one sentence explanation of what the product will do.
Explain why this product is needed. Discuss the specific problems that this product
will attempt to solve.

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

Present any domain-specific background necessary to understand the problem.


Include a measurable statement of the intended benefits or objectives to be achieved
by developing this product..

1.2 Product Features


Give a brief summary or bullet list of the major features that the software will perform.

1.3 User characteristics


Describe general characteristics of the intended user of the product, including age,
education level, specific experience, and technical expertise.

1.4 Constraints
Describe any constraint that may limit the choices available to the developers, such as
regulatory policies, intellectual property restrictions, high level language requirements,
etc.

1.5 Assumptions and dependencies


List any factors or dependencies that the developers may assume will exist that may
affect the software product.

2.0 Functional Requirements


This is the most important section of the SRS. List all the required functionality of the
software in complete detail. Number and organize the requirements carefully.

Two common notations for stating requirements are "atomic sentences" or "Use
Cases." Atomic sentences are appropriate where the system functioning is primarily
computational or processing oriented. Use Cases are often preferred where the system
is primarily interactive or event driven.

Be sure to follow the quality criteria for writing good requirements.

Winter 2004. Using the ASCENT CASE tool you should write your functional
requirements (or "mini-specs") as "Process Logic" within the CASE tool itself. You then
have several alternatives for how to submit it.

1. You may submit your ASCENT project itself in computer readable form (be sure
to include all the ".cde" files that contain the mini-specs).
2. You may convert the content of all the ".cde" into HTML and include them in
this section of the SRS.

3.0 Quality Attributes (Nonfunctional Requirements)


This section describes any desired attributes or characteristics required of the system
that don't provide a function or capability. Another way of saying it, is that this section
specifies how much quality is required.

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

One way to distinguish a functional requirement is that you can point to the source
code that implements it, but nonfunctional requirements can't be isolated in the
code. The best example is performance requirements, e.g., "the executable module
must fit on a 1.4MB floppy disk."

These requirements are subject to the same criteria as the previous section. Special
attention must be given to stating the requirements in a manner that is objective and
quantifiable; there must be some measurable way to assess whether the requirement
has been met.

Consult this online reference as well as your textbook. Also refer to section 5.3.6 of
the IEEE template.

4.0 Behavioral Requirements


This section describes the manner in which the software behaves or operates. In a
typical end-user application this section describes the human-user interface. For
some products this section is a separate document that is simply referenced here,
ideally with a hyperlink.

5.0 Informational Requirements


This section describes the information requirements from an external perspective only.
Only data that is visible by the end user is described.

5.1 Data Model


Include one or more visual depictions of the data and relationships in the problem
domain using some standard notation such as Entity-Relationship Model, Data Flow
Diagram, State Transition Diagram, etc.

5.2 Data Dictionary


Provide an organized, alphabetical listing of all data elements that are pertinent to the
system, with precise, rigorous definitions. Each item must follow the Data dictionary
notation. Refer to this sample Data Dictionary.

6.0 Appendices

6.1 External Interfaces


6.1.1 Hardware interfaces

Describe all interfaces between the software and any hardware components in the
system (e.g. touch tablet).

6.1.2 Software interfaces

Describe the way in which the software will interact with any other required software
(e.g. database, legacy system, web server, etc). It is not necessary to detail any well-
documented interface (e.g., SQL).

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

6.1.3 Communcations interfaces

Describe any communication protocols to other devices or networks. It is not


necessary to detail any well-documented interface (e.g., HTTP).

6.1.4 I/O formats

Specify the format for all data input to or output from the system. This includes any
external file formats and the layout of any printed reports.

6.2 Issues and Tradeoffs - Engineering Analysis


Give an engineering analysis explaining your rationale for all significant
decisions you made during Analysis. Issues such as platform choice,
user interface style, and tradeoffs between usability and efficiency, are
examples.

6.3 FTR Review Summary report, signed by your reviewing group

6.4 QA Checklist, (with items checked off), signed by your QA person. You
must provide an explanation for any items not checked off.As a general rule,
checklists with more than five unchecked items are not ready for submission. If
an item is missing or obviously unsatisfactory that has been checked off, the
entire document will be returned for correction and a late penalty will accrue.

Types of Specifications
General Specifications
In general specifications, nature and class of works and names of materials that
should be used are described. Only a brief description of each and every item is given.
It is useful for estimating the project. The general specifications do not form a part of
contract document.

Detailed Specifications
The detailed specifications form a part of a contract document. They specify the
qualities, quantities and proportions of materials and the method of preparation and
execution for a particular item of works in a project. The detailed specifications of the
different items of the work are prepared separately and they describe what the work
should be and how they shall be executed. While writing the detailed specifications,
the same order sequence as the work is to be carried out is to be maintained.

Examples of products or systems that should have detailed installation specs, and
issues to cover in the specs, include:

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
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2017-2018 Second Semester

 Foundations – Concrete mix, strength, reinforcing


 Concrete slabs – Concrete mix, strength, reinforcement, flatness, finish,
expansion/movement joints, allowable cracks
 Roofing – Type, weight/thickness/warranty period of roofing; type of
underlayment, flashing, and fasters. Carefully spec details for low-slope roofs,
and for complex roofs with hips and valleys, detailing how valleys will be
waterproofed. Get detailed material and installation specs for roofing materials
such as wood, metal, tile, slate, and composite materials.
 Windows and doors – Specify type, model, and energy efficiency. Also provide
flashing details around doors and windows to prevent leaks, which are common
here.
 Skylights – Prone to leaking. Make sure installation follows manufacturers
specs. Extra membrane flashing around skylights recommended in freezing
climates.
 Insulation and air sealing – If you care about energy performance, you’ll need to
spec this carefully.
 HVAC systems – A lot can go wrong here. System can be oversized, undersized,
uneven, noisy, leaky (ductwork), and inefficient due to installation errors.
 Radiant heating – Needs careful specifications by an experienced designer or
installer.
 Wood flooring – Moisture content, substrate, fasteners, vapor barriers (over
slab), finishes. Follow the recommendations of the National Wood Flooring
Association (NWFA).
 Ceramic tile – Follow the methods and standards in the TCNA Handbookif you
want trouble-free installations. Floor must be stiff enough. Also pay attention to
substrates, adhesives, and movement joints.
 Special construction for wind or seismic loads: This includes wind-resistant
roofing, impact-resistant windows, engineered framing fasteners, and shear wall
requirements.
 Metal components in coastal areas: Make sure that any exposed metal
flashing, fasteners, or hardware is stainless steel, copper, brass, lead, or double
hot-dipped galvanized. Other metals and finishes will not last long due to the
corrosive power of salt spray.

Product specifications. These can name specify a specific brand-name product,

Installation specifications These describe, in detail, how a product is to be


installed or applied.

Quality standards. Installation specs for visible finish work often contain quality
standards as well

Performance specs. This type of spec describes the standards that must be met,
rather than the specific product of system to be used

Special conditions. This type of specification would cover an special measures


required on the job due to poor weather (too hot or too cold), difficult access, very
steep or wet sites, environmental concerns, etc.

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

MasterFormat Divisions
MasterFormat was first released in 1975 and only had 16 Divisions until the new 50-
Division MasterFormat 2004 was released in late 2004. Divisions that are not listed
below are reserved for future use (including Division 49.)

 Division 00 - Procurement and Contracting Requirements


 Division 01 - General Requirements
 Division 02 - Existing Conditions
 Division 03 - Concrete
 Division 04 - Masonry
 Division 05 - Metals
 Division 06 - Wood, Plastics, Composites
 Division 07 - Thermal and Moisture Protection
 Division 08 - Openings
 Division 09 - Finishes
 Division 10 - Specialties
 Division 11 - Equipment
 Division 12 - Furnishings
 Division 13 - Special Construction
 Division 14 - Conveying Equipment
 Division 21 - Fire Suppression
 Division 22 - Plumbing
 Division 23 - Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
 Division 25 - Integrated Automation
 Division 26 - Electrical
 Division 27 - Communications
 Division 28 - Electronic Safety and Security
 Division 31 - Earthwork
 Division 32 - Exterior Improvements
 Division 33 - Utilities
 Division 34 - Transportation
 Division 35 - Waterway and Marine Construction
 Division 40 - Process Integration
 Division 41 - Material Processing and Handling Equipment
 Division 42 - Process Heating, Cooling, and Drying Equipment
 Division 43 - Process Gas and Liquid Handling, Purification and Storage
Equipment
 Division 44 - Pollution and Waste Control Equipment
 Division 45 - Industry-Specific Manufacturing Equipment
 Division 46 - Water and Wastewater Equipment
 Division 48 - Electrical Power Generations

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

References

Arch Media Group LLC. (2004). MasterFormat Specification Divisions (CURRENT) -

archtoolbox.com. Retrieved from

https://www.archtoolbox.com/representation/specifications/csidivisions.html

Benzu, J. (2010, August 28). Purpose of Specifications and types of Specifications |

Civil Engineering Projects. Retrieved from

http://www.civilprojectsonline.com/civil-projects/purpose-of-specifications-

and-types-of-specifications/

Building Advisor. (2016, October 2). Residential construction specifications: Don't

build without them. | BuildingAdvisor. Retrieved from

http://buildingadvisor.com/project-management/where-to-get-plans-and-

specs/construction-specifications/

Dalbey, J. (n.d.). Specification Document Format. Retrieved from

http://users.csc.calpoly.edu/~jdalbey/205/Deliver/SRSformat.html

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Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

Summary and Conclusion

Specifications describe the nature and the class of the work, materials to be
used in the work, workmanship etc. and is very important for the execution of the
work. The cost of a work depends much on the specifications. Specifications should be
clear. Specification of a work is required to describe the quality and quantity of
different materials required for a construction work and is one of the essential
contract documents.
There are format on creating a specifications guidelines with provided
standards of requirements.

There are types of specifications;

In general specifications, nature and class of works and names of materials that
should be used are described. Only a brief description of each and every item is given.
It is useful for estimating the project. The general specifications do not form a part of
contract document.

The detailed specifications form a part of a contract document. They specify the
qualities, quantities and proportions of materials and the method of preparation and
execution for a particular item of works in a project. The detailed specifications of the
different items of the work are prepared separately and they describe what the work
should be and how they shall be executed. While writing the detailed specifications,
the same order sequence as the work is to be carried out is to be maintained. To
further define specification these type of specifation are required.

Product specifications, these can name specify a specific brand-name product.

Installation specifications, these describe in detail, how a product is to be


installed or applied.

Quality standards, Installation specs for visible finish work often contain
quality standards as well.

Performance specs, This type of spec describes the standards that must be met,
rather than the specific product of system to be used.

Special conditions, This type of specification would cover an special measures


required on the job due to poor weather , difficult access, very steep or wet sites,
environmental concerns, etc.

There are also divisions on which a certain specification are specified and
detailed which is as follows; Division 00 - Procurement and Contracting Requirements
,Division 01 - General Requirements, Division 02 - Existing Conditions, Division 03 –
Concrete, Division 04 – Masonry, Division 05 – Metals, Division 06 - Wood, Plastics,
Specifications Standard Page 8
Adamson University – College of Architecture
Building Technology 04
2017-2018 Second Semester

Composites, Division 07 - Thermal and Moisture Protection, Division 08 – Openings,


Division 09 – Finishes, Division 10 – Specialties, Division 11 – Equipment, Division 12
– Furnishings, Division 13 - Special Construction, Division 14 - Conveying Equipment,
Division 21 - Fire Suppression, Division 22 – Plumbing, Division 23 - Heating,
Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Division 25 - Integrated Automation,
Division 26 – Electrical, Division 27 – Communications, Division 28 - Electronic Safety
and Security, Division 31 – Earthwork, Division 32 - Exterior Improvements, Division
33 – Utilities, Division 34 – Transportation, Division 35 - Waterway and Marine
Construction, Division 40 - Process Integration, Division 41 - Material Processing and
Handling Equipment, Division 42 - Process Heating, Cooling, and Drying Equipment,
Division 43 - Process Gas and Liquid Handling, Purification and Storage Equipment,
Division 44 - Pollution and Waste Control Equipment, Division 45 - Industry-Specific
Manufacturing Equipment, Division 46 - Water and Wastewater Equipment, Division
48 - Electrical Power Generations

Therefore I conclude that specification has standard format provided and is


important on a design process specially inrelation to the the actual construction of the
structure and ofcourse estimating bill of materials and cost of the project. These
specification varies by types and focus on providing the standard or general
specifications and detailed specification which will focus on determining the exact or
nearly detailed specification of every certain materials that also conforms with the
standard specification. These includes; specify a specific brand-name product, how a
product is to be installed or applied, quality performance, sizes, dimensions, and other
detail of a certain material. The process or division of these specification also have a
standard format which can be seen on the previous statements.

Specifications Standard Page 9