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ILLUSTRA
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Great Solutions for Cutting,
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Super Ideas to Make Your
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Ultimate Woodworker’s Guide
to Shop-Built Jigs & Tools
ADD-ONS
TOOLADD-ONS

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tool
Jigs & Tool workstations
Add-Ons
JIGS &&TOOL
XX

Creative Home Arts Group


General Manager: Donald B. Peschke
BEST XXXX

Editorial Media Director: Bryan Nelson


JIGS

Managing Editor: Vincent Ancona


Senior Editors: Wyatt Myers, Phil Huber, Randall A. Maxey
Assistant Editor: Robert Kemp
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Executive Art Director: Todd Lambirth


Senior Graphic Designer: Bob Zimmerman
Senior Illustrators: Dirk Ver Steeg, Harlan V. Clark,
Peter J. Larson
OUR

Graphic Designer: Becky Kralicek

Creative Director: Ted Kralicek


Assistant Design Director: Chris Fitch
4
Project Designer/Builder: John Doyle
CAD Specialist: Steve Johnson
Shop Craftsman: Dana Myers Drill Press Station 6
Upgrade your drill press with this handy
Photographers: Crayola England, Dennis Kennedy platform, drawer, and table with fence.
Associate Style Director: Rebecca Cunningham
Senior Electronic Image Specialist: Allan Ruhnke
Production Assistant: Minniette Johnson Bench Vise Stand 12
Video Director/Editor: Mark Hayes Create the perfect workstation for your
bench vise with this useful stand.
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Our Best Jigs & Tool Add-Ons is published by Air Tool Station 16
Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. Clear shop clutter and get more use from
2200 Grand Ave., Des Moines, IA 50312. air tools with this wall-mounted station.
Canada Post Agreement 40038201.
Canada BN 84597 5473 RT.
©Copyright 2015 Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. Sharpening Center 20
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form This all-in-one, multi-wheel setup will
or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage fulfill all your shop’s sharpening needs.
and retrieval devices or systems, without prior written permission from
the publisher, except that brief passages may be quoted for reviews.

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A Supplement to Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. SHOP SAFETY IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY


Using hand or power tools improperly can result in serious
2200 Grand Ave., Des Moines, IA 50312 injury or death. Do not operate any tool until you read the
Printed in U.S.A. manual and understand how to operate the tool safely. Always
use all appropriate safety equipment as well as the guards that
come with your tools and equipment and read the manuals
that accompany them. In some of the illustrations in this book,
the guards and safety equipment have been removed only to
provide a better view of the operation. Do not attempt any
procedure without using all appropriate safety equipment or
CHAIRMAN Efrem Zimbalist III without ensuring that all guards are in place. Cruz Bay Publishing,
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illustrations contained in this book.
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Brian J. Sellstrom
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Patricia B. Fox

2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


shop-built jigs & table saw & router
tools accessories upgrades

26 56 74
Swivel Vise 28 Handsaw Miter Box 58 Table Saw Small Parts Jig 76
Clamp any awkward or unusually shaped A few basic parts and hardware create the This jig takes the worry and inaccuracy out
items with this simple shop project. perfect handsaw helper for precise cuts. of cutting small parts on the table saw.

Sliding Cutoff Grinder 32 Workbench Rail System 62 Palm Router Bases 82


Turn an ordinary angle grinder into a Get more from your basic workbench by A compact router becomes even more
precision, metal-cutting chop saw. adding this useful extension rail system. useful with these simple add-on bases.

Rotary Tool Milling Machine 40 Drill Press Depth Stop 68 Router Mortising Machine 88
Make precision small parts with your This quick and easy add-on makes your Cut smooth, accurate mortises with your
rotary tool and this simple stand. drill press a more accurate tool. router and a few pieces of hardware.

Drill Press Edge Sander 48 Band Saw Circle-Cutting Jig 70


Don’t spend big bucks on an edge Flawless circles and arcs are a snap to cut
sander. Build this handy table instead. by adding this basic band saw accessory.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 3
4 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS
Tool
Workstations
Transforming your shop into a more organized,

efficient space to work on projects doesn’t have to

be difficult. All it takes are a few custom areas that

are designed with specific tools in mind.

BENCHTOP DRILL PRESS STATION ...6

BENCH VISE SYSTEM......................12

AIR TOOL STATION .........................16

SHARPENING CENTER ...................20

WoodsmithSpecials.com 5
WORKSTATIONS
XXXXXX
TOOL XXXX XX

benchtop
Drill Press
Station
This two-part
upgrade adds
accuracy and storage
in a small footprint.
A benchtop drill press packs a lot of
accuracy and versatility into a com-
pact package. It does have a few
shortcomings, though. First, you
need a stand or some spare bench
space to use it. Throw in the fact that
the stock table is pretty small, and
you have a tool that’s just begging for
some upgrades.
The workstation you see here
solves both of those problems. A
stout shelf with a built-in drawer cre-
ates a platform for the drill press and
offers some valuable storage, as well.
Then an easy-to-build table and Stowaway Table. You can quickly
fence system add accuracy. When remove the table by loosening a
you don’t need the table and fence, couple knobs. Then slip it into a pocket
they stow in a pocket under the shelf. under the drawer for handy storage.

6 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Cutout in fence
accommodates drill chuck
when drilling thin stock
CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
OVERALL DIMENSIONS:
23" W x 4!/2" H x 11!/4" D (Table & Fence)
22!/2" W x 23#/4" H x 24!/2" D (Shelf)

Auxiliary table
increases workpiece
support and accuracy
for drilling T-track in table accepts
fence and other hold-
down accessories

Notch on back
corner of the table
Replaceable insert provides clearance
backs up workpiece for table lift crank
to eliminate tearout

Dowels register the Wide hardwood


auxiliary table to the stock edging protects
table on the drill press and strengthens
plywood
worksurface
Knobs and washers
thread into inserts in
underside of table to lock
it in place

Tongue and groove


joinery simplifies
the assembly process
Hardboard
dividers slip into
matching dadoes
to organize
Tongue and dado drawer
drawer joints are Smooth-sliding full-
easy to cut on the extension drawer
table saw slides increase access
to drawer contents

Wide edging strips on


sides form a pocket for
drill press table (see
inset photo on the
facing page)

False front covers


drawer slides and
creates even gaps
along sides and
top edge

GO
GO
2
Online
nline
To download a free cutting
diagram for the drill press
station, go to:
WoodsmithSpecials.com
Extras

WoodsmithSpecials.com 7
benchtop
drill press station
XXXX XX

Materials & Cutting Diagram


XXXXXXEXTRAS

A Top (1) 23 x 21 - 3⁄4 Ply. J False Front (1) 3⁄ x 4 - 111⁄


4 4 • (2) #6 x 1" Rh Woodscrews
B Sides (2) 23 x 231⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. K Drawer Dividers (4) 31⁄2 x 10 - 1⁄4 Hdbd. • (2) 3⁄4" x 3⁄8" x 111⁄4" T-Track w/Screws
C Back (1) 12 x 23 - 3⁄4 Ply. L Table Bottom (1) 111⁄4 x 23 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Threaded Inserts
ONLINE

D Wide Edging 3 ⁄4 x 11⁄2 - 116 rgh. M Table Wings (2) 111⁄4 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 1" Studded Knobs
E Narrow Edging 3⁄ x 3⁄ - 17 rgh. N Table Insert (1) 111⁄4 x 3 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16" Fender Washers
4 4
F Stops (2) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 51⁄ O Fence Base (1) 3⁄ x 2 - 21 • (4) 3⁄4 "-dia. x 1" Dowels
4 2 4 4
G Drawer Sides (2) 1⁄ x 4 - 203⁄ P Fence Face (1) 3⁄ x 3 - 21 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 11⁄2" Flange Bolts
2 4 4
H Drawer Front/Back (2) 1⁄ x 4 - 10 • (1) 4" Drawer Pull w/Screws • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Knobs
2
I Drawer Bottom (1) 10 x 201⁄4 - 1⁄4 Hdbd. • (1 pr.) 20" Full-Extension Drawer Slides • (2) 5⁄16" Flat Washers

#/4" x 48" - 96" Birch plywood

B A

M M N

#/4" x 5!/2" - 96" Maple (3.7 bd. Ft.)


D J P

O F E
!/2" x 5" - 96" Maple (3.3 sq. Ft.)
G G H H

!/4" x 24" - 24" Hardboard

K K K K

PAGE 1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
FIGURE
1

a rigid Shelf TOP


A

(23" x 21")
B
8!/4

The main benefit of this project is that it


creates a dedicated place to use a benchtop B
drill press in your shop. It isn’t elaborate, SIDES C
but I still managed to squeeze in a few nice 23!/4 (23" x 23!/4") BACK
(12" x 23")
features. When it comes right down to it,
the drill press workstation is nothing more
than a large shelf to hold the drill press at a 6
convenient working height.
SIMPLE, STURDY CONSTRUCTION. The four ply- NOTE: All parts
are made from
wood parts shown in Figure 1 interlock to #/4" plywood
create a rigid platform for the drill press. b. TOP VIEW
Despite the small number of parts, I found a. FRONT VIEW
there’s a specific order to the construction !/4
4!/2 !/4
that makes it easier to build.
Back
I began with the top. It has a pair of Top !/4
dadoes cut across the bottom face, as !/4
Side
shown in Figure 1a. Those dadoes accept Side
tongues that are cut along top edge of the
sides. This simple detail serves to tie the
parts together and registers the sides for dimensions for the width of the back and I applied wide edging to the shelf top
a square assembly. the size of the tongues along each edge, to add stiffness, as in Figure 2. The same
A couple more details are needed on as you can see in Figure 1b. wide edging is applied to the angled sec-
the sides. You can cut grooves along EDGING. Even for a shop project, bare ply- tion of the sides. Its purpose is to create a
the back edge of the sides to capture the wood edges just won’t cut it. The exposed lip to store the table and fence when they
back. Then cut a large bevel on the lower edges are vulnerable to dents and prone to aren’t needed. (Just be sure to round over
corner to lighten the appearance. chipping. So I like to cover the edges with the edges before attaching it to the shelf.)
Take a moment to dry assemble the hardwood strips. In addition, I think the Narrow edging covers the front edges
top and sides. This gives you the final strips improve the look. of the sides. The edging is sized to match

FIGURE
2 Top
WIDE EDGING Side
(1!/2" wide)
D
Wide
edging
Wide edging on
shelf is mitered SIDE
at the front VIEW
NOTE: Apply wide corners !/8"
edging to sides round-
before adding !/8" roundover on overs
narrow edging Wide edging on lower end of
sides is mitered narrow edging
at each end
Narrow
a. edging
D
E b.
NARROW
#/4 EDGING
!/8" (#/4" wide)
Wide Side Stop
round-
c.
edging over NOTE: Edging and Stop
stops are made from 50°
F #/4"-thick hardwood
Back Wide
ANGLE VIEW STOP SIDE VIEW edging
(1!/2" x 5!/4")

8 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


the thickness of the plywood and fea- a close match to the thickness
tures the same roundover detail. of the divider stock. Aim for an
There’s one final detail to point out. I easy sliding fit.
glued small, angled stops on the inside The trick in making the front
bottom face of the sides, as shown in and back isn’t in cutting the
Figures 2 and 2c. The table rests on these tongues on each end. Instead,
stops when it’s in the stowed position. it’s sizing the length of the
parts. You need to take into
DRAWER account the joinery and the gap
The drawer sits just below the top of the needed for the drawer slides
shelf. It rides on full-extension drawer (1⁄2" per side).
slides to make the most of the available The tongue can be cut with
storage space. Dadoes cut in the drawer a dado blade in the table saw.
sides allow you to divide the drawer into I made this cut in a series of
compartments to keep small bits and passes. Start with the dado
accessories protected and easy to find. blade set low and raise it slightly Drawer Organizers. Slip hardboard dividers into
In Figure 3, you can see the component between cuts until the tongue dadoes in the drawer sides to organize the contents
parts. The place to begin is with the basic that’s formed just slides into the and make items easier to find.
drawer box, which consists of the sides, dado. The drawer bottom fits in
front, back, and bottom. The corners are a groove cut in the sides, front, and back. I made enough dividers for each pair of
assembled with tongue and dado joinery. You can assemble and install the dadoes. This way, I’ll have them on hand,
The drawer sides have dadoes near the drawer box in the shelf before adding the no matter how I choose to organize the
ends to accept tongues on the front and false front. The front is sized to cover the drawer down the road.
back. I also cut a few dadoes to hold hard- drawer sides and leave a consistent gap
board drawer dividers. It’s a good idea to (1⁄8") on each side and along the top
tweak the size of your dado blade so it’s edge, as shown in Figure 3b.

FIGURE DRAWER DIVIDER NOTE: Drawer sides, front,


3 (3!/2" x 10")
K NOTE:
and back are !/2"-thick
hardwood. False front is
#/4"-thick hardwood
Dividers are
not glued in
NOTE: Drawer place
bottom and
dividers are !/4"
hardboard !/4
3#/4
H
DRAWER
FRONT/BACK 4!/4
(4" x 10")
H G
#6 x 1" Rh
woodscrew

4" drawer pull


w/screws 20"
full-extension
drawer slide
w/screws

G
I
DRAWER SIDE
J DRAWER BOTTOM (4" x 20#/4")
FALSE FRONT (10" x 20!/4")
(4" x 11!/4")
FRONT !/8
Drawer VIEW Drawer
side side
TOP VIEW !/4 Drawer
slide
!/4 Drawer
Drawer bottom
front !/8
Drawer
side !/4 !/8
!/8 False front
Divider
!/4
!/4
a. b. TOP VIEW c. !/4

WoodsmithSpecials.com 9
add a Table
Now that you have a home for your
benchtop drill press, the next part of the
project is to add an auxiliary table and
fence system. This increases the capability
and accuracy of the drill press.
Most drill presses come with a small
metal table. And on benchtop models, these
can be especially puny. The table doesn’t
provide a lot of support for long pieces. In Knuckle Room. A notch
addition, the workpiece isn’t backed up to at the back of the table creates
prevent tearout. To overcome these prob- clearance for the table lift crank.
lems, I made a large auxiliary table.
PLYWOOD CONSTRUCTION. The table is built
up from two layers of plywood, as shown T-tracks is installed in dadoes cut in the This notch provides clearance for the
in Figure 4. The lower layer consists of a wings to accept a fence or other accesso- table lift crank, as you can see in the
single piece. The upper layer is in three ries like hold-downs. photo above. Because of this notch, I
segments. The outer wings of the table There’s an important detail I want offset the location of the T-track on the
are glued to the lower layer and help cre- to point out about the table. There’s right side of the table, as illustrated in
ate a thick, rigid worksurface. A pair of a wide notch cut in the back corner. Figure 4a. Otherwise, the range of the
fence would be limited.
FIGURE INSERT
4 (11!/4" x 3")
N
INSERT. The center part of the upper
layer is a removable insert. It isn’t glued
in place. Instead, it just rests in the space
#/4" x #/8"
T-track between the outer wings. Its purpose
w/screws is to back up the workpiece to prevent
tearout as a bit drills through.

M
a. FRONT VIEW

2 #/4 #/4

#/8
Table
NOTE: All parts wing
are #/4" plywood Insert

Table bottom
8
!/4
M
TABLE WING #/8"-dia.
2 Dowel
(11!/4" x 10")

TABLE BOTTOM
(11!/4" x 23")
L

b. Place threaded insert


near midpoint of slot
in drill press table
NOTE: Use drill press
table to determine
location of threaded Table wing
inserts and dowels %/16"-18 Table
threaded bottom
insert #/4" x 1"
dowel Size dowels END
to closely match VIEW
%/16"-18 x 1" slots in metal drill
studded knobs & press table
fender washers

10 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


FIGURE
In order to provide full support for the
workpiece, it’s important that the insert
5
match the thickness of the table wings.
1!/2"-rad. cutout
And since the insert is going to get centered on
FENCE FACE
chewed up in use, I decided to make sev- (3" x 21") fence face
eral of them to have on hand using the P %/16" flat
washer
same plywood I used for the other parts.
(You can store the extras in the drawer.)
FENCE BASE
ATTACHING THE TABLE. As handy as the table (2" x 21")
is, there are times when I need to remove 45° bevel O

it — like when I want to tilt the table or


drill metal. So I wanted a way to quickly
install and remove it. The answer is !/8" chamfer for
dust relief
shown in Figure 4b. NOTE: Fence parts are
#/4"-thick hardwood
Four dowels index the auxiliary 1
table by slipping into the large holes in
the metal table. The table is secured by
studded knobs and washers that fit into %/16"-18 x 1" studded
threaded inserts installed in the under- knob and fender washer
side of the table.
The stock tables on drill presses vary
among manufacturers. So your arrange-
ment of dowels and inserts may not match
this one. To determine the layout, clamp
the auxiliary table to the stock table. Then
trace the slots in the metal table onto the a. %/16"-18
auxiliary table. Choose dowels that are a star knob END
close match to the width of the slots and and flat washer VIEW b.
install inserts along the slots. Fence #/4
face 13!/8
Fence
base
ESSENTIAL FENCE #/4 Fence
#/8 base
The final piece of the puzzle is the fence. %/16"-18 x 1!/2"
And while it’s important for drilling accu- flange bolt
1!/16 %/8 #/8"-dia.
rate holes safely, that doesn’t mean it needs
to be overly complicated. TOP VIEW Fence face
!/8"
You can see in Figure 5 that there are chamfer
only two parts — a face and a base. The
base has a hole on one end and a short slot
on the other end that align with the T-track The fence face has a centered notch cut task to complete at the table saw. I used
in the table. The slot provides some wiggle in it to provide clearance for the drill chuck long lag screws to attach the shelf securely
room for the flange bolts, washers, and when you’re drilling thin stock close to the to a wall stud. Once the drill press is bolted
knobs. This way the fence won’t bind as fence. The final detail is that the upper cor- in place, your drilling center is ready to go
you adjust it (Figure 5b). ners of the face are beveled. This is an easy for your next project.

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


A Top (1) 23 x 21 - 3⁄4 Ply. J False Front (1) 3⁄ x 4 - 111⁄
4 4 • (2) #6 x 1" Rh Woodscrews
B Sides (2) 23 x 231⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. K Drawer Dividers (4) 31⁄2 x 10 - 1⁄4 Hdbd. • (2) 3⁄4" x 3⁄8" x 111⁄4" T-Track w/Screws
C Back (1) 12 x 23 - 3⁄4 Ply. L Table Bottom (1) 111⁄4 x 23 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Threaded Inserts
D Wide Edging 3⁄4 x 11⁄2 - 116 rgh. M Table Wings (2) 111⁄4 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 1" Studded Knobs
E Narrow Edging 3⁄ x 3⁄ - 17 rgh. N Table Insert (1) 111⁄4 x 3 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16" Fender Washers
4 4
F Stops (2) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 51⁄ O Fence Base (1) 3⁄ x 2 - 21 • (4) 3⁄4 "-dia. x 1" Dowels
4 2 4 4
G Drawer Sides (2) 1⁄ x 4 - 203⁄ P Fence Face (1) 3⁄ x 3 - 21 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 11⁄2" Flange Bolts
2 4 4
H Drawer Front/Back (2) 1⁄ x 4 - 10 • (1) 4" Drawer Pull w/Screws • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Knobs
2
I Drawer Bottom (1) 10 x 201⁄4 - 1⁄4 Hdbd. • (1 pr.) 20" Full-Extension Drawer Slides • (2) 5⁄16" Flat Washers

WoodsmithSpecials.com 11
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GO
2
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nline
Extras
WORKSTATIONS

To download a
3-D model of
the bench vise
stand, go to
our website:
XXXX XX

WoodsmithSpecials.com

handy
XXXXXX
TOOL

Vise
Stand
Designed to tackle the
toughest tasks, this strong,
stable, and easy-to-build
stand is a great home for
your bench vise.
My bench vise used to sit on a rickety old
bench in a dark corner of my shop. But
that old bench wasn’t meant to stand up to
sawing, pounding, and torquing on a vise
handle. The solution was to build the vise
stand you see at right.
For starters, the stand is made by glu-
ing up multiple layers of MDF to create a
lot of mass. It’s designed to rest solidly on
the floor and anchor to the wall. These fea-
tures make the stand able to absorb vibra-
tion and redirect all the force of pounding
and sawing to the floor and wall.
As you can see in the photos, the extra
storage the stand provides is a welcome
bonus. The open shelves hold a lot of
tools and supplies. And the custom racks
on the sides keep your tools close at
hand. After a weekend’s worth of work,
you’ll finally have a permanent home for
that shop workhorse.

12 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


NOTE: Round over
FIGURE
all exposed edges a. 11
with !/8" roundover bit
1 CASE TOP
(11" x 15!/4")
15!/4
A
B NOTE: All parts
made from #/4" MDF

starting with a Side


A

Waste

Cabinet
panel
A
SHELF Slightly oversized blank
(11" x 15!/4")

Most of the components that make


Rout
up the vise stand are built up from !/8" roundover SIDE PANEL
(16!/4" x 34")
multiple layers of MDF, as shown in 9!/4 on inside edge A
Waste
the drawings. When laminating sheet C
A A
goods like MDF, I like to use a spray
adhesive or contact cement. This way,
the bond is instant with the added ben- b. Pattern bit
efit of being strong.
CREATING TWO LAYERS. Rather than trying c. Bottom
shelf
to line up two layers cut to final size, 9!/4 A
1
I went another route. I chose to cut A
one layer to final size and then glue a Roundover

slightly oversized blank onto that (Fig- D

ure 1a). This way, it’s an easy task to 3 Toe kick


trim the oversized layer with a flush- D

trim bit, as in Figure 1b. TOE KICK


(3" x 11") #8 x 1!/2" Fh 1!/2
MAIN CABINET. The construction starts woodscrew
with the three shelves, a case top, and
the sides. The narrow width of the cabinet through the side pieces. It’s a good idea To locate the bottom shelf, I cut two
allows for the back panel to extend past to clamp the assembly together first and pieces for the toe kick (front and back), as
the cabinet sides (main photo). But I’ll talk then predrill the screw holes. This way, the shown in Figure 1. After the bottom shelf is
more about that later. All of the shelves, screws won’t split the edges of the MDF as fastened to the sides, I used a pair of spac-
toe kicks, and top are fastened with screws you drive them home. ers to position the other two shelves.
Finally, to hide all of the screws and add
FIGURE
2 FIRST: Glue oversized
Blank to sides
more mass, glue an oversized blank to
each side. As before, use a flush-trim bit to
Case top cut away the waste around the edges. That
SECOND:
Trim blank with leaves you with the double-layer sides, as
flush-trim bit you can see in Figure 2.

Shelf
NOTE:
Round over all MATERIALS & SUPPLIES
Side exposed edges
panel Side with !/8" A Shelves (3) 11 x 151⁄4 - 11⁄2 MDF
Side panel roundover bit
panel
B Case Top (1) 11 x 151⁄4 - 3⁄4 MDF
Side C Sides Panels (4) 161⁄4 x 34 - 3⁄4 MDF
panel
Shelf D Toe Kicks (2) 3 x 11 - 3⁄4 MDF
E Top (1) 171⁄4 x 18 - 21⁄4 MDF
F Rim (1) 171⁄4 x 18 - 3⁄4 MDF
G Back (1) 18 x 40 - 3⁄4 MDF
C

Waste C • (60) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews


Shelf
• (4) 3⁄8" x 21⁄2" Lag Screws w/Washers
Flush
trim bit
NOTE: All parts can be cut from
a. Case top 11⁄2 sheets of MDF
Toe kick

WoodsmithSpecials.com 13
3 E
#8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew
TOP
(17!/4" x 18")
E

2"-rad. Waste E
E

adding a E Flush
trim bit
B

Top & Back Side


Shelf
Side
a. C C

Even though the case of the vise stand is


pretty heavy, I added even more mass with
a built-up top. The top is made from three
4 FIRST: Fasten blank with
double-sided tape and
a. THIRD: Round over top
edges on router table
layers of MDF. It provides a solid platform trim flush
#/4 !/8"
for mounting your bench vise. Finally, to F roundover
keep your tools from rolling off onto the RIM BLANK
(17!/4" x 18")
floor, the top has a rim around the edge.
THREE-LAYER GLUEUP. Gluing up the top is
a pretty simple process. The first layer is E
E
anchored to the cabinet and serves as a
template for the other two layers and the FOURTH:
SECOND: Align
narrow rim you’ll add later. Lay out and outside
cut inside edge and
To start, I cut the first layer to size and shape glue in
shape, carefully sanding the edges smooth. place
Then you can fasten it to the cabinet with
screws, as shown in Figure 3.
FLUSH TRIMMING. Using the first layer as a second layer to the first. Using a hand- it’s time to round over the top edges and
template, trace the shape onto three over- held router fitted with a flush-trim bit, attach the rim to the top with yellow glue.
sized blanks that will create the other two clean up the edges. Just repeat this process The goal here is to clamp the rim in place
layers for the top and later, the rim. Cut for the final layer of the top. so it’s lined up and flush along the outside
close to the line then carefully glue the ADDING A RIM. In Figure 4, you see the rim edge of the top (Figure 4a).
I added. The construction SOLID BACK PANEL. While the glue is drying,
FIGURE
5 again starts out with an over-
sized blank. You’ve already
start on the back. It’s simply a panel cut to
shape then fastened with screws into the
2"-rad. traced the outside shape top and cabinet, as illustrated in Figure 5.
using the top as a template. The panel is flush with the bottom of the
Top
But this time, instead of cabinet and centered side-to-side. It over-
gluing the blank to the top, laps the sides to create flanges you’ll use
BACK
(18" x 40") temporarily attach it using later to fasten the stand to the wall.
G double-sided tape. Then trim PRIME & PAINT. Painting the vise stand not
it flush as you did before. only makes it look better, but makes it
SHAPING THE INSIDE. At this easier to wipe off dirt and grime. I sealed
point, you’re ready to lay out the porous edges with drywall com-
the inside shape of the rim. pound and sanded them smooth before
Side To do this, mark a line 3⁄4" brushing on a coat of primer. After a cou-
Side in from the outside edges. ple coats of paint, you’re ready to find a
#8 x 1!/2" Fh After removing the blank home for the stand.
woodscrew
and tape from the top, head SOLID & SECURE. The best place to locate
to the band saw to remove the stand is a permanent spot in your
the waste on the inside. shop where you can securely fasten it to
You’ll need to be careful the wall. Then, after mounting your vise
as you do this. The result- with a few lag screws, be sure to take a
NOTE: Round over all ing thin strip will be fragile. look at the accessories on the next page
exposed edges with
!/8" roundover bit After some careful sanding, to make the stand more useful.

14 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Custom Tool Holders #8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew

You’ll gain quite a bit of storage 4 HAMMER


space with the three shelves of the HOLDER
vise stand. But for keeping your
#/4
often-used tools readily accessi-
ble, you can make the custom tool
holders you see on the right. They 1!/2 TOP VIEW
make use of the real estate on the
sides of the vise stand. !/2
All of the racks are made from
3⁄ " plywood. Their simple con- 1#/4
4
struction means you can make
1!/2
a variety of racks to fit your tool
!/2
selection. A couple of screws are
all you need to fasten them to the
sides of the vise stand.
HACK SAW !/2 1 1!/4
Hammers & Mallets. These simple
HAMMER STORAGE. The tools I find HOLDER 2!/2 L-shaped racks keep your hammers
myself using often at the bench within easy reach.
!/2
vise are my ball pein hammer and !/2
a small mallet. To keep them readily
accessible, I made the hammer racks
you see at the upper right. They’re 3!/8
L-shaped holders with a slot in the 2#/4

top piece. The slot is sized to fit the


handle width of your hammer or
mallet just under their heads.
END VIEW
HACK SAW HOLDER. Another tool I reach
for a lot is the hack saw. The holder #8 x 1!/2" Fh
you see at right consists of two lay- woodscrew

ers of plywood. These layers form a


notch for the frame of the saw (the
front piece is taller). The ends of the
FILE RACK Hack Saw Storage. Keep this often-
used tool close at hand with this
two pieces are angled to match the #8 x 1!/2" Fh easy-to-build lipped support.
woodscrew
angle on the saw’s frame. This way, 12
the saw will hang straight.
FILE RACK. My collection of metal
files and rasps was beginning to get
out of hand, so this rack is a welcome
#/4
addition (bottom right photo). The
rack keeps the files organized and
prevents them from banging against 1!/2
one another, which can dull them.
The dimensions shown in the !/2
drawing are just a guide. Be sure to
size the slots for your files. And the TOP VIEW
rack can be made longer or shorter
to match your set of files. Note:
If your files don’t have handles, 1#/4
you’ll find them at most hardware
stores or home centers. 1!/4
As you can see, with just a little !/2 Storage & Protection. Protect the
extra time, it’s easy to keep those !/2 1 cutting edges of your files by storing
essential tools within easy reach. 3!!/16 them in this handy rack.
Size to fit file

WoodsmithSpecials.com 15
WORKSTATIONS
XXXXXX
TOOL XXXX XX

high-capacity
Air Tool Station
Give your air tools a home of
their own and all the air they need
to achieve maximum performance.
16 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS
SIDE VIEW
1!/4 (TANK SUPPORT)
BACK
FIGURE (26" x 36" - 1!/2" Ply.)

I use air tools for a number of tasks


1 A
5!/2"-rad.
1#/4
!/2"-
in my shop. I appreciate their power, rad.
5!/2
light weight, and longevity. Over 4!/2
time, though, I’ve collected a num- NOTE: Tank supports 135°
are glued and screwed
ber of these tools. And some really 9!/4 in place
demand a large volume of air. Some- 7!!/16 3!/16
times my small air compressor works
overtime just to keep up. B
TANK SUPPORT
I created an air tool station (photo, (5!/2" x 10#/4" - 2!/4" Ply.)
left) to help with this and to provide 5#/4 B
a convenient location for storing
my air tools. A large auxiliary tank
#10 x 3!/2" Fh
increases air capacity, maximizing E woodscrew
the time between each cycle of my
compressor. An in-line regulator and E FRONT VIEW
HOSE (HOSE HANGER)
filter, as well as a lubricator, ensures HANGER FACE
L-hook sized HOSE HANGER BLOCK (8" x 5" - #/4" Ply.)
that my tools get exactly what they for blow gun (8" x 5" - 3" Ply.) 2%/8
accessory C D
need to operate at their best. And
1!/2
because the compressor and tank are
both connected with quick-connect 1!/2
fittings, it’s easy to disconnect them 13
8
for use away from the shop. PIPE STANDOFF
(1" x 1!/2" - 2!/2")
E 6
TANK & HOSE RACK
The station consists of three sections:
NOTE: Edges of
two for storage and one for the air back and hose
hanger face are #8 x 2" Fh
tank and connections. The tank, hose, #8 x 2" Fh painted woodscrew
and plumbing are held in place on a woodscrew
1"-rad.
two-layer, plywood back. The tank
supports and hose hanger attached to the
back are also constructed from multiple final size once the glue dries. The tank pipe standoffs. These small hardwood
layers of plywood. Small hardwood pipe supports and hose hanger, as well as the pieces started as an extra-long blank cut
standoffs provide clearance for the various corners on the hanger face, can easily be to width. After cutting them to length, I
pipe fittings. You can see how it all goes cut to shape on the band saw. Due to its rounded the corners with sandpaper.
together in the illustration above. size, I used a jig saw to round the cor- ASSEMBLY. Each part is attached with
The laminated plywood parts are best ners on the back. screws as shown above. For extra security,
made by gluing together oversized ply- PIPE STANDOFFS. The plumbing fixtures I added glue to the tank supports before
wood layers and then trimming them to are attached proud of the back using attaching them with screws.

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


TANK & HOSE RACK • (8) 1⁄2" Male Reducers - 1⁄4" NPT
A Back (1) 26 x 36 - 11⁄2 Ply. • (1) Portable Air Tank • (1) 1⁄2" Female Reducer - 1⁄4" NPT
B Tank Supports (2) 5 ⁄2 x 103⁄4 - 21⁄4 Ply.
1 • (1) Blow Gun • (9) 1⁄4" MPT Couplings (universal)
C Hose Hanger Block (1) 8 x 5 - 3 Ply. • (1) In-Line Regulator • (3) 1⁄4" FPT Couplings (universal)
D Hose Hanger Face (1) 8 x 5 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Self-Retracting Hose • (1) 1⁄4" Body Barb Connector
E Pipe Standoffs (3) 1 x 11⁄2 - 21⁄2 • (1) Ball Valve • (1) 1⁄4" Hose Clamp
• (1) Regulator/Filter • (1) L-Hook
TOOL RACK & STORAGE SHELVES • (1) Lubricator • (11) #10 x 31⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
F Back Panels (2) 12 x 36 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 48" x 1⁄2" Copper Tube • (22) #8 x 2" Fh Woodscrews
G Top/Bottom Spacers (4) 12 x 21⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (3) 1⁄2" Copper Elbows (90°) • (6) #8 x 1⁄4" Sheet Metal Screws
H Shelves (8) 12 x 63⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (3) 1⁄2" Copper “T” Fittings
I Small Spacers (4) 12 x 7 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (3) 1⁄2" Copper Pipe Straps
J Large Spacers (2) 12 x 143⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 1⁄2" Male Adapters - 1⁄2" NPT

WoodsmithSpecials.com 17
G TOP SPACER
(12" x 2!/8")
FIGURE 1"-rad.
2
I
SMALL SPACER H

tool & accessory (12" X 7") SHELF


(12" x 6#/4")

Storage F
BACK PANEL I
(12" x 36")
I like to have my air tools and accessories STORAGE
close by my compressor. This way, they’re SHELVES

within reach and ready to use when I need


#8 x 2" Fh
them. I added separate storage shelves woodscrew
and a tool rack just for this purpose.
I
NOTE: Edges of
The simple construction is the same for parts are painted
both sections. A single piece of plywood after assembly
H
makes up the back. And the shelves are
secured in dadoes created by individual
plywood spacers. You can see what I mean
I NOTE: All parts made
in the illustration on the right. from #/4" plywood
WORK UP. Don’t try to assemble all the
parts at once. It’s best to start from the 1"-rad. H

bottom by attaching the bottom spacer


first. Use a shelf to position the next G BOTTOM SPACER
spacer. Work your way up the back, glu-
ing and clamping each spacer piece in TOOL FITTINGS. Each shelf for the tool rack After assembling all the pieces, I
place. Finally, cut the top piece to size has three holes drilled into the bottom painted the edges of the station red to
and glue it in place. Then you can round face. I threaded quick-connect fittings into match the color of the tank, then mounted
the corners on the assembled back with a the holes to hold my tools securely and it to the wall with lag screws and wash-
jig saw and sand it smooth. to keep dust and dirt out of their connec- ers. You’ll want to locate your wall studs
tors. Figure 3a below before mounting it, though. The finished
FIGURE
3 TOOL RACK
TOP SPACER
shows the details. And
the photograph below
assemblies are quite heavy.
After completing the plumbing as
G (12" x 2!/8")
1"-rad. shows how to keep shown on the opposite page, start up
the fittings square your compressor. It will take a short time
when threading them to completely fill up the auxiliary air
in place. When you’re tank, but once you do, you’ll have plenty
J H
LARGE SPACER
done, glue and screw of air power available. And you’ll appre-
SHELF
(12" x 14#/4") (12" x 6#/4") all of the shelves ciate the convenience of having your air
securely to the back. tools close at hand.
Female coupling
threaded into shelf
F bottom for air tool
BACK PANEL storage
(12" x 36")
NOTE: Edges of parts
are painted after
assembly

NOTE: All parts made


from #/4" plywood

J
a. SIDE VIEW
Installing the Connections.
4#/4 !/2 Use a clamp to keep your couplings
#8 x 2" Fh square to the face of the shelf while
woodscrew
threading in place.
1"-rad. H
!/2"-dia.

18 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


PRESSURE CONTROL LUBRICATOR
Regulator makes it In-line lubricator
easy to adjust air provides oil automati-
pressure to suit the cally for longer life of
task at hand pneumatic tools

finish up with
Plumbing
The plumbing for the air tool station
is fairly straightforward. There are a
few fittings and fixtures that link your
compressor and air tank to your tools.
All the equipment in the photo at right
might make the plumbing look compli-
cated. But I’ll break things down into EASY HOOKUP
manageable steps. CLEAN AIR
SWEATING THE DETAILS. Copper pipe makes Quick-connect fittings
Protect your air are accessible for fast
a rigid assembly for the quick-connect
tools from dirt and tool connections
fittings and regulators. Soldering the corrosion with this
joints isn’t hard. It just takes a little in-line air filter
practice. The key is to make sure the
copper is clean. I use emery cloth (or
steel wool) for this job. A little flux QUARTER-TURN VALVE
applied to the joint will help draw, or
“sweat,” the solder into the joint for a Ball valve provides fast
on/off for upper half
leak-free connection. of air station
DRY-FIT FIRST. You’ll find that the process
goes a lot smoother if you dry-fit the
pieces before firing up the torch. I cut all
the lengths of pipe I needed first. Then,
using the photo at right, you can work
out how each section goes together.
SOLDER. I worked on the plumbing
on my benchtop to make it easier to
position all the fittings. Use a torch to
heat the copper until the solder melts.
Keep a damp rag handy to help cool
the joints and smooth out the solder PRESSURE CONTROL
before it hardens.
FINAL ASSEMBLY. With the soldering
In-line regulator
is convenient for
complete, install the regulator and quick air pressure
filter, lubricator, and quick-connect adjustments
fittings. Now you can mount the
completed assembly onto the station.
Use pipe straps to attach the assem-
bly to the hardwood pipe standoffs
you made earlier. ALWAYS READY
When connecting tools for use, keep
in mind that the lubricator will add oil This coil hose and blowgun
are permanently installed
to the air in the far-right connector. This
and always ready for use
is recommended for tools such as nail-
ers. For tools like spray guns, use the
oil-free, left connector instead.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 19
WORKSTATIONS
XXXXXX
TOOL XXXX XX

multi-wheel
Sharpening Center
Give your tools the sharp edge they need and keep them ready to use with this
convenient, wall-mounted sharpening system.
Seasoned woodworkers know that one everything you need to go from coarse an arbor that is made from off-the-shelf
secret to clean, accurate cuts is working with grinding to a mirror-like polish. And since hardware components.
sharp tools. But many sharpening systems it mounts to the wall, it’s always ready to go. There’s no doubt that with a system
can take a long time to set up. So keeping Construction is fairly straightforward like this you’ll be more likely to keep
your tools sharp becomes a real chore. and the electrical wiring is limited to your tools sharp. And the payback will
The sharpening center above solves that simply adding a plug to the motor. The be tools that are easier to use and better
issue. It has multiple wheels that give you grinding and buffing wheels mount to results on your projects.

20 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Pulley cover protects
operator from spinning Shield helps contain

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS drive belt honing compound


splatter during use

OVERALL DIMENSIONS:
Felt wheels
32" W x 24" H x 11!/4" D charged
with honing
compound for
final polishing
Grinding
wheels establish
Additional wheels primary bevel
can be added to
ends of arbor

Tool rest provides


support while Wheels
grinding attach to
threaded
arbor with
nuts and
washers
Mounted
NOTE: bearing
Top of wheels
rotate away
from operator

NOTE:
Pre-wired switch Station will
for simple accommodate
connections grinding wheels
up to 6" in
diameter and
buffing wheels
up to 8" in
diameter

GO
GO
2
Online
nline
Removable panel Extras
gives quick access
to motor and
switch To download a
cutting diagram
and two bonus
NOTE: For technique
hardware Drawers articles, go to:
and electrical ride on
sources, turn to Drawers WoodsmithSpecials.com
add room full-extension
page 98 slides
for storage

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


A Back (1) 32 x 24 - 3⁄4 Ply. S Access Panel (1) 93⁄16 x 173⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 120X x 6" x 1" Grinding Wheel
B Shelf (1) 93⁄8 x 32 - 3⁄4 Ply. T Access Panel Cleats (2) 3⁄4 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 6" x 1" Hard Felt Wheel
C Sides (2) 9 x 91⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. U Shield Holder (1) 1 x 11⁄4 - 32 • (1) 6" x 1" Medium Felt Wheel
D Center Panel (1) 9 x 91⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. V Shield (1) 7 ⁄4 x 32 - 1⁄8 Acrylic
3 • (1) 6" Shaped Felt Wheel
E Drawer Fronts/Backs (4) 4 x 103⁄4 - 1⁄2 Ply. W Pulley Cover 31⁄2 x 9 - 1⁄8 Acrylic • (16) 5⁄8" Washers
F Drawer Sides (4) 4 x 8 - 1⁄2 Ply. • (16) 5⁄8"-8 Acme Hex Nuts
G Drawer Bottoms (2) 71⁄2 x 103⁄4 - 1⁄4 Ply. • (1) 5⁄8"-8 x 36" Acme Threaded Rod • (8) 1⁄4" x 11⁄2" Lag Screws
H False Fronts (2) 49⁄16 x 121⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Dayton 1⁄3-hp Motor • (12) 1⁄4" Washers
I Mounting Blocks (4) 11⁄2 x 31⁄2 - 8 • (1) 2"-dia. V-Belt Pulley • (4) 1⁄4"-20 x 2" Carriage Bolts
J Sliding Base (1) 3 x 9 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 3"-dia. V-Belt Pulley • (4) 1⁄4"-20 Hex Nuts
K Table (1) 31⁄2 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (4) 5⁄8" I.D. Mounted Bearings • (24) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
L Post (1) 21⁄2 x 9 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (4 ft.) Twist-Lock Link Belt • (6) #8 x 2" Fh Woodscrews
M Base Top (1) 7 x 7 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 13⁄4" Studded Knobs • (8) #8 x 11⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
N Base Bottom (1) 7 x 8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) Drawer Pulls • (10) #8 x 1" Ph Sheet Metal Screws
O Cleat Top (2) 11⁄2 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2 pr.) 8" Drawer Slides w/Screws • (8) #8 x 1" Fh Woodscrews
P Cleat Bottom (2) 1 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Power Tool Switch • (2) 5⁄16"-18 T-Nuts
Q Switch Mount (1) 4 x 8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Power Tool Cord Set • (2) 5⁄16" Washers
R Switch Mount Brackets (2) 21⁄2 x 4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 80X x 6" x 1" Grinding Wheel

WoodsmithSpecials.com 21
L

P
T

multi-wheel
sharpening center
H H Q
XXXX XX

R R

Materials & Cutting Diagram


XXXXXXEXTRAS

B
N M

Grain direction

A Back (1) 32 x 24 - 3⁄4 Ply. S Access Panel (1) 93⁄16 x 173⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 120X x 6" x 1" Grinding Wheel
B Shelf (1) 93⁄8 x 32 - 3⁄4 Ply. T Access Panel Cleats (2) 3⁄4 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 6" x 1" Hard Felt Wheel
C Sides (2) 9 x 91⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. U Shield Holder (1) 1 x 11⁄4 - 32 • (1) 6" x 1" Medium Felt Wheel
ONLINE

D Center Panel (1) 9 x 91⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. V Shield (1) 73⁄4 x 32 - 1⁄8 Acrylic • (1) 6" Shaped Felt Wheel
E Drawer Fronts/Backs (4) 4 x 103⁄4 - 1⁄2 Ply. W Pulley Cover 31⁄2 x 9 - 1⁄8 Acrylic • (16) 5⁄8" Washers
F Drawer Sides (4) 4 x 8 - 1⁄2 Ply. • (16) 5⁄8"-8 Acme Hex Nuts
G Drawer Bottoms (2) 7 ⁄2 x 103⁄4 - 1⁄4 Ply.
1 • (1) 5⁄8"-8 x 36" Acme Threaded Rod • (8) 1⁄4" x 11⁄2" Lag Screws
H False Fronts (2) 49⁄16 x 121⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Dayton 1⁄3-hp Motor • (12) 1⁄4" Washers
I Mounting Blocks (4) 11⁄2 x 31⁄2 - 8 • (1) 2"-dia. V-Belt Pulley • (4) 1⁄4"-20 x 2" Carriage Bolts
J Sliding Base (1) 3 x 9 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 3"-dia. V-Belt Pulley • (4) 1⁄4"-20 Hex Nuts
K Table (1) 3 ⁄2 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply.
1 • (4) 5⁄8" I.D. Mounted Bearings • (24) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
L Post (1) 21⁄2 x 9 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (4 ft.) Twist-Lock Link Belt • (6) #8 x 2" Fh Woodscrews
M Base Top (1) 7 x 7 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 13⁄4" Studded Knobs • (8) #8 x 11⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
N Base Bottom (1) 7 x 8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) Drawer Pulls • (10) #8 x 1" Ph Sheet Metal Screws
O Cleat Top (2) 1 ⁄2 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply.
1 • (2 pr.) 8" Drawer Slides w/Screws • (8) #8 x 1" Fh Woodscrews
P Cleat Bottom (2) 1 x 91⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Power Tool Switch • (2) 5⁄16"-18 T-Nuts
Q Switch Mount (1) 4 x 8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) Power Tool Cord Set • (2) 5⁄16" Washers
R Switch Mount Brackets (2) 2 ⁄2 x 4 - 3⁄4 Ply.
1 • (1) 80X x 6" x 1" Grinding Wheel

1!/2" x 3!/2" - 72" Maple (3.5 bd. Ft.)

I I I I

U NOTE: Shield holder (U) planed to 1" thick

30" x 30" - !/2" Baltic Birch plywood 30" x 30" - !/4" Baltic Birch plywood

E E

E E G

F F

F F
G

Grain direction Grain direction

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
60" x 60" - #/4" Baltic Birch plywood

D C
A

J C

P
T

H H Q

R R

B
N M

Grain direction

(3.5 bd. Ft.)

I I

U NOTE: Shield holder (U) planed to 1" thick

ch plywood 30" x 30" - !/4" Baltic Birch plywood

E G

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
G
FIGURE
1 a. Back FRONT
VIEW
b. Back
!/4 #/8
Shelf
A
NOTE: All BACK Right Shelf
parts are #/4" Drive belt (32" x 24") side
plywood opening Right SIDE
!/4 side VIEW

#8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew
15!/4 Back
c.
Drive belt 1!/2
opening
C 1!/2
B
SIDE
SHELF 4!/2
(9#/8" x 32") Shelf
!/4
D
10#/4 Center
CENTER
PANEL divider
(9" x 9!/2")
18!/4

The sides and center divider are


C
SIDE
attached to the shelf with some simple
(9" x 9!/2") joinery. After cutting the pieces to size,

start with the use a dado blade to make the dadoes in


the bottom of the shelf and the rabbets

Cabinet
1"-rad.
on the top edge of each side.
The opening for the drive belt can be
made with a jig saw. Just drill a hole in
The wheels need a solid foundation, so I You’ll notice that it extends above the each corner to get the cuts started. Then
started with the cabinet. As you can see wheels. This makes it easy to attach the you can assemble the pieces with glue
in Figure 1 above, it’s just a few pieces of cabinet to a wall and protects your wall and screws through the back.
Baltic birch plywood held together with from any debris, like honing compound, DRAWERS. There’s nothing fancy about
common joinery. To maximize ventilation that may come off the wheels during use. the drawers, either. You can see in
for the motor, there’s no bottom on the Once you cut the back to size, go Figure 2 that the front and back are
cabinet. This also simplifies construction. ahead and cut the dado for the shelf attached to the sides with tongue and
BACK. Since this station hangs on a at the table saw. Then use a jig saw to dado joints. And the drawer bottom is
wall, the back is the first thing to make. round off the corners. held in place by a groove cut near the
lower edge of each piece. Full-extension,
FIGURE
a.
a
2 Drawer
metal drawer slides give complete access
to the drawer contents.
side Side
!/4 I cut the false fronts to fit, leaving a 1⁄16"
clearance gap around the edges. They are
simply screwed to the drawers (Figure
DRAWER 2b). Oversized holes in the drawer allow
SIDE Full-extension Drawer !/4
(4" x 8") drawer slide bottom !/4 4#/4 you to adjust the false front for an even fit.
DRAWER !/8
FRONT F
(4" x 10#/4") WHEEL ASSEMBLY
E DRAWER
SIDE Completing the cabinet lets you focus on
E
DRAWER
F the heart of this project — the various
BACK wheels used for sharpening. And this
#8 x 1" Ph b. is where you can customize the station.
woodscrew Many wheel sizes and types are available,
Drawer and you can include those that suit your
front !/4
!/4 sharpening needs.
H
FALSE FRONT G Side If you take a look at Figures 3 and 3b, you
(4(/16" x 12!/8") DRAWER BOTTOM see that the wheels are attached to a length
(7!/2" x 10#/4") False
front of threaded rod that’s secured in a series of
NOTE: Drawer fronts, backs and sides are mounted bearings. Each wheel is held in
!/2" plywood. Drawer bottoms are !/4" TOP VIEW !/16
plywood. False fronts are #/4" plywood place with a washer and nut on each side.

22 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Back NOTE: Mounting blocks are
FIGURE 1!/2"-thick hardwood

This is also true for the pulley. I found


3 Grinding
Felt
wheels
wheels
it easiest to leave each part loose on
the arbor until the assembly was 3"-dia.
pulley
secured to the cabinet. !/4" x 1!/2" Soften top
lag screw edges with
For this station, I included two %/8"-8 x 32" Acme sandpaper
threaded rod
6"-dia. grinding wheels (80 and 120
!/4" USS
grit) for establishing or modifying the washer
primary bevel on tools that need sig- Shelf Mounted
nificant work. I also mounted a 6"-dia. bearing
%/8"-8 Acme
hard felt wheel for honing straight- Set screw a. I
nut
secures bearing Mounted
edged tools and a medium felt wheel to rod bearing MOUNTING
BLOCK
that conforms to the contoured edge (3!/2" x 8")
of some tools. An additional shaped
felt wheel also helps when honing
these types of tools. For more infor- %/8" USS
mation on honing and buffing wheels washer
Mounting
refer to bonus article that's available block
at online at WoodsmithSpecials.com.
MOUNTING BLOCKS. The entire wheel
b. Grinding Felt wheels
assembly is attached to mounting Back Mounted 3" pulley
wheels bearing
blocks that elevate the arbor off of the
cabinet shelf. The blocks can be cut
to size at the table saw. I softened the
top edges before gluing them in place
on the shelf. Now you can locate the 2!/2 2!/2
mounted bearings and attach them 13!/2 13!/2
securely to the mounting blocks. You
can see what this looks like in Figure Mounting block
3a. Make sure the pulley is centered
over the opening in the shelf.
TOOL REST. To help maintain a constant The radiused notches in the table allow You may have to make some minor
angle while grinding, I added the tool rest access to the sides of the wheels. For tips adjustments to the mounting locations of
you see below. It slides up and down to on cutting these, refer to the technique the grinding wheels before you attach the
achieve the proper grinding angle. article at WoodsmithSpecials.com. All you tool rest. Once you do, you can go ahead
The three pieces can all be cut to size have to do before attaching the post and tighten the nuts
at the table saw. And the slots in the slid- to the cabinet shelf is add the threaded in order to secure each
ing base are easily made using a jig saw. inserts for the adjustment knobs. wheel in place.

4 #8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew
TABLE
(3!/2" x 10") b. Grinding
wheel
K

SIDE VIEW

#8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew
L
POST Table
(2!/2" x 9")

Sliding Mounting
base block
a. FRONT VIEW Post
50° (set T-nut
#8 x 1!/2" Fh
table saw woodscrew
blade
to 40°) Adjustment #/8"-dia. Add Additional
knob and Side
J washer Sliding
Back 1(/16 Wheels. Extra
base
SLIDING BASE NOTE: All Adjustment Shelf wheels can be
(3" x 9") parts are 1!!/16 knob
added to each
#/4" plywood
end of the arbor.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 23
a. FIGURE
5
Link belt

Base
!/4"-20 x 2"
5!/4 carriage
Side bolt Motor 2"-dia.
pulley
Dependent Motor
upon motor
size
N
BASE O
Cleat BOTTOM CLEAT TOP
(7" x 8") (1!/2" x 9!/4") Pulleys used
M to reduce
BASE TOP motor to
(7" x 7") approx. 1150
RPM
CLEAT
P

completing the Station


BOTTOM
(1" x 9!/4")
NOTE: All parts are
#/4" plywood

At this point, the bulk of the construction You can see in the illustrations above
is complete. All that’s left is the motor and that the base is held in place by two b. NOTE: Once belt
switch, and some acrylic protective covers. cleats. The cleats keep the motor in line is tightened, secure
base with 2" screws
For added safety, the motor is suspended with the arbor pulley, but still allow it
Back
below the shelf and is hidden behind an to move vertically. This makes it easy to
access panel (more on this later). adjust the belt tension. Base bottom
The base and cleats are made by gluing Base top
MOUNTING THE MOTOR two pieces of plywood together (Figure
Cleat
There are two key items to consider when 5b). So once the base is complete, you can bottom
mounting the motor. The pulley on the locate the holes to attach your motor. Cleat
top Motor
motor needs to be in line with the pulley As I mentioned earlier, the wiring is
on the arbor. And the drive belt needs to be limited to attaching a plug to the motor
set at the proper tension. That’s why I built (though you may have to relocate wires to have the wiring done, you can attach a
a sliding base for the motor, rather than just ensure that the motor rotates clockwise). 2"-dia. pulley to the motor.
attaching it to the back of the cabinet. The box below shows you how. Once you With the motor wired and attached to
the base, you’re ready to locate the motor

Wiring the Motor


in the cabinet. I found it’s best to lay the
cabinet on its back for this.
Position the motor so that both pul-
leys are in alignment. A straightedge
held against both pulleys helps here.
With the motor in position, place the
cleats on either side of the base and
attach them to the back of the cabinet
with screws (Figure 5b).

16-gauge,
3-wire cord
2’-long

3-prong plug
Clockwise Rotation. Connect the black Add a Plug. Locate the black, white, and
wire to post #2 and the red wire to post #4 green wires from the plug as shown to pro-
for a clockwise rotation. vide power to the motor. Crimp-on
connector

24 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


FIGURE SWITCH MOUNT
Now you can assemble and attach the
link belt that connects the two pulleys.
6 BRACKET
(2!/2" x 4")
R
Then set the cabinet upright and adjust #8 x 1!/2" Fh
the tension on the belt by sliding the woodscrew
motor down. Once the tension Prewired
is taught, but not too tight, drive #8 x 1!/4" Fh switch
woodscrew
screws through the base and into
the back of the cabinet.
Using a pre-wired switch keeps
the wiring simple, but I needed a
NOTE: All parts
way to attach it to the cabinet for 1 are #/4" plywood
S
simple access. That’s why I made Q T
ACCESS PANEL
the mount you see in Figures 6a (9#/16" x 17#/8") SWITCH ACCESS
MOUNT PANEL CLEAT
and 6b. It‘s easy to make and attaches (4" x 8") (#/4" x 9!/4")
to the cabinet with screws.
2!/2
Before you secure the switch to its
mount, you’ll want to attach the access
panel cleats and cut the panel to fit. A hole b. 1!/2
cut in the panel is sized to fit around the
switch. You can use this hole to position Switch
mount 1!/2
the switch on its mount, and then secure bracket
the access panel in place (Figure 6a). Side
a. Switch #8 x 1!/2" Fh
SHIELD & PULLEY COVER. Now, all that’s left woodscrew
is to make the shield and pulley cover Side Switch
Access
panel mount
(Figure 7). The shield helps to contain
Access cleat
debris, like honing compound, within
panel 4#/4
the confines of the station during use. cleat !/4
Switch
And the pulley cover helps prevent any
accidental contact with the pulley while
sharpening your tools. Access
3 panel
To secure the shield in place, I added Switch mount TOP VIEW
a holder near the top of the cabinet
back. The shield holder is made of
hardwood and has a 1⁄8"-wide kerf cut with a screw on either side. You can look at WoodsmithSpecials.com for step-by-step
at an angle along its length (Figure 7a). at Figure 7a to see how this was done. To details on how to do this.
With a standard width saw blade set at prevent splitting the acrylic, it’s best to After you attach the cover to the cen-
an angle of 15°, the kerf can be cut with pre-drill holes before driving the screws. ter mounting blocks, it’s time to securely
one pass at the table saw. The pulley cover will need to be bent to attach the station to your wall. Then
The shield is made from 1⁄8" acrylic and wrap over the pulley. This isn’t difficult to you’re ready to get your tools in top shape
fits into the kerf in the holder. It is secured do, but take a look at the technique article for your next project.

FIGURE
7 U
SHIELD
HOLDER
V (1" x 1!/4" - 32")
SHIELD
(7#/4" x 32") NOTE: Shield
SIDE VIEW a. holder is 1"-thick
hardwood 8
#8 x 1" Ph NOTE: Center
sheet metal #8 x 1!/2" !!/16" deep kerf on
screw Fh front of shield
15° Back wood- holder at 15°
screw

Shield Shield
holder NOTE: Shield and
!/4"- pulley cover are
rad. !/8" acrylic
PULLEY
COVER W
(3!/2" x 9")

WoodsmithSpecials.com 25
XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS
ONLINE

Secure with Position end of


screws through cover flush with
existing holes back of form

curved Acrylic Cover


!/4
2

The pulley cover for the sharp- bent with a torch or heat gun. Be
ening center is a curved piece of sure to keep the heat source mov- 4!/2 5
acrylic. Bending it is a breeze. ing to heat the area evenly. And, 2!/2"-rad.
I started by making the MDF as always, use caution if you’re
form you see in the photo above working with an open flame.
and the illustration at right. Once As the material softens, you can
the acrylic is cut to size, you can slowly start to bend it into place. 2!/2
screw it to the form using the same Once you remove the heat, it NOTE: Form 7
is constructed
holes you’ll use to attach it to the should fully harden in a matter of with five layers
mounting blocks on the station. minutes. Then you can remove it of #/4" MDF
Then, gently heat the area to be from the form and install it.

radiused Notches
Slots are cut up The notches in the sharpening station’s tool rest are
to layout lines
designed to provide support for your tools while
grinding an edge. They have to be cut so that the
Auxiliary tool is supported close to the grinding wheels with-
miter out the tool rest contacting the wheels. To meet these
gauge fence
requirements, I used a dado blade to cut the radiused
1
1!/4 notches as shown in detail ‘a.’
2 As you can see in the illustration at left, it starts by
marking the location for each notch on your work-
piece. Then you can go ahead and set your dado
blade to the correct height (11⁄8" for an
a. 8" dado blade).
Auxiliary
8" dado fence To complete each notch, it’s easiest
blade to make multiple passes using an aux-
NOTE: Slot
locations are iliary fence attached to the miter gauge.
the same on 1!/8
both ends This way you can sneak up on the lay-
out lines as you make each cut. And it
takes almost no time to complete.

PAGE1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS
ONLINE

choosing
and using
Strops &
Buffing Wheels
With the right tools and techniques, you can be on
your way to the sharpest tools you ever imagined.
Every woodworker knows that a the top of their favorite work-
sharp tool performs better than shop activities list.
a dull one. The tool requires less The good news is that once a
effort to use, is safer when used tool has been properly sharpened,
correctly, and leaves a much it generally just needs a regular
cleaner cut on your workpiece. touch-up to stay sharp. Leather
But most woodworkers I know strops and buffing wheels can be
wouldn’t put sharpening at a big help here.
Leather Strop SHARPENING BASICS. As a general
Wheel Options. Leather rule, sharpening starts with a rel- Multi-Function Wheel. Use the side
strops (left) and buffing atively coarse abrasive material of the leather strop to hone chisels
wheels (below) are the secret followed by progressively finer and other tools.
to a perfect edge. grits. Grinding wheels, sharpening
stones, and sandpaper go a long fine abrasive surface leaves a razor-
way toward establishing the sharp sharp edge on tools.
edge on a tool. But to get the
sharpest edge possible, BUFFING WHEELS
additional work is The three small wheels in the photo
often needed. This on the left are the basic types of
is where strops and buffing wheels available. They’re
buffing wheels come each unique in their design, but
in. When charged with serve the same function — to put
Muslin
honing compound, the the final edge on a tool.
Standard Felt Shaped Felt

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
FELT & MUSLIN WHEELS. Standard felt seeing leather strops used
wheels are available in different on straight razors in tra-
levels of firmness. The most appro- ditional barber shops.
priate one to use depends on the There’s a reason for this.
type of tool to be sharpened. Hard The natural, fine abrasive
felt wheels are great for straight- texture of leather creates
edged tools like chisels and plane a mirror finish on the
irons. Their firm surface helps edge of a tool.
maintain a consistent bevel. An updated version of
For tools with a curved bevel, the leather strop is the one
like some turning or carving tools, you see in the main photograph
its best to use a soft or medium felt on the previous page. It’s an 8"
wheel. The softer face of the wheel plywood wheel that has been cov-
will conform to the shape of the tool, ered with leather on the sides and
creating a nice, smooth edge. around the perimeter. Hard Felt Wheel. When putting the final polish on
An alternative is a muslin buff- The leather wheel works great straight-edged tools, use a hard felt wheel that will stay
ing wheel. Available in multiple when putting the final edge on flat and give the perfect edge.
levels of firmness, they’re great your knives. And the side of the
for polishing the inside edge of wheel is perfect for hon-
gouges and V-tools. ing the bevel on chisels.
SHAPED FELT. Another option for tools By adding honing com-
with a curved edge is a shaped felt pound to the wheel, you
wheel. These wheels have a concave can speed up the process
area in the center of the wheel and and reduce the amount
a convex section at the edge. This of heat generated as well.
really helps when polishing the This is because the hon-
curved edge of a gouge. ing compound does the
When using any wheel, it’s impor- polishing rather than the
tant to apply consistent pressure leather itself. You can read
along the full length of the bevel. more about this in the box below.
This helps maintain a uniform pol- When using the wheel, the key is
ish along the entire edge of the tool. to approach it at the same angle as
the bevel on your tool, while being
LEATHER STROPS careful to not round over the sharp
Another option for creating a edge. With just a little practice, you’ll Shaped Felt Wheel. With help from the contoured profile
razor sharp edge is to use a leather become a sharpening expert and be of a shaped felt wheel, you can get a razor-sharp edge on
strop. You may be familiar with back to work in no time. tools with a curved bevel.

Honing Compound
Honing compounds, sometimes referred
to as buffing or polishing compounds,
come in several different grits (photo
right). They’re applied directly to the sur-
face of felt and leather wheels, as shown
in the photo on the left. Medium
The amount of compound to add varies by Fine
wheel type, but the key is to saturate the sur- Micro-Fine
face of the wheel so that the compound does
the work rather than the wheel itself. And it’s It’s best to find a compound that works well
important that only one compound be used for your needs and use it on all your wheels.
per wheel. This ensures that there’s a consis- This eliminates the possibility of any mix ups
tent level of polishing. that may occur.

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
26 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS
Shop-Built
Tools
There’s a certain satisfaction that comes from

crafting your own tools in the shop. And when it

saves you money or fills a need that a store-bought

tool can’t, that’s an even better feeling.

SWIVEL VISE...................................28

SLIDING CUTOFF GRINDER ............32

ROTARY TOOL MILLING MACHINE ...40

DRILL PRESS EDGE SANDER ..........48

WoodsmithSpecials.com 27
XXXXXX XXXX
SHOP-BUILT TOOLS
XX

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES &


CUTTING DIAGRAM
21⁄2 x 6 - 6

multi-function
A Vise Block (1)
B Front Jaw (1) 1 ⁄4 x 21⁄2 - 6
3

C Jaw Plate (2) 21⁄2 x 6 - 1⁄4 Steel


D Vise Mounting Plate (1) 1 x 51⁄4 - 51⁄4

Swivel Vise
5
• (1) 2 ⁄16"-dia. Hitch Ball
• (1) 1" Pipe Flange
• (1) 1⁄2"-13 Adjustable Handle
• (2) 1⁄2"-13 x 103⁄4" Threaded Rods
• (4) 1⁄2"-13 Hex Nuts
• (1) 1⁄2"-13 Hex Lock Nut Position a workpiece exactly where you need it
• (6) 1⁄2" USS Washers with this versatile vise. The quick-change design
• (1) 1⁄4"- 21⁄2" x 24" Steel Bar
• (8) #8 x 1" Fh Woodscrews allows for mounting multiple accessories.
• (1) 3⁄4"-10 x 7" Hex Bolt
There’s no denying that many of us But the genius of this vise is the use of
• (1) 3⁄4"-10 Hex Nut
could benefit from a fully adjustable, a standard hitch ball between the vise
• (2) 3⁄4" USS Washers
rotating vise in our shop from time to jaws that gives you complete adjust-
• (4) 1⁄4"-20 x 11⁄4" Hex Head Mach. Screws
time. Having the ability to quickly rotate ability on two axes. Simply release the
• (4) 1⁄4" USS Washers and position a workpiece is a huge handle to rotate and tilt the workpiece
• (4) 1⁄4"-20 T-nuts advantage when performing certain to the position needed.
1#/4"x 6!/2"- 24" Hard Maple (2.2 Bd. Ft.) tasks. However, finding the workbench On the main mounting platform,
B space to permanently mount a tool that shown above, I attached a machinist’s
A A
may not be used all the time isn’t the best vise (also called a mechanic’s vise)
use of space. The shop-built vise shown for handling many common clamp-
1"x 6 "- 12" Hard Maple (.6 Bd. Ft.) here is the perfect solution. ing situations. For even more versatil-
C NOTE: Parts A are This vise can be temporarily mounted ity, check out the additional clamping
planed to 1!/4" thick
to a workbench using existing dog holes fixtures at the bottom of page 31. The
and easily removed when not needed. plans for these fixtures are available as

28 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


NOTE: Through holes 1#/4
in vise block are drilled 6
from both ends of the
Online Extras and can be found at our workpiece
website, WoodsmithSpecials.com.
6 FRONT JAW
#/4" -rad. B
VISE BLOCK & FRONT JAW #/4"-dia. 2!/2
The vise is constructed from a combination bolt hole for
securing vise
of hardwood and steel hardware. But you block to
workbench
won’t need a full metal shop to fabricate
the steel components. Most of the steel
work can be performed with a hack saw, a A
few metal files, and a drill press. VISE NOTE: Vise block is
BLOCK glued up from two layers
BLOCK & JAW FIRST. It really doesn’t matter of 1!/4"-thick hardwood.
NOTE: Through Front jaw is made from
whether you make the vise block and front holes in front jaw 1#/4"-thick hardwood
jaw from one solid blank or glue it up from are aligned with
holes in vise block
thinner stock. Just be sure to choose a solid b.
hardwood for long-term durability. For a. 1(/16

the vise block, I planed an oversized blank 1!/2 END VIEW 1


#/4
down to 11⁄4" thick. I then cut the board in
half and face glued the pieces together. #/4 Vise
block
After cutting the two parts to size, you’ll
want to lay out the locations for the 1⁄2"-dia. !/16" A
through holes in the block and jaw. These 1!/8"-dia. counterbore, !/2"-dia. chamfer
!/2"deep through hole
holes will house the threaded rods that 6
secure the vise halves together. Detail ‘a’ at SIDE VIEW
right shows the position of these holes.
COUNTERBORE & DRILL. Start by drilling the
counterbores on the back end of the vise the face of the workpiece, as shown below. ROUND CORNERS. The back corners of the
block using a Forstner bit in the drill press. With the workpiece positioned against vise block are rounded off. This is easy to
The How-To box below gives the details. the drill press fence, drill at least halfway do at the band saw. A quick trip to the disc
Now switch to a 1⁄2"-dia. twist bit and drill through one end of the block. Flip the sander does a good job cleaning up the saw
the two through holes in the front jaw. piece end-for-end, keeping the same face blade marks and leaving a smooth surface.
The block also gets two holes that match against the fence, and complete the holes. CHAMFER EDGES. To ease any sharp edges,
up with the holes in the jaw. However, One more hole in the top of the vise I used a chamfer bit in the router table to
because the block is 6" wide, these holes block completes the drilling operations. chamfer the top and bottom edges of the
need to be drilled from both ends of the This 3⁄4" hole is for the bolt needed to secure vise block, as well as the top, bottom, and
block. I transferred my layout lines around the assembly to the workbench. side edges of the front jaw.

How-To: Drill Long Holes a.

1!/8"-dia. FRONT
Forstner VIEW
bit Clamp !/2" -dia.
drill bit Drill at least
halfway
NOTE: Drill through block
Aux. through holes
fence from both
ends of b.
A block
A
Flip
then
Aux. drill
#/4 fence
Transfer FRONT rest of
TOP way
VIEW layout lines VIEW
to both
a. ends
1!/2 1

Two Counterbores. After laying out the hole locations, Drill Twice. Starting on the counterbored end of the block, drill at least halfway
reference the workpiece against the drill press fence in through the block (detail ‘a’). Then flip the piece end-for-end and complete the
order to drill the counterbores with a Forstner bit. holes by drilling through the other edge (detail ‘b’).

WoodsmithSpecials.com 29
2%/16"-dia.
!/2"-13 hitch ball
hex lock-
nut
NOTE: Jaw plates are a. NOTE: Chamfer
mirror images of corners after
!/2" washer one another attaching plates
!/2"-13 A
hex nut
!/2"
washer !/2"-13 x 10#/4"
threaded rod

B B

!/2" washer
!/2"-13
A
hex nut
Adjustable C
handle #8 x 1" C
JAW PLATE Fh woodscrew
(2!/2" x 6" - !/4" steel) JAW PLATE
(2!/2" x 6" - !/4" steel)

b.
1

c. 1!/2

A %/8 #/4 %/8 #/4


B

TOP SECTION VIEW


JAW #/16"-dia.
PLATE !/2"-dia.
w/counter-
1!/4"-dia. sink
1!/2 %/8

!/2 !!/16 END VIEW 1

add the hardware adding some hardware and making the


machinist’s vise mounting platform.
The large center hole secures the hitch
ball while the two 1⁄2"-dia. holes allow the

& Vise TWO STEEL JAW PLATES. To keep the amount


of metal cutting needed to a minimum,
I purchased a section of 1⁄4"-thick steel
threaded rod to pass through. Also, there
are four mounting holes in each plate. To
keep them all aligned, I stacked the plates
With the bulk of the woodworking for that was 21⁄2"-wide and long enough together to drill these holes, as shown in
the multi-purpose vise done, you can to accommodate both jaw plates. All I the How-To Boxes below.
turn your attention to some light metal- needed to do was cut the two sections to Be sure the workpieces are secured to
working. The two steel jaw plates are fab- length with a hack saw and clean up the the drill press table. This keeps the pieces
ricated and attached to the vise block and edges with a metal file. from potentially catching on the drill bit
front jaw. These jaw plates help to secure DRILLING THE HOLES. Several holes need to be and spinning. I used a handscrew to hold
the hitch ball. It’s then just a matter of drilled in the steel jaw plates (detail ‘c’). the workpieces and clamped it to the table.

How-To: Metal Work


Half-round
metal file !/16
1!/4"-dia.
bi-metal
hole saw

Handscrew

Bar
clamp
NOTE: Set
drill press to
slowest speed Countersink
mounting
NOTE: Handscrew holes
holds jaw plate
securely Handscrew

Jaw Plates. Stack the jaw plates and Hitch Ball Hole. A bi-metal hole saw works great to Chamfer Hole. Use a half-round
clamp in a handscrew. A bar clamp drill the hole in the center of the plates. Cutting fluid is metal file to chamfer the edge of
secures it to the table. essential for drilling this large hole. the hitch ball hole.

30 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


a.
Use pipe flange
!/2"-rad. to lay out
four center
After drilling all of the through holes, Machinist's holes
vise 5!/4
remove the clamps and label the two jaw %/16"-dia. hole
plates (drawing lower right, previous page).
This ensures the countersinks for the mount-
ing holes and the chamfered edges of the large
2&/16"-rad.
center holes are mirror images when drilled. D
ADD VISE HARDWARE. The jaw plates are
attached to the vise block and front jaw with TOP
VIEW
5!/4
woodscrews. I filed a slight chamfer on all
four corners of each jaw plate to match the D &/8"-dia.
Use
VISE vise to counterbore,
chamfer on the block and jaw. MOUNTING lay out and !/16"deep
PLATE size mounting
Now secure the vise block and front jaw holes
assemblies together with a pair of threaded 1" pipe
rods, washers, and nuts, as shown in the main flange
NOTE: Vise mounting
plate is made from
illustration on the opposite page. Also, install #/4"-10 x 7" 1"-thick hardwood
the adjustable handle on one threaded rod. hex bolt
!/4"-20 x 1!/4"
VISE MOUNTING PLATE. The next step is to hex head #/4" washer
b.
machine
make the mounting plate for attaching the screw and SIDE VIEW
machinist’s vise (detail ‘a’). Cut the plate washer Jam nut supplied
with hitch ball
to size and round the corners with a band D
saw. I also chamfered the edges to match Align with !/4"-20 Pipe
bench dog T-nut flange
the vise block and jaws. hole
Since flange hole patterns may vary, you’ll
want to use the pipe flange you purchased to
mark the mounting holes on the plate. Once this
is done, drill through holes and counterbores for
#/4" washer
some T-nuts and then tap them in place with a hammer. c.
FINISHING TOUCHES. Just a few more details need atten-
Size bolt
tion to complete the swivel vise. First, screw the hitch for hole
in vise
ball to the flange and secure it with the supplied nut. Recess washer
and nut in a D
Next, you’ll use the hole pattern of the machinist’s counterbore
SIDE !/4
vise to locate and drill the holes in the mounting VIEW
plate. Attach the vise to the mounting plate with bolts #/4"-10
hex nut
and nuts (detail ‘c,’ at right).
Finally, you’re ready to attach the swivel vise to your
workbench. A large hex bolt through a dog hole works
great. Now you can put your new vise to work.

Additional Clamping Fixtures


You can give the multi-function
swivel vise even more versatility
with the addition of the two clamp-
ing fixtures shown in the photos at
right. The plans for these fixtures
are available on our Online Extras
page at WoodsmithSpecials.com.

GO
GO
2li
Online
nliline
For two more handy
accessories, go to:
WoodsmithSpecials.com
Extras

WoodsmithSpecials.com 31
multi-function
swivel vise
Handscrew
XXXX XX

Mount
XXXXXXEXTRAS

As a stand-alone project, the swivel vise is an incred-


ibly useful shop accessory. But you can give the vise
even more versatility by building a couple additional
clamping fixtures. The first fixture (shown at right) is a
ONLINE

mount for a standard 10" handscrew.


QUICK CONSTRUCTION. Start by cutting the base and two
brackets to size. To match the look of the vise, I cham-
fered the edges of these parts, as shown in the drawings
at right. There are a couple of options when it comes a. FRONT
to marking the holes in the base for the pipe flange. VIEW
Hand- !/2 45°
You can use the pipe flange from the machinist’s vise
screw 1
mount and move it each time you switch between fix-
tures. Or, the option I chose was to purchase an extra Bracket
flange and leave it attached to the base. This makes it
easy to switch between clamping fixtures by unscrew- 1!/2
ing the flange from the hitch ball. 1 Base
DRILL HOLES & ASSEMBLE. With the flange location
marked, drill the holes in the base. You’ll then
drill the counterbores for the T-nuts and tap them
in place with a hammer. Next, I attached the b.
brackets to the base with some screws and held
one leg of the handscrew between the brackets 10" handscrew
&/8
to mark and drill the through holes for the
T-nut
bolts (detail ‘a’). Secure the handscrew
with two carriage bolts, nuts, and !/4"-20 x 3!/2"
carriage bolt
washers, and it’s ready to use. 7#/4
%/16"-dia.
hole

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES &


!/4" washer Use pipe
CUTTING DIAGRAM flange
to lay out 2&/8
A Base (1) 1 x 41⁄2 - 81⁄2 3#/8
four holes
3⁄ x 33⁄ - 6
B for T-nuts
B Brackets (2) 4 8 !/16" chamfer
• (4) 1⁄4"-20 T-Nuts BRACKET TOP VIEW
B
• (1) 1" Pipe Flange !/4"-20
T-nut
• (4) #8 x 13⁄4" Fh Woodscrews 6 !/4"-20 c.
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 x 31⁄2" Carriage Bolts hex nut
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 Hex Nuts
BASE
• (2) 1⁄4" Washers A
Carriage
bolt
• (1) 10" Handscrew
Hex nut
1"x 5"- 24" Hard Maple (1.0 Bd. Ft.) & washer
%/16"-dia.
A hole &/8"-dia. Handscrew
counterbore,
8!/2 !/16"deep
#/4"x 4"- 24" Hard Maple (.7 Bd. Ft.) !/8" chamfer
4!/2 NOTE: Base is made END VIEW &/8
B B from 1"-thick hardwood.
#8 x 1#/4" Brackets are made
Fh woodscrew from #/4"-thick hardwood

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Bar Clamp
Mount
Having built two mounts for my swivel vise (one for a machinist’s
vise and one for a handscrew), I still felt the need to add one more
fixture. That third fixture is the bar clamp mount you see at right.
This mount holds two bar clamps in a couple of cradles and adds
even more functionality to my swivel vise.
FAMILIAR CONSTRUCTION. You’ll notice right away that the base for
the bar clamp mount is very similar to the base for the handscrew
mount, just a little longer. This is a good place to start. Cut the
base to size and chamfer the edges. You’ll also lay out the holes
to mount the pipe flange as before. Now, drill these through holes
and the counterbores for the T-nuts (detail ‘a’). Tap the T-nuts in place with a hammer. b. !/8 1!/4
CRADLE BLOCKS. The cradle blocks are next. They hold the bar clamps in an upright position.
Glue up a couple of pieces of 3⁄4"-thick stock, plane them to final thickness, and then cut
B
them to size. I used a dado blade in my table saw to cut the slots for the bar clamps. Most bar TOP VIEW
clamps have a similar design, but be sure to have the clamps that you’ll be using on hand in
order to size the slots. Now, chamfer the edges of the blocks (drawing at right and detail ‘a’) 4!/8
A

and attach them to the base with glue. The through hole in the center of the block and base !/4
NOTE: Use pipe
are made at the drill press. flange to lay
HOLD-DOWNS. All that’s left is to fashion a cou- a. 1!/2
out four holes
for T-nuts
ple hold-downs from a 1⁄4"-thick piece of steel. END VIEW
These pieces hold the bar clamps securely in
place. Finish up by drilling a centered hole in
each hold-down. Drop the bar clamps into the !/4"-20 x 3!/2"
carriage bolt
slots and lock them in place with the hold-
Bar Cradle C
downs, carriage bolts, and knobs. clamp block HOLD-DOWN
1"x 5"- 24" Hard Maple (1.0 Bd. Ft.) NOTE: Tap
(1!/4" x 3 - !/4" steel) carriage bolts
A Carriage (/32"-dia. with hammer
bolt Base hole to seat square
neck of bolt
MATERIALS,
#/4"x 4"- 24" HardSUPPLIES
Maple (.7 Bd.&Ft.) 1!/2 in hold-down
B B DIAGRAM
CUTTING B
Threaded
knob !/16"
A Base (1) 1 x 41⁄2 - 131⁄2 4!/8 chamfer
B Cradle Blocks (2) 11⁄4 x 11⁄2 - 41⁄8
C Hold-Downs (2) 11⁄4 x 3 - 1⁄4 Steel 1!/4
!/4"-20
1
• (4) ⁄4"-20 T-nuts CRADLE T-nut
• (1) 1" Pipe Flange BLOCK
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 x 31⁄2" Carriage Bolts B C

• (2) 1⁄4" Washers A !/8" chamfer


• (1) 1⁄4"- 11⁄4" x 12" Steel Bar BASE
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 Threaded Knobs %/16"-dia. 13!/2 !/4" washer
• (2) 12" F-Style Bar Clamps hole

1"x 5"- 24" Hard Maple (1.0 Bd. Ft.)


A NOTE: Base is made NOTE: Size depth
4!/2 from 1"-thick hardwood. of slots in cradle
!/4"-20 Cradle blocks are glued blocks so bar clamps
#/4"x 4"- 24" Hard Maple (.7 Bd. Ft.) threaded up from two pieces of stand just proud
knob #/4"-thick hardwood of top of blocks.
and planed to Hold-downs secure
B final thickness the clamps in place

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
XXXXXX XXXX
SHOP-BUILT TOOLS
XX

sliding
Cutoff Grinder
This unique shop-made project transforms an ordinary angle grinder into a
benchtop tool for cutting metal parts accurately and easily.
I use metal parts from time to time in my a little work, I essentially turned it into turn is connected to a sturdy support
projects, especially ones for the shop. But a small, sliding cutoff saw for accurately arm that’s bolted to the base.
other than using a hacksaw and a whole cutting thin metal parts. And about that base: As you can see in
lot of elbow grease, I didn’t really have a PROJECT OVERVIEW. What makes this proj- the drawings on the opposite page, it’s
good method for cutting these metal parts ect work are the clever carriage and han- built up from three layers of plywood
cleanly and accurately. dle assembles. These hold the grinder to be rock-solid. It also has a wide metal
NEW ANGLE FOR GRINDERS. I do, however, and allow it to slide back and forth, as channel at the center for added safety, and
own an angle grinder. And that served as well as rotate up and down. The assem- a two-position fence for greater versatility.
the inspiration for the unique project that blies slide along the hardwood rail that All in all, it’s sure to add some precision to
you see here. With a few basic parts and you see in the photo above, which in your metal-cutting operations.

32 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
OVERALL DIMENSIONS:
23" W x 15" H x 22!#/16" D

Large carriage bolts


lock support arm
to base
NOTE: Cutting capacity
Support arm mounts of grinder is nearly 16"
to base and accepts
the carriage and
handle assemblies Resin slides allow
carriage assembly to
move smoothly back and Adjustable Fence. The fence can be mounted in two
forth along their length
positions for cutting wide or narrow metal stock.

GO
GO
Spring returns
grinder to
2
Online
nline
neutral Extras
Rail mounts to position Handle is
support arm and shaped and
has grooves to rounded For a full-size
accept resin slides for comfort pattern of the
handle and
metal-cutting
tips, go to:
WoodsmithSpecials.com

Carriage assembly
moves back
Steel pins and forth on rail
act as stops
for carriage
assembly
Metal fence
can be repositioned Concentric disc
for cutting wide or and ring allow the
narrow metal pieces grinder to pivot
up and down

Mounting blocks
NOTE: Refer to cut to match
page 98 for shape of angle grinder
hardware sources
and finishing information

Aluminum strap
Cuts made with secures angle grinder
abrasive grinding to handle assembly
wheel

Steel inserts
and U-channel
protect the base
from sparks
when cutting Threaded inserts
accept bolts for Sliding Saw. Resin slides mounted in the rail accept
mounting fence
Sturdy base built in two positions the carriage and handle assembly, allowing the
up from three grinder to slide back and forth.
layers of plywood

WoodsmithSpecials.com 33
full-size handle pattern
Sliding Cutoff Grinder
XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS

A comfortable, easy-to-grip handle is


a key component of the sliding cutoff
grinder. And while it’s a little bit elabo- %/8

rate, the handle pattern you see here


was the result of a lot of trial and error
#/4
ONLINE

until I arrived at the perfect shape and


!/2
size for the project. Do not round
over this edge
USING THE PATTERN. Fortunately, making
your own handle doesn’t have to be as 2
2(/16
time-consuming. You can either use the
1!/4 Do not round
dimensions shown here to lay it out on over these edges
a scrap of plywood, or simply print this
pattern and attach it to your plywood
#/4
with spray adhesive. A little sanding
will remove it after the fact. Shaping the
handle is mostly band saw work. I cut the
hand-hold with a Forstner bit and jig saw. Do not round
over these edges
Finally, I rounded the edges for comfort.

#/4"-rad.
NOTE: Rout !/8" roundover
on all edges except on
bottom of handle

2%/8

1"-rad.

1#/8"-dia.

1!!/16 2#/16

1"-rad. #/4"-rad.

PAGE 1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
!/2"-13 x 8" NOTE: Do not
a. SIDE SECTION VIEW carriage bolt glue support arm
c. TOP VIEW
1 assembly to base 6
!/8"- !/4"-rad.
rad. C 1!/2 B 1#/4
1!/4 MAIN 4
SUPPORT ARM
B
!/4"-rad. SMALL
!/2"- SUPPORT ARM
rad. D 2#/32 C 1"-rad.
1
#/16 D
A
6 14 !/4"-20
1&/16 2 threaded
insert
10 1"-rad.
4
b. FRONT 6
11!/2
SECTION 1
2!/4
VIEW
A
5 1
4 BASE
!/2" NOTE: Join
main and small 3%/8 5
hole #/8"-dia. hole,
support arm D 1" deep
before SUPPORT
drilling holes BLOCK 1 !/8"
3
roundover
23
%/8 NOTE: All parts are
#/4" plywood. Base 21
is three layers and main
1!/8 support arm is two layers
!/2"-13 lock !/2" fender
nut washer

the Base & This way, you can glue them face to HOLES. There are some holes to drill in the

Support Arm face without worrying about the edges


being perfectly aligned. After that, it
just requires a few table saw cuts to
base, as well. Two large counterbored holes
near the back left corner let you bolt down
the support arm later on (details ‘a’ and
The cutoff grinder’s base is a good place trim the base to final overall size. ‘b’). And two rows of smaller holes accept
to start on this project. It’s built up from SHAPING. A notch on the back edge threaded inserts for the fence. You’ll drill
several layers to make it sturdy, stable, of the base forms a tab for mounting these holes and install threaded inserts
and unlikely to shift as you’re making a support arm. These cuts, as well as as shown above. The center channel and
cuts. It has softened edges and holes for the radiused corners, are quick work fence get added later as you’re putting the
mounting a support arm and fence. at the band saw (lower left drawing in final touches on your project.
SIZE THE BASE. To make the base easier to tint box). Then use a roundover bit to SUPPORT ARM. The next part of the project is
assemble, I started with oversize panels. soften the top edge. a support arm that connects the base to the

How-To: Shape the Base & Support Arm !/2"


spade
bit

Main
Waste support arm Support
!/4" band arm
saw blade assembly
Base

1" sanding
drum

Cut Notch. The wide notch at the back Smooth the Shapes. I relied on a sanding Holes. Use a spade bit to bore holes through
of the base requires simple band saw cuts. drum in the drill press to smooth the radii the arm for carriage bolts. You may need to
Then sand the notch smooth. of the support arms. raise the table mid-hole.

34 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Sliding Cutoff Grinder
Steel Cutting Guides
XXXX XX

The cutoff grinder is a great solution


1 Position 2
XXXXXXEXTRAS

for making precise cuts in metal. But hacksaw against


guide block as
the irony of the project is that you have you cut
to make some accurate cuts in metal by Use block with
45° end as guide for
hand first in order to build the project. cutting angled notch
GUIDE BLOCKS. A few of those cuts
are required for the steel-angle Guide
block Guide
ONLINE

fence, which is both cut to length block


and notched at 45° on one end. To Fence Fence
blank blank
do this accurately, I made a guide
block with a 90° and 45° end. Then I
clamped the block and steel angle in
a vise and cut along the block with a
hacksaw (Figures 1 and 2).

PAGE 1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Resin
slide !/8"
b. TOP SECTION VIEW
roundovers
!/2
2!/4
Support 21 3
arm

21
RAIL 6
E #/4

#8 x 1#/4" Fh Rail
woodscrew Support
NOTE: Rail is arm
1"-thick hardwood. Base
Slides are !/4" resin 2!/2 a. FRONT Rail Resin
SECTION slide
VIEW

%/16 Resin
slide
!/4 !%/16
NOTE: Do not !/4"-dia. x 1"
secure pins in steel pin 6
slide rail yet Support
Resin !/4 Pin
slide arm
%/8
assembly that holds the angle grinder. It !/2
consists of several built-up plywood parts,
as well as a hardwood rail that the angle Resin
slide
grinder assembly slides along.
As shown on the previous page, the
support arm is a five-layer plywood cut the small support arm and support mounting it to the base. I used a drill
sandwich. Two pieces of plywood form blocks to overall size, as well. Next, use press equipped with a spade bit for this
the main support arm, and then a small a band saw to cut the main support arm (lower right drawing, previous page).
support arm is added to the side to give and small support arm to shape (detail A fence and stop block help align the
the structure even more rigidity. The two ‘a’, opposite page). After a little sanding assembly as you drill the holes. Then it’s
small support blocks widen the base of the (lower middle drawing, opposite page), time to glue on the support blocks and
support arm for additional stability. you’re ready to glue the small support bolt the support arm to the base.
You can get started by gluing two pieces arm to the main support arm. They align
of plywood together for the main support along the bottom and back edges. MAKING THE RAIL
arm, and then cutting the arm to final size You’ll need to drill two long holes The rail comes next. It’s a piece of hard-
when the glue is dry. While you’re at it, through the support arm assembly for wood with grooves in the edges to accept
resin slides. After cutting the rail to size,

How-To: Complete the Rail


form the grooves in the edges (far left
drawing). Have the slides on hand to
check their fit in the grooves.
Countersunk holes in the face of the
NOTE: rail accept screws. And larger holes near
Flip rail end for the ends hold steel pins that will serve
end between cuts
to center as stops for the carriage assembly. After
groove Resin drilling the holes, round the ends and
a. END slide
VIEW edges of the rail.
SLIDES. The resin stock I used for the slides
E
!/4 E was rough, so after ripping the strips and
%/16 trimming them to length, I dressed the
Block edges with a block plane (near left draw-
plane
ing) before epoxying them in the grooves.
Then it was just a matter of securing the
Centered Grooves. Use a rip blade and flip Smooth Slides. To create smooth slides, rail on the support arm with woodscrews.
the rail between passes to cut a centered make a few quick swipes along the Cut the steel pins to size now, but you
groove sized to fit the slides. edges with a block plane. won’t insert them until later, after adding
the carriage assembly onto the rail.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 35
.438" O.D. x !/4"-dia.
3#/4"-long spring screw eye
NOTE: Plate and stop are
#/4" plywood, disc is !/4" plywood, 5 CARRIAGE
and guides are 1"-thick hardwood PLATE
H 1 8#/4 F STOP
!/2
3!#/16 G
!/2

#/8"-16 x 2" !/8"


carriage roundover
bolt 2

4#/4 #8 x 1!/4" Fh
DISC woodscrew
H (3"-dia.)
GUIDE I

a. b. SIDE VIEW #/4 c. &/16 FRONT


!/4 SECTION
TOP SECTION VIEW Plate H
VIEW
!/2 1!/4 !/2 %/16 G
Resin F !/8
2#/8 !/4
slide G
#/8 I
H 45°
!/2 !/2 #/16
F #/4
#/8"
hole 4#/8
G

4 !/4 I
I !/2 45° F
H

adding the carriage & stopped slots at each end that butt a perfect task for a drill press circle cut-

Handle Assemblies against the pins on the slide rail. Make


the slots as shown in Figure 1 below.
STOP & GUIDES. At this point, you can
ter (Figure 3). The key here is to drill at a
slow speed, and have the plywood blank
attached securely to a backer as you cut.
A carriage assembly is the next component cut the plywood stop and hardwood When you’re done, enlarge the center hole
of the sliding cutoff grinder. This assem- guides to size. These parts (and the plate) to 3⁄8". Now you can assemble the entire
bly moves along the resin slides on two all receive 45° cuts along some of the cor- carriage assembly with glue and screws,
guides. On the outer face of the assembly ners (Figure 2). The plate has a counter- as shown above.
is a plywood disc. The disc mates with bored hole to attach the disc, and a hole on
a ring on the handle assembly to let the the top edge for a screw eye. The guides HANDLE ASSEMBLY
grinder pivot up and down. A stop limits have grooves along the edges to fit over The handle assembly goes on next. On the
the travel of the grinder. the resin slides in the rail (detail ‘c’). inner face of the assembly, it has a ring that
CARRIAGE PLATE. I started on the carriage DISC. The disc is the next order of busi- mates with the disc on the carriage assem-
plate. After cutting it to size, you’ll form ness. It’s made from thin plywood, so it’s bly to allow the pivoting action. On the

How-To: Make the Carriage Assembly 3


1 !/2"
straight bit 2 Miter gauge
tilted 45°

Aux.
F fence Stop
block
Stop Disc
block
Waste F
Circle cutter
(set to 3"-dia.)
NOTE: Rout slots Backer
in multiple passes

Stopped Slots. Set a stop block on the Bevels. Rotate the miter gauge 45° in order Cut the Disc. Cut the disc from a larger
router table fence and make a series of to cut the beveled corners on the plate, plywood blank using a circle cutter running
passes to rout the slots in the plate. stop, and guides. at low speed on the drill press.

36 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


!/4"-dia. NOTE: Ring is NOTE: Shape
screw eye NOTE: Use
!/4" plywood. mounting block pattern (below)
4#/4 Other parts are cutouts to to size and
#/4" plywood match grinder body shape handle
(Figure 3 below)
!/2 #/8"-16 lock nut
3%/16 w/fender washer
3 1#/8
K
4&/16 HANDLE
!/8"
5%/8 3!/8 roundovers
#8 x 1!/4" Fh
3!/8 woodscrew
RING 4!/2
N #/4
#8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew M
1!/4
MOUNTING #8 x 1!/4" Fh
a. FRONT J BLOCKS woodscrew
K SECTION PIVOT PLATE L
VIEW PATTERN (One square = !/2")
SPACER BLOCK
%/16
N
1!/4
b.
N #/4"-rad.
1%/8
J M TOP 1"-rad.
SECTION
L VIEW
1#/8"-dia.
K J
!/16 M M
1"-rad.
#/4"-rad.

outer face, two mounting blocks hold the shape at the band saw. Then it’s a matter
grinder in place. A spring running from the of cutting the hand-hold (Figure 2) and
carriage assembly to the handle assembly softening the handle edges.
returns the grinder to a neutral position. BLOCKS. The mounting blocks require a lit- ASSEMBLY. The handle assembly can now
RING. The ring is made similarly to the tle work to get just right. The cutouts need be glued and screwed together. Next fit the
disc. The difference is you’ll make two to match the shape of the grinder body ring over the disc and secure the carriage
cuts (Figure 1 below). and hold the grinding wheel parallel with assembly to the handle assembly with a
PLATE, SPACER & HANDLE. The pivot plate and the handle. For my grinder, this required a bolt, washer, and lock nut. Snug up the lock
spacer block are pretty basic (drawing different cutout on each block. nut so the handle still pivots freely on the
above). These parts are cut to size, drilled, To get it right, lay out and cut the cut- carriage assembly. Then add the screw eyes
and rounded on the edges. The handle is outs on your blocks, then put the grinder and spring between the carriage and handle
a little more involved. There’s a full-size on the blocks on a worksurface. When the assemblies. Finally, slide the guides over
pattern at WoodsmithSpecials.com that you grinder wheel is parallel with the work- the resin slides of the slide rail, and insert
can use as a guide to cut the handle to surface, your job is done (Figure 3). the steel pins to complete the assembly.

How-To: Add the Handle Assembly Continue shaping the Framing 3


mounting blocks square
until grinding wheel
1 Jig saw 2 is parallel with
worksurface

Blocks cut to
1#/8"-dia. width of leg
hole of square

Handle
Ring

Circle cutter
(set to 4&/16"-dia.) Backer

Cut the Ring. Cut the inner circle first, Hand-Hold. Drill two holes in the handle Blocks. Test the fit of the mounting blocks to
then the outer circle to form the ring for with a Forstner bit, then connect them with ensure that they hold the grinder wheel parallel
the handle assembly. a jig saw to form the hand-hold. with a worksurface.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 37
a. TOP VIEW

Plate
Handle Strap

THIRD: Drill pilot


holes and secure
NOTE: Grinder wheel is strap around grinder
parallel with handle with screws

b. SIDE VIEW
!/4"
washer
Position strap
to not interfere
with grinder
switch
#10 x 1!/4" Rh
woodscrew

FIRST: Use body of


grinder as form for Angle
bending strap to shape grinder

SECOND: Bend ends Strap


of strap at 90° in vise, (!/2" x 9" - !/16" Alum.)
and trim strap to final length

drawings above and then use sparks from directly hitting the plywood

finishing touches for the grinder body as a form for


bending the strap to match.
base. I waited until now to form the chan-
nel, so I could determine precisely where

The Cutoff Grinder After determining where the


strap will meet the handle and
spacer block, bend the strap at
the grinder wheel would come in contact
with the base. The steel parts used for the
channel are cut to length with a hack saw.
Your sliding cutoff grinder is nearing com- 90° in a vise at those locations. Then trim To locate the center channel, lower the
pletion. A few more additions will leave off the excess aluminum from the ends of grinder, and run it along the base to form
you with the precision metal-cutting tool the strap. Finally, position the grinder and the centerline for the channel you’ll be cut-
you’ve been waiting for. That starts with strap on the handle assembly and drill ting (Figure 1, next page).
adding the grinder to the assembly. pilot holes for screws. Secure the grinder FORM THE CHANNEL. Now remove the sup-
STRAP. The angle grinder is held in place to the mounting blocks by driving screws port arm from the base and set up a dado
on the mounting blocks with a strap through the holes in the strap and into the blade in your table saw. Using the rip fence
formed from thin aluminum. After cut- handle and spacer block. as your guide, cut a groove centered under
ting the strap extra-long, place it around CENTER CHANNEL. The base of the cutoff the grinder wheel to accept the U-channel
the body of the grinder as shown in the grinder has a steel channel. This prevents (refer to Figure 2).

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


A Base (1) 21 x 23 - 21⁄4 Ply. • (8) 1⁄4"-20 Threaded Inserts • (2) #10 x 11⁄4" Rh Woodscrews
B Main Support Arm (1) 6 x 14 - 11⁄2 Ply. • (2) 1⁄2"-13 x 8" Carriage Bolts • (6) 1⁄4" Washers
C Small Support Arm (1) 6 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 1⁄2" Fender Washers • (1) 1⁄2" x 1" - 17" Steel U-Channel
D Support Blocks (2) 2 ⁄4 x 35⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply.
1 • (2) 1⁄2"-13 Lock Nuts • (2) 1⁄8" x 4" - 17” Steel Inserts
E Rail (1) 1 x 21⁄2 - 21 • (6) #8 x 13⁄4" Fh Woodscrews • (16) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
F Carriage Plate (1) 4 ⁄4 x 83⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply.
3 • (2) 1⁄4" x 3⁄4" - 21" Resin Strips • (2) 1⁄8" x 1" - 12" Steel Angles
G Stop (1) 2 x 313⁄16 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 1⁄4"-dia. x 1" Steel Pins • (4) 1⁄4"-20 x 1⁄2" Hex Bolts
H Guides (2) 1x1-5 • (9) #8 x 11⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
ALSO NEEDED:
I Disc (1) 3"-dia. - 1⁄4 Ply. • (2) 1⁄4"-dia. Screw Eyes One 60" x 60" sheet of 3⁄4" Baltic birch plywood
J Pivot Plate (1) 43⁄4 x 55⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 3⁄8"-16 x 2" Carriage Bolt One 24" x 24" piece of 1 ⁄4" Baltic birch plywood
K Handle (1) 8 rgh. x 10 rgh. - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 3⁄8" Fender Washer 0.8 bd. ft. of 1"-thick maple (parts E and H)
L Spacer Block (1) 11⁄4 x 31⁄8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 3⁄8"-16 Lock Nut
M Mounting Blocks (2) 13⁄8 x 41⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) .438" O.D. x 33⁄4"-long Spring
N Ring (1) 4 ⁄16"-dia. - 1⁄4 Ply.
7 • (1) 1⁄16" x 11⁄4" - 9" Aluminum Bar

38 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


a. FRONT SECTION VIEW NOTE: Position fence right
in front of threaded inserts
in order to transfer hole
45° !/4 45° locations from base to fence
2!/2 3%/8

!/8 %/8

b. SIDE SECTION VIEW


!/4"-20 x !/2" Fence
hex bolt Steel angle Steel bar
w/washer (!/8" thick)
1

11&/8
U-channel
10!/2
17

Steel from steel angle that I cut to length. I also


inserts #8 x 1!/2" Fh
(!/8" thick) woodscrew formed a notch on the left fence using a
4 #8 x 1!/4" Fh
hack saw, so it wouldn’t interfere with the
woodscrew body of the grinder. Then I beveled the
17 edge of the right fence. (You’ll find metal-
cutting tips at WoodsmithSpecials.com.)
Position the fence parts on the base, just
in front of the row of threaded inserts, and
!/2" x 1" steel
U-channel mark hole locations that match up with
the inserts. Then drill the holes, do a little
NOTE: Use grinding wheel filing and sanding, and the fence is ready
to mark dado locations as
shown in Figure 1 below to be installed with bolts and washers, as
shown in the drawings above.
I also placed some wider steel inserts on File and sand the ends smooth, drill coun- PRECISION METAL-CUTTING. Reinstall the sup-
either side of the U-channel (and overlap- tersunk pilot holes, and attach the channel port arm on the base with the carriage
ping it slightly) as added insurance against in the groove with long screws for a secure bolts, do a little painting and finishing,
sparks. You’ll want to lower the dado connection. Repeat the process for the steel and your sliding cutoff grinder is ready
blade and make a series of passes to form inserts, as well. I filed a chamfer on the for action. It’s sure to bring a much-
rabbets for these inserts (Figure 3). ends of the inserts to soften them. needed measure of accuracy to all your
Next, cut a piece of steel U-channel with a FENCE. The last addition to the cutoff cuts in metal, and that will ultimately
hack saw to fit the center groove in the base. grinder is the two-part fence. It’s made lead to better shop projects.

How-To: Complete the Base


1 2 a. END VIEW 3 a. END VIEW
Base Base
1 Waste 3%/8 !/8
Base %/8 Base
Dado Waste
centerline

Grinding
wheel #/4" dado
#/4" dado
blade blade

Score a Line. Run the grinder wheel Deep Dado. Set up a dado blade in the Shallow Dado. Lower the blade, and
along the base to score a line. This is the table saw, and pass the base over it to make a series of passes to create two
centerline for the U-channel. form the groove for the steel U-channel. shallow rabbets for the steel inserts.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 39
rotary tool
TOOLS
XX

Milling Machine
XXXXXX XXXX
SHOP-BUILT

This 3-axis milling


machine provides a new
level of accuracy for
making small parts.

There have been more than a few times The precision comes from two sliding tables made from strong, hard maple for dura-
when I’ve wished for some way to precisely that move the workpiece in the X (left-right) bility. With the right bit plus proper feed
mill small project pieces or parts for model- and Y (front-back) directions. A platform and speed rates, it can handle wood, plas-
making. But a traditional, 3-axis milling moves the tool up or down in the Z direc- tic, brass, and aluminum.
machine can cost several hundred dollars tion. Simple hardware makes this possible. An added vise also lets you hold small
or more. The milling machine you see here The bulk of the machine is made from parts vertically for milling (inset photo
uses a rotary tool to power the tool bit. Baltic birch plywood. Some parts are above). You’ll find the details on page 45.

40 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
OVERALL DIMENSIONS: Z-axis assembly
moves tool Double thickness
16&/8" W x 23&/8" H x 22#/16" D up and down plywood posts add
rigidity

Variable-speed rotary
tool allows machining
a variety of materials

GO
GO
2
Online
nline
Extras
Shop-made
For bonus aluminum clamps
techniques hold tool in place
helpful in
building the
machine, go to:
WoodsmithSpecials.com

Workpiece is Hardwood gibs and


clamped to ways provide
replaceable smooth operation
spoilboard
on rotary table

Shop-made
clamps hold
rotary table in
position

Y-axis assembly
moves
workpiece
front-to-back

Handwheels make
X-axis assembly positioning
moves workpiece workpiece easy
side-to-side

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


A Base (1) 13 x 18 - 11⁄2 Ply. O Hold-Downs (2) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 1⁄ Alum.
4 2 8 • (3) 31⁄4"-dia. Zinc Handwheels
B Posts (2) 10 x 13 - 11⁄2 Ply. P Z-Axis Slide (1) 21⁄4 x 8 - 1 Ply. • (2) 1⁄4"-20 Threaded Inserts
C Tool Platform (1) 5 x 111⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. Q Z-Axis Ways (2) 5⁄ x 1 - 8
8 • (4) 1⁄4"-20 Through Knobs
D X-Axis Platform (1) 51⁄2 x 13 - 3⁄4 Ply. R Tool Bracket (1) 11⁄2 x 2 - 31⁄2 • (2) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Studded Knobs
E X-Axis Slide (1) 23⁄4 x 51⁄2 - 1 Ply. S Nose Bracket (1) 3⁄ x 2 - 23⁄
4 4 • (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 12" Threaded Rod
F X-Axis Ways (2) 5⁄ x 1 - 51⁄ T Rod Block (1) 1 x 17⁄8 - 21⁄2 • (18) #8 x 11⁄4" Rh Woodscrews
8 2
G End Blocks (4) 3⁄ x 1 - 21⁄ U Z-Axis Gibs (2) 15⁄ x 13⁄ - 8 • (8) #8 x 3" Fh Woodscrews
4 2 16 16
H X-Axis Gibs (2) 15⁄ x 13⁄ - 111⁄ V Tool Clamp (1) 11⁄2 x 31⁄2 Rgh. - 1⁄16 Alum. • (18) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
16 16 2
I Y-Axis Slide (1) 23⁄4 x 51⁄2 - 1 Ply. W Nose Clamp (1) 3⁄4 x 23⁄4 Rgh. - 1⁄16 Alum. • (8) #8 x 11⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
J Y-Axis Ways (2) 5⁄ x 1 - 51⁄ • (1) 3⁄8"-16 x 12" Threaded Rod
8 2
K Y-Axis Platform (1) 5 ⁄2 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply.
1 • (2) 3⁄8"-16 x 24" Left-Hand Threaded Rods • (4) 3⁄8"-16 Thin Hex Nuts
L Y-Axis Gibs (2) 15⁄ x 13⁄ - 81⁄ • (8) 3⁄8"-16 Left-Hand Thin Hex Nuts • (2) 3⁄8"-16 Coupling Nuts
16 16 2
M Rotary Table Base (1) 61⁄2-dia. - 3⁄4 Ply. • (6) 3⁄8" SAE Flat Washers • (1) 1⁄2"-dia. x 11⁄4" Steel Rod
N Spoilboard (1) 61⁄2-dia. - 3⁄4 Ply. • (3) 3⁄8"-16 Left-Hand Coupling Nuts • (8) #8 x 2" Fh Woodscrews

WoodsmithSpecials.com 41
Circular Groove Handle

Routing the groove in the rotary NOTE: Space


guide blocks to
table for the milling machine isn’t position disk
Rotary for #/8" depth
difficult. I used a slot-cutting bit at of cut
table
XXXX XX

the router table. Guide base


Double-sided
The problem is, most of these bits block
tape
XXXXXXEXTRAS

cut a slot up to 1⁄2" deep. To make


the shallower, 3⁄8"-deep cut for the a.
NOTE: !/4" slot
groove, I used a pair of guide blocks, Secure guide cutting bit
blocks with
as you can see in the drawings. The clamps or Guide
spacing between them determines double-sided block 60°
tape
the depth of cut into the disk. Guide
Rotary
ONLINE

To make it easier to rotate the table block


#/8 base
disk, I attached a temporary handle
TOP VIEW
using double-sided tape.

Tool Clamp Rotary table

Aluminum Clamps
mold

3!/2"-dia.
Nose 1#/4
The milling machine features the three aluminum Clamp 2!/2
clamps you see at right. Two of them secure the
rotary tool to the tool brackets. A pair of the smallest
ones lock the rotary table in place. 2!/2
To make it easy to form the shapes, I made clamp-
ing molds from hardwood. You can see how they Rotary
work in the photos below. And the drawings on the Table Clamp
right give you all the dimensions you need to make 3!/2
each of the three molds.
I drilled a hole at each corner of the straight lay- Tool mold
Second 2#/4
out line where it meets the arc of the bracket shape. First cut
2!/2 cut
This serves as a pivot point for the scroll saw or band Nose
3!/2 mold 1!/2
saw blade. This way, it’s easy to complete the arc cut
2!/2
without binding the blade.
#/16"-dia.
Using an extra-long aluminum blank, clamp it 2"-dia. Hole 1"-dia.
between the blocks to form the final shape.

1 2

Setup. Use double-sided tape to attach each half of the hardwood Tight Squeeze. Start tightening the vise jaws to force the alumi-
mold to the vise jaw. Place the aluminum blank between them, num into the mold. Then you can cut the aluminum to final length
centering the blank on the mold. and drill the holes used to attach the clamp.

PAGE 1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
FIGURE Paint edges of
1 tool platform
TOOL
PLATFORM Posts
1#/16
(5" x 11!/2")
C

!/2

NOTE: RIp bevels


while blanks are 65°
square, before
cutting to final
Tool shape
platform
NOTE: Tilt
blade 25°
B Tool to cut
platform bevels
B TOP VIEW
POST
SIDE (10" x 13")
VIEW NOTE: Posts and base
#8 x 2" Fh 1!/4
woodscrew glued up from two
layers of #/4" plywood

2"-rad.
5
Post !/2"-rad.
3 A
BASE
(13" x 18")
!/2 Post
1!/2
2"-dia.

NOTE: Posts and base SIDE VIEW


painted after assembly

starting with a
6

BASE & POSTS. The base is easy to make TOOL PLATFORM. To provide a sturdy mount

Base by cutting it to size from plywood and


rounding the corners with a disk sander.
For the posts, it’s a good idea to cut the
for the rotary tool, a tool platform connects
the two posts at the top. It’s cut to shape at
the band saw and sanded smooth. After
One of the keys to accuracy in a milling blanks to their overall size first. After laying out the locations for the screw
machine is the stoutness and stability of its that, a little bit of layout work is required holes, drill them at the drill press and
base. It has to hold the tool steady without to outline their shape. attach the platform to the posts. Then you
vibration. To accomplish this goal, the base While the blank is still rectangular, it’s can install the post assembly to the base
and post assemblies are made up of two lay- easy to rip the beveled edge, as in Fig- with screws, making sure the platform is
ers of 3⁄4" Baltic birch plywood. So the first ure 1 and the Top View above. With that parallel to the front edge of the base.
step is to glue up some plywood blanks for done, you’ll shape them at the band saw
the three parts, as shown in Figure 1. and then put them aside. X-TABLE ASSEMBLY
The next phase of the construction pro-
2 X-AXIS PLATFORM
(5!/2" x 13 - #/4" Ply.)
cess involves building up the X-Y table
that moves the workpiece side-to-side and
Post D front-to-back. Each sliding table uses a
1!/2
threaded rod mechanism to move a slide
Post between a pair of dovetailed gibs and ways.
Base
You’ll build this assembly from the bot-
tom up, starting with a rectangular plat-
form (Figure 2). Once it’s secured to the
base with screws, you can turn your atten-
#8 x 1!/2" Fh tion to the moving parts.
Paint edges woodscrew Figures 3, 4, and 5 give you the run-
of x-axis platform
down and all of the details on how the
rest of the X-table assembly goes together.

42 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


I’ll help out with some of the more impor-
3 #/8"-16 x 15" Lh
threaded
rod
X-AXIS SLIDE
(2#/4" x 5!/2" - 1" Ply.) a. SIDE VIEW
E %/32 #/8
tant points along the way.
TWO-PART SLIDE. Figure 3 shows how the
X-table consists of a two-part slide and a 25°
pair of ways. A pair of coupling nuts are %/16
Way
trapped between the halves of the slide.
These engage the threaded rod used to NOTE: Epoxy coupling Left-hand
F nuts in groove before coupling
move the table between the gibs. assembling slide halves nut and
X-AXIS WAY #/8"-16 x 1#/4" Lh threaded rod
LEFT-HAND THREADS. A note about the (%/8" x 1" - 5!/2") coupling nut
threads: When turning the handwheels
that are used to move the tables, I wanted
to mimic the action of production milling
machines. When turning the crank clock-
4 !#/32"-dia.
hole centered
wise, it moves the table away from you. on end block
In order to do this, you’ll need to use nuts
#/8"-16 Lh Post
and rods with left-hand threads. Refer to thin hex Base
Sources on page 98. nuts
w/washers
The slide is made from two layers of 3!/4"-dia.
1⁄ " plywood. I started with a long blank handwheel
2 !/4"-rad.
cut to width. Then I cut a groove down
the center. This groove forms a slot for
G
capturing the coupling nuts.
END BLOCK
Before gluing the halves of the slide (#/4" x 1" - 2!/2")
G
together, you’ll need to use epoxy to posi-
tion the coupling nuts. I threaded them
onto the rod and then “tacked” them
into the groove with epoxy. You can then a. TOP VIEW Left-hand b. Left-hand
hex nuts FRONT VIEW threaded
remove the rod and glue on the second w/washer rod
layer of the slide.
End block
WAYS & END BLOCKS. To create the ways, I
glued extra-wide hardwood to the long
X-axis Left-hand File a flat on
edges of the slide and then ripped the threaded
Left-hand
platform coupling threaded rod
bevels at the table saw, as illustrated in rod nut for handwheel
Figure 3. Two end blocks support each set screw
end of the threaded rod, as shown in
Figure 4. You’ll want to make four since
you’ll need two for the Y-table later. shown in Figure 4. Then add the rod and previously, they’re bevel ripped at the
Fasten the end blocks to the X-axis handwheel assembly. table saw. Oversized holes drilled in the
platform, flush with the ends of the The gibs shown in Figure 5 below are gibs allow for adjustment for a sliding fit
platform and centered on its width, as easy to make. As with the ways made when fastening them in place.

5 NOTE: Adjust
gibs for a H
#8 x 1!/4" Rh
a. b.
smooth, #/8"-dia. TOP VIEW
sliding fit counterbore !/4" woodscrew
deep, with !/4"-dia.
through hole
!/4 Gib

Slide Base
Way
Slide
Gib

#/4 Gib !/4"-rad.


H
X-AXIS GIB SIDE VIEW #/4
(!%/16" x 1#/16" - 11!/2")

WoodsmithSpecials.com 43
6 Y-AXIS WAY
(%/8" x 1" - 5!/2")

completing the
J

#/8-16 x 1#/4"
coupling nut

Table
You’ve taken care of the X-axis for the
table assembly. Now, you’ll switch gears I
to build the Y-axis subassembly and a Y-AXIS SLIDE
J (2#/4" x 5!/2" - 1" Ply.)
rotary table. The Y-axis table is similar to
the X-axis table you just built. The differ-
ences are that it’s mounted upside down
a. FRONT VIEW
and shorter in length. %/8
There’s one other thing to note. Since Way
the slide and way assembly are fixed to %/16
the X-axis slide, you can use right-hand
threads for the rod and coupling nuts. This
way, as you rotate the handwheel clock- %/32 #/4 Slide
wise, the workpiece moves away from the X-axis slide
handwheel as it does on the X-axis.
Y-SLIDE. Like the X-slide you built earlier,
the Y-slide is made up of two layers of 1⁄2" Y-PLATFORM. The Y-platform should be After mounting the two remaining end
plywood, as you can see in Figure 6. The familiar territory by now. It holds the blocks you made earlier (Figure 7), add the
coupling nuts are trapped in a groove. I mechanism for moving the workpiece. threaded rod assembly, as shown in Figure
threaded the nuts onto the rod to properly After cutting it to size, you’ll need to 8. You can also attach the handwheel.
orient the threads and hold the nuts in drill some holes. Oversized, counter- Y-AXIS GIBS. In Figure 9, you’ll see how
position until the epoxy set up. bored holes along each edge hold the the gibs are attached under the platform.
The ways are glued to the slide and the gibs in place and allow for adjustment. They secure the platform assembly to the
bevels ripped as before. Then you can drill You need to drill another pair of holes slide assembly. Roundhead screws allow
countersunk screw holes before attaching for threaded inserts used to clamp the for adusting the fit of the gibs against the
this sub-assembly to the X-slide, as illus- rotary table. Finally, a center hole holds ways. You want a smooth, sliding fit when
trated in Figure 6a. a pin for the rotary table. turning the handwheel.

FIGURE
7 End block 8 !/4"-20 threaded
NOTE: Platform insert
shown upside 1!/2
1#/4 down
#/8"-16 Rh
threaded thin hex #/8"-16 x 12"
nuts w/washer right-hand
1!/2 threaded
rod and
thin hex nuts
w/washer
!/2

K
Y-AXIS PLATFORM
(5!/2" x 10" - #/4" Ply.) End block

a. a. SIDE VIEW
1!/2
End
block
Platform

!/2 Y-axis slide

Y-axis Handwheel
platform

FRONT VIEW

44 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


FIGURE
ROTARY TABLE.The last piece of the overall
table assembly is the addition of a rotary
9 SPOIL BOARD
(6!/2"-dia. x #/4" Ply.)
a. !%/16 FRONT VIEW

Spoilboard #/8
table, as in Figure 9. It’s made up of two N
!/4
layers of plywood. But the top layer is Rotary table base
simply screwed to the bottom layer. It’s %/16
sometimes called a “spoilboard” and is
!/16
designed to be easily replaced as needed.
Gib Gib
The bottom layer of the rotary
table has a groove around the !/4"-20 x 1"
circumference. This enables two studded knob
clamps to engage the rotary table b.
to keep it from spinning. Spoilboard
I cut the two disks slightly over- SIDE
VIEW
sized at the band saw. You could Rotary
also use a straight bit in a router table base
M
with a circle-cutting jig. I used the
ROTARY TABLE BASE
bottom disk as a template to flush- (6!/2"-dia. x #/4" Ply.)
trim the top disk. You might just as O
well make a couple of extra disks to #/4"HOLD-DOWN
x 1!/2" - !/8"
have on hand. The spoilboard will Aluminum Y-AXIS GIB
(refer to !/2"-dia. x 1!/4" (!%/16"x 1#/16" - 8!/2")
get chewed up over time as you use online extra) steel pin L
the milling machine.
To cut the groove around the
edge of the bottom layer, I used
a 1⁄4" slot-cutting bit in the router table.
A free technique article available online
at WoodsmithSpecials.com explains the
process. Once that’s done, you can drill
a center hole for a steel pivot pin that
allows the table to rotate. I glued the pin
into the disk with epoxy. aluminum bar stock. An oversized hole the bonus technique article that’s available
HOLD-DOWNS. Using the milling machine to allows a studded knob to pass through online at WoodsmithSpecials.com.
make straight cuts in the X- or Y-directions to secure it to the platform (Figure 9b). To I found that a vise is useful at times
requires locking the rotary table. A pair of find out how to make the hold-downs and for holding parts. The box below shows
shop-made hold-downs are made from two other clamps you’ll need later, refer to how to build one.

Optional Auxiliary Vise MOVABLE JAW


!/4"-dia.
through hole
(1" x 1!/2" - 3#/4")
!/4"-20 x 4" carriage
An auxiliary vise makes it easy to connect the two jaws to one bolt
(/32"-dia.
secure small parts for machining. All another, as illustrated below and at through hole !/2
you do is remove the rotary table and right. The knobs are the same style
!/4"
secure the vise with screws to the used to clamp the rotary tool motor washer
FIXED JAW
Y-axis platform (see the inset photo in place (refer to page 47). (1" x 1!/2" - 3#/4")
on page 40). You can also attach it to
!/2
the spoilboard on the rotary table to a. Through knob 1
make circular or arc cuts. w/washer
#/8 !/4"-20
Movable Fixed through knob
The vise consists of a plywood jaw jaw (see sources 1!/4
base and two hardwood jaws (I on page 98)
used maple). One of the jaws is BASE
#/8 (4" x 5" -!/2" Ply.)
fixed to the base with screws while NOTE: Jaws
Base #/16"-dia. made from
the other jaw “floats.” through hole hardwood.
Long carriage bolts, through #8 x 1!/4" Fh Carriage Base is !/2"
woodscrew bolt plywood
knobs, and washers are used to

WoodsmithSpecials.com 45
FIGURE
10 NOTE: Epoxy coupling nut
into tool bracket %/8 TOP VIEW Z-axis
slide
#/8"-16 x 1#/4" Lh
coupling nut (cut Way
to 1!/2" long) !/2

finishing the Z-AXIS SLIDE


(2!/4" x 8" - 1" Ply.)
P 2!/4
Size hole for

Motor Mount tight fit of


coupling nut Tool
bracket
#/4
2"-dia.
a.

Attaching the rotary tool to the base is the Q


Z-AXIS WAY TOP VIEW b.
next task. It’s secured to a mechanism that (%/8" x 1" - 8")
!/4"-dia.
moves the tool vertically in the Z direc- R
TOOL BRACKET Way Z-axis
tion. Like the X- and Y-axis tables you’ve (1!/2" x 2" - 3!/2") slide
already completed, it follows a similar
construction path. The main difference #8 x 1!/2" Fh Nose
woodscrew 1
bracket
is that the threaded rod assembly passes
S 1"-dia. !/2
through a couple of brackets used to hold
NOSE BRACKET
the tool in position. (#/4" x 2" - 2#/4") !/8" chamfer
Z-AXIS SLIDE & WAYS. The slide is made of
two layers of plywood as before, except nut that engages the threaded rod to move of threaded rod. They’re used to secure
there’s no need to cut a groove for cou- the tool up and down. The lower nose the aluminum clamps that hold the tool
pling nuts. The ways are glued and cut bracket fits around the nose of the tool in place. You’ll add the threaded rod later.
with the technique that is familiar to you (Figures 10a and 10b). In the meantime, drill and install the cou-
by now (Figure 10). To make each of the brackets, I started pling nut in the tool bracket. Attach each
BRACKETS. To hold the rotary tool in place, with extra-wide blanks. After drilling bracket with a pair of screws from the
you’ll need to make a couple of brackets. the holes that form the U-shaped recess, back of the slide.
The upper tool bracket is made to fit the they’re cut to final width. A pair of holes ROD BLOCK. In order to easily move the
body of the tool. It also holds the coupling on the front of the brackets hold lengths tool up and down, you’ll need to make a
rod block. It’s shown in Figure 11. The
FIGURE
11 Handwheel a. Left-hand
thin hex nuts
threaded rod passes through and spins
in this block to engage the threads in
w/washer
Add flat to rod the coupling nut in the tool bracket.
to secure set The rod block stays stationary on the
screw !#/32"-dia. #/8
tool platform as the tool moves.
#/8"-16 x 9#/4" SIDE
#8 x 1!/4" Fh Lh threaded Rod Figure 11a shows how the threaded
woodscrew VIEW
rod w/thin block rod and handwheel are attached after
hex nuts &
T washers Tool Left-hand you fasten the rod block to the tool plat-
ROD BLOCK plat- threaded rod
(1" x 1&/8" - 2!/2") form form. Then you can focus your atten-
tion on the adjustable gibs.
Slide GIBS. There’s nothing new to tell you
Way
about the gibs that trap the Z-axis plat-
#8 x 1!/4" Rh
woodscrew form. They’re similar to ones you’ve
already made and installed (Figure 11).
b. Oversized holes allow for adjustment
Post so the slide travels smoothly.
WAX & ADJUST. Once you have the
Tool Tool platform assembly together to this point, it’s a
bracket
T good idea to apply some paste wax to
Way Z-axis the gibs, ways, and the threads on the
Z-axis gib slide
threaded rods. This ensures smooth
travel of all the mechanisms as you’re
U TOP VIEW using the machine. You should also
Nose Z-AXIS GIB !/16 take the time to adjust the gibs to ensure
bracket (!%/16" x 1#/16" - 8") Tool
bracket a smooth, sliding fit.
SHOP-MADE CLAMPS. The rotary tool is
held to the brackets with a pair of

46 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


shop-made aluminum clamps attached
with knobs, as illustrated in Figure 12.
12 NOTE: Epoxy
threaded rod Threaded rod a.
into brackets to
The knobs engage the short lengths of form studs
threaded rod I mentioned earlier. The TOOL CLAMP TOP
(1!/2" x 3!/2" rgh. - VIEW
threaded rod forms the studs that are sim- !/16" Alum.)
ply epoxied into the brackets. V

The clamps are made from aluminum


bar stock. To shape them, I used mating
Tool clamp Through knob
pairs of molding blocks to form the metal
in a vise. You can see how in a bonus arti- !/4"-20
through knob
Threaded b.
cle at WoodsmithSpecials.com. rod
After cutting the clamps to length and !/4"-20 x 1!/2"
drilling a hole at each end of the clamp, threaded rod
fasten the rotary tool in place with through
knobs. You’ll want to make sure the tool Through
fits tight so it won’t vibrate during use. W
Tool knob
Variable-speed clamp
This ensures a cleaner cut as you use the NOSE CLAMP rotary tool BOTTOM VIEW
(#/4" x 2#/4" rgh. - !/16" Alum.)
machine. For more on using it, see below.

Using the Milling Machine


The key to success in milling with your new Another factor that guarantees success
machine is finding the right combination of is investing in quality bits. Look for solid
spindle speed, depth of cut, and feed rate. carbide bits that are designed for milling.
The first can be handled with a variable-speed (You’ll find some listed in Sources on page
rotary tool. The depth of cut and feed rate 98.) The 1⁄8"-dia. shank size on the bits for
are determined by the speed and amount your rotary tool means they can flex a bit
of rotation of the three handwheels. Each if you’re making a heavy cut. So be sure to
full rotation of the handwheel advances the make cuts in several lighter passes to extend
workpiece (or tool) 1⁄16". bit life and avoid breaking them.

X Direction. Spinning the handwheel clock- Y Direction. Rotating the handwheel Z Direction. The handwheel determines
wise moves the workpiece to the left. One clockwise moves the workpiece toward the the depth of cut. Stick with shallow
rotation equals 1⁄16" of travel. back of the machine. passes for cleaner cuts.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 47
XXXXXX XXXX
SHOP-BUILT TOOLS
XX

drill press
Edge Sander
This inexpensive jig transforms your ordinary drill press into a fully functioning
edge sander for smoothing the rough edges of your project workpieces.
A full-size, dedicated edge sander is one of First, it’s powered by your drill press. outside curves. Inexpensive hardware,
those tools that would be nice to have — if Since there’s no motor, it’s easier to including ball bearings, makes it a
I had the space. As an alternative, I built store when it’s not being used. Plus, it smooth-running, quiet machine.
the portable edge sander you see above. uses a common 4" x 36" sanding belt. And the best part is, you’ll find that
It’s a scaled-down version of a big, com- The long, wide platen provides sup- building the sander is just as enjoyable
mercial unit with several advantages. port for smoothing straight edges and as using it afterward.

48 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Table assembly adjusts
vertically to provide
even wear on
sanding belt
CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
DIMENSIONS:
OVERALL DIMENSIO
29" W x 14!/4" H x 10
10!/2" D

Sander uses
readily available
4" x 36" belts
Steel shaft spinning
in bearings can be
used to sand
a tight radius

Platen provides
backing for belt
when sanding
Knob moves
tracking assembly
to adjust the
belt tension

Durable phenolic-
covered plywood Drive roller
reduces friction shaped on drill
press after glueup

GO
GO
Online
nline
2
Extras
Tracking For bonus
arm pivots techniques
on steel pin helpful in
making the
sander, go
Belt tracking online to:
is adjusted WoodsmithSpecials.com
with knob
Knobs lock
table height Metal plate
in position positioned under
tracking knob to
prevent wear

Oversized base
provides plenty of
clamping area for
attaching to drill
press table

SECTION VIEW
(WITHOUT TABLE)

Ball bearings prevent


heat build-up and
Tracking assembly provide smooth
moves to adjust performance
belt tension

Tracking arm pivots


to keep belt centered
on rollers

Tight Radius. The 5⁄8"-dia. steel shaft supported by


a pair of bearings at one end of the sander enables
the belt to reach into tight areas.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 49
XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS

drill press
ONLINE

edge sander
Making a
Drive Roller
The drive roller for the edge SHAPING THE ROLLER. The final step To shape the roller, chuck the
sander is easy to make. In simple involves shaping the roller, as shown assembly in the drill press at low
terms, it’s a series of six MDF disks above. To provide a reference, I drew speed and use a coarse file or rasp,
glued to a shaft. After assembling a circle on the top and bottom of the as you can see above. You’re aim-
the roller, you’ll use a file to form roller about 1⁄8" in from the edge. This ing to create a gentle curve from
the barrel shape that keeps the belt is the amount of camber you’ll create top to bottom. Finish up by sand-
tracking properly. during the shaping process. ing the roller smooth.
CREATING THE DISKS. The process starts
by cutting out the disks and drilling
the 1⁄2"-dia. center hole. These steps
are detailed on the bottom of page 53.
GLUING & STACKING. For the next step, FIRST: Glue up
roller, using !/2"-dia. x
FOURTH:
you’re going to use the 1⁄2" steel rod shaft to keep Epoxy roller
9" shaft for
disks aligned drive roller
as an alignment guide for glueup. to shaft
Simply apply wood glue to the
disks and slip them onto the shaft. THIRD:
After clamping the series of disks, 1#/8 Rough up #/4
surface of
remove the rod before the glue sets. shaft with
file
The drawing at right shows how to
clamp the assembly.
SHAFT INSTALLATION. After cutting the 4!/2
FIFTH: Shape
drive shaft to length, you’ll need to roller on
drill press
roughen up the surface where the
drive roller will be attached. For
this, I used a file. This provides some
“bite” for the two-part epoxy. !/8
1#/8
All you need to do now is apply
a thin layer of epoxy to the shaft
SECOND: NOTE: Drive roller made from six
and slip the assembled drive roller Remove steel 3"-dia. x #/4" MDF disks
shaft
into position. Make sure to wipe off
any excess epoxy.

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
cutting an End Bevel
Cutting the shallow bevel on
the end of the edge sander ’s
platen is easy with a simple Platen
table saw setup.
The first thing I did was clamp
a tall auxiliary fence to the saw’s
rip fence, as you can see in the Tall a.
drawings at right. The tall fence auxiliary
fence Platen
provides solid support that Cleat
allows you to control the work- Fence Waste
clamp Fence
piece and keep it vertical. clamp
I set the workpiece against the Auxiliary 10˚
fence
fence and clamped a long cleat on
the back side. The cleat rides on Rip
top of the tall auxiliary rip fence fence Waste
and keeps the workpiece from NOTE: Tilt
rocking front-to-back. Simply blade 10˚
keep the workpiece against the
fence while making the cut.

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
making the Base
The base for the sander is really just a long
box with an oversized bottom. It holds the
mechanics for tensioning and adjusting
the belt tracking for proper alignment.
To make the base, I used a “bottom-up”
approach. In Figure 1, you can see how
the bottom is simply a rectangular piece
of plywood with rounded corners. You’ll
find some helpful tips for rounding cor- Adjusting the Tracking. The tracking knob (photo above)
ners at WoodsmithSpecials.com. adjusts the angle of the tracking spindle (left photo).
Besides drilling countersunk holes on
the underside for screws, there’s one more the front and back (Figures 1 and 1b). hole to engage the tracking and tension
thing to do. And that’s to add a small, metal To make the sides, I started with a wide mechanism inside.
strip. This is just a small mending plate blank ripped to length. This way, you FRONT & BACK. If you take a look at Figure
you’ll find at the hardware store. It prevents can cut the rabbet on both ends and 1, you’ll notice that the front and back
wear to the plywood base when adjusting then trim the sides to their final width. of the base are identical in size. But the
the tracking knob on the pivot arm. The only other thing you need to do is front requires a little more work. You’ll
SIDES. The sides of the base are also drill a hole in the left side. The stud on want to cut an access window to allow
pretty simple. They’re rabbeted to accept the tensioning knob extends through this you to adjust the belt tracking. And a
pair of counterbored holes accommodate
FIGURE
1 NOTE: Rout !/4"
roundover after top,
FRONT VIEW T-nuts for the table height adjustment
knobs (Figures 1 and 1c).
sides, front, and back %/16 Top
are assembled TOP. To cap off the base, the top comes
b. Side next. There are a couple of large holes
Bottom a. that provide clearance for the two
1!/2 shafts. The hole for the drive shaft is
2!/4"-dia.
#/8 hole %/8"-dia.
Left side hole w/1!/8"-dia.
flush counterbore
with Back 1(/16
bottom
4#/4 #8 x 1!/2" Fh 1(/16
TOP woodscrew
VIEW
D
!/2" dia.
TOP
1#/4 (5!/2" x 21!/2")
#/8" x 16 C
T-nut
BACK
&/16"-dia. (5" x 20#/4")

3#/8 1"-dia. !/2" x 2"


1
mending
7#/4 plate B
w/screws SIDE !/4" roundover
FRONT
(5" x 20#/4") (5" x 5!/2")
C BOTTOM
c. 2 (8!/2" x 27!/2")
Top A
4
10&/8
END 2!/8
VIEW #8 x 1!/2" Fh NOTE: All parts
woodscrew made from #/4"
plywood
Front 1"-dia. NOTE:
counterbore Counterbore
for flange #8 x 1!/2" Fh !/2"-rad.
all T-nuts flush
on T-nut woodscrew

50 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


FIGURE
2 &/16"-dia. hole #/8"-16 T-nut NOTE: Bracket
parts made from
b.
TOP VIEW
w/1"-dia.
counterbore #/4" plywood
NOTE: Bracket assembly should
BRACKET SIDE slide freely inside housing
(5" x 8") F PIVOT ARM
1#/4 (3#/8" x 13!/2")
F E
Bracket
end !/2
!/2"-dia. x 4" G 2!/4
steel pin
BRACKET END !/4 #/4"
!/2" (5" x 3") ply.
washer
NOTE:
Counterbore
T-nuts flush 3!/2 Pivot
Washer pin

&/16 a.
2 NOTE: Pivot arm SIDE Pivot
made from three VIEW arm Bracket
!/2 layers #/4" plywood side
& /16"-dia.
3#/8 hole
!/2"-dia. hole
#/4"-dia. hole w/1#/8"-dia.
1%/8 counterbore at each end
1

1 &/16 #/4
13!/2
NOTE: Drill holes in blank before cutting to shape

counterbored to accept a bearing, so I TRACKING ASSEMBLY You’ll want to remove the top so you can
drilled it first (Figures 1 and 1a). The key to keeping the sanding belt fit and install the assembly inside the base.
ASSEMBLY. Now, you’re ready to start tensioned and tracking correctly is the PIVOT ARM. The pivoting arm requires the
assembling the base. I glued up the front, assembly shown in Figure 2. It consists of most work, so that’s what I started on
back, and sides then temporarily attached a three-sided bracket and a pivoting arm. next. I began by gluing up three layers
the top with screws. I took this subas- The arm tilts a rotating shaft to allow you of plywood. Before cutting it to shape at
sembly over to the router table to ease the to adjust the tracking of the belt on the the band saw, I drilled the counterbored
sharp corners. Once that’s done, you can drive roller and platen. The only thing holes. You can find all the details and
install the bottom with a few screws. to be aware of is the whole assembly dimensions for the holes in Figure 2a.
needs to slide freely inside the base. BRACKET. The next item to focus on is
the three-piece bracket. The
bracket end fits into a dado in
each of the sides. The sides are
also drilled for a steel pivot
pin. The best way to ensure
the holes align is to stack the
pieces together to drill them.
Then cut the bracket end to
size and drill a counterbored
hole for a T-nut.
After you assemble the
three parts of the bracket,
you’re ready to install the
pivot arm. As you insert the
pivot pin, install a washer
between the arm and each
Tensioning. The knob on the side bracket side. This allows the
of the base moves the tracking arm to rotate without rub-
assembly to adjust the tension on bing. Finally, you can install
the sanding belt. the assembly into the base.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 51
!/2"-dia. x 9" Score shaft with
NOTE: Shape steel rod file before
roller on drill fastening roller
FIGURE with epoxy
3 press after
assembling disks
b.
!/8
onto shaft
H FRONT
VIEW
DRIVE ROLLER
%/8"-dia. x 10" (3"-dia. x 4!/2" MDF)
hardened steel
tracking rod
Drive roller
#8 x 1!/2" Fh !/2" SAE
woodscrew washer
#/8"-16
through knob
!/2" SAE
washer
#/8" washer !/2" I.D.
Top bearing
!/2" I.D.
bearing Top
!/2" washer
#/8"-16 !/2"
Tracking washer
assembly through
#/8"-16 x 3#/4" knob
threaded rod !/2" stop
!/2" I.D. stop collar
collar
Pivot
arm NOTE: Washers
%/8" I.D. bearing should not contact c. %/8" x 10"
outer race of
bearings when hardened
installed steel rod

#/8"-16 x 3!/4"
#/8"-16 T-nut threaded rod

%/8" stop collar Bracket %/8" stop


side collar

%/8" I.D.
bearing Pivot arm
a.
#/8"-16 FRONT
NOTE: Fasten through VIEW
threaded rods to knob Pivot
knobs with epoxy pin
%/8" I.D.
#/8"-16 bearing
Pivot threaded
arm

making the
rod FRONT %/8" stop
VIEW collar
Mending #/8"-16
plate T-nut

Roller & Table Bottom

At this point, most of the mechanics are DRIVE ROLLER With the disks in hand, you’re ready to
complete. What you’ll concentrate on The drive roller is made from a half dozen glue them into a stack and shape them.
now is making the barrel-shaped drive MDF disks fastened with epoxy onto a steel To learn how I did this quickly and easily,
roller, installing the hardware, and finally drive shaft. The roller is then shaped to help go online to WoodsmithSpecials.com. Once
adding a table. keep the sanding belt tracking properly. everything is assembled and shaped, the
DISK BLANKS. To cut the 3"-dia. disks, use a
D roller should look like the one shown in
hole saw or wing cutter, as shown in the the photo at left.
left photo at the bottom of the opposite HARDWARE. At this point, you can gather
page.
pag Since the disks need to be mounted up all the bearings and other hardware.
on a 1⁄2"-dia. shaft, you’ll need to enlarge The only thing I need to point out is that
the center hole before assembly. the washers that fit next to the bearings
The
T easiest way to do this is to make a should be SAE-dimensioned washers.
simple
sim jig with two cleats, as shown in the Their smaller outside diameter ensures
center
cen photo on the opposite page. This the washer contacts only on the inner race
allows
allo you to center the disk under the of the bearing. This helps avoid friction
dril chuck using a 1⁄4" bit. Once the jig and
drill and heat build-up.
disk are positioned, clamp the jig in place, The bearings are simply press-fit into
Camber. The barrel shape of the drive roller change to a 1⁄2" drill bit, and enlarge the
cha the counterbores in the pivot arm and
helps the belt track properly. hole (right photo, opposite page). the top of the base (Figures 3b and 3c).

52 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


7#/8 3#/8
4!/4
FIGURE 4!!/16
The tracking shaft is “locked” in place,
but the stop collar and washer for the
4 #8 x 1!/2" Fh
TABLETOP
(10!/2" x 23!/2")
5&/16

drive shaft should be installed so the woodscrew I

shaft rotates freely. &/8"-dia.

ADJUSTABLE TABLE 1"-rad.


You can turn your attention now to mak-
ing the adjustable table, as illustrated TOP VIEW
in Figure 4. It’s a simple assembly with
a phenolic plywood tabletop, a pair of NOTE:
brackets, and a support. Tabletop
J made from
SHAPED TOP. The shape of the tabletop SUPPORT #/4" phenolic
(5" x 13!/4") plywood.
allows it to “wrap around” the tracking rod Braces and
K support
for sanding inside curves. After laying K
BRACKET made from
out the shape, I drilled out the radius (2" x 3!/2") #/4" plywood
#8 x 1!/2" Fh
in the V-notch and then stepped over to woodscrew
Tracking rod
the band saw to cut the final shape. Drive
roller
SUPPORTING STRUCTURE. The tabletop
#/8"-16 x 1!/2"
rides on top of the support and brack- studded knob
ets. Slots in the support allow the w/washer
table to be adjusted to even out wear
on the sanding belt. To make the slots,
drill a hole at the top of the slot and
remove the waste at the band saw
(Figures 4 and 4b).
BRACKETS. The bevel on the table brack- END VIEW Tracking Tracking
rod rod
ets is best cut at the band saw due to
its small size (Figure 4a). You can fas- Tabletop Tabletop
!/2
ten them to the support with glue and Bracket
Support
screws and then attach the tabletop
before adding the knobs. Bracket #8 x 1!/2" Fh
A PAIR OF KNOBS. As you can see in Fig- woodscrew
ures 4 and 4b, a pair of studded knobs 3!/4
with washers are used to adjust the table !/4 Support 2#/4
FRONT
height and hold it in position. The knobs VIEW
are threaded into the pair of T-nuts you a. b.
installed earlier in the front of the base.

Making Drive Roller Disks

Making Disks. Using a hole saw or wing Centering the Bit. Use a simple jig consisting Enlarge the Hole. Swap out the bit to
cutter, cut out the six MDF disks that will of a base and a couple of cleats to align the disk drill the !/2"-dia. center holes to fit the
form the drive roller. with the drill bit. shaft for the drive roller.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 53
adding the 5
FIGURE

PLATEN
#8 x 2" Rh woodscrew
w/washer
Tracking
rod

Platen
(4#/4" x 12#/4")
L
PLATEN BRACE
(1!/2" x 1#/4" - 9#/4") Tabletop
M
The platen provides a flat, straight sup-
!/4"-dia.
port for the sanding belt. And a handy, hole
clamp-on stop allows you to accurately
a.
sand edges square. You’ll work on these Drive Platen
roller
two items next, starting with the platen.
Straight-
#8 x #/4" Fh edge
woodscrew Drive
PLATEN roller
The platen assembly consists of only two
parts — a brace and the platen. The platen NOTE: Platen made
from #/4" phenolic
will see a lot of friction and wear over plywood. Brace made
time, so tough, phenolic-covered plywood from hardwood
is a good material to use for this applica-
tion. The brace that supports the platen is
made of hardwood. b. !/8" roundover TOP VIEW
SHAPING THE PLATEN. After cutting the platen 1!/4
to size, there are a couple of things to do Platen
before mounting it to the sander. If you
Platen
look at Figure 5b, you’ll notice a bevel brace
on the back side near the tensioning and !/8
#8 x#/4" Fh
tracking rod. This bevel provides clear- woodscrew
ance for the sanding belt as it wraps Holes counterbored to same 10° bevel provides
depth for #8 woodscrew clearance for belt
around the tracking rod. To create this
bevel, I used a tall auxiliary fence on the

Belt Tensioning

Alignment. Align the drive roller shaft with Remove Slack. Turn the tensioning knob Adjust Tracking. At a medium speed,
the chuck of the drill press, then raise the clockwise to remove slack on the belt before adjust the tracking until you get the belt
table and tighten the chuck. you adjust the tracking. centered on the drive roller.

54 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


table saw and the technique online at the front edge of the table-
WoodsmithSpecials.com. A quick trip to the top and clamp the stop in
router table creates the 1⁄8" roundovers on place. That’s all there is to it.
the remaining three edges. You’ll find all
the details in the drawings in Figures 5 SANDER SETUP
and 5b, on the opposite page. Now that the sander is
PLATEN BRACE. To secure the platen complete, the next step is
square to the table, you’ll need to make to give it a test run. The
the wedge-shaped brace (Figure 5b). As steps at the bottom of the
you did with the pivot arm, it’s easier opposite page provide a
to drill the holes for the screws before few handy pointers.
cutting it to shape. ALIGNING THE DRIVE SHAFT. The
The holes used for attaching the first thing to do is slip a
platen are counterbored. Figure 5b belt over the tracking rod
shows you how this allows you to use and drive roller, place
the same length for the three screws. the sander on your drill
The holes through the top of the brace press table, and lightly
are oversized to allow some adjustment clamp it in place. Then
when fastening the assembly to the you can raise the table to
base. After all the holes are drilled, you begin aligning the drive
can create the brace’s tapered shape at shaft with the chuck. You
the band saw and fasten it to the platen. may need to loosen the
It’s important for the face of the clamps before tightening
platen to align with the drive roller and the chuck, then you can
tracking rod. To position it accurately, I retighten the clamps.
used a straightedge. Place the straight- BELT TENSION. It’s best to take Using the Stop. Clamp the stop in position with the
edge against the widest point of the the slack out of the sanding cleat against the tabletop. The stop guides and controls
drive roller and the tracking rod (Figure belt before you adjust the the workpiece for smooth results.
5a). Then simply slide the platen against tracking. To do this, tighten
NOTE: Stop made
the straightedge. All that’s left is to fas- the knob (clockwise) on the side of the 1 from #/4" plywood.
Cleat made from
ten it down with roundhead screws and sander until the belt is just snug. #/4"-thick hardwood
washers (Figure 5). BELT TRACKING. Now you can set the speed
on the drill press to around 1,000 RPM.
STOP ASSEMBLY With the belt moving, adjust the tracking N

The final piece that completes the sander knob until the belt is centered on the drive STOP
(4" x 7!/16") 90°
is the stop you see in the drawing at right. roller and platen. It doesn’t take much to
It helps you maintain control of the work- get the belt to track properly. Once the
piece when sanding square edges. belt is centered and tracking consistently, CLEAT
(1!/4" x 4")
SIMPLE ASSEMBLY. As you can see in the you’re ready to go to work.
O
drawing, there’s not much to the stop. A With a little practice, you’ll be able to set
shaped piece is attached to a simple cleat. up the sander in no time. And putting it to
To use the stop, butt the cleat up against use is sure to yield great results.

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES


A Bottom (1) 81⁄2 x 271⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. L Platen (1) 43⁄4 x 123⁄4 - 3⁄4 Phenolic Ply. • (2) 3⁄8"-16 x 12" Threaded Rod
B Sides (2) 5 x 51⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. M Platen Brace (1) 11⁄2 x 13⁄4 - 93⁄4 • (2) 1⁄2" SAE Washers
C Front/Back (2) 5 x 203⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. N Stop (1) 4 x 71⁄16 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (1) 1⁄2" I.D. Ball Bearing
D Top (1) 51⁄2 x 211⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. O Cleat (1) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 4
4 4 • (1) 1⁄2" I.D. Stop Collar
E Pivot Arm (1) 33⁄8 x 131⁄2 - 21⁄4 Ply. • (1) 2" x 1⁄2" Mending Plate • (1) 5⁄8"-Dia. x 10" Hardened Steel Rod
F Bracket Sides (2) 5 x 8 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (22) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews • (2) 5⁄8" I.D. Ball Bearings
G Bracket Back (1) 5 x 3 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (4) 3⁄8"-16 T-Nuts • (2) 5⁄8" I.D. Stop Collars
H Drive Roller (1) 3"-dia. x 41⁄2 MDF • (1) 1⁄2"-Dia. x 24" Steel Rod • (2) 3⁄8"-16 x 11⁄2" Studded Knobs
I Tabletop (1) 101⁄2 x 231⁄2 - 3⁄4 Phenolic Ply. • (2) 1⁄2" Washers • (3) #8 x 3⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
J Support (1) 5 x 131⁄4 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 3⁄8"-16 Through Knobs • (3) #8 x 2" Rh Woodscrews
K Brackets (2) 2 x 31⁄2 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (3) 3⁄8" Washers • (3) #8 Washers

WoodsmithSpecials.com 55
56 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS
Jigs &
Accessories
Your tools are the lifeblood of the shop. And if

you outfit them with the right upgrades and add-

ons, you might just find that you’ll get even more

versatility, accuracy, and value from them.

HANDSAW MITER BOX ..................58

WORKBENCH RAIL SYSTEM...........62

DRILL PRESS DEPTH STOP ..............68

BAND SAW CIRCLE JIG ..................70

WoodsmithSpecials.com 57
& ACCESSORIES
XXXXXX
JIGS XXXX XX

handsaw
Miter Box Smooth-Sliding Guides.
Position low-friction plastic
guides against the saw to
make an accurate cut.
This handy shop-made jig makes it easy to
achieve perfect cuts in small pieces.
Cutting small pieces like delicate molding or thin glass stop poses some
unique challenges. Since the pieces are often very small, they can be hard
to hold down and cut safely at the table saw or miter saw. But it’s impor-
tant that each piece is cut accurately for a tight fit.
For this reason, I usually rely on a handsaw and a miter box. Now, I’m
not talking about the cheap, plastic miter boxes you find at hardware
stores. The wide slots in these miter boxes don’t do a good job of guiding
the saw. Instead, I made the miter box you see in the photo above. (You’ll
find a version for a Japanese saw on page 61.) To guide the saw, a set of
low-friction guides press against the body of the saw plate without bind-
ing (inset photo). The results are safe, accurate cuts.

58 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


%/8
FIGURE
Besides precision cuts, this miter box has
another key advantage — simplicity. You
1 FENCE
A
A
Blank is made A
can build it and start using it in an afternoon. from four layers 45°
of #/4" plywood
Waste
BUILD THE FENCE
The miter box is made up of two com- %/8
ponents — the adjustable fence and the
45°
base. The most important part is the A
fence. So that’s where I began building it.
%/8 NOTE: Fence blank
The fence has two roles. First, it pro- is 3" x 4!/2" - 16"
vides a wide, flat face to fully support the
workpiece. The second role is to guide %/8
NOTE: Cut grooves
the saw accurately during the cut. in blank before
cutting sections to size
PLYWOOD FENCE. To handle each of these
tasks, the fence is made from two differ-
ent materials. To support the workpiece, END VIEW !/4
the main part of the fence is made from a 4 a. Cut grooves in several passes
four-layer, plywood sandwich, as shown
in Figure 1. The drawing also shows how !/4
the fence is created from a long blank. 2!/4
#/4" dado
When gluing up the blank, the important blade
thing to keep in mind is that the front is the
reference face for supporting a workpiece. #/4
So the edges should be smooth and flat.
1 2!/2 1
TWO GROOVES. Before cutting the fence
into individual sections, I cut a groove
in the top and bottom of the blank. The sawdust-catching channel that keeps dust At this point, you can cut the blank
upper groove is sized to hold a piece of from building up between the fence and into four sections (Figure 2). Cutting
ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) workpiece. I cut both of these grooves in a workpiece this thick can be a chal-
plastic for the saw guides you’ll several passes with a dado blade at the lenge for some table saws. But since the
make later. The other groove creates a table saw, as shown in Figure 1a. plywood doesn’t guide the saw, the cut
doesn’t need to be perfect. So I cut the
FIGURE !/4"-20
2 threaded
insert
fence pieces at the band saw and then
sanded the edges smooth.
The next step is to install a threaded
FIRST: Locate insert in each section. These make it easy
and drill fence 1%/16 1#/8
sections for to attach the adjustable saw guides.
threaded inserts
BASE. The fence sections are glued to
a plywood base (Figure 2). To keep the
sections aligned, I attached a piece of
Fences hardboard to the base with double-sided
SECOND:
BASE Attach pad tape. It also serves as a replaceable cut-
(12" x 12" - #/4" Ply.) to base with ting surface. This way, you can “renew”
B double-sided
tape the pad when it gets chewed up.
!/8" gap
between
sections END VIEW
Fence

C
CUTTING PAD
(6" x 12" - !/4" Hdbd.)
Cutting
THIRD: Align pad
fence sections 1!/2
with pad and
End of fence glue in place
should align Base
with edge of base
Channel for dust relief

WoodsmithSpecials.com 59
FIGURE
3 Drill out waste
at drill press D
1
Waste
(Detail ‘a’)
SAW GUIDE

smooth-sliding
D #/4 %/16" dia.

Guides
1 D
45°
1 NOTE: Cut slots
1 after cutting
1 guides to size
I mentioned earlier that the fence
served two functions — supporting the
workpiece and guiding the saw. Com- D a.
pleting the plywood fence sections and
attaching them to the base takes care of NOTE: Saw guide
blank is #/4" x 4" - 14"
the first function. UHMW plastic
SAW GUIDES. For the second, you can
turn your attention to the four saw fine-tune the saw blade and miter gauge
guides. These guides are made from settings on my table saw. %/16" bit
UHMW plastic and keep the saw trav- ADJUSTMENT SLOTS. The saw guides are Stop
block
eling in a straight, square line. attached to the fence with studded
The guides are cut from a long blank, as knobs, as in Figure 4. The studs fit in
Clean up slots
shown in Figure 3. Each piece has a 45° cut slots that are cut in each guide. To make with a chisel
on one end and a 90° cut on the other end. the slots, I drilled a series of holes at the
It’s important that these pieces are accu- drill press (Figure 3a). Then I cleaned up
rately cut since they actually guide the the edges with a chisel.
handsaw during use. So before cutting the
guide pieces to size, I took some time to SETTING UP THE MITER BOX
After attaching the guides to the fence, centering it in the slot. After tightening
FIGURE
4 !/4"-20 x 1"
studded knob
you need to do a little set up. This
customizes the miter box to your
the knobs, move the saw back and forth.
The saw shouldn’t wobble or be too tight.
saw. Your goal is to have the saw Repeat the process for the 45° slots — with
held securely by the guides. one difference. Loosen the outer guides
!/4" flat
washer Start by loosening the knobs and slip- only, so you don’t alter the 90° setting.
ping the saw into the 90° slot. Slide the I attached some adhesive-backed
Saw
guides adjacent guides against the saw blade, sandpaper to the face of the fence (Fig-
ure 4). This simple step prevents a
SECOND: Slide saw into workpiece from creeping during the cut.
center slot and snug Finally, when inserting (or removing)
guides against saw plate
the saw, keep the teeth below the guides
FIRST: Attach
so the teeth don’t spoil the faces of the
THIRD: Place saw in
saw guides
45° slots and position guides. Now you’re set to make perfect
outer guides miters and crosscuts every time.
against blade

a.
SIDE VIEW (PUSH)

Adhesive-backed
sandpaper
keeps workpice
from shifting
Saw
guide Work-
piece

60 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Pull Saw Miter Box
Design Option. You can easily adapt the miter box
to work with a Japanese-style pull saw.
You’ll still get flawless cuts.

The miter box was originally built to be of cut found on most Japanese saws. To Using the Miter Box. The other “modi-
used with a Western-style back saw. But compensate for this, all you need to do is fication” you need to make with the Japa-
with a few modifications, you can make a shorten the height of the plywood fence nese saw version of the miter box is in how
version that works with a Japanese-style assembly, as shown in the drawing below. it’s used. Since a Japanese saw cuts on the
pull saw, as shown in the photo above. In this case, all I did was reduce the num- pull stroke, the cutting action would pull the
Shorter Depth. The biggest difference ber of plywood layers from four to two. workpiece away from the fence. And this
between the two saws is the shorter depth The grooves on the top and bottom are the could lead to an inaccurate cut.
same. And I didn’t change the saw guides, The solution is as simple as turning the
either. There’s plenty of adjustment space miter box around and using it “backwards.”
to account for the thinner blade. Now, pulling the saw holds the workpiece
firmly against the fence.
Saw
guides You can also see that I clamped the miter
Fence is box between bench dogs in the face vise.
only 1!/2" thick However, securing the miter box to the
(two layers of plywood)
benchtop with clamps would work as well.
No matter which version of the miter box
you choose, you’ll find it makes cutting small
pieces as accurate (and nearly as quick) as
any powered saw.

a. Lower fence profile


SIDE VIEW (PULL)
accommodates
Saw guide narrow Japanese saws

Cutting direction
pulls workpiece
against fence
(Detail ‘a’)
Workpiece
NOTE: All
other parts
and hardware
remain the same

WoodsmithSpecials.com 61
& ACCESSORIES
XXXXXX XXXX XX

add-on
JIGS

Bench Rail
System
Turn any workbench into a
multipurpose workstation with this
versatile rail system.
A workbench is often nothing more than a large, flat sur-
face for setting your work on to assemble a project. But as
your woodworking skills grow over time, you might need
more functionality from your workbench.
That’s where the dual-rail system you see here comes
into play. It adds a lot of features to an otherwise ordi-
nary bench. First, the grooves in the pair of rails accom-
modate sliding accessories. These include dog blocks to
clamp a workpiece, and tool anchors used to attach aux-
iliary platforms for tools like a bench vise or miter saw.
And speaking of a miter saw, the rail system also fea-
tures a pair of support blocks for holding up long work-
pieces as you’re using the saw. Each of the support blocks
can be positioned anywhere along the length of the rails.
Each one incorporates a stop that can be raised to make
repetitive cuts both quick and easy.
The bottom line is, you can turn an ordinary bench into a
multipurpose workspace without a lot of time or material.
Gaining additional functionality out of your shop space is
always a good thing. And this project is just the ticket.

62 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Platforms. Custom
plywood platforms
for your tools are easy
to make. They fasten
securely to the rail system.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 63
SPACER
BACK RAIL (1" x 1!/2" - 8")
FIGURE
1 (#/4" x 2!/4" - 48")
B
C

Drill and
countersink for #8
woodscrew
Bench
top
B
A FRONT RAIL
BACKING STRIP (#/4" x 2!/4" - 48")
(#/4" x 1" - 48")

1"-dia. counterbore
6 with %/16"-dia.
through hole
3
FRONT VIEW #/4"-dia. through
4 hole with !/16"
1 chamfer
12 !/2

2 %/16" x 3!/2" !/8"


lag screw Spacer !/4 chamfer
w/washer
#8 x 1!/2" Fh
woodscrew 6 2

creating a Each of the rails is 21⁄4" wide. Since the


top of my bench is only 11⁄2" thick, I made a
a.
!/4
!/4
SIDE VIEW

%/16

Rail System 3
⁄4"-thick backing strip to beef up the thick-
ness of the top and support the back rail.
The final thickness of the backing strip, Bench
top
!/2
!/4 1

The foundation for the bench rail system and whether you need one, depends on
starts with a pair of long rails separated the thickness of your benchtop.
!/2 Spacer
by spacers. There’s a groove in each of the After cutting the backing strip to size
rails on the inside face that forms a “track” and proper thickness, fasten it to the Front
for the accessories. A backing strip sup- underside of the benchtop, flush with the Backing Back rail !/8"
strip rail chamfer
ports the back rail on thinner benchtops. front edgeas in detail 'a'.
BACKING STRIP. There’s one thing I need to GROOVED RAILS. The front and back rails are
point out before you start. The dimensions simple to make, as you can see in Figure Some careful layout is in order for drill-
shown for the rails and backing strip are for 1. They’re cut to the same size. I cut a 1⁄4" ing all of the rail holes. Countersunk holes
a 48"-long section. My bench is 8' long, so I groove on the inside faces with a dado in the back rail are used to attach it.
made two rail sections. You’ll need to adjust blade. A chamfer on the front rail eases To drill the holes for the lag screws
the dimensions to suit the your workbench. the outside edges. that secure the rail assembly, start by

2 %/16"-18 x 2"
snap-lock knob
!/8" chamfer on
all upper edges
%/16" fender SIDE VIEW 1!/4 c.
Tool base washer
(!/4" Ply.)
Tool TOP VIEW
%/16"-18 x 1" base #/8 %/16"-
hexhead bolt dia.
!/16
T-NUT BLOCK
(1" x 1" - 3") Tool 1!/2
T-nut T-nut
D
a. block base base
!/4" #/16
%/16"-18 chamfer
1!/4
Propell T-NUT BASE
nut (1#/8" x 2" - #/16" b. Tool base
Phenolic. Phen.) #/8
E T-nut
As a strong and block
&/8"-dia. #8 x %/8" Fh
stable material, a counterbore woodscrew
phenolic insert is an with #/8"-dia. 1 #/4
through hole %/16"-18 x !/2" Fh !/2 %/16 FRONT VIEW
ideal base for the END VIEW
machine screw
sliding accessories.

64 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


SIDE
drilling the counterbores in the front
rail. Then clamp the two rails together
3 #/4"-dia. through
VIEW

hole with !/16" chamfer


to drill the through holes. Wonder (drilled after assembly) #/16 Dog
SPACERS. Several spacers separate the Pup
block
rails (refer to Figure 1 on the previous DOG BLOCK DOG BLOCK BASE base
(1" x !!/16" - 6") (1#/8" x 4" - #/16" Dog
page). The openings between them Phen.) block
F
allow sawdust to fall through the rails. G
a.
ASSEMBLING THE RAILS. The rails and spac-
ers can be mounted to the bench, starting b. Wonder
with the back rail. It should be flush with Pup
the top of the bench.
Dog
The spacers are next. Just make sure block
they’re level and flush with the bottom of 4 1
#8 x %/8" Fh FRONT
the groove in the rail (Figure 1a). Finally, woodscrew VIEW Spacer Back rail
add the front rail, keeping the top of the
rail even with the back rail.
T-NUT BLOCKS. Now you can start adding
accessories to the rail system. The T-nut
block shown in Figure 2 is used to attach
4 Bench
Pup NOTE: Drill dog
tools to the benchtop. I made six of them. DOG holes before
The blocks are made of hardwood ADJUSTER cutting angled
(1" x 1!/4" - 10") notches
with a phenolic base that slides along the H
grooves in the rails. I added a Propell nut #/4"-dia.
through hole
to accept a studded knob that’s used to with !/16"
chamfer
secure the tool bases.
TOOL BASES. Figure 2 also shows how a
plywood base fits over the T-nut blocks. a.
The block slides into a groove. A slot 3°
at each end of the base allows it to slip
around the studded knob. You’ll size !/2
Dog
each base for the tool you intend to use adjuster
on the benchtop. I made bases for my Spacer
miter saw and machinist’s vise.
DOG ASSEMBLY. No woodworking bench is
complete without a series of bench dogs. b. Bench Pup acts
as pin to secure
I used a Bench Pup set from Lee Valley, dog adjuster 4
as in the photo below. (Refer to Sources 2 1
on page 98.) A sliding dog block holds A bench dog locks the
Dog
the clamp assembly, as in Figure 3. It’s adjuster over a spacer, adjuster
designed to be secured over a dog hole in as shown in Figure 4b.
one of the spacers between the rails. Angled notches on the Back rail Spacer
I also made a dog adjuster that fits over ends of the adjuster
one of the spacers, as in Figure 4. It can secure the workpiece FRONT VIEW
be positioned to allow easy clamping. tightly when clamped.

Bench Dogs.
Clamping a
workpiece with this
adjustable bench
dog system is a snap.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 65
making the
Support Stands
Since I planned to use my miter saw on
my workbench, I thought it would be
helpful to make a pair of supports for
long workpieces. You can see what they
look like in the photo at right. The height
of each support matches the height of
the table on the miter saw when it’s
mounted on the plywood base. So you
may need to modify the height of the
support stands to fit your miter saw.
The supports also incorporate an
adjustable stop. This stop is made from
phenolic and locks in place with a
T-knob on the back side.
TOP & BASE. The top and the base of the sup- Support for Long Stock. A pair of supports slide along the bench rails and lock in place
ports are the same size. But their construc- with cam clamps. An integrated, phenolic stop allows you to make accurate, repetitive cuts.
tion is a little different than what you might
expect. Each of the pieces has a through Like the tool bases, the bottom of base for attaching the completed sup-
mortise for the support riser. To cut these the support base has a dado to fit over port to a T-nut block.
mortises, it’s easier and more accurate the T-nut block. After nipping off the TWO-PART RISERS. An adjustable stop is
to rip a blank in two, cut notches in each corners, chamfer both pieces along one of the features of the supports. To
piece, then glue them together (Figure 5). the edges. Finally, drill a hole in the form the mortise in the support riser to

FIGURE
5 SUPPORT TOP
(#/4" x 3" - 8") a. TOP VIEW 7
I NOTE:
#/8" #/4 Support
Open top
mortises chamfer NOTE:
formed by Rout !/8"
notching Both chamfers before
supports 2!/4 assembly
halves
before !/2
1!/4 glue up

SIDE VIEW

Support #/4
I
SUPPORT BASE base #/8
(#/4" x 3" - 8")
b. 1 #/4 !/2 SUPPORT
RISER
%/16"-18 (2" x 3!/4" - 4%/8")
threaded J
6 a.
a. Threaded
insert
insert
!/8"
#/32 chamfer

&/8
#/32"
NOTE: Cut chamfer
groove 1!/2
before !/2"-dia.
assembly hole
Support
base
SIDE NOTE:
Support TOP VIEW VIEW Support stand final height
riser blanks determined from height of
miter saw table

66 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


8 a.
TOP VIEW
STOP %/16"-18 x 1!/4"
(1&/16" x 4&/8" - #/16"Phen.) T-knob %/16"-18
K threaded
NOTE: Height of insert
stop matches
height of support
stand Stop
&/8
!/2"-dia.
T-knob counterbore

%/16"-18
cam clamp
w/washer
b. SIDE VIEW
NOTE: Cut Support
dado after stand
assembly
1!/2 1

#/8
Support
%/16"-18 x 1!/2" top
set screw

Support
stand

T-nut
block
c. Cam
clamp
Fender
washer
accommodate the piece of phenolic that piece of phenolic to create the stop. I sized
serves as the stop, I used a similar two- the length to match the overall height of
part assembly process (Figure 6). Start the support. This way, it sits flush when
T-nut
with two blanks, each long enough for stored inside the support. block
the two halves of a riser. After cutting the Now there are a couple pieces of hard- Set
blank to final width, cut a wide, shallow ware to add. The first is a small T-knob. It screw
groove down the center. Size the groove holds the stop in position. The second is a
for a smooth, sliding fit of the phenolic cam clamp. This makes it easy to lock the Rail Rail
when the halves are assembled. support securely on the rails.
Glue the parts together, keeping the All that’s left to do now is put the rail
edges flush. I applied glue only along the system to use for your projects. It won’t
outer edges to keep it out of the grooves. take long for you to wonder how you ever SIDE VIEW
There are a couple more woodwork- got along without it.
ing tasks to complete. The first thing is
to drill a hole for a threaded insert and
install it (Figure 7). Next, you’ll need to MATERIALS & SUPPLIES (FOR ONE 48" SECTION)
cut a tenon on each end to fit into the A Backing Strip (1) 3⁄ x 1 - 48
4 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 1" Capscrews
mortises in the top and base. B Rails (2) 3⁄ x 21⁄ - 48 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Threaded Inserts
4 4
SUPPORT ASSEMBLY. You’re ready to assem- C Spacers (4) 1 x 11⁄2 - 8 • (1) Bench Pup Set
ble the three parts of the support. Sim- D T-Nut Blocks (6) 1x1-3 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Cam Clamps
ply glue the top and base to the riser E T-Nut Bases (6) 13⁄8 x 2 - 3⁄16 Phenolic • (12) #8 x 5⁄8" Fh Woodscrews
keeping them parallel to each other and F Dog Block (1) 1 x 11⁄16 - 6 • (32) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
square to the riser. G Dog Block Base (1) 13⁄8 x 4 - 3⁄16 Phenolic • (4) 5⁄16" x 31⁄2" Lag Screws
H Dog Adjuster (1) 1 x 11⁄4 - 10 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Snap-Lock Knobs
You can see in Figure 8 how a dado is 3⁄ x 3 - 8
I Support Base/Top (4) 4 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 1" Hex Bolts
cut on the top of each support after assem-
J Support Risers (2) 2 x 31⁄4 - 47⁄8 • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 11⁄2" Set Screws
bly. This provides room to adjust the stop. K Stops (2) 17⁄16 x 47⁄8 - 3⁄16 Phenolic • (8) 5⁄16" Washers
After cutting the dado, use a sanding • (6) 5⁄16" Fender Washers
block to chamfer the edges of the dado. • (6) 5⁄16"-18 Propell Nuts • (4) #8 x1⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
There are a few final details to com- • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 11⁄4" T-Knobs • (16) 5⁄16"-18 x 1⁄2" Fh Machine Screws
plete the supports. It starts with cutting a

WoodsmithSpecials.com 67
& ACCESSORIES
XXXX XX

drill press
XXXXXX

Depth Stop
JIGS

With a few pieces of simple


hardware, you can build this
add-on that makes drilling
holes at a consistent depth
much faster and easier.
The depth stop on some drill presses metal collar. Attached to the wood collar Simply depress the button on the side,
seems like an afterthought. Setting it can is a threaded rod that passes through the slide the nut into place, then release the
be a fussy operation. That’s where the bracket for adjusting the quill position. button. For fine-tuning the position, you
upgrade you see here really shines. Plus, Push-button nuts act as stops on the rod. can spin the nut as usual.
it adds the ability to lock the quill at any EASY-TO-FIND HARDWARE. As you can see I’ve included two nuts: The top one sets
height. (I’ll talk more about this later.) below, most of the parts you need to the length of travel of the quill. Push the
HOW IT WORKS. The photos and draw- make the depth stop can be found at bottom nut up against the bracket and
ings provide an overview of how the a hardware store. The only exception it locks the quill in its vertical position.
depth stop works. First, a steel bracket might be the push-button nuts. This comes in handy when using sanding
mounts to the side of the drill press. The big advantage of the push-button drums, for example.
A wood collar fits around the quill’s nuts is that they can quickly be repositioned. METALWORKING. I started by creating the
metal bracket. It’s made from a piece of
%/16"-18 x 4" hex
Simple Build. The depth stop is bolts w/washers steel angle, as illustrated in the box on the
made from easy-to-find hardware. next page. To locate the bracket on the side
of the drill press, find a spot in line with
%/16"-18 hex nuts Collar the quill and close to the bottom edge of
w/washers the casting. For my bracket, I had to create
Bracket made a notch to clear the set screw and nut that
from 2"x 2" - !/4" holds the spindle in place (detail ‘c’). Drill
steel angle countersunk holes for #10 machine screws
!/2"-13 push-button nuts and the 5⁄8"-dia. hole for the threaded rod.
!/2"-13
threaded rod After cutting the bracket to length,
grind the corners round and file all of the
edges smooth. Use the bracket to locate
!/2"-13 hex nuts the tapped holes in the drill press casting.
w/washers Drill the holes through the casting then
tap them for #10-24 threads. Now attach
#10-24 x %/8" Fh
machine screws the bracket to the drill press. You’ll use it

68 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


NOTE: Length NOTE: Lightly chamfer
of threaded rod %/16"-dia. hole with
a. NOTE: Align hole TOP VIEW varies with drill countersink bit b. FRONT VIEW
with hole in bracket press model before assembly
3%/8
!/4

!/4"- Bracket
!/4"- rad.
1#/8 2" x 2"- !/4"
rad.
steel angle Drill and tap
!/2"- (/16 for #10-24
dia. #10-24 x %/8" Fh threads
!/4"- machine screw NOTE: Wood collar
rad. fits around
5#/4 &/8 metal stop collar
3#/8
#/8
4!/2 !/2"-13
push-button
!/2 nut
2!/4
1%/16"- Collar
Drill to fit rad.
quill diameter (/16
2!/4 #/8 1 !/2"-13 %/16"-18 x 4"
threaded hex bolt c. SIDE VIEW
rod w/washer Push-button
nut Threaded
to help locate the hole in the collar for the rod
threaded rod. To figure out the length of
rod you need, extend the quill all the way, !/2"-13 !/2
hex nut
measure from the top of the drill chuck to w/washer !/2
%/16"-dia.
the bottom of the horizontal flange on the
bracket, then add 3". Cut the rod to length !/2
and install a push-button nut. Slide the rod
through the bracket and fasten the other Collar Bracket
push-button nut. This holds the rod in
place while you work on the collar.
Collar
QUILL COLLAR. The collar starts out as a %/16"-18 !/2"-13 hex nut
hex nut w/washer
rectangular blank. I cut the blank to w/washer
width, as shown in detail ‘a’ above. Then
I drilled through the edge of the blank for and then drill the hole to fit the quill, as press quill temporarily to locate the hole
the long hex bolts. in the lower right drawing. Then cut the for the threaded rod. After drilling the
Start by laying out the centerpoint of blank to separate the two parts. hole, finish shaping the collar. Finally,
the hole for the metal stop collar’s diam- Using hex bolts, washers, and nuts, you can assemble all of the parts and put
eter. Lay out the two parts on the blank you can mount the collar on the drill your new depth stop to use.

How-To: Shape the Parts


%/8"-dia.
drill bit
Wing cutter

Bracket Waste

Waste
2" x 2" - !/4"
steel angle
Waste Collar
1 #/4 blank

Drilling. Start with an extra-long piece Creating a Notch. If the bracket Drill to Fit. Drill a hole sized to fit around
of steel angle. Drill the mounting holes interferes with any hardware on the drill the metal stop collar before separating
and hole for the threaded rod. press, create a notch for clearance. the two pieces of the collar.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 69
& ACCESSORIES
XXXXXX
JIGS XXXX XX

band saw Circle Cutting Jig


Cut perfect circles and arcs with this simple, easy-to-use band saw accessory.
The band saw is one of the most versa- in a heavy-duty aluminum bar allows you band saw table. I sized the jig base 4"
tile tools in any shop. One of the tasks it to cut circles up to 38" in diameter. Finally, larger in both directions to provide solid
excels at is cutting curves. And with the jig a unique stop system lets you align the support for the workpiece (Figure 1).
you see above, you can cut perfect circles pivot pin with the front edge of the blade. LOCATE THE RUNNER. An aluminum runner
quickly and reliably. This way, the jig automatically stops at the rides in the miter slot to align the jig for
The jig’s base is made from phenolic ply- correct point for you to begin rotating the the initial cut into the workpiece. (I’ll talk
wood. Its durable, slick surface is perfect workpiece for the cut. more about that later.) To locate the run-
for supporting the workpiece as you rotate SIZING THE BASE. To get started, you’ll want ner, place the base on the saw table with
it through the cut. An adjustable pivot pin to measure the width and depth of your the left side of the base flush with the

70 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


1
Phenolic plywood
provides a durable,
slick surface

BASE
(18" x 18" - #/4" Ply.)

SECOND: Mark
location for
runner

FIRST: Position
base flush with
inside edge
of table

NOTE: Ease all edges


with !/16" chamfer

FIGURE

Cut dado for 2


runner and
temporarily
attach with screws

a.
#/4

RUNNER
(#/4" x 18" - #/8" Alum.) !/16
#8 x #/4" Fh
woodscrew

3 FIRST: Slip runner


into miter slot
edge of the saw table. After marking the
location of the miter slot, cut a shallow
dado sized to fit the runner (Figure 2).
You can temporarily install the runner to
complete the next step.
MAKING A SAW KERF. The next task is to cre-
ate a kerf in the base. This kerf locates
the end of the stopped groove used to SECOND: Cut saw kerf
until back edge
house the adjustment bar. It’s a simple extends #/4" past back
edge of table
matter to turn on the saw, set the run-
ner in the miter slot, and push the base
forward. When the back edge of the base
extends 3⁄4" past the back edge of the
table, stop the cut, as shown in Figure 3.
You can now turn your attention to mak-
ing the adjustment bar.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 71
attaching the 4
FIGURE
Make pin from
!/16" drill bit and
epoxy into hole

!/16"-dia. Bar & Stop End of groove


aligned with
saw kerf 1!/2

!/2 The next task is to add an


1 #/8"-wide
adjustment bar that locks slot
in the cutting radius. The NOTE: To cut the
last step will be to add !/4"-20 x 1" threaded groove for the
1#/4 adjustment bar, see the
rod fastened
an adjustable stop. This with epoxy Online Extra at
3!/8 WoodsmithSpecials.com
stop correctly positions
the pivot pin relative to
!/4"-20
a. Pivot Adjustment
the blade. It also prevents File edges of pin bar
Drill and bar smooth insert knob
tap for the jig and workpiece from w/washer
!/4"-20 lifting off the table once
threads
11 you start the cut. Base
ADJUSTMENT BAR. The first
Runner
thing to do is cut the 5⁄16"- stopped groove for the bar. And
thick aluminum bar to there’s a slot located at the end of the SIDE
VIEW
length. I took the time to file groove for the adjustment knob that
off the sharp edges before sets the radius. I removed the runner
%/16"-thick drilling and tapping all the to make these two tasks easier. thickness of the band saw table (Fig-
alum. holes (margin drawing). Routing the stopped groove is easy ure 5a). Drill the through hole for the
adjust-
ment The tapped holes allow for (see the article at WoodsmithSpecials.com). threaded rod and the two screw holes
bar
a wide range of adjustment Then, I routed the adjustment slot at the used when attaching it to the base. You
1!/2 for the cutting radius. router table, as shown in Figure 4. You can go ahead and install the threaded
!/2 Figure 4 and the margin can fasten the adjustment bar in place insert while you’re at it.
drawing show all of the with a studded knob and washer. Now After fastening the block to the
2
hole locations in the adjust- would also be a good time to reinstall the underside of the base, all you need to do
#/8 ment bar. The pivot pin is runner on the bottom. is install the hardware. This starts with a
1
5 made from a ⁄16"-dia. drill STOP ASSEMBLY. When using the jig, it’s short length of aluminum bar. It’s longer
bit ground to a point. It’s important that the pin is directly aligned than the mounting block and creates a
Drill and glued with epoxy into the with the front edge of the blade’s teeth (see “hook” to keep the jig in place. You can
counter-
sink aluminum bar. The remain- opposite page). This prevents the blade see how it’s installed in Figures 5 and 5a.
for #8 Fh ing holes are drilled and from binding and results in a smoother Next comes the knob assembly. Begin
wood-
screw tapped for a 1⁄4"-20 thread. cut. To accomplish this goal, I made the by cutting the threaded rod to length and
%/16"-thick
GROOVE & SLOT. You can stop assembly shown in Figure 5. using epoxy to fasten a knob at one end.
aluminum set the bar aside for now The assembly starts with the mount- After the epoxy sets up, you can spin on
stop bar
and get to work on the ing block. Its thickness matches the a locking knob before threading the rod
into the insert in the mounting block.
5 MOUNTING BLOCK
FINAL ADJUSTMENT. The last thing to do is
install the jig on your saw and make
1!/2
(1!/4" x 1!/2" - 3") some adjustments following the pro-
cess detailed on the next page. Once
!/4"-20 x 8" everything is set up, you’ll soon dis-
1 threaded cover how easy it is to cut perfect arcs
rod
!/4"-20 and circles in no time at all.
threaded
#8 x 1#/4" Fh insert
woodscrew a. SIDE VIEW !/4"-20 insert
knob fastened
with epoxy

Runner !/2

!/4"-20 through
#8 x #/4" Fh #/8"-dia. !/4" washer knob
STOP BAR hole
woodscrew (1!/2" x 5" - %/16" Alum.)

72 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Using the Circle-Cutting Jig
Perfect Circles. After cutting the
workpiece to shape, a little sanding is
all it takes to remove the saw marks.

Setting up the jig and using it is pretty sim- Here, you’re measuring from
ple. The photo sequence below will step the center of the pin to the out-
you through the process. side edge of the blade’s teeth.
Initial Setup. The most important part Cutting. You’re almost ready to start
of using the jig is making sure the pivot pin cutting, but first you need to drill a centered
is aligned with the front edge of the blade. pivot hole in the workpiece. This involves
This is a matter of adjusting the stop to drilling a stopped hole on the bottom face. the jig forward, making
contact the edge of the table and locking it With the saw off, slip the workpiece a straight cut, until the jig stops
using the locking knob. over the pivot pin. Now you can turn on against the table. Then, you can begin
Set the Radius. The next step is the saw and get ready to make the cut. rotating the workpiece into the blade to
to set the radius for the desired cut. While holding the workpiece steady, slide cut a perfect circle.

Aligning the Center Pin. Use a Setting the Radius. To set the radius, loosen
framing square to align the pivot or remove the adjustment knob and slide the
pin with the front edge of the blade. After adjusting the stop underneath so that the bar so the pivot pin is located at the desired
threaded rod contacts the table, lock it in place (inset). radius and tighten the knob.

Straight Cut First. After drilling a pivot Perfect Circles. Once the stop contacts the band saw table, you
hole (inset), place the workpiece on the jig. can start rotating the workpiece into the blade in a clockwise
As you make the cut, hold the workpiece direction. The key to a smooth edge is to maintain a consistent
straight until the jig stops. feed rate throughout the cut.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 73
circle-cutting jig Fasten strips in place
around aluminum bar

Fitted Groove
to form template
for routing

Guide
Jig base
The adjustment bar on the band saw cir-
XXXX XX

cle jig rides in a stopped groove. To cut


Guide
the groove, I used my router and simple Aluminum
XXXXXXEXTRAS

bar
guides. As you can see in the drawings
at right, I assembled the guides around Template
the aluminum bar, guaranteeing a per-
Double-sided
fect fit. All you need to do is set the bar tape
in position on the base, Guide
then fasten hardwood a.
ONLINE

guides around it using


double-sided tape.
I used a dado cleanout Guide
Guide
bit to rout out the groove. !/4

The bearing on the bit fol-


Waste
lows the guides. All that’s Dado
cleanout bit Jig base
left to do is square up the
corners with a chisel.

PAGE 1 OF 1 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
74 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS
Table Saw &
Router Upgrades
Most woodworkers would agree that their table

saw and router are their most-used (and often

favorite) tools. These simple jigs and upgrades will

make your essential tools even more valuable.

TABLE SAW SMALL PARTS JIG .......76

PALM ROUTER BASES ....................82

ROUTER MORTISING MACHINE .....88

WoodsmithSpecials.com 75
XXXXXX
TABLE SAW & ROUTER
XXXX XX

GO
GO
2
Online
nline
Extras
For techniques
helpful in
building the
small parts jig,
go to:
WoodsmithSpecials.com

precision-cutting
Small Parts Jig
This easy-to-build project makes
it a snap to cut thin and small parts
accurately and safely at the table saw.
It’s no surprise that the table saw handles most of the cutting
chores in my shop. It’s a powerful and accurate tool for heavy
work. But when it comes to cutting very small parts, it’s just not
nearly as well suited to the task. The reasons are simple. First,
the rip fence isn’t designed for easy adjustment in very small
increments (less than 1⁄32"). And even if you can dial in that level
of accuracy, you still have the problem of controlling a work-
piece before, during, and after the cut. Crosscut Sled. This crosscut sled rides in a slot in the jig’s platform
The jig shown in the photo above handles these tasks by for making accurate cuts on small parts. A hold-down keeps the
incorporating a small-scale “replacement” table on your saw. workpiece in place safely while you cut.

76 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS

small parts jig


Making a
ONLINE

Featherboard
When it comes to ripping a very thin Making the featherboard is a miter gauge. After fitting a remov-
workpiece, I like the added control pretty straightforward process. able index pin into the kerf, you’re
a featherboard offers. But it’s not a Start by cutting a blank to width, ready to start cutting.
good idea to locate a conventional as shown in the lower right draw- You’ll start by cutting feathers
featherboard directly over the blade ing. Making an angled cut on the along the end of the blank. Later,
for rip cuts. That’s because the blade top and bottom brings it to final you’ll cut out the middle feathers
would quickly cut up the “feathers.” length. You can then go ahead and to create the notch.
To solve this problem for the table cut the mounting slots in the top To make the feathers, butt the
saw jig, I made a notched feather- edge of the featherboard. blank against the pin and cut a kerf.
board (photo above). What sets it The key to making consistent For the next feather, slip the kerf
apart is the gap in the middle. This feathers is to use the miter gauge over pin and make another cut.
allows you to place the featherboard jig shown in the lower left draw- Repeat this process to cut feathers
directly over the blade. The feathers ing. The jig is basically a long across the end of the blank. At the
ahead of and behind the blade keep auxiliary fence with an angled band saw, cut away the center fin-
the workpiece firmly on the table. kerf fastened to the fence of your gers for the notched area.

THIRD:
Fasten auxiliary fence to 30˚
miter gauge, slide fence BLANK (3%/8" x 5!!/16")
so pin is kerf-width away
from blade
a. FRONT VIEW

Auxiliary #/4
fence
!/8 Grain
1 direction
SECOND:
Slide index Index
pin in kerf pin
(don't glue)

FIRST: Cut away waste NOTE:


Cut a kerf at band saw 3 Remove
at 30˚ index pin
to start
1 1

First cut 30˚


shown
5
INDEX PIN
(1" x 1!/2" - !/8" Hdbd.) 2!/8

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
1 Cleat and
fence are made from
2 Sliding
base
(1" x #/4" hardwood) 2!/2

Spacer is
TAPER SLED BASE !!/16"-wide
(7" x 32"- !/4" Hdbd.) piece of
scrap
28 Waste
Fixed
base
3
Fence

Plate

Attach
blank with
double-sided
tape Size spacer
to align
1 layout lines
Sliding base with edge
(see Figure 2) of sled

multi-purpose Taper Sled


Spacer
is ripped
down to
%/8"-thick

One of the main features of the Then I located the fence and stop GROOVE. There’s Size dado
blade to match
small parts table saw jig is the to cut the fixed base to final size, one final use for opening in T-track
unique sliding rip fence. Its two as shown in the article. To keep the the sled. And that’s
tapered bases give you fine control workpiece from shifting during the to create the groove
for adjusting the fence position. In cut, I used double-sided tape to hold in the lock plate
order to keep the fence parallel to it to the sled, as shown in Figure 1. (Figure 3, at right). Cut another
the blade, the tapers on each piece SLIDING BASE. To make the narrow spacer that positions the inner
need to be identical. sliding base, I marked end points edge of the groove at the edge of
BASIC SLED. To do this, I made a sim- of the taper on the workpiece. Then the sled. (You may need to move
ple taper sled. It consists of a hard- I cut a spacer to fit against the fence the rip fence.) And be sure to match
board base with a hardwood fence and position the layout lines on the the size of the dado stack to the
and stop. These hold the workpiece edge of the sled, as illustrated in opening in the top of the T-track in
at the correct angle to cut the taper. Figure 2. (Mine was 11⁄16" wide.) the sliding base.

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Along with the table comes a couple of
handy accessories designed to take you
1 BLADE INSERT
2 !/4"-20 x !/2"
Fh machine
(2" x 29" - !/4" Hdbd.) 10
to a whole new level of accuracy. 1 screw
B
The main feature of this jig is the #/4

micro-adjusting rip fence. It consists of


two, tapered sections that slide against !/4"-20
threaded
each other. Sliding the adjustable section insert
2 A
forward or backward also shifts the fence
toward (or away from) the blade in very PLATFORM
(20" x 29" - #/4" Ply.)
small, repeatable amounts. 9!#/16
Some of the other features included
with this jig are a crosscut sled, a zero- #/4
Centerline a. END VIEW
clearance insert, and a unique hold-down. of blade
Blade insert
2
THE RIGHT BLADE. There’s one other addi- centered over
blade
tion to your table saw that will help
NOTE: Center !/4
when cutting small parts — the blade. blade insert Platform
I replaced my standard blade with a over blade to
locate miter slot !/8
40-tooth, 71⁄4"-dia. combination blade.
Threaded insert
Using a smaller blade reduces the
tooth speed which makes cutting small
pieces smoother and provides more
accurate results. it (Figure 1). A wide groove in the top shown in Figure 2. Size it for a snug fit in
holds a hardboard insert. It allows you both the groove and slot in the saw table.
START WITH THE PLATFORM to create a zero-clearance opening for the Just don’t glue it in place yet.
The jig is made up of three assemblies. blade (Figure 1a). A second groove cut in HARDBOARD INSERTS. The other part to make
It begins with the platform, which serves the top serves as a miter gauge slot for is the zero-clearance insert I mentioned
as a base for the other assemblies: the the crosscut sled shown on page 81. earlier, as shown in Figures 1 and 2.
rip fence and the crosscut sled. What’s The final groove is cut in the bottom Go ahead and make a few of these. The
important here is the platform is flat and face. This groove accepts a runner to insert will eventually get chewed up.
smooth. To ensure this, I used a piece of register the jig in the miter gauge slot And you will use one as a fence insert
Baltic birch plywood for the platform. of the saw table. later on. Finally, Figure 2 shows you
THREE GROOVES. There’s a little more to it MITER BAR. With the details of the plat- how to add a splitter to a zero-clearance
than a plain piece of plywood, though. form complete, you can make a few parts insert. This comes in handy when rip-
The platform has three grooves cut in that attach to it. The first is the miter bar ping very narrow strips.

2 SPLITTER
a.
FIRST: Lower
(!/8" rgh. x 2" - #/4") blade and
B
C position jig
BLADE platform
INSERT
SECOND: Raise
blade to cut
through
platform
and insert
A
PLATFORM

b. c. Blade
insert
THIRD: Lower kerf
MITER BAR blade and pull
(!/2" x #/4" - 29") back blade Beveled
insert 2!/4" edges
D

FOURTH:
Raise blade
to lengthen
kerf to
NOTE: Clamp about 7!/2"
jig in place
during use Splitter

WoodsmithSpecials.com 77
FIGURE
3
micro-adjusting
F
!/4"-20 x 1" KEY
studded knob 15!/2 (!/8" x !/2" - 1!/4")

Rip Fence FIXED BASE


(3#/4" x 29" - #/4" Ply.)
E
3#/4
NOTE: Refer to
WoodsmithSpecials.com
to make fixed base

The next part of the jig to make is the rip 1!%/16


fence. It’s made of two tapered components
— one fixed and the other adjustable to
slide against it. The tapers work together to !/4"-20
make small incremental adjustments easy. F threaded
insert
SLIDING TAPER. The fixed base of the rip KEY
fence assembly registers in a series of
a. Fixed
base
notches in the platform. The notches pro-
vide a rough adjustment. To fine-tune the
position, you move the sliding fence face
!/2
forward or backward — not side to side. See Figure 4b
The key is the long taper on the mating F
KEY
faces of the fence parts I mentioned earlier.
If you slide the fence face away from you,
it also moves away from the blade a small
FENCE BLANK
amount. For example, sliding the rip fence %/8 15!/2
forward 1" moves the fence face away 1!%/16 1!/2 Fixed base
from the blade only 1⁄16". 3#/4
5!/2
TAPERED BASES. Making the tapered por- Sliding base
3!/16
tions of the rip fence is the place to get (See Figure 5) %/16 1!/4
started. The most important thing about 29
making these pieces is the taper on each
edge should be identical. This way, the from a single blank. The fixed base now insert in the platform. The other detail is
fence stays parallel to the blade as you has a couple of details to take care of. a notch cut in each end. These notches
adjust the fence. To make these cuts, I used The first is a slot that’s used to set the rough hold hardwood keys, as shown in Figure
a sled at the table saw. You can read more position of the fence. The slot serves as a 3a. The keys slip into a matching series of
about the sled in an article avail- guide to install a threaded notches in the platform.
able at WoodsmithSpecials.com. CUTTING THE NOTCHES. The setup I used to cut
FIXED BASE. Figure 3 shows how all these notches is shown in Figure 4. Begin
you can make the tapered pieces by cutting the first notch in the platform and
a. fixed base at the same time. The notches are
4 Fixed
base
cut with these pieces held on end.
Since this could be a little unsteady,
&/8
you’ll want to take a couple of steps to keep
!/8
Fixed the pieces under control. Start by attaching
NOTE: Clamp fixed base
base parallel with Platform the fixed base to the platform with a stud-
!/2
edge of platform
ded knob and a clamp. Figure 4a shows
you where to position the fixed base for the
cut. Then attach a tall auxiliary fence on the
b. Platform miter gauge to keep things stable.
To locate the notches accurately, I used
Platform NOTE: Remove
miter bar the rip fence as an end stop. After mak-
Rip 4%/8 before cutting ing a notch at one end, flip the assembly
fence notches
end for end and cut a notch on the oppo-
!/2 !/2 !/2
!/2 site end Note: You’ll need to move the
clamp to the other end of the platform to
Tall miter make this cut.
fence
To create the remaining notches in the
platform, remove the fixed base and adjust
the rip fence, as shown in Figure 4b.

78 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


FIGURE T-track
G
HARDWOOD KEYS. Once you cut the notches
in the fixed fence base, you can make
5 #8 x !/2" Fh
woodscrew
SLIDING BASE
(3!/16" x 29 - #/4" Ply.)
and glue the hardwood keys in place, as 1!/4
NOTE: Cut
illustrated in Figure 3a. Your aim is for groove on
the keys to fit snugly in the notches in angled side
of sliding base
the platform, but not be too difficult to to fit T-track
insert or remove. I used some sandpaper
to ease the edges and fine-tune the fit.
SLIDING ASSEMBLY. Now, you can turn 3!/16 NOTE: Refer to
your attention to the sliding L-shaped WoodsmithSpecials.com
to make sliding base
portion of the rip fence. The pieces for
this assembly are illustrated in
Figures 5 and 6.
The sliding base has a match-
ing taper that slides along the a.
fixed base. After using the taper- END VIEW
!/4
ing sled to cut the sliding base to size, in exactly the same T-track
Sliding base
the only other thing you need to do is manner — with screws and
cut a groove near one edge. threaded inserts. Fixed
base
As you can see in Figure 5 at right, The plywood fence face also has a
Platform Insert
the groove is sized to hold a length of section of T-track mounted to it. This
aluminum T-track. This track is used to allows you to attach a featherboard
secure the sliding part of the fence once or hold-down.
it’s in position. If you look at Figure 6a, you can see
When cutting this groove, make sure that the T-track is flush with the fence It’s designed to straddle the blade and
to cut it parallel with the tapered edge of insert. So I had to cut a shallow rabbet hold the workpiece down both ahead
the workpiece. Then screw the T-track in along the top edge of the fence face of and behind the blade. You’ll find
place, as shown in Figure 5a. to accommodate the T-track. At this instructions at WoodsmithSpecials.com.
FENCE FACE. Attached to the sliding base is point, the upright portion of the fence
the upright portion of the rip fence. It’s can be glued to the sliding base. Just
made up of two pieces. The main part is take care to keep the fence face square
a plywood fence face. Attached to this is to the jig platform. 3%/8
a replaceable hardboard insert. FEATHERBOARD. One of the accessories for
FEATHERBOARD
The insert is identical to the blade the fence I mentioned is a featherboard. DETAIL
inserts you made earlier. And it’s attached My version is detailed in Figure 6. 60 °
1
FIGURE
6 FEATHERBOARD
(!/2" x 3!/2" - 6")
T-track
3
#/4

!/4"-rad.
!/4"-20 x 1" I !/4"-20
flange bolts Grain
threaded direction
insert 1
FENCE FACE
(2#/4" x 29" - #/4" Ply.) !/8
H

a. Featherboard
Sliding
base #8 x !/2" Fh
woodscrew !/4"-20 Fence face
star knob END
w/washers VIEW
Fixed B
base FACE INSERT NOTE: Cut
(2" x 29" - !/4" Hdbd.) rabbet to
fit t-track Face
insert
!/4"-20 x !/2"
Fh machine Sliding base
screw
NOTE: Refer to
WoodsmithSpecials.com
to make featherboard

WoodsmithSpecials.com 79
lock plate &
Indicator
At this point, the two sections of the rip
fence are essentially complete. What’s
left is to connect them so the fence can be
locked in position to make a cut.
LOCKING PLATE. You can see how this is
accomplished in Figure 7. It’s nothing more
than a plywood plate with a hardwood
runner. The plate is attached to the fixed
base and the runner hooks into the T-track
in the sliding portion of the fence, as shown
in the photo at right. A flange bolt, washer,
and knob hold everything in place.
The trick is that the runner in the plate
sits in an angled groove. This allows it to
mate with the tapered fence. The good
news is that you can use the same taper
sled you used earlier to cut the groove. The
details are at WoodsmithSpecials.com. Adjusting the Fence. A ruler and indicator help you fine-tune the position of the
When sizing the groove, the goal is to sliding fence. Then you can lock it in place by tightening a knob.
match the width to the slot in the top of
the T-track, as shown in Figure 7a. Then INDICATOR. You could put the jig to use as Making the indicator is a pretty simple
you can cut a hardwood runner to fit and is, but I added one other feature — a hair- task, as you can see in Figure 8. Attach
glue it in place. The last step is to drill a line indicator. I use it as a gauge to adjust a ruler to the fence base with screws or
hole to accommodate the flange bolt, as the position of the fence face. The tapered double-sided tape. Then cut a piece of
in Figures 7 and 7a. fence design gives you finer control for acrylic to size and drill mounting holes.
#8 x 1!/4" Fh adjusting the fence. The To create the hairline, I used a utility
OVERVIEW PLATE
7 !/4
woodscrew
1
(3#/4" x 12" - #/4" Ply.)
J
ruler allows you to move
the fence in precise, small
knife and square to scratch a line on the
back face. Filling in the line with a fine-
!/4"-20 increments. For example, tipped marker makes it stand out. Now,
star knob 1 you can clamp the jig to the saw table and
⁄4" of movement on the
ruler moves the fence set up to rip thin strips. To handle cross-
#/8 1⁄ " closer or farther from cutting on the jig, take a look at the sled
64
NOTE: Refer to
!/4 WoodsmithSpecials.com the saw blade. on the next page.
to cut groove
in plate

K
8 !/4"-20 x !/4"
Fh machine
screws
FENCE RUNNER
(%/16" x %/16" - 12")
L

Fixed INDICATOR
Fence base Sliding (1!/2" x 2" !/4"-20
face base - !/8" Plas.) t-slot
T-track nut

a. TOP VIEW
a. Fixed
!/2 base T-slot nut
Fence
face
SECTION 2
!/4"-20 x 1" VIEW 12"
flange ruler
bolt %/16"-dia. Plate
hole
!/4"-20
Sliding Fixed T-slot nut Hairline
base base indicator Ruler
mark

80 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


small parts
Crosscut Sled
The platform and rip fence allow you added the fence and a
to make precise, small-scale rip cuts. plywood blade guard.
For crosscutting a small part, you need The blade guard
an alternative to a miter gauge. There also houses three
are a couple of challenges. The first, of threaded inserts. As I
course, is cutting the piece accurately. mentioned earlier, two
The second is controlling the workpiece are for the hold-down
and the cutoff piece. and the third accepts a Crosscut Sled. The sled gives you solid control while making an
The crosscut sled lets you do both. It has tall plastic handle. accurate crosscut on a small part.
a hardboard base and hardwood fence to The critical part of
keep a workpiece steady as it’s cut. A run- making the crosscut sled comes when you Now the jig is complete and ready to
ner on the bottom slides in the groove you attach the runner to the underside of the put to use. The results should be some
cut in the top of the platform. base. It needs to be perfectly square to the new capability and versatility when mak-
The sled has a hold-down to prevent a fence in order to make accurate crosscuts. ing cuts on your table saw.
piece from shifting or getting thrown by When that’s done, you can set it in place
the blade. And it keeps your fingers safely on the platform and cut a kerf in the base.
away from the cut. Threaded inserts in the This kerf makes it a snap to line up a cut.
MATERIALS & SUPPLIES
sled allow the hold-down to be positioned HOLD-DOWN. The final thing to make is the PLATFORM ASSEMBLY
on either side of the blade. hold-down. It consists of three thin pieces A Platform (1) 20 x 29 - 3⁄4 Ply.
Figure 9 provides the details for build- of hardwood (Figure 9a). It’s secured with B Inserts (2) 2 x 29 - 1⁄4 Hdbd.
C Splitter (1) 1⁄ rgh. x 2 - 3⁄
ing the sled. I started with a base then a studded knob and washer. 8 4
D Miter Bar (1) 1⁄ x 3⁄ - 29
2 4
FIGURE !/4"-20 x 1" E Fixed Base (1) 33⁄4 x 29 - 3⁄4 Ply.
9 studded
handle F Keys (2) 1⁄ x 1⁄ - 11⁄
8 2 4
G Sliding Base (1) 31⁄16 x 29 - 3⁄4 Ply.
!/4"-20 x 1" HOLD-DOWN BACK
H Fence Face (1) 23⁄4 x 29 - 3⁄4 Ply.
!/4" flat studded (!/8" x !/4" - 1%/16")
I Featherboard (1) 1⁄ x 31⁄ - 6
washer knob R 2 2
J Plate (1) 33⁄4 x 12 - 3⁄4 Ply.
Q 1 !/4" flat 5⁄ x 5⁄ - 12
K Fence Runner (1) 16 16
HOLD-DOWN 2!/4 washer
(!/4" x 1%/16" - L Indicator (1) 1 ⁄2 x 2 - 1⁄8 Plastic
1

4" Ply.) !/4"-20 CROSSCUT SLED


threaded
insert M Sled Base (1) 6 x 12 - 1⁄4 Hdbd.
N Fence (1) 1⁄ x 3⁄ - 12
2 4
S O
O Blade Guard (1) 4 x 5 - 3⁄ Ply.
BLADE GUARD 4
HOLD-DOWN FRONT 3⁄ x 6 - 1⁄ Hdbd.
(!/8" x &/8" - 1%/16") (4" x 5" - #/4" Ply.) P Runner (1) 4 4
2 2!/2 Q Hold-Down (1) 1⁄ x 115⁄ - 4
4 16
R Hold-Down Back (1) 1⁄ x 1⁄ - 115⁄
1 1!/4 8 4 16
S Hold-Down Front (1) 1⁄ x 7⁄ - 115⁄
4 8 16
FENCE
1!%/16 (!/2" x #/4" - 12")
N • (2) 36" T-Tracks
• (5) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Flange Bolts
P • (2) 1⁄4"-20 T-Slot Nuts
RUNNER • (10) 1⁄4"-20 Threaded Inserts
(#/4" x 6" - !/4" Hdbd.)
• (5) 1⁄4"-20 Star Knobs
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Studded Knobs
a. Hold-down Studded
front secures knob • (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Studded Handle
workpiece while
Hold-
• (1) 12" Ruler
cutting
down • (1) 11⁄2" x 2" - 1⁄8" Plastic for Indicator (L)
Hold-down back • (2) 1⁄4"-20 x 1⁄4" Fh Machine Screws
END • (6) 1⁄4"-20 x 1⁄2" Fh Machine Screws
VIEW • (9) 1⁄4" Washers
M • (10) #8 x 1⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
SLED BASE • (4) #8 x 11⁄4" Fh Woodscrews
Blade guard (6" x 12" - !/4" Hdbd.)

WoodsmithSpecials.com 81
XXXXXX
TABLE SAW & ROUTER
XXXX XX

palm Router Bases


Improve the control and expand the utility of these handy compact routers
with one or all of these versatile shop-built upgrades.
My palm, or compact, hand-held router has become the go-to tool
for many of the routing tasks in my shop. It’s light and easy to
control, but powerful enough for most jobs. The only problem is
that the base is small and provides limited support when working
close to the edge of a workpiece.
The base you see above is designed to address this issue. The
wide baseplate provides stability, which helps keep the router
from tipping during use. And to ensure an accurate cut, there’s a
micro-adjustment feature that allows you to fine tune the bit loca-
tion. There’s even an option for routing along contoured edges
(photo, next page). Some simple shop-made hardware is the key
to adding this handy baseplate to your router.
As a bonus, you’ll also find plans for a shop-made router
trammel on page 87. This handy accessory transforms your
compact router into the perfect tool for tool for making smooth, Straight Edge. Routing parallel to a straight edge is easy. The wood
accurately sized circles in wood. edge guide provides the steady support you need for accurate work.

82 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS Large baseplate Fixed knob
stabilizes router provides
Locking knob secures handle for
slider bar in position increased
control

Adjuster arm and


knurled machine
screw allow for
accurate adjustments NOTE: Baseplate
cut from 12" x 12"
phenolic sheet
Slider bar
positions edge
guide

NOTE: For materials &


hardware sources, turn Threaded insert
to page 98 locks the edge
guide to the roller
block Edge guide ensures
a consistent
distance from
workpiece edge

Roller block
connects the
edge guide to
the slider bar

SIDE VIEW Locking knob Fixed knob

Chamfer helps clear


Adjuster arm debris when routing
Slider bar Baseplate

Panhead screws
in counter-bored
Edge guide holes attach
NOTE: Roller block accommodates baseplate to router
optional roller edge guide (see below).

Optional Roller Edge Guide

Roller Edge. The roller edge guide’s single point of contact


Roller attaches to allows you to maintain a consistent distance from the
roller block
contoured edge of a workpiece.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 83
A

FIGURE SLIDER BAR


1 (#/8" x %/8" - 4!/4")

Slot

shaping the Centered


hole tapped
for #10-32
(!/4" x 1!/2")

Brass Parts machine screw


Holes
tapped for #8-32
machine screws
Building the base begins with making
some custom hardware and a wood edge a. Use round file
to flatten nibs
guide. The hardware consists of a brass
slider bar, roller block, and adjuster arm.
When attached to the baseplate these parts Hole tapped for
!/4"-20 machine screw
let you position the router bit accurately.
You’ll begin by drilling holes in a long jig made from 3⁄4" MDF with a groove
brass bar. After removing the waste for cut along its length helps keep it secure.
each part, you’ll cut the parts free from the You need a 5⁄8"-wide groove when drill-
extra-long blank. The brass is easy to work, ing the slider bar and a 3⁄8"-wide groove
so I doubt you’ll for the two other parts. b. File edges
have any trouble. Using the jig is simple, just align and smooth
LAYOUT. Start by clamp the MDF on the drill press table so
marking the outline that it’s against a fence and the brass stock
of each part along is centered under the bit. Drill the parts by
the length of the removing the clamp from the jig and slid-
bar stock. A scribe ing it along the fence.
is perfect for the SLIDER BAR. I started with the holes for
layout, and a cen- the slot in the slider bar. This slot allows
ter punch will help for approximately 11⁄2" of travel from
Metal-Cutting locate the holes. the micro-adjust screw. A locking knob goes in the hole at the
Blade. It’s best to The patterns on the You can see in the illustrations to the center of the slider bar. The roller block is
use a metal-cutting opposite page give right that it’s just a series of overlaping secured by the two small holes near the end
blade on the brass, the dimensions. holes drilled at the drill press. The holes of the bar. These holes need to be tapped to
but any carbide- HOLES. Holding the are then squared using both round accept screws, so refer to your tap and die
tipped blade with brass bar in place and flat files. Boards clamped on both set for the correct hole size to drill. The hole
flat-topped raker while you drill is sides of the brass help create a slot with in the end of the slider bar is drilled later, so
teeth will work. difficult. A simple smooth, straight walls. you can move on to the other parts.

FIGURE
2
Bar Stock Drilling Jig
Holes are
drilled and Centered Holes.
countersunk
(see pattern) A groove cut in a
B
scrap of MDF helps
ROLLER BLOCK to secure the bar
(#/8" x %/8" - 2!/4") stock while drilling
it. Once the brass is
FIGURE
3 centered on the drill
bit, the jig can slide
Holes tapped along a fixed fence
for #8-32
machine screw on the drill press
table to ensure that
C
you drill centered
ADJUSTER ARM
Bevels on each (#/8" x %/8" - 2") holes every time.
end are shaped
with a file
Notches are cut
on table saw

84 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


PATTERN
(SHOWN ACTUAL SIZE)
a. %/8
FIGURE
4 Drill %/16"-dia.
SIDE VIEW TOP VIEW
hole for #8-32
threaded insert TOP !/4
VIEW

1!/2

D
Tapped 1
EDGE GUIDE #/8 for
(#/4" x 2#/8" - 8") 1!/2 #8-32

!/2
Angled cuts #/4
are made at SLIDER
band saw BAR
A
4!/4
b. FRONT VIEW NOTE: Dado and slot %/8
centered on edge guide
%/8 Tapped
for
%/16 wood blocks as you drill the hole !/4"-20
in the end at the drill press.
#/8 SHAPE THE PARTS. Once you tap the
1!/2 1!/4
remaining holes, the brass parts
can be filed to final shape. Just !/4"-dia.
clamp the adjuster arm in the hole

ROLLER BLOCK & ADJUSTER ARM. The holes for vise and file the bevel on each
the roller block are simply drilled and end. The rounded end on the
#/8 #/16"-rad.
countersunk for #8-32 screws, while the roller block can be shaped using
adjuster arm holes need to be tapped. the same method. !/8
Once the holes are drilled, you can #/16
cut the notches for each part. Multiple EDGE GUIDE Tapped
for
passes at the table saw will remove the The next step is to make the wood #10-32 #/4
!/2
waste. Then go ahead and cut the parts edge guide. By riding against the %/32"-dia.
free from the bar. edge of the workpiece, the guide hole

All that’s left is to drill the hole in the helps stabilize the base while
end of the slider bar for the micro-adjust routing. It’s simple to make, but ROLLER
2!/4 BLOCK
screw. The best way to do this is to clamp there’s a dado and a slot located B
the bar stock between two tall, square in the center of the guide that
1!/2 1
deserves close attention.
The roller block slides into the
MATERIALS & SUPPLIES slot, so it needs to be a snug fit.
A Slider Bar (1) 3⁄ x 5⁄ - 41⁄ Brass
8 8 4 The same is true with the dado,
!/4
B Roller Block (1) 3⁄ x 5⁄ - 21⁄ Brass which secures the slider bar.
8 8 4
3⁄ x 5⁄ - 2 Brass !/8
C Adjuster Arm (1) 8 8 Additionally, the slot needs to be !/8
D Edge Guide (1) 3⁄ x 23⁄ - 8
4 8 centered in the dado so that both
E Phenolic Plate (1) 1⁄4 x 31⁄2 - 12 parts can easily slide in place.
• (3) #8-32 x 1⁄2" Fh Machine Screws I started the guide at the table
• (2) #8-32 x 1" Fh Machine Screws saw using my miter gauge and an Tapped 1#/8 %/8
for
• (1) #8-32 Threaded Insert auxiliary fence. A couple passes #8-32 !/4
• (1) #10-32 x 2" Knurled Machine Screw with a dado blade takes care of 2 ADJUSTER
• (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 1⁄2" Fh Machine Screw ARM
the dado and slot. Two angled #/8
• (2) 1⁄4"-20 Round Knobs C
cuts at the band saw create the
• (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Threaded Rod
• (1) 1⁄4" Washer tapers that form the shape of the %/16 1
• (1) 3⁄4" Shower Door Roller guide. The illustrations above
#/16
• (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 1" Tab Base Weld Nut give you the details you need. !/4
!/8
w/ Center Pilot The last step is to drill a hole and
add a threaded insert (Figure 4b). %/8 #/8

WoodsmithSpecials.com 85
FIGURE
5 Drill out

making the BASEPLATE


(!/4" x 3!/2"- 12")
hole with
1!/4"- dia.
hole saw

Baseplate
E

Compared to what you’ve done so far,


making the baseplate is a breeze. You
simply cut it to size then drill the hole
for the bit. Use a router to chamfer the
%/8"-wide x !/16"-deep
hole and to make a groove and slot. groove
Then drill holes to attach the parts and
your router. Taper the edges, and your
NOTE: Drill
new base will be complete. counterbored
SIZE. The size and shape of the baseplate holes to fit
your router base
isn’t critical, though the locations for the
slots and holes are. To help with the lay-
out, use the pattern below as a guide. 3⁄ "
MDF using double-sided tape. When
4
CENTER HOLE. The hole in the center of the you cut the hole, be sure to drill all the For hole and slot
locations see
plate is best made using a 11⁄4" hole saw way through the MDF backer. You’ll use pattern below
in the drill press. To back up the work- it as a guide for the next step.
piece, I attached the blank to a piece of A chamfer routed on the top edge of The slot for the locking knob goes through
the hole is the next step. the entire thickness of the plate.
This detail improves visibil- DRILL HOLES. In order for the micro-adjust
ity and helps clear the chips feature to operate smoothly, it’s important
from the hole when routing. that the location of the brass adjuster arm
There isn’t much support is centered and square. A quick way to do
for the router bit bearing this is to center the part over the end of the
though, so the MDF backer is groove and use the adjuster arm as a tem-
a big help here. plate to mark the hole locations.
GROOVE & SLOT. To secure the Once the holes for the adjuster arm are
slider bar you made, rout a drilled and countersunk, you can do the
centered groove on the under- same for the fixed knob and your router.
side of the base and add a slot SHAPE. The base can be cut to shape at the
to secure the locking knob. table saw. I made a simple sled to help cut
Once you remove the MDF the angles. You can see in the left photo
from the plate, you can make that I attached two small strips of wood
both at the router table. to a piece of 3⁄4" MDF. These angled strips
The groove is sized to secure the base while making each cut.
Taper Sled on Table Saw. Two small strips of wood match the width of the slider After you soften the corners with a file,
glued to an MDF base secure the phenolic plate at an bar, and extends from the cen- you can attach the hardware and your
angle when cutting it to shape at the table saw. ter hole to the end of the plate. router and put your new base to work.

PATTERN (ENLARGE TO 200%) 2!/4

!/4"-rad.
%/8 #/8
!!/16
1!/4"-dia.
!/4"-dia. hole 1!/4
hole

See note !/4"-dia.


in Fig. 1 %/8"-wide x !/16"-deep hole
groove
1!/4
BOTTOM VIEW 4

86 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


Router Trammel
After finishing the edge guide there was plenty of
phenolic plate left over. So I decided to put it to use
by making a trammel base for routing circles and arcs.
Both bases are similar in size and shape, so making it
was an easy decision.
A trammel is the perfect solution for cleaning up
the edge of a circular workpiece cut at the band
saw. You can see in the photo at right that a router
is mounted at the end of the trammel’s base. The Handy Trammel. Cleaning up saw marks
guide’s centering pin, which is adjustable to the from the edge of a round workpiece is
radius of the workpiece (91⁄2" maximum), is secured easy with a router trammel.
by a hole drilled in the bottom of a round workpiece.
This allows the router to pivot around a stationary
center point, creating a perfectly round circle.
This guide is made with some of the same techniques used MAKING THE TRAMMEL
for the edge guide. There is one additional step necessary for You can start by shaping the baseplate from the pattern
the shop-made centering pin though. It’s a simple process below. I used the same overall dimensions of the edge guide
however, using a couple off-the-shelf hardware items. when making this base. The hole for the router bit is also cut
and chamfered the same way. The only difference is that it’s
located at one end of the base instead of the center.
Jam weld Like the edge guide, the trammel baseplate has a groove
EDGE GUIDE nut against Ease a. Cut head
PLATE shank of bolt edge off bolt and slot, but they’re quite a bit longer. (See the illustration
(!/4" x 3!/2"- 12") of pin
below for details.) The purpose of the groove is to capture a
flange nut that locks the knob (and pin) in place.
I made the small, thru-slot the same way as before. I drilled
1
⁄4" holes at each end of the slot, then removed the waste
between them at the router table.
As I mentioned, the centering pin is made from simple
Weld nut hardware items. It’s just a 1⁄4"-20 x 11⁄2" bolt and a weld
nut. To make it, clamp the bolt in a machinist’s vise with the
!/2"-wide x threads facing up. Then thread the weld nut all the way down
!/8"-deep
NOTE: Drill groove to the smooth part of the shank. Using a wrench, tighten
counterbored the nut securely. The goal is to keep the nut from loosening.
holes to fit
your router Complete the pin by cutting the head off the bolt with a
hacksaw and cleaning up the cut edge with a file.
Now you can drill the holes for your router and cut the base
Locking knob
and washer to shape using the same methods you used before. Go ahead
and thread the centering pin into the locking knob, as shown
in the illustration. With the base fully assembled, you’re able
to create perfect circles in a short time.

PATTERN (ENLARGE TO 200%)


BOTTOM VIEW !/4"-rad.
1#/4
7!/4
#/4
!/2"-wide x !/8"-deep
groove

!/4"-dia.
hole
1!/4
1!/4"-dia. 8!/4
hole

WoodsmithSpecials.com 87
XXXXXX
TABLE SAW & ROUTER
XXXX XX

router Mortising Machine


Create smoother, more precise mortises for all your project parts by
transforming a common router into this handy shop-built machine.
Most projects I build have at least a few machine plans. This design has a “keep- a snap. Common T-nuts and studded
mortise and tenon joints in them. And of it-simple” philosophy. It’s mostly built knobs round out the hardware list.
the two parts, the mortise causes the big- from plywood parts that are glued and POWER SOURCE. This mortising machine
gest headache. If that’s the case for you, screwed together. The moving compo- uses a medium-sized router motor as
then maybe it’s time to upgrade from the nents — the router carriage and sliding the power source. I find that a variable-
drill press and chisel method. A dedicated table — operate with heavy-duty, full- speed router gives you more versatility.
mortising machine may be just the ticket. extension drawer slides. A no-nonsense But even with a single-speed router, this
EASY TO BUILD. Complexity is the big stop system and a commercial toggle machine will make creating accurate
obstacle to most shop-built mortising clamp make cutting identical mortises mortises a quick and easy process.

88 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
OVERALL DIMENSIONS:
26" W x 23!/2" H x 21#/8" D

NOTE: Mortising machine


painted with "hammered" finish Router carriage
spray paint in Verde Green designed to accept
a mid-size
router motor
Large handle
can be used
Stout hardwood fence with either hand
won't flex under Router carriage
clamping pressure moves on
Stop block
makes repeatable heavy-duty,
mortises a breeze full-extension
drawer slides

Toggle clamp securely


holds workpiece
against fence

Upper table
adjusts in and out
to position workpiece
in relation to router bit

Threaded rod and


push-button nuts
create stops for cutting
repeatable mortises

Slots act as handles


for sliding table
back and forth NOTE:
to create mortise Mortising machine
is made primarily
from #/4" plywood

Sliding table
rests on
full-extension
drawer slides for
smooth operation

GO
GO
2
Online
nline
NOTE: For
hardware sources,
turn to page 98
Extras
For techniques
helpful in
making the
mortising
machine, Wide base provides
go to: room for clamping
WoodsmithSpecials.com mortising machine
to worksurface

WoodsmithSpecials.com 89
router
mortising
XXXX XX
XXXXXXEXTRAS

machine
Open Your Eyes
ONLINE

Springs on the the router mortising machine


retract the router carriage to its raised position.
The springs are attached to eye bolts and a screw
eye. To get the springs installed, you need to open
the eyes slightly. The photo shows how I used a
cold chisel and hammer to get the job done.

cutting a
Ramped Dado Spacer block
Double-sided
tape
I use a toggle clamp to secure a workpiece to the fence on
the router mortising machine. With just a flick of the lever, Clamp base
6
it provides the right amount of holding strength to keep the
workpiece from shifting during a cut. !/4
It works well on its own, but I added a few “upgrades” to Waste
make it work even better. A strip of sandpaper on the fence
!/4
and a wider hardwood clamp face increase the grip. The
other improvement I want to highlight here is to angle the
6
toggle clamp. This way the clamping pressure is directed 2!/2
slightly down against the table, as well.
USE A SPACER. For this to work, the clamp sits in a ramped
dado I cut at the table saw. To make this cut, I used a thin
spacer block to raise the back edge of the clamp base, as
shown in the upper right drawing. The block is sized to
match the deepest part of the ramp. Fasten the block to the
back edge of the plywood blank with double-sided tape.
Then all you need to do is make several passes over a dado
blade. The photo at right gives you the general idea. Like the
spacer, the dado blade is raised to match the deepest portion
of the ramp. I started cutting the ramp by using the rip fence
to roughly center the base on the dado blade.
SEVERAL PASSES. Make one pass, then flip the piece end for
end to make a second pass to center the dado. Now you can
move the rip fence closer to the blade and make another set
of passes. Repeat this process until you reach the layout lines.
The final step is to clean up the score marks on the surface
of the ramp with a sanding block.

PAGE 1 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
1
NOTE: Cut grooves using
a long hole
Without Drilling
a regular table saw blade
to sneak up on a good fit
with the threaded rod
9%/8
Handle
shaft Overall, the router mortising machine is a straightforward proj-
blank
ect to build. But there are a couple of head scratchers that you’ll
run across. The hardwood handle for lowering the router car-
riage is a good example and deserves a closer look.
a. END The rounded wood handle is comfortable to grab, but I wanted
VIEW Push
block to make sure it would be strong enough for long-term use. And
1 I needed to make a solid connection to the arms. The solution
%/16 %/32 to both of these challenges was to run a length of threaded rod
!/2 through the handle. Sounds simple enough, but drilling a long
hole through end grain isn’t easy to do. So rather than invest in a
long bit, I took another route.
TWO-PIECE CONSTRUCTION. Instead of making the handle out of a

2 single piece, I glued it up from a pair of blanks. Take a look at


Figure 1 to get the gist of the idea. By using two pieces, I could
cut a groove along each piece so that when the two halves were
joined, the result is the hole I needed.
Figure 1a shows how to cut the groove with a 1⁄8"-wide blade.
Rip fence This allows you to make a pass, flip the workpiece, and then
make a second pass to create a perfectly centered groove. With
Waxed a few fence tweaks and several more passes, you can size the
paper
groove for a nice fit with the threaded rod.
ASSEMBLY. Gluing up the halves into the handle presents another
challenge. The two parts need to stay aligned. So I used my table
saw rip fence and saw table to create a form, as shown in Figure
2. A sheet of waxed paper prevents you from getting glue on the
saw table. Speaking of glue, use a small amount so you don’t get
any squeezeout in the hole.

PAGE 2 OF 2 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS ©2015 CRUZ BAY PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
5!/2
3#/8
a. SIDE VIEW C
b. FRONT VIEW
POST
FACE
!/4 #/4"-
D rad.
#/4"-dia.

22
B 6#/4 C
A

NOTE: All parts


are #/4" plywood
E
6&/8
D POST
!/4 INSIDE
POST
OUTSIDE D
E 1!/4 7!/4
8 18
6 8
6 5
B
BASE TOP
22
A B
2"-rad. D
C

12
TOP VIEW
!/2"-rad. A
(all corners) BASE BOTTOM

26
NOTE: Temporarily
mount post to base
with screws only

a solid Foundation #8 x 3" Fh woodscrew

A fixed, stable core is a must for minimizing with glue and screws. a pattern to trace the rear profile on
vibration from the router and for keeping Once the foundation is the blank for the base bottom. After
the workpiece from shifting during the cut. built, you can move on to the rough-cutting the shape of the bot-
That job falls to the base and post assem- moving parts of the machine. tom layer, the two parts can be glued
blies shown in the drawing above. It’s also There’s nothing complicated about the together. Use a router and flush-trim bit
a good place to start because all the other construction process. However, I want to to remove the remaining waste and cre-
parts are attached to these two components. highlight several key items. ate a smooth, even edge.
The material of choice here is 3⁄4" ply- BASE. You start by building the base. In POST. The second assembly is the post.
wood. (I used Baltic birch.) As you can the drawing, you can see the base bottom Its function is to provide a mounting
see, the assemblies are laminated from two is wider than the top. This creates point for the router carriage that you’ll
layers of plywood. The added thickness a flange for clamping the mortising build momentarily. From the top, the
improves rigidity and provides more meat machine to a worksurface without inter- post has a “U” shape (Top View above).
for attaching heavy-duty hardware. fering with the sliding table. Don’t rush things by starting to cut
There’s no need for fancy joinery here. I cut the base top to its final size and and glue parts together. It’s a good idea
Instead, parts are cut to size and fastened shape as shown above. Then I used it as to knock out a few details on the post
face while it’s a separate part. The first
D E
a. SIDE SECTION VIEW of these is to cut a slot. The purpose of
%/16"-18 hex
nut & washer #/8"-dia. hole
the slot is to allow a pair of springs that
%/16"-18 x 2"
E eyebolt connect the router carriage to the post to
&/8"-dia. 1
E retract the carriage between cuts.
counterbore
D
I made the slot by drilling end holes and
then connecting the dots with a jig saw.
1 !/8 To open the eye, refer The upper drawing and detail ‘b’ on the
%/16"-18 1!/2 to the Online Extra at
T-nut C C WoodsmithSpecials.com previous page have the dimensions you
need for this. Then I reached for files

90 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


10" full-extension
8!/2 drawer slide w/screws
a. SIDE SECTION VIEW F

#8 x 2" Fh woodscrew G G
CARRIAGE
I H SIDE
F
1!/2 CARRIAGE
BACK
10
C
%/16"-18 x 5!/4" 1#/4 #/8 10
threaded rod NOTE: Cutout in
router mount and
clamp should
Threaded rod will cut match diameter of
threads in router mount. 4!/8 router motor
Add epoxy to hole 9!/2 E
for a secure hold 2#/4

Drill %/16"
through hole
c. TOP VIEW
2!/16 6#/4 D

6&/16 2!/4 C E
D
Drill (/32" H
pilot hole
2!/4 ROUTER G
MOUNT 1 !/8 C
5
ROUTER !/4
CLAMP F
%/16"-18 through !/8"- I
knob and washer roundover
B !/4 H
b. E E
D D
B
D d. TOP SECTION VIEW

G G A H %/8
C !/2"-dia.
F
4!/8 3!/4
6&/8
H
!/4 !/2
2%/8 2%/8
B
2!/8 2!/8
B !/4 1#/4"-rad.
TOP 2!/16
SECTION I
VIEW

and some sandpaper to straighten and time to tackle the moving parts. The first router holder have a half-circle cutout on
smooth the sides of the slot. of the these is the router carriage assem- the inside edges. Like I mentioned before,
Creating a mounting point for the bly that’s shown above. I sized this for a mid-size, Porter-Cable 892.
springs is the other detail on the post This assembly is made up of two sec- You may need to alter the size of the cutout
face you need to address. The springs tions. The U-shaped carriage and the to match your router motor.
are attached to a pair of eye bolts that are router holder. The carriage is the simplest Two short pieces of threaded rod, knobs,
anchored to T-nuts. The lower drawings to make. You need to size the parts care- and washers apply the clamping pressure.
on the facing page show where to locate fully to wrap around the post and a pair of I drilled the through holes in the clamp
the through hole and counterbore. drawer slides. The goal is a smooth sliding first. To mark the holes in the mount, I
The sides of the post are glued up from action on the slides. The back and sides are used a brad point bit through the clamp.
two layers of plywood. Take note that the joined with a tongue and groove joint to These holes are sized so that the rod cuts
front edges of each layer are offset to cre- align for assembly (detail ‘c’). threads into the mount for a stronger con-
ate a rabbet sized to accept the post face. The router holder takes a little more nection. I backed out the rod and applied a
When you’ve completed cutting the taper explanation. The holder consists of a little epoxy to the rods as some insurance
along the back edge of the sides, you can mount screwed to the carriage and a clamp before driving them in for good.
glue up the post assembly. that secures the router motor to the car- The router mount can be screwed to
The post and base are joined with long riage assembly. These two parts are made the carriage, as in details ‘a’ and ‘b.’ The
screws driven from the bottom, as shown from three layers of plywood. carriage assembly is attached to the post
in detail ‘a’ and Top View drawing on the Detail ‘d’ above shows a through hole with full-extension drawer slides (detail
previous page. near the back edge of the mount that ‘c’). For the most stability, the slides are
ROUTER CARRIAGE. Your work on the fixed forms part of the stop system to control arranged to be in the “closed” position as
parts of the mortiser is over. Now it’s the depth of the mortise. Both pieces of the the carriage is lowered.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 91
J

HANDLE !/8"-rad.
a. b.
FRONT G F
POST BLOCK VIEW
J
#/4
1!/4 D
3
%/16"-dia. CARRIAGE 7#/4 K &/8
!/2"-rad. K #/8"-16 POST BLOCK
hex nut K SIDE
VIEW
#/8"-dia.
#/8"-16 x 3" hex 4
head bolt #/8" flat J
washer G
1!/4

#8 x 2" Fh
woodscrew #/4"O.D. x
2!/2 #/8" I.D.
NOTE: 1!/4"O.D. x 1" nylon
All parts #/4" I.D. spacer
washer 1!/2
made from
hardwood H

router carriage HANDLE BLOCKS. The four blocks shown in


the drawing above serve as anchor points
The bushing rides in a slot in the handle
that draws the carriage up and down.

Controls for the handle shown on the next page.


Unlike the previous parts, these are all
made from hardwood for durability and
The carriage blocks are attached with
screws. The bolt and bushing are held by
a nut and a pair of washers.
The router carriage needs a little more to accept screw threads better. DEPTH STOP. The job of controlling the depth
work before it’s ready to accept the router The first two blocks mount to the post of cut falls to the block and hardware
motor. This isn’t too difficult, though the and allow the handle assembly to pivot assembly shown below. The depth rod
bits and pieces you make and add are clear of the wider carriage assembly. Glue block holds a short piece of threaded rod
important for the mortising machine to the blocks to the post at the location shown (detail ‘a’). I glued it in the same way as the
operate smoothly and accurately. in detail ‘a.’ Then drill a centered pilot hole threaded rod in the router mount. You can
Let’s make a quick rundown of what’s to accept a 5⁄16" lag screw that secures the use the rod to align the block with the hole
ahead, then I’ll highlight key points along end of the handle. you drilled earlier in the router mount.
the way. A large handle controls the up The other pair of blocks you need to The stop is provided by a push-button
and down motion of the router. A few add are attached to the front of the car- nut located below the carriage assembly
blocks and hardware additions to the car- riage assembly. Instead of a fixed point (lower left photo). For quick adjustments,
riage and post are necessary to add this. of connection, the blocks house a bolt press the button and slide the nut along
In order to create an accurate mortise, and nylon spacer, as you can see in the the threaded rod. To fine-tune the depth of
you need a way to make cuts to a consis- main drawing above and detail ‘b.’ cut, simply turn the nut as needed.
tent depth. A basic stop system handles
this easily. A pair of springs in the back lift a. SIDE
the router clear of the cut and return it to SECTION
%/16"-18 x 10!/2" VIEW
its ready position. threaded rod

%/16"-18
Epoxy push-button
secures rod nut, hex nut
in block and washer

L #/4

1!/2
< Quick-Set Stops. Drill (/32"-dia. !/2 2
pilot hole
Push the button in block
for fast adjustment of the
stops. Then turn the nut to 3
L
fine-tune its location. !/2"-rad.
5!/4 DEPTH
#8 x 2!/2" Fh ROD BLOCK
woodscrew

92 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


SECOND: Fit handle shaft NOTE: Shaft made from two
between arms and install rod pieces of !/2"-thick
hardwood. All other parts a. SIDE SECTION
are #/4"-thick hardwood VIEW
9%/8
ARM NOTE: Refer to
!/4"-rad. WoodsmithSpecials.com M
M
THIRD: Secure M for instructions to
make handle shaft 1
with washers
and nuts P
1 %/16
N
ARM SPACER P
HANDLE SHAFT
O %/16
ARM CAP
N

NOTE: Paint FIRST: Fit handle


handle shaft J over bushing and
black before N install lag screw
final assembly
O

b. SIDE VIEW !/8 "-rad. c.


P FRONT
%/16 "-dia. 3 SECTION
M
VIEW
1!/8 M
1!/4
N N #/4 1!/2
1 !/2"-rad.
O #/4
%/16"-18
5#/4 6 %/16"-18 x 12" hex nut
G
17!/2 threaded rod and
washer

HARDWOOD HANDLE. With all the preliminary What’s important here is the width of the d. FRONT
items crossed off the list, you can make the spacers. They should be just a hair wider SECTION
M VIEW
handle. The long, front-mounted handle is than the bushing. This allows the bushing J
easy to use with either hand and provides to move freely but without any slop.
good leverage for plunging the router bit The arm has a hole drilled at each end.
into the workpiece. The handle is made up One is used to attach it to the post. The %/16"x 3"
lag screw
of three components — two arm assemblies other is to join the arms to the handle w/ washers
that sandwich a shaft and threaded rod. shaft, as shown in detail ‘b.’
Each arm incorporates a slot that SPLIT SHAFT. I was concerned about screw
houses the nylon bushing you installed threads holding in the end grain of a looks. An article at WoodsmithSpecials.com
on the carriage. But rather than cutting solid dowel. To eliminate those worries, will walk you through the technique.
a slot, I built it up from smaller parts, as I made a two-piece shaft that captures a You need to assemble the handle in
you can see in the drawing above and section of threaded rod. This is illustrated a specific order. Fit the slot over the
detail ‘b.’ Two spacers and a cap piece in details ‘a’ and ‘c.’ Creating the chan- bushing and drive lag screws to secure
are glued to the main handle piece. nel for the threaded rod is easier than it each arm to the post. Then slip the shaft
between the arms and add the washers
P
a. and nuts, as in detail ‘c.’
C RETURN SPRINGS. Two extension springs
%/16"-18 x 2"
eyebolt are the final elements you need to add.
w/washer #/4
%/16"-dia. As I said earlier, these springs lift the
drill bit E D
router carriage and hold it above the
C F workpiece. This gives you plenty of
BACK VIEW room to move workpieces around and
set up the sliding table. One end of each
F M
b. spring is attached to one of the eyebolts
F C E
5.625" x on the back side of the post.
.563" O.D. H
The two springs meet at a single screw
M Springs
extension
springs eye threaded into the back of the carriage
(detail ‘b’). You can see in detail ‘a’ how
SIDE SECTION Screw eye
J J to locate and drill the pilot hole for the
VIEW
%/16"x 2!/2" screw eye in the back of the carriage.
screw eye

WoodsmithSpecials.com 93
1!/4 %/16" washer
%/16"-18 hex nut
NOTE: Remove the D
post to fit drawer 1!/2
slide components 3!/4 !/2"-dia.
together STOP BLOCK
2 S
NOTE: Use holes
in stop blocks
to locate hole B 3#/8 #/8"-dia. through hole
in post
%/16"-18 !/2"-rad.
push-button
nut
S 6!/8
R
SLIDING TABLE
NOTE: Table parts 2#/4 TOP
are #/4" plywood. 1!/4"-dia. #/8"-dia. through hole,
Stop blocks are &/8"-dia. counterbore
glued up from 3 1%/8 (for all T-nuts)
#/4"-thick %/16"-18 x 22&/8" 15 1&/8
hardwood threaded rod
4
Q
22 SLIDING TABLE
%/16"-18 BOTTOM
Attach upper portion of 2!/4 T-nut
slides flush with the end 12
of the table bottom

a. SIDE SECTION VIEW 5!/4


1!/4 before that happens. On the bottom
18" full-extension
drawer slides w/screws layer, I cut the plywood piece to its final
1!/4 shape with a large notch in the back and
S
rounded corners at the front. These details
R 3!/8 are shown in the main drawing.
D Q The top layer is deeper than the bottom
#/8
layer. Along the overhanging front edge,
you cut a pair of hand-holds that you use
B 5!/4
!/4 to slide the table side to side.
This layer also has a narrow kerf cen-
b. FRONT SECTION %/16"-dia tered on the top face, as shown in detail
VIEW through hole ‘b.’ It houses an aluminum strip in the
next component of the table assembly (the
D E !/8 E D S fence base). It’s used to position the work-
piece front to back in relation to the router
!/4 R 3#/8
bit while keeping it square.
Q !/8 The top layer has the same notch at the
back, but I only roughly cut it out before
B
gluing the two layers together. I used a
router and flush-trim bit to clean up the

two-way The other action moves the securely


held workpiece side to side as the bit cuts
notch so it matched the layer below.
Take a look at details ‘a’ and ‘b’ to install

Sliding Table along the length of the mortise. Fixed


and sliding may seem like oil and water.
But as we go along, you can see how this
a set of T-nuts in the bottom face of the
sliding table. These lock the fence base in
position with knobs.
The work so far has focused on making the table makes it work. The notch along the back edge of the
mechanism for the router plunge smoothly BUILT IN LAYERS. The table is a built-up sliding table wraps around the post. A
into a workpiece. From here on, you turn assembly where each new layer adds a pair of blocks glued to the “ears” on either
your attention to the workpiece support different function. The drawing above end of the notch house a threaded rod. It’s
and control functions of the machine. All gets the ball rolling with the two lower used to create the end stops for the mortis-
that is handled by the table assembly. sliding table pieces. These mount to the ing machine. Use the holes in the blocks to
There are two separate actions going mortising machine’s base with drawer locate matching holes you need to drill in
on. The first is creating a way to line up slides. With this arrangement, you can the post sides (detail ‘a’).
the workpiece in relation to the bit. While smoothly slide a workpiece side to side DRAWER SLIDES. I mentioned earlier that the
it’s adjustable, the setting needs to be to create a smooth mortise. sliding table is attached with drawer slides.
“fixed” so that the workpiece can’t shift Even though they’re glued together, But there’s a little more to it. In order to
during the mortising process. there’s some work to do on each piece allow the table to slide both left and right,

94 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


NOTE: Fence and stop block a. TOP VIEW #/8"-dia.
are made from hardwood.
Fence base is #/4" plywood T-track
FENCE R T
%/16"-18 x 1#/4" U
Attach strips of
studded knob adhesive-backed 1#/16 2%/8
and washer 2#/8 sandpaper to
fence face
FENCE BASE b. #/4 #/8 L
T !/4" washer
2!/8 %/8
22 &/8 V
!/2"-rad. #/4 1!/8
#/4
!/4" -20
4 !/4"- 20" x 1!/4" insert U
!/2"-rad. hex bolt knob
SIDE SECTION
8!/4 VIEW
3#/8
R 8
!/2" x 12#/4" - !/8" T
aluminum bar

#/8"-dia. through hole, 2!/4 #8 x 1!/2" Fh woodscrew


&/8"-dia. counterbore V
2!/4 1!/4 1!/4 FENCE
STOP BLOCK 2!/4 d. FRONT VIEW U

T !/8
Sand dust relief on T
R %/16"-18 T-nut lower corners of stop block
!/16 !/4
SIDE SECTION Q Several details help accomplish those
c. VIEW Aluminum bar R
tasks. An aluminum strip in the bottom
face mates with the kerf in the sliding table
you need to attach the slide components (detail ‘d’). And the slots shown in detail
to the machine base and sliding table so ‘a’ line up with the T-nuts in the sliding of the fence above and below the T-track
they’re offset. So when the table is centered, table. Studded knobs and washers com- to keep a workpiece from creeping out of
the mechanism is half-open, as shown in plete the task of securing the fence base. alignment while making a mortise.
the drawing and details ‘a’ and ‘b’ on the Take a look at the extension tab in the TOGGLE CLAMP. The final piece of the puzzle
previous page. As you install the slides, it’s front of the fence base. It holds six more is the toggle clamp you see in the drawing
important that the slides are installed paral- T-nuts that are installed on the bottom below. It’s attached to a mounting base, so
lel to each other and square to the face of face to anchor a toggle clamp that pins the you can adjust its position depending on
the router carriage. To install the table, you workpiece against the fence, as in detail ‘c’ the thickness of the piece you’re working
need to remove the post and fit the drawer and the drawing below. with. The clamp sits in an angled dado to
slides together. Then reattach the post. A STOUT FENCE. The next layer of the table apply slight downward pressure in use. An
FENCE BASE. Moving up from the sliding assembly is the fence. It’s glued up from article at WoodsmithSpecials.com explains
table, you come to the fence base shown hardwood and beveled on the back edge. how the dado is cut. I glued a wide clamp
above. The base does a few things: It sup- I installed a length of T-track in the face to block to the swivel head of the clamp to
ports the workpiece, serves as the mount- hold an adjustable stop, as you can see in distribute the pressure more evenly.
ing point for the fence, and determines detail ‘b.’ The fence is glued and screwed The mortising machine is now ready
the front to back position of the work- to the fence base. I also applied strips of to be put into action. The straightforward
piece in relation to the bit. adhesive-backed sandpaper to the face design helps keep this a simple process.
#10 x %/8" Ph You can read about it in the step-by-step
sheet metal screw instructions on the next page.
NOTE:
Clamp block is
glued up from CLAMP BLOCK
two layers of a.
X
!/2"-hardwood. 4!/4 SIDE SECTION VIEW
Clamp base is
#/4" plywood

Toggle L
CLAMP BASE clamp 1
W
!/2"-rad.
X 1!/2
#/4 U
6 W !/4 !/8
6
T %/16"-18 x 1#/4" T
studded knob
and washer 1!/2
!/2"-rad.

WoodsmithSpecials.com 95
set up & use the Mortising Machine
The easy-to-use controls on the mortis- When it’s time to rout the next part, just of the suppliers listed on page 98. You rout
ing machine make setting up and using slip it into place on the table, and you’re the mortise in a series of several shallow
it quick to master. The various stops take ready to get started. passes — usually no more than 1⁄4" for each
the hassle out of routing identical mor- In use, the mortising machine works pass. You remove a lot of waste in making
tises. In fact, you will need to lay out a best with either a spiral bit or an end mill a mortise, so you may want to stop and
mortise on only one of the workpieces. router bit. These are available from several vacuum the chips from time to time.

How-To: Set Up the Mortising Machine


1 2

Lay Out the Mortise. Draw a complete mortise on one of your Set the Depth Stop. I mark the depth of the mortise on the end of
workpieces. You can then use this to adjust the table and set the the workpiece. Lower the router bit to the line and position the nut
stops on the mortising machine. on the depth stop at the post to set the depth of cut.

3 4

Align Table & Fence. With the workpiece against the fence, use Set Right End Stop. Slide the table so the bit is directly over the
the mortise layout to adjust the table so that the bit is centered on right end of the mortise. Move the pushbutton nut on the right side
the mortise. Don’t forget to lock the table in place. of the machine so it’s against the side of the post.

5 6

Set Left End Stop. With the bit over the left end of the mortise, set Position the Stop Block. Chances are you need to rout the same
the stop nut on the left side in the same way. Now you don’t have to size mortise in multiple parts. Set the stop block on the fence to
worry about overshooting your lines as you rout. simplify and speed up the process.

96 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS


How-To: Use the Mortising Machine
1 2

Secure the Workpiece. After following the steps to Routing Mortises. Starting at one end of the mortise, plunge the bit 1⁄8"
set the stops and adjust the table, you can slip the to 1⁄4" deep into the workpiece and slide the table to the other end of
workpiece into place against the fence and stop. The the mortise. Lower the bit slightly and make a second pass. Repeat this
toggle clamp presses the workpiece against the fence process until the carriage contacts the depth stop. Remove the part and
and prevents it from shifting during the cut. install another to continue making mortises.

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM


A Base Bottom (1) 18 x 26 - 3⁄4 Ply. T Fence Base (1) 121⁄4 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 3⁄8" I.D. x 3⁄4" O.D. -1" Nylon Spacers
B Base Top (1) 18 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. U Fence (1) 21⁄8 x 23⁄8 - 22 • (2) #8 x 21⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
C Post Face (1) 51⁄2 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. V Fence Stop Block (1) 3⁄ x 21⁄ - 21⁄
4 4 4 • (3) 5⁄16"-18 Pushbutton Nuts
D Post Outsides (2) 8 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. W Clamp Base (1) 6 x 6 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16" x 3" Lag Screws
E Post Insides (2) 71⁄4 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. X Clamp Block (1) 1 x 11⁄2 - 41⁄2 • (1) 5⁄16" x 21⁄2" Screw Eye
F Router Carriage Back (1) 81⁄2 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5.625" x .563" O.D. Extension Springs
G Router Carriage Sides (2) 23⁄4 x 10 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (8) #8 x 3" Fh Woodscrews • (2) 18" Full-Extension Slides w/Screws
H Router Mount (1) 41⁄8 x 91⁄2 - 21⁄4 Ply. • (10) 5⁄16"-18 T-nuts • (1) 1⁄2" x 123⁄4” x 1⁄8" Aluminum Bar
I Router Clamp (1) 21⁄16 x 67⁄16 - 21⁄4 Ply. • (2) 5⁄16"-18 x 2" Eye Bolts • (1) 24" T-Track w/Screws
J Handle Post Blocks (2) 11⁄2 x 11⁄4 - 21⁄2 • (16) 5⁄16" Flat Washers • (8) #8 x 11⁄2" Fh Woodscrews
K Carriage Post Blocks (2) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 4 • (7) 5⁄16"-18 Hex Nuts • (1) 1⁄4"-20 x 11⁄4" Hex Bolt
4 4
L Depth Rod Block (1) 3⁄ x 2 - 3 • (3) 5⁄16"-18 x 24" Threaded Rods • (1) 1⁄4"-20 Through Knob
4
M Arms (2) 3⁄ x 11⁄ - 171⁄ • (2) 5⁄16"-18 Through Knobs • (1) 1⁄4" Flat Washer
4 8 2
N Arm Spacers (4) 3 ⁄4 x ⁄16 - 11⁄4
13 • (8) #8 x 2" Fh Woodscrews • (4) 5⁄16"-18 x 13⁄4" Studded Knobs
O Arm Caps (2) 3⁄ x 13⁄ - 6 • (2) 10" Full-Extension Slides w/Screws • (2) 5⁄16" Fender Washers
4 16
P Handle Shafts (2) 1⁄ x 1 - 95⁄ • (2) 3⁄8"-16 x 3" Hex Bolts • (1) Toggle Clamp
2 8
Q Sliding Table Bottom (1) 12 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 3⁄8"-16 Hex Nuts • (4) #10 x 5⁄8" Ph Sheet Metal Screws
R Sliding Table Top (1) 15 x 22 - 3⁄4 Ply. • (2) 3⁄8" Flat Washers
S Stop Blocks (2) 11⁄2 x 2 - 23⁄4 • (2) 11⁄4" O.D. x 3⁄4" I.D. Washers

#/4"x 6"- 72" Maple (3 Bd. Ft.)


M M P P N
L S S S S X X K K J J J J O O

U U U V

ALSO NEEDED: One 60"x 60" Sheet of #/4" Baltic Birch Plywood

WoodsmithSpecials.com 97
MAIL
Our Best Jigs & Tool Add-Ons Sources
ORDER Most supplies for projects in this SWIVEL VISE (P. 28) Bench Pup Set . . . . . . . . 05G10.03
SOURCES book are at hardware stores or • McMaster-Carr Cam Clamps . . . . . . . . . . 05J51.05
home centers. For specific prod- Hitch Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8785T6 Snap-Lock Knobs . . . . . . 00M70.20
Rockler ucts, look at the sources listed here. Adjustable Handle . . . . . . 6270K52 • McMaster-Carr
800-279-4441 Retailers sometimes discontinue • Amazon 3⁄ " Phenolic (Garolite). . .85315K113
16
rockler.com
items, so gather hardware you need 4" Mechanics Vise . . . . . . 4935504 DRILL PRESS DEPTH STOP (P. 68)
All Metals, Inc. before you get started. You can ad- Pipe Flange. . . . . . . B003EAFEKY • McMaster-Carr
888-638-2517 just dimensions or drill different-
allmetalsinc.com SLIDING CUTOFF GRINDER (P. 32) Push-Button Nuts . . . . 98150A770
sized holes to suit your hardware. • McMaster-Carr
1⁄ "-20 Inserts . . . . . . . 90016A029
CIRCLE-CUTTING JIG (P. 70)
amazon.com DRILL PRESS STATION (P. 6) 4 • McMaster-Carr
• Essentra Components White Resin Bars . . . . . . . 8739K86 5⁄ " x 11⁄ " Alum. Bar . . . 8975K18
16 2
DrillSpot 4" Drawer Pull. . . . . . . . . . KHO-5 1⁄ " x 11⁄ " Alum. . . . . . 8975K198
16 4
720-204-3660 • Essentra Components
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drillspot.com 4 1⁄ "-20 Insert Knob . . . . .DK-1204
4
T-Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22104 33⁄4" Spring . . . . . . . . . . 9654K376 • Kreg
5⁄ "-18 Insert Knobs . . . . . . 23812 Metal parts are from All Metals, Inc.
Enco 16 Jig/Fixture Bar . . . . . . . . KMS7303
800-873-3626 5⁄ "-18 Studded Knobs. . . . . 23846
16
use-enco.com 5⁄ "-18 Flange Bolts. . . . . . . 83311
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Essentra Components AIR TOOL STATION (P. 16) 31⁄4"-dia. Handwheels . . . 6403K44 SMALL PARTS JIG (P. 76)
800-847-0486 • Northern Tool LH Threaded Rod . . . . 90036A031
essentracomponents.com • Lee Valley
10-Gallon Air Tank. . . . . . . . 17367 LH Hex Nuts. . . . . . . . 90083A031 36" T-Track . . . . . . . . . . 12K79.24
Kreg Tool • McMaster-Carr LH Coupling Nuts . . . 93345A231 1
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800-447-8638 Blowgun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5186K41 RH Threaded Rod . . . . 99086A123 1
⁄4"-20 x 1" T-Bolt . . . . . . . 12K79.70
kregtool.com Ball Valve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47865K23 RH Hex Nuts. . . . . . . . 90949A031 1
⁄4"-20 Inserts . . . . . . . . . . 00M90.01
• Essentra Components RH Coupling Nuts . . . 90264A460 1
⁄4"-20 Knob w/1" Stud . . . 00M51.02
Lee Valley
800-871-8158 In-line Regulator. . . . . . . . COL-4002 Through Knobs . . . . . . . 6121K211 1
⁄4"-20 Knob w/Insert . . . . 00M51.01
leevalley.com Coil Hose . . . . . . . . COL-PR1425AB Studded Knobs . . . . . . . . . 6079K14 Tapered Handle w/Stud . . . 00M53.02
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630-833-0300 PALM ROUTER BASES (P. 82)
mcmaster.com Lubricator. . . . . . . . . . . . . 328-4933 DRILL PRESS SANDER (P. 48) • McMaster-Carr
SHARPENING CENTER (P. 20) • McMaster-Carr Phenolic (Garolite) . . . 85315K114
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⁄2" x 24" Steel Rod . . . . . 1346K18
800-221-0516 Brass Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . 8954K195
northerntool.com Dayton 1⁄3-HP Motor . . . . 6XH45 1⁄ " Ball Bearing . . . . . 60355K704
2 Knurled Screw . . . . . . . 90200A264
• McMaster-Carr 1⁄ " Shaft Collar. . . . . . . . 9414T11
2 Red Ball Knobs . . . . . . . . 6146K43
Proxxon 2"-dia. V-Belt Pulley . . . . 6245K62 2" x 1⁄2" Plate . . . . . . . . . 1394A31 Weld Nut . . . . . . . . . . . 98001A130
877-776-9966 3"-dia. V-Belt Pulley . . . . 6245K66 5⁄ " Ball Bearings . . . . . . . 2780T61
8
proxxon.com 5⁄ " x 10" Steel Rod . . . . 6061K112 MORTISING MACHINE (P. 88)
Mounted Bearings . . . . . . 5913K62 8
2" Twist Lock V-Belt . . . . 6173K37 5⁄ " Shaft Collars . . . . . . . 9414T13 • McMaster-Carr
Woodcraft 8
800-225-1153 Power Cord . . . . . . . . . . 70355K33 • Essentra Components Push-Button Nut . . . . . 98150A730
woodcraft.com 5⁄ "-18 Studded Knobs. . . 5993K26 3⁄ "-16 x 11⁄ " Knob. . . . . . . . RST-102 Extension Spring . . . . . . 9654K332
16 8 2
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5⁄ "-8 Acme Rod . . . . . . 99030A009 3⁄ "-16 Insert Knob . . . . . . . . . DK-87 16
8 8
5⁄ " Studded Knob . . . . . 5993K26
5⁄ "-8 Acme Hex Nuts. . . 94815A108 16
8 MITER BOX (P. 58) 1⁄ " Through Knob . . . . . . 5993K22
• Essentra Components 4
• Lee Valley Toggle Clamp. . . . . . . . . . 5127A13
Drawer Pull . . . . . . . . . . . . KHO-5 11⁄8" Knob w/Stud . . . . . 00M51.02
• Rockler Nylon Spacers . . . . . . . 94639A860
1⁄ "-20 Threaded Inserts . . . 00M90.01
4 • Lee Valley
Power Tool Switch . . . . . . . . 20915 4" x 24" - 3⁄4" UHMW . . . 46J90.14
• Lee Valley 24" T-Track. . . . . . . . . . . .12K79.22
80x Grinding Wheel . . . 08M18.01 BENCH RAIL SYSTEM (P. 62) • Woodcraft
120x Grinding Wheel . . 08M21.02 • Lee Valley 10" Drawer Slides . . . . . . . . 27D11
5⁄ "-18 Propell Nuts . . . 00N32.01 18" Drawer Slides . . . . . . . . 27D15
Hard Felt Wheel . . . . . . 08M41.05 16

Medium Felt Wheel . . . . 08M40.05 11⁄4" T-Knobs . . . . . . . . . 00M60.03


Shaped Felt Wheel . . . . . 08M42.03 1" Capscrews . . . . . . . . . 00M60.12

98 OUR BEST JIGS & TOOL ADD-ONS