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102085 Summer A 2018/19 The Australian Botanic Gardens, Mt Annan Aboriginal and Culturally Responsive Pedagogies
102085 Summer A 2018/19
The Australian Botanic Gardens, Mt Annan
Aboriginal and Culturally
Responsive Pedagogies
Yandel’ora – a place of meeting between people
Jade Cunningham 17999508
Michael Flarrety 18309241
Joseph Gatehau 17806741
Michael Holmes 19266611
School of Education
Unit of Work

In the unit of work students investigate the value of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sites as Yandel’ora. Students explore the cultural and aesthetic value of the Australian Botanic Garden and its significance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Focus is placed on the sites built and natural landscape, including its flora and fauna. The unit of work consists of ten interconnected

lessons from the curriculum areas of English,

Geography and Music.

from the curriculum areas of English, Geography and Music. Australian Botanic Gardens Dharawal Site The Australian
from the curriculum areas of English, Geography and Music. Australian Botanic Gardens Dharawal Site The Australian
Australian Botanic Gardens Dharawal Site The Australian Botanic Gardens is an important Aboriginal and Torres
Australian Botanic Gardens
Dharawal Site
The Australian Botanic Gardens is an important
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander site for
Dharawal people as it homes the Fruit Loops
Garden and Stolen Generation Memorial. The
gardens are located in Mt Annan, a place known
by Dharawal people as Yandel’ora, a place of
peace and meeting between people (The
Australian Botanic Gardens, 2018; Bodkin &
Bodkin-Andrews, 2013). The gardens was first
opened in 1988 and has grown into an important
site for Dharawal education, sustainability,
healing and reflection.
Prior to, during the site visit and throughout the
creation of the unit of work, it has been difficult
to engage with the community to enrich our
knowledge of Dharawal community’s use of the
Australian Botanic Gardens. Aboriginal
Community Consultation and Protocols have
informed the unit of work to create authentic
learning opportunities for students whilst being
sensitive of the history and culture of Dharawal
people (Board of Studies NSW, 2008).
culture of Dharawal people (Board of Studies NSW, 2008). Curriculum English The unit of work encourages
Curriculum
Curriculum

English

The unit of work encourages students to develop and improve core English skills. The importance of context is made clear, with students gaining a strong understanding of the Dharawal people prior to completing the site visit. Through studying a Dharawal dreaming story, students gain a strong understanding of context and story sharing. English concepts such as symbolism are explored in the context of the Stolen Generations, resonating with students and enhancing their knowledge. Students explore various forms of writing, producing both letters and reflective pieces. Through this, both their skills in comprehension and composition are benefited. Outcomes: EN4-2A, EN4-3B, EN4-4B, 4N4-7D

Geography

The unit of work allows students to investigate the ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people value landscapes and landforms. Students

interact with the features of the built and natural environment that makes the site an important place of peace for Dharawal people. The flora of the Fruit Loop

garden and the landscapes of the Stolen Generation Memorial demonstrate the cultural and aesthetic value of the Australian Botanic Gardens site. Learners develop their ability to recognise the values that form and characterise landscapes. Students discuss the management of the site as a place of education and sustainability. Throughout the unit of work students communicate their geographic knowledge and skills in a

variety of ways.

Outcomes: GE4-1, GE4-2, GE4-5, GE4-8

Music

The unit of work focuses on non-traditional methods of notating, composing and performing. These lessons focus on using Dharawal symbols as a catalyst in breaking down the preconception that, ‘you have to be

able to read music to play music’. After going to the Botanic Gardens students will use the site as a resource and source of inspiration for their own compositions.

Music composition will be taught through using

Dharawal symbols and students will use non-traditional methods to perform their compositions.

Outcomes: 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.7

8 Ways of Learning Story Sharing In this unit students will focus on story sharing
8 Ways of Learning
Story Sharing
In this unit students will focus on story sharing using graphic notation.
Students will use symbols to depict their experience at Yandel’ora. In
future lessons students will share their story through composition and
performance.
Deconstruct-reconstruct
Scaffolding is an important part of this unit, with teachers providing
outlines across different curriculums. For letter writing in English, the
teacher breaks down the different paragraphs, allowing students to
work from parts to wholes. Through working on paragraphs separately,
students are able to create a successful letter in its entirety.
Non-linear
Overall, how this unit uses the one resource could be considered a
complimentary form of learning. The Music unit encourages students
to ‘think outside the box’. By the end of the unit students will have
composed, performed and notated their own composition. Assembling
their knowledge through Dharawal symbols.
Land-links
For indigenous Australians the land is an invaluable resource. This unit
shares this concept by using the Botanical Gardens as a resource for
lessons. In addition to having the students go on a site visit,
throughout our unit we have taken photo’s that can be used as
stimulus material.
Community links
The unit of work uses traditional Dharawal language and knowledge
through organic learning experiences at the Australian Botanic Gardens
site and community member engagement within the classroom. Aunty
Fran Bodkin’s involvement in the creation and management of the site
is integral for understanding the site as a place of meeting and
education.
Non-verbal
In the composition lesson, the students are given the opportunity to
use their creative skills by designing their own symbols and using them
to tell a story. The non-traditional method allows all students to use
their natural instincts and draw what they think and feel rather than
explaining their story.
Learning maps
A learning map creates authentic linkages between curriculum areas to
establish a cohesive unit of work. Students are provided the
opportunity to create their own learning map post site visit and engage
in continual reflection of their learning journey.
Symbols and images
The importance of symbols and images is demonstrated in this unit,
particularly in English. Symbolism is used in order to enhance student
understanding of the Stolen Generations. The symbolism present in
the memorial at the gardens is used to teach students about the
painful history, with students considering the symbolic meaning of
water.
AITSL Standards Standard 1.4 Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students The unit
AITSL Standards
Standard 1.4 Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander students
The unit incorporates various strategies for teaching
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students,
maintaining high-expectations relationships for all
students. Students are encouraged to produce high
quality work, incorporating a range of traditional
Indigenous learning. Elements from Dharawal
culture have been incorporated throughout the unit
in an effort to effectively engage Indigenous
students.
Standard 2.4 Understand and respect Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people to promote reconciliation between
Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
The unit has been comprised with both
understanding and respect at the forefront.
Throughout the unit, Aboriginal history, such as the
Stolen Generations, are treated both respectfully
and appropriately. The unit values traditional
Aboriginal culture, incorporating Dharawal dreaming
stories, Dadirri listening exercises and various other
highly valuable cultural elements.
Standard 4.1 Support student participation
Students are encouraged to participate in a vast
number of ways throughout the unit. The unit
maximises differentiation, allowing students to
participate in learning in a variety of ways depending
on particular skillsets. Students are encouraged to
engage in practical exercises, verbal discussions and
written tasks.
References
ABC. (2013). Aunty Fran. Gardening Australia. Retrieved from
ABC. (2013). Aunty Fran. Gardening Australia. Retrieved from
https://www.abc.net.au/gardening/factsheets/aunty-fran/9434386
Australian Botanic Gardens. (2018). Indigenous heritage. The Botanic
Gardens Trust. Retrieved from
https://www.australianbotanicgarden.com.au/About-Us/History-
and-Facts/Indigenous-Heritage
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL). (2014).
Australian professional standards for teachers. AITSL. Retrieved from
http://www.aitsl.edu.au/australian-professional-standards-for-
teachers/standards/list
Board of Studies NSW. (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: a
guide to community consultation and protocols. Board of Studies.
Retrieved from https://ab-ed.nesa.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-
aboriginal-communities.pdf
Bodkin, F., & Bodkin-Andrews, G. (2013). Dharawal dreaming stories.
Dharawal Stories.
Yunkaporta , T. (2009). Aboriginal pedagogies at the cultural interface .
(PhD thesis). Retrieved from
https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/10974/4/04Bookchapter.pdf