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CIVIL AIR PATROL Connecticut Wing Congressional Gold Medal Recipients

Semper Vigilans

Always Vigilant

Gold Medal Recipients Semper Vigilans Always Vigilant Honorees Norman Allgeier Loering Johnson Welles
Gold Medal Recipients Semper Vigilans Always Vigilant Honorees Norman Allgeier Loering Johnson Welles

Honorees

Norman Allgeier

Loering Johnson

Welles Bishop

Thomas Lockhart

Judith Calandrelli

Ernest Markham

Joel Fairfax

Andre Maye

Helen Sarr-Hill

Hyland Tasker

Nancy Hopkins-Tier

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas H. Lockhart

Thomas Lockhart was born on January 9, 1911 in New Haven, CT. He was serving as Commissioner of the Connecticut Depart- ment of Aeronautics when the Second World War broke out in 1941.

An alumni of the Staunton Military Academy (class of 1929) and St. Louis Univer- sity, Lockhart, a licensed pilot, answered his nations call to service and was appointed the first Commander of Connecticut Wing. It was under his leadership that Connecticut's first squadrons were formed.

In 1944, he joined the US Marine Corps and commissioned a lieutenant. He served as an Operations Officer in Marine Air Group 22, seeing action in the South Pacific, notably during the Battle of Okinawa.

After the war, Lockhart resumed his po-

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

sition as Commissioner for one year and then went on to a successful career in advertising. He died on December 4, 1992 and is laid to rest in Princeton, Mass.

on December 4, 1992 and is laid to rest in Princeton, Mass. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas H.

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas H. Lockhart, First Commander of Civil Air Patrol’s Connecticut Wing (1941-1944).

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Norman E. Allgeier

Norman Allgeier began his Civil Air Pa- trol career by joining a squadron in Cincin- nati, Ohio where he attained the grade of sergeant and was awarded the One Thou- sand Hour service medal.

Though far removed from the U-boat menace, Ohio squadrons undertook a variety of missions on behalf of the war effort. Squadrons conducted scrap metal drives and aerial patrols over coal, oil and gas resources. They flew fire watches over forestlands and also served as aerial couriers during the war.

Sergeant Allgeier served with Civil Air Patrol senior member Mary Jo Fromeyer, who later became Mrs. Allgeier. Their son

Thomas recalls talks with his dad who said “we did our job, and we did it well.”

Mrs. Allgeier. Their son Thomas recalls talks with his dad who said “we did our job,

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Welles Bishop

1st Lt. Welles Bishop was an avid birder and owner of the Bishop Bird Feeder Compa- ny. His love of birds might have led to his in- terest in aviation. During the 1920’s he earned his private pilot’s license at Meriden Airport. When the war broke out, Wells de- cided to do his part and joined Civil Air Pa- trol. He was put on to active duty, and joined his fellow “Nutmeggers,” flying submarine patrols off of Bar Harbor, Maine.

On Feb. 2, 1943 Bishop took off on a routine patrol when his plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean. Although wearing rub- ber bail-out suits, he and his observer, 1st Lt. William Hites, died from exposure.

Ocean. Although wearing rub- ber bail - out suits, he and his observer, 1st Lt. William

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Judith Calandrelli

Judith Calandrelli was an 18 year of ad- mirer of Amelia Earhart in 1944. Working at Norwalk Aircraft as a welder, she saw a mag- azine advertisement to join Civil Air Patrol. She was hooked and soon became part of the home-front effort to win the war.

In addition to learning how to spot ene- my aircraft, drill and other civil defense skills, she was one of three women chosen to earn free flying lessons at Danbury Airport.

women chosen to earn free flying lessons at Danbury Airport. After the war, Calandrelli worked for

After the war, Calandrelli worked for C.R. Gibson and the Westport Public Library.

lessons at Danbury Airport. After the war, Calandrelli worked for C.R. Gibson and the Westport Public

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Joel Fairfax

Joel Fairfax is a charter member of Con- necticut Wing’s Danbury Squadron. He was assigned to perform coastal patrols in Bar Harbor, Maine, but his job in the defense manufacturing industry, making machine tools for aircraft, was deemed too important to the war effort for him to take time off.

Fairfax flew many missions with Civil Air Patrol, freeing up Army Air Corp crews for combat.

him to take time off. Fairfax flew many missions with Civil Air Patrol, freeing up Army
him to take time off. Fairfax flew many missions with Civil Air Patrol, freeing up Army
him to take time off. Fairfax flew many missions with Civil Air Patrol, freeing up Army

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Loering Johnson

Loering Johnson was a member of a high school affiliated Civil Air Patrol program in 1942 in Belfield, North Dakota.

Although a long way from the threat of enemy attack, Johnson and 12 of his class- mates helped the war effort by completing courses in aeronautics, served as aircraft spotters, collected aluminum and copper for the scrap drive and even collected milk weed for use in life preservers.

Although he wished to join the air corps, he ended up in the 88th Infantry Divi- sion serving in Italy.

preservers. Although he wished to join the air corps, he ended up in the 88th Infantry

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Ernest Markham

Major Ernest L. Markham began his ca- reer in 1919 as a second class aviation ma- chinist mate on flying boats at the Naval Sta- tion in Chatham, Mass. An alumnus of the Pensacola Flight School (class of 1921) Mark- ham served as a naval aviation pilot. He be- came the first airport manager of Meriden Airport, Meriden, Connecticut in 1928.

Markham was appointed to the com- mittee to organize Civil Air Patrol’s Connecti- cut Wing in 1942. In 1943 he deployed to Civ- il Air Patrol Base No. 20 at Bar Harbor, Maine and served as temporary commander and operations officer. He played a significant role with other Connecticut Wing members in countering the German U-boat threat to U.S. shipping.

After the war, Markham served as com- mander of the Meriden Squadron and worked as airport manager at Meriden Air- port. On July 14, 1962 the airport was re- named Meriden Markham Airport in honor of Markham’s 32 years of dedicated service.

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing Andre Maye Lieutenant Andre Maye joined Civil Air Patrol eight days

Andre Maye

Lieutenant Andre Maye joined Civil Air Patrol eight days following the attack on Pearl Harbor. The father of three chil- dren, he was not eligible for the

draft but felt he must join the war effort.

He took a leave of absence from his po- sition as a tool and die maker at GE and went on active duty at Bradley Field where he served as a pilot, flying courier missions for the Army Air Corps.

On September 14, 1943 Maye and a passenger, George Menzel, a mechanic at Bradley Field, were on a flight from Bradley Field to Grenier Field when his Taylorcraft Cub began to smoke. He attempted an emer- gency landing but both men were killed on impact. He is one of two members from Con- necticut Wing who were killed in war time service.

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Helen Sarr-Hill

Helen “Billie” Sarr was a young gradu- ate of secretarial school who was offered a job at the Connecticut Department of Aero- nautics. The commissioner was Thomas Lock- hart, who also served as the first Wing Com- mander for Civil Air Patrol in the state.

Sarr served as the wing’s secretary, earning her the rank of technical sergeant and one of the few paid positions in CAP. In addition to taking care of the wings paper- work, she learned military customs and cour- tesies and the age old art of drill.

Her CAP service ended when her fian-

cée, an Army Air Corp pilot, returned from Europe, but Sarr continued to serve her state and nation as an ad- ministrative secretary for numerous elected and gov- ernment officials.

to serve her state and nation as an ad- ministrative secretary for numerous elected and gov-

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Hyland Tasker

Hyland E. Tasker was living in East Hartford, Connecticut when the Second World War broke out. A licensed pilot, he quickly joined the newly formed Civil Air Pa- trol to help support the missions of the US Army Air Corp.

Tasker was a lifelong employee of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft and maintained his pi- lot’s license until 1974. He passed away in 2009 at the age of 92.

and Whitney Aircraft and maintained his pi- lot’s license until 1974. He passed away in 2009
and Whitney Aircraft and maintained his pi- lot’s license until 1974. He passed away in 2009
and Whitney Aircraft and maintained his pi- lot’s license until 1974. He passed away in 2009

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Colonel Nancy Hopkins-Tier

Nancy Tier was a noted Aviatrix of the early 20th century. One of the few female commercially rated pilots, she competed and placed 8th in the Ford Reliability Tour of 1930; quite a feat for a 22 year old upper- class woman. She competed in the Meriden Speed Race in 1931 (and again in1971) and was one of the first of women who flew solo coast to coast in 1932.

Trier joined Civil Air Patrol in 1942, serving on the Wing Staff until 1947, when she was appointed Connecticut Wing Com- mander, and holds the distinction of being the first CAP female wing commander.

She was elected into the Pioneer Wom- en in Aviation Hall of Fame, is a honorary member of the USAF 38th Strategic Missile Wing and a charter member of the Ninety- Nines. She served as the first president and

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

founder of the International Women’s Air and Space Museum from 1986 to 1994. Nancy passed away in 1997.

Space Museum from 1986 to 1994. Nancy passed away in 1997. Colonel Nancy Tier, Commander of

Colonel Nancy Tier, Commander of Civil Air Patrol’s Connecticut Wing (1947-1949)

Nancy passed away in 1997. Colonel Nancy Tier, Commander of Civil Air Patrol’s Connecticut Wing (1947

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

Civil Air Patrol’s World War II Service

Some 200,000 men, women and teenagers from all walks of life participated in CAP during the war years. Members of CAP’s coastal patrols flew 24 million miles from March 1942 through August 1943 over the Atlantic and Gulf coasts in order to ward off German U-boat attacks against U.S. ship- ping. The patrols spotted 173 U-boats and attacked 57. They escorted more than 5,600 convoys and re- ported 17 floating mines, 36 bodies, 91 ships in dis- tress and 363 survivors in the water.

Civil Air Patrol members patrolled the coun- try’s borders by air, vigilant for potential saboteurs. In addition, they towed targets for military trainees, watched for forest fires, conducted search and res- cue missions, provided disaster relief and emergen- cy transport of people and parts and conducted ori- entation flights for future pilots.

In all, 65 CAP members lost their lives in the line of duty by the end of the war, including two members from Connecticut Wing. In-depth infor- mation about CAP and its World War II missions and members can be found at www.capgoldmedal.com.

CAP National Public Affairs

Civil Air Patrol Connecticut Wing

PO Box 1233 Middletown, CT 06457 publicaffairs@ctwg.cap.gov www.ctwg.cap.gov www.facebook.com/CTWGCAP

www.ctwg.cap.gov www.facebook.com/CTWGCAP Major Peter Milano, Connecticut Wing Public Affairs Captain

Major Peter Milano, Connecticut Wing Public Affairs

Major Peter Milano, Connecticut Wing Public Affairs Captain Christopher Keenan Connecticut Wing Historian SEMPER

Captain Christopher Keenan Connecticut Wing Historian

SEMPER VIGILANS

Biographies: Captain Christopher Keenan, Historian Pamphlet: Major Peter Milano, Public Affairs Officer Printing: Major Jeff Travers, Plans & Programs Development Officer Photographs: CTWG Collection and CAP National Historian

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