Sei sulla pagina 1di 49

ARMY TRAINING AND EVALUATION PROGRAM NO. 34-245- 1 0-DRtLL

ARTEP 34.24.5- 1 O. DRI LL

HEADOUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Washrngton, DC,31 December 19g7

DRI LLS/PROCEDURES FOR THE INTEI-LIGENCE SECTION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

CHAPTER 1

Drill Training

General

Training

Format

CHAPTER 2

Drills

Paragraph page

lt

1-1

1-ó

1_9

1-1

1-1

1-1

t-2

2-r

Drill 1

Recordi

ling Intelligence Info

formation

Drill2 Intellig

Drill 3

Intellig

gence Preparation of

of the Battlefield

Id

ler

gence Annex to the O Operation Orde

RECONNAIS

SSANCE AND SUR\

RVEILLANCE I PLAN

,

Driìl4a Battali< ion Reconnaissance

Planni ring

¿

e and Surveillan

rnce

Drill 4b Battalir

ion Reconnaissance ¿

. r.rd Sr'lrrreitlan

rnce

Planni.

ring

DISSE¡

]MINATiON OF INT

{TELLIGENICE

D

l')

Drill Sa

Drill

Dri

Briefin ng,/Transmitting by ì

y

Radio

Driìl5b Writter

Driìl

Dri

rn Reports

Ap

Appendix A

App

llossary

Glc

Glos

Individual Task to Di

Ir

Drill Matrix

A

Acronyms and Abbre

rreviations

'

'.'

Glossa.

C

2-r

2-14

.2-29

2-39

2.49

2-60

2-67

AO

ry-1

;:

PREFACE

1. The purpose

sectionieaäer

of this drill book is to provide the intelligence

with the standard U.S. Army

of these

drills that apply drills is an essen-

to his section. continuous mastery

tial baseline requirement for all

2. Tables of organization and equipment

Mechanized InTantry Ba.ttalion,

intelligence sections'

was

(TOE) 07245J410,.

used as a basis for writ-

i"g

tfrlr drill book. Oth". type

units should adapt these drills

to their respective TOE.

3. The proponent of this publication is Headquar!91s'

TRADöC. Submit

Int.ìligutt".

changès for irnproving this publication o-n

to Publications and

9.p

49+f

Fort

ÐÁ Form 2028 (Recomrnended Chãnges

Blank Forms)

and forward it to Commander,

Óenter and School, ATTN: ATSI-TD-UTC,

Huachuca, AZ 85613-7000.

4. unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine gender is

used, both men and women are included.

CHAPTER 1

DR¡LL TRAIN!NG

1-1. General.

a. A unit's abílity to accomplish its mission frequently

ability of its soldiers to execute

immediate reaction to a situation

keyactions

-or

order.

depends on the

tlefield.

instiirctively in

The ability to do this is fundamental to survival on the bat-

Drills are designed to focus on a iimited number of

key actions that every

like

unit in the Army must master.

U.S. Army

United States Army drills are

standards, and your

deviatio., arrd

section must be able to execute them without

precisely as described. A drill is a collective task at section

level which has been identified as one of the

performed by that unit for success in combat.

mission, enemy, terrain, troops and time availatrle (METT

most vitar tasks

It is largely

T)

independent; requires minimal leader actions to execute; is

executed on a cue such as

a specified enemy

action or simply

a ieader order; and is executed in the same way every time.

b. Ðrills do several important things:

(1)

They allow your section to perform critical tasks because they have been practiced repetitively.

instantly

(2) They reduce communications

requirements because

the soldiers know what they have to do.

(3) Thev build teamwork.

(4) They save time, energy, and lives.

X-2. Training. Drills

may be trained

using a talk-through.

course, must

walk-through, and run-through method. you,'of

be a master of the drill to train

your

soldiers to execute it. you

through the

may wish to periodically talk your soldiers

driil-explaining

each soldier's role-then have tirem go

an environment in

protection posture (MOpp). Be tòugh ãn

through it slowly, correcting any

ever possible, train

in

mistakes as they go. !Vhu.r-

which you would be

it frequently in

expected to execute the drill in wartime. Do

and with

mission-oriented

you_rself and your soldiers. A

good section executes instantly

--'

for

precision. Your section will pay a high pricà

faiiure to do so.

1-3. F-ormat. This drill book contains two chapters' orìe appendix, and a glossarY.

a. Chapter

1 is entitled DriII Training'

It contains general

i.rfãrr"utiã" about the drill book, training guidelines for

leáclri"g drills, and the format for this

drill book'

b. Chapter

2 contains five drills for use by the intelligence

section

leader to train his section'

c. Appendix A contains

an individual task to drill matrix

and individual tasks extracted from

tfrãt iaä"tifies the leader

innärt"tv Qualification

Standards Manual ffQSM)

ã¿-li s5a

i and Soldier Training Publications (STPs)

34-9681-SM and 34-96824-SM-TG.

d. The glossary contains a list of acronyms and abbrevia-

tions used in this drill book'

t-2

CHAPTER 2

[¡RtLt_s

DM¡LL 1

Recordimg ! mteBllgemce ImforrnatËøar

T.dSK: Record intelligence information.

CtlE: The intelligence officer directs his section to record incoming intelligence information to support the unit,s

mrsslon.

STANÐARDS: No prior

section will

drills are required.

The intelligence

enter intelligence

information into the data base

analysis easier and more

of intelligence

which will make evaluation and

accurate, and will facilitate preparation

reports by drawing together all available informãtion on a specific subject.

SUPPORTING

INDIVIÐUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,

Individual Task to Ðrill Matrix.

XLLUSTR-A.TIONS:

Area), 2-2 (Intelligence

See Figures 2-1 (Organization of a TOC

Journ al), 2-B (Order of Battle Situa-

Register with Written Entries),

tion Map), 2-4 (Coordinate

and 2'5 (Coordinate Register with Schematic Entry)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-

through instructions.

SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:

a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J410. Other

type units

should use equipment organic or available to their-respective

unit.

(1) Carrier command post, Iight tracked.

(2) Radio set, AN/VRC-90. (3) Radio set, AN/VRC-92.

(4) Telephone set, TA-312 /PT (2 each).

(5) Power supply, vehicle, HYP-57/TSEC.

(6) Administrative supplies

including acetate, china

markers,

paper, pens, penciìs, masking tape, blank forms,

and so forth. (7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale).

2-r

(B) Applicable reference materiais, unit operatfgngrdg¡

L"li*ut", DA Forrn i594

(llailv Staff

(OPORD), intelligence

);;r""il;

ö"1v öiri"""'s Log), and current order of battle

(OB) holdings.

(9) Other TOÐ equipment, as necessary'

b. Training site. The intelligence

in-tþe

section is collocated wjth

th; Sg iop"r"Iio". "ã"tio"l

;;;i;i

*""ïpt""ide

"p"rations

for

good

""tti"t

b.attalion 'r'ask force (BTF)

The location of the ToC

aïeas are good iocalon^s

cannot be used' the TOC

cover and con-

irocl'

comntunications and be near routes to

u

other subordinate

i;i;h"; h"tdquartãrs, companv teams,

i""iir,^""1iËu

ÈrF trains. Buitt-up

f"r ifrtÈfF. TOC. If built-up areas

t"ãt tf."

;h";iã be tocated o.,

cealment frorn e"te-v gto""a obsãrvation

r",r"i.e slope to provide

and fire' This drill

be performôd in a

garrison environment'

c. Section instructions.

(1) Arrange the intelligence

section in a realistic config-

uration for fietã operations

within a TOC (Figure 2-1)'

(2)

Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough

understaitding of recording devices and procedures'

(3) Break

ài"r^tion. Each team will consist of a team chief and a

the section d'own into teams to simutrate 24-

horr,

team member.

(4) Ensure that the required Ïesources are on hand prior

to comrnencement of training'

(5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE'

TWO WAVS OF ORGANIUüNG T@C

wË[0Ee 8-Eg

ffiE

roP

view

ffi1 fr

Figure 2-1. Organization of a TOC Area'

oo

TALK-THROUGH INST'R,UCTtrONS :

a. Orientation. Devices for recording intelligence informa,

tion used by the

intelligence section include: intelligence

file, situation rnap (SITMAP),

journal, intelligence journal

and the coordinate register. Each member of the intelligence

section is personally responsible for ensuring that each bit of incoming combat information is properly recorded, evalu- ated, interpreted, made available to the battalion cornmander

and his staff, and disseminated to using units.

(1) The intelligence journal is the official, permanent,

and chronological record of reports and messages that have been received and transmitted, important events that have occurred, and actions taken in response. The journal is of great significance, so accuracy and cornpleteness are essential.

(2) The intelligence journal file is maintained

by the

intelligence section to retrieve journal entries and supporting material when writing reports or answering questions about

enemy activity taking place during a specified reporting

period.

(3) The SITMAP is a temporary graphic display of cur- rent enemy dispositions and major enemy activities. It is

used to portray the enemy situation and provide a basis for comparison to determine the significance of newly received data about enemy forces. The SITMAP will show possible

intelligence gaps which may require redirection of the collec- tion effort. Maintenance of the SITMAP at battalion level is usually a joint S2lS3 effort. The friendly situation is nor-

mally the responsibility of the S3, and the enemy situation

the responsibility of the 52. Maintenance of the SITMAP

takes precedence over all other recording means during com-

bat operations. In a fast-moving situation, particularly af. the

BTF level, the SITMAP is the basis for briefing the com- mander and his staff daily, or more often, and may be the

only recording device used.

(4) The coordinate register provides the intelligence sec-

tion with a workable counterpart to the extensive intelligence files maintained at higher echelons. This device permits ready access to available intelligence information by 52

personnel.

a'.) ot

b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety precau-

tions should be observed.

c. Demonstration. None.

d. Explanation. (1) Explain the process of recording incoming informa-

tion, illustrating each recording procedure. Use a simulated

message that would be received by the intelligence section to begin the recording process. IJse a mapboard with a map of the area of operations (AO) to illustrate posting a SITMAP.

Explain the purpose and use of the intelligence journal, intel-

ligence journal file, and the coordinate register. Talk through

the process of completing each recording device using an

enlarged example of each device. Explain how messages are

received by the intelligence section during normal operations. (2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position in the intelligence section and explain the duties of that posi-

tion to each individual. Performance measures outline the

responsibilities of each individual.

(3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain his role in the battle drill, to include performance steps for which he is responsible.

IVALK-THROUGÍI: Initiating Cue. This drill begins when

the TOC has been established and the intelligence section begins receiving messages from higher, adjacent, and lower

echelons. These messages arrive by radio, telephone, and

courier.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

1. Team member 1 maintains the intelligence journal (Figure 2-2) accurately and completely.

a. AII journaì entries wilì contain the following:

(1) An accurate and concise statement of the message,

report, or event.

(2) A notation about the sender or individual making

the report, to include unit, duty position, and section.

(3) The time of receipt or dispatch and the method of

transmission.

(4) Action actually taken as a result,

nation assigned to

reports or information

internaÌ recording actions.

to include dissemi- received, and other

¡flTELIIGETCE IOUR¡{AN- SAHPTE PAGE

29 Bd

LEGEND:

M-map

C-commander

S - staff

ru-units I

I

If -trooos ¡

Figure 2-2. lntelligence Journal.

b. Record the following:

COACI{ING POINT: The following list is onlv the

minimum standard. Other items may be recorded in the journal. Remind section members to record all important

information in the journal.

(1) Purpose, subject, and conclusions ofbriefings'

(2) Command decisions and summaries of plans'

(3) Movement of enemy units, platoon to division level'

(4) Significant messages received and transmitted'

(5) Incidents of enemy activity, other than movement'

(6) Friendly patrol activitY.

(7) Liaison activity.

(8) Changes in personnel within the intelligence

section.

(9) Summaries of written messages or orders'

(10) Summaries of action based on enemy or friendly

activity.

2. Tearn chief maintains intelligence files.

a. Maintain journal file containing previously recorded

journal sheets and supporting materials. (1) File all supporting material in chronological

sequence.

(2) Include copies of orders, periodic reports, m-essages,

cottf"rence notes, map overlays, and other

memorandn*s,

items required to support journal entries.

(3) Annotate the journal number on the supporting

document.

3. Team member 1 posts the SITMAP. Figure 2-3 shown on

the next page illustrates an OB SITMAP-

2-6

ORDER OF BATTLE SITIJAT!ON MAP

#-

E-1" \

t¿r

\

'""h/

,,

\

r

"--"

/

^\

,181,,.,;'

,

iffi';

çs

,H,l

./

lÀf' f

fr#,'{

,

(F'

/

fE-1,, ur'Ûo¡o ,lËl

---¡¡-

t ffi ,

)

/

f;;"'

r,

[H]"

i

,, o1ro1o 'lHl,.

-_-

ffi

,, f

\

'['fu,.,lÉl; ,Ë,.

l

l"

oarzoo

^ìu

032120

\ vvvvvvvvvvvvvv\7

/-\/

_nn

,'i

nlza

SfRENGTH

\/

\1r.p^r-_\/--,

x"

UNLOCATÊD UNIÌS

/ /

z¿ x ss

-g-NLr -N-Q eE_8S

MRB

TK SN

6

2

2580

330

FIRE SUPPORT

wPN

80 MED TK

]¿!Lr

SSM

BN

N_Q

1

wPN

FROG

llg

4

tg

36

18

54

AFTY 8N 5 152mm HOW

122mm RL

122ñh MORT

122mñ Sp HOW

122mm HOW (O_30) 72

SAM

REGI

5A.6

SA-9

AAMSL

BTRY

ZSU-23-4

FEINFORCEMENTS

!al-T

No

MFH

TX REGT r

1

Ee¡r

40

MEO tX

OO MED

TK

20

16

16

Recon 8n.22d MRO

122ñm HOW Regr.22d MRD

TK Regl,22d

MRD

Figure 2-3. Order of Battle Situation Map.

a. Limit information about friendly forces to-

(1) Boundaries.

(2) Locations

and adjacent units.

of command posts (CPs) of higher, lower,

(3) Reconnaissance units.

(4) Forward edge of the battle area (FÐBA).

2-7

(5) Forward line of own troops (FLOT)' b. Dispiay graphically all current enemy dispositions and major enemy activities.

(1) Unit identification.

(2) Unit boundaries. (3) Major roads or trails that could support movement of personnel, weapons, and equipment.

(4) Locations of automatic weapons. (5) Locations of supporting mortars.

(6) I-ocations of antitank guns.

(7) Locations of artillery, to include air defense

artillery.

(8) Locations of minefields.

(9) Locations of roadblocks.

(10) I-ocations of entrenchments.

(11) Locations of obstacles.

(12) Locations of defensive positions.

(13) Locations of logistic and command facilities. (14) Locations of aircraft staging areas.

(15) Locations of nuclear, biological, and chemical

(NBC) contaminated areas. (16) Locations of intelligence and electronic warfare

(IEW) systems.

c. Post all enemy units platoon level and above.

d. Indicate the latest time when the activity was observed

or the disposition was confirmed.

e. Use conventional signs, symbols, and abbreviations

in FM 21-31 (Topographic Symbols)

depicted

(Oþerational Terms and Symbols). Explain

the marginal data on the map or overlay. f. Ensure that maps and overlays are properly classified.

and FM 101-5-1

any deviation in

COACHING POINT: Take care not to overcrowd the

2-B

map. One method to avoid overcrowding is to group

on a series of acetate overlays.

entries by categories

Another method is to prepare an enlarged sketch map

that covers the overcrowded area.

g. If time and

personnel are available, prepare separate

overlays depicting-

(1) Enemy fortifications.

(2) Potential enemy nuclear targets.

(3) Enemy obstacles.

(4) Destroyed bridges in enemy areas.

(5) Enemy OB data.

(6) Friendly reconnaissance patrols.

(7) Surveillance activities that include ground coverage

of each system.

h. Remove information from the SITMAP that is outdated

or no longer needed for current operations.

COACIIING trOINT: There is no definitive means to

determine what information is outdated and should be

removed from the SITMAP. This is a value judgment

based on the mission of the unit and how often the

enemy relocates his assets. Information posted to the

SITMAP should be

checked against the priority intelli-

and information require-

gence requirements (PIRs)

ments for validity. Experienced personnel should guide

Iess-experienced personnel

in determining the length of

time that information should remain on the SITMAP.

i. Make a record of past activity on a 24-hour basis for his-

Examples are map overlay tracings or pho-

torical purposes.

tographs of the SITMAP.

COACI{ING POtrNT: This historical file wilt be used to

determine patterns of enemy movernent and disposi- tions, and to identify trends.

j. Post the following information

in the margin of the

SITMAP or on briefing charts nearby.

(1) Computations of enemy personnel, weapon

strengths, and weaknesses.

(2) Organizatton charts of specified enemy units.

(3) Summaries of weather and terrain data. (4) List of FIRs and information requirements.

(5) Notations about the current patrol plan.

(6) Movement computations.

(7) List of friendly attachments.

2-9

(8) List of unlocated enemy units believed to be in the

AO.

(9) Probable enemy courses of action.

(10) Battle damage assessment (BDA). 4. Team chief maintains the coordinate registers. Figure 2'4 below shows a coordinate register with written entries. Fig- ure 2-5 shown on page 2-12 shows a coordinate register with schematic entry. COACI{ING FOINT: Timely maintenance of the coordinate registers might not be practical in fast-

moving, high-intensity situations such as pursuit, delay, or exploitation. This recording device would be valuable in a relatively static situation or in a trow-intensity con- flict (LiC).

a. Use a iooseleaf notebook with each page representing a

single grid square of the SITMAP. Use st'rong, semi-

COORÐ83*ATE REG¡STER W!Tû{ WRBTTEN EruTR¡ES

IÎEM

TII/IE

cooRo

092235 2S381 539

2

09231 I

 

?

3

r00600

 

28021

523 lo

2A141527

 

28141527

lo

28221429

29611545

lo

28781

551

28311551

to

29001599

4

102335

28391

530 lo

 

28691541

 

5

110600

28431

588

6

1

10630

2838f 557

 
 

28731

584 !nd

 

r r1320

281

51 564

 

I

1

2001 0

2861 1 564

GRIO SQUARE 2E15 STATEMENT

MG Êlrcr on nacon Rl trom  Co

V.h ñoløê - Tl? - Hclrd dlrccl H of

A Co OP 2 283215o7

Sp.cl6l OB ropod on WPnt

å

Follllcatlon¿

Trcnche! & Bunkere

Plûloon on llnc - h6c 2 MGr

Ê¡lcnllYc lrênche! añd flrlng por

I Co Plt rêplr wlrê âñd AP M¡nê.

R.r Unll (Co?) ln gcncr¡l ore¡

Med T!ñk rpollcd by L Plrnc

Fl!.h lrom.m¡ll

7S

Crl Ady nol ovêr

F¡OTES Hov€ no!l Pll check lhlt

All

Alr OP lo look

OIY wohlr morc lnto oñ

Epnr Btrcngth

Sûme MG å3 Yc¡lerdoy?

Chcck !hlrl

Nêw ¡lncc 081800

(From DIY PIR)

Hor mlny morc?

AT? ôîllâlrcrôlt? Guñ? RR

or B¡zook!? Arl hlghêr HO

Figure 2-4. Coordinate Register with Written Entries.

transparent bond paper whenever possible. Ensure that you

cover the following; (1) AO.

(2) Areaofinterest.

(3) Enemy area. (4) Areas on both flanks.

b. Maintain a written entry page (Figure 2'4) for each grid

square. This entry page should describe:

(1) Enemy activity.

(2) Locations of enemy weapon systems.

(3) Other significant data that impacts on battalion

operations.

c. Precede each entry by the date-time group (DTG) and map coordinates.

d. Add comments or notations to any entry as directed by

the 52.

e. Maintain a schematic entry page (Figure 2-5) for each

grid square. Use a grid scaie underneath the schematic page to allow a more accurate and rapid plotting of, or reference to, the entries. A standarized scale will assist in dissemination

of intelligence data from higher to lower echelons. Plot the entry on the grid square in the same manner used to plot the SITMAP.

f. Review the coordinate register when your unit moves to a new area, whenever new data is added, or when obsolete

data is deleted.

COORD¡NATE REGISTER WITH SCHEMATIC ENTRV

GRID SQUARE 2815

I

ri

,

I

E<

î

\ "i

*þ.o

NOTATIONS:

Elms

66 Rille Regl

Ot 1sl & 3d Bn

\-

Jt

LEGEND

X

-lncoming

Àdy

-

-En Pelro¡ Contâcl

B

-Bunker

I

+

82 mm

il

^

,

c

x

c

r

c

.'t.Jil1" -ñJ

(1/

I

I

I

G)

+

to

rzz r,ry

ro

I rzz rny

I to

I

nz drry

Figure 2-5. Coordinate Register with Schematic Entry.

PR,ACTICE:

a. Whe¡r personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to create new inputs and practice under realistic volume and

time constraints. b. As section members develop proficiency, rotate person-

nel to ensure cross training.

c. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of each soldier

and to maintain soldier interest in the training. Realistic situations include personnel who are absent due to work or sleep shifts (24-hour operation), and completion of short- notice, command-directed reports and details.

d. The intelligence section must be prepared to operate on

the integrated battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to

moving to the performance stage.

2-12

e. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com- plete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly.

PERFORMANCE: When intelligence section personnel can perform all tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate manner, inform the commander or evaluator that the section is ready for evaluation or reevaluation.

o

L- L.)

11)

ElRtñ-L 2 ãmtelligeE¡ee Freparatiom of the Battle'fie8d

TASK: Perform intelligence preparation of the battlefield

(IPB).

CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to perform

IPB to support the unit's assigned contingency mission.

STANÐ.A.RÐS: No prior drills are

section will perform IPB in conjunction with other staff ele-

required. The intelligence

ments to project

actions, and to predict the enemy's probable courses of action

significant battlefield events and enemy

prior to initiation of hostilities.

SUPPORTING

INDIVIÐUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,

Individual Task to Drili Matrix.

ILLUSTRATIONS: See

Figures 2-6 (IPB Process), 2-7 ("ter-

Factor Overlay), 2-9

Factor

rain Factor Matrix), 2-B (Terrain

(Weather Factor

Analysis Matrix), 2-10 (Weather

Overlays), 2-11 (Doctrinal Templ ate),2-72 (Situation Tem-

plate),

Template), and 2-I5 (Decision Support Template).

2-13 (Available Collection

Resources), 2-74 (Event

PÐRFORMANCE MEASURÐS: Found in the walk-

through instructions.

SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:

a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J470. Other type units

should use equipment organic or available to their respective

unit.

(1) Carrier command post, light tracked.

(2) Radio set, AN/VRC-90. (3) Radio set, AN/VRC-92. (4) Telephone set, TA-312/PT (2 each).

(5) Power supply, vehicle, HYP-57/TSEC.

(6) Administrative supplies including acetate,

china

markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms,

and so forth. (7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale). (8) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-

gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, ciimatology

studies, and current OB holdings.

2-r4

(9) Other TOE equipment, as necessary.

b. Training site. The

intelligence section is coliocated with

in

the BTI" TOC. The location of

the S3 (operations section)

the TOC must provide for good communications and be near routes to higher headquarters, company teams, other subor-

dinate units, and the BTI- trains.

locations for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used,

Buil'u-up areas are good

the TOC should be located on a reverse slope to provide cover and concealment from enemy ground observation and fire.

This dritl may also be perfbrmed in a garrison environment. c. Section instructions. (1) Arrange the intelligence section in a realistic config-

uration for field operations

within a TOC (!'igure 2-1).

(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough

understanding of recording devices and procedures.

(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24- hour operation. Each team will consist of a team chief and a

team member.

(4) Ensure that the required resources are on hand prior to cornmencement of training.

(5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE.

TAT-K-TFIR,OIJGH INSTRUCT'IONS :

a. Orientation. IPB is a process which the intelligence sec-

tion must perform in conjunction with other staff elements on a continuous basis. IPB is used as the basis for briefing the

cornrnander ancl his staff daily, or more frequently

directed. The information developed during

when

IPB isffiGince

Ferves as the basis for command decisions at battalion and higher headquarters. Each mernber of the intelligence section

is personally responsible for ensuring that all useful pro-

cessed intelligence and combat information have beëñ'iñêor- póratãd into the IPB process, madè available to the battalion comrrrander and his staff, and clisseminated to using units

(Figure2-6)on the next page.

b. Safety. tions should be

rmal traini

c. Demonstra

d Explanation.

ñd equipment safety precau-

2-15

THREAT

evaLùÁÍíöñ

WEATHER

ANALYSIS

IPB FROCESS

THREAT

INTEGRATION

EVALIIATION

BATTLEFIELD

AREA

EVALUATION

TERRAIN

ANALYSIS

Figure 2-6. IPB Frocess.

(1) Use a mapboard with a map of the battlefield area'

Explain each step

Explaln

Taik

of the IPB process to all section members'

the purpose and use of each overlay and matrix'

through the process of completing each overlay and

copy

of those products to illustrate

matrix using an actual

each step. Explain

the information used as input in each step

of the IPB

mation can be obtained when it is needed.

process. Tell all section members where the infor-

(2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position

section, and explain the duties of that posi-

individual. Performance measures outline the

in the intelligence

tion to each

responsibilities of each individual.

2L6

(3) Conduct a