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Sports: Burns plays in 1,000th game. C1 Business: Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit.

Sports: Burns plays in 1,000th game. C1

Sports: Burns plays in 1,000th game. C1 Business: Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit. C7
Sports: Burns plays in 1,000th game. C1 Business: Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit. C7

Business: Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit. C7

Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit. C7 Local: California’s early primary makes it a crucial
Elon Musk seeks dismissal of ‘pedo-guy’ lawsuit. C7 Local: California’s early primary makes it a crucial

Local: California’s early primary makes it a crucial candidate stop. B1

early primary makes it a crucial candidate stop. B1 Nation: Spacey’s accuser says he has video.
early primary makes it a crucial candidate stop. B1 Nation: Spacey’s accuser says he has video.

Nation: Spacey’s accuser says he has video. A5

stop. B1 Nation: Spacey’s accuser says he has video. A5 The newspaper of Silicon Valley 111

The newspaper of Silicon Valley

says he has video. A5 The newspaper of Silicon Valley 111 Volume 168, issue 192 FRIDAY,
says he has video. A5 The newspaper of Silicon Valley 111 Volume 168, issue 192 FRIDAY,
says he has video. A5 The newspaper of Silicon Valley 111 Volume 168, issue 192 FRIDAY,

111 Volume 168, issue 192

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

24/7 COVERAGE: MERCURYNEWS.COM » $1.50

DECEMBER 28, 2018 24/7 COVERAGE: MERCURYNEWS.COM » $1.50 “Noooo. Go on! Go! I’m not dying right

“Noooo. Go on! Go! I’m not dying right here.”

— Tamra Fisher, screaming in a 25-minute video recorded as she escaped

This is what death looks like

recorded as she escaped This is what death looks like Terrified they wouldn’t e sc ape

Terrified they wouldn’t escape the Camp Fire, some reached for their phones to record how they outwitted death. Watching can be as painful as recovering.

outwitted death. Watching can be as painful as recovering. ALL PHONE SCREEN PHOTOS COURTESY TAMRA FISHER;

ALL PHONE SCREEN PHOTOS COURTESY TAMRA FISHER; PHOTOS BY KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Tamra Fisher, who found her car weeks after the fire, posted a chilling 25-minute-long video of her screams and curses as she escaped.

By Julia Prodis Sulek and Matthias Gafni

Staff writers

PARADISE » A week after the Camp Fire, Tamra Fisher posted a message on Facebook:

“You may all unfriend me and I

wouldn’t blame you,” she wrote, a bit embarrassed by the video she was about to share. “I am that person in an emergency.” The one who screams, who cries, who curses. Like so many others who feared they would burn

alive that No- vember day when smoke blocked the sun and morning looked like night, she hit

the record button on her phone as she fled. The record- ing runs — for a full 25 minutes — with the phone in her hand or stuffed in the car’s cup holder. In the video, you see the tunnels of flames, the embers snapping side- ways along the road, glowing as red as the line of brake lights stopped in front of her. “Move! Move!” she cried. “Oh God. Go! Go! I’m scared. Go! Go! Come on!” She lays on the horn so long and so hard it wheezes and dies. Pine needles at the base of her windshield ignite — her car is catch- ing on fire. “What do I do? What do I do? I don’t want to die!” Except for her three dogs pant- ing in the sweltering back seat, she is alone. No one can hear her. But still she screams. This is what death must have sounded like in Paradise. At least 86 people were killed that Nov. 8 morning when the deadli- est and most destructive wildfire in state history wiped out the Northern

VIDEOS » PAGE 6

The videos made by Tamra Fisher and others can be seen at www. mercurynews.com

SEE THE VIDEOS

others can be seen at www. mercurynews.com SEE THE VIDEOS Travis Wright, right, with wife, Carole,

Travis Wright, right, with wife, Carole, recorded a hellish 20 seconds of video, but says he can’t watch it. “It pretty much plays in my head.”

he can’t watch it. “It pretty much plays in my head.” Jennette Ranney, right, recorded one

Jennette Ranney, right, recorded one minute and 33 seconds of video of the battle she and her husband, Michael, fought to save the Wrights’ home.

FAUX PAS?

Iraqis demand US troop pullout

Lawmakers: Trump visit ‘arrogant,’ violated nation’s sovereignty

By Philip Issa

The Associated Press

BAGHDAD » President Donald Trump’s surprise trip to Iraq may have quieted criticism at home that he had yet to visit troops in a combat zone, but it has infuriated Iraqi politicians who on Thurs- day demanded the withdrawal of U.S. forces. “Arrogant” and “a violation of national sovereignty” were but a few examples of the disapproval emanating from Baghdad follow- ing Trump’s meeting Wednesday with U.S. servicemen and women at the al-Asad Airbase. Trips by U.S. presidents to con- flict zones are typically shrouded in secrecy and subject to strict security measures, and Trump’s was no exception. Few in Iraq or elsewhere knew the U.S. pres- ident was in the country until minutes before he left. But this trip came as curbing foreign influence in Iraqi affairs has become a hot-button political issue in Baghdad, and Trump’s perceived presidential faux pas was failing to meet with the prime minister in a break with diplomatic custom for any visit- ing head of state. On the ground for only about three hours, the American pres- ident told the men and women with the U.S. military that Is- lamic State forces have been

IRAQ » PAGE 8

WRONG CAR CHASED

Police stand by actions leading to fatal shooting

By Robert Salonga and Julia Prodis Sulek

Staff writers

SAN JOSE » When four San Jose police officers opened fire early Christmas morning on a white

Toyota ramming a patrol car after

a high-speed chase, they thought they were aiming

at suspects from

a shooting across

town. Turns out, they were chasing the wrong car, po- lice acknowledged Thursday. The driver, who was

killed, and pas- senger, who was wounded, were both young women — and un- armed. Now, the family of the driver, Jennifer Vasquez, is de- manding justice. “We feel everything is unfair,” Virginia Vasquez, Jennifer’s aunt, said outside San Jose police head- quarters following a news confer- ence Thursday. “It was a differ- ent car and different person. We want this to go farther, more in- vestigation.” During the news conference, Police Chief Eddie Garcia said the shooting was tragic but his officers had little choice but to fire: The women were in a stolen car, led police on a high-speed

VASQUEZ » PAGE 8

a stolen car, led police on a high-speed VASQUEZ » PAGE 8 J. Vasquez NEWS ON

J. Vasquez

NEWS ON YOUR PHONE

Download the Mercury News mobile app for iPhone or Android.

INDEX

Business

Classified

C7

CA13

Comics/TV

Lottery

Movies

B6

A2

B3

Obituaries

Puzzles

Weather

B4

B2, C6

B8

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111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

CELEBRITIES

AREA NEWS GROUP 111 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 CELEBRITIES KEVIN WINTER — GETTY IMAGES FOR RADIO.COM

KEVIN WINTER — GETTY IMAGES FOR RADIO.COM

Pop singer Chris Brown was caught owning a capuchin monkey for which he didn’t have a permit.

Pet monkey at center of Brown’s legal troubles

By Martha Ross

mross@bayareanewsgroup.com

It goes without saying that Chris Brown is no stranger to legal troubles, from accusations of as- saulting women, including Rihanna, to brawling with fellow entertainers such as Drake or being subject to probation and restraining

orders. Now the singer is in trou- ble for something that last year raised the ire of ani- mal lovers and the Califor- nia Department of Fish and Wildlife. Brown, 29, was caught owning a capuchin monkey for which he didn’t have a permit. TMZ reported Thurs- day that the Los Angeles City Attorney has charged Brown with two misde- meanor counts of having

a restricted species with-

out a permit, crimes seri- ous enough that they carry

a maximum sentence of six

months in jail. Brown is due

in court on Feb. 6.

Brown actually incrim- inated himself in Decem- ber 2017 when he posted a video to Instagram show- ing his 3-year-old daughter Royalty cuddling the mon- key, named Fiji. Fish and Wildlife Capt. Patrick Foy told USA Today in January that the video prompted a half-dozen calls from people concerned about the girl’s safety and the monkey’s welfare. State agents launched an investi-

gation and served a search warrant at Brown’s home to retrieve the animal. Brown wasn’t home when agents visited, but he agreed to cooperate and had employees hand over the monkey in a cage. Fiji was taken and housed at an undisclosed facility. Capuchin monkeys, na- tive to Central and South America, are among a long list of restricted animals under California state law. That means it’s illegal to import, transport or pos- sess these species without a permit issued by the Fish and Wildlife department. Capuchins, often weigh- ing less than 10 pounds, are considered among the most intelligent of the Western Hemisphere monkeys. They also are “charming” as ba- bies and need to be cared

for like human babies, ac- cording to The Spruce Pets. According to Primarily

Primates, a nonprofit ref- uge in Texas for non-native

wild animals, capuchins and other primates often are abandoned by private owners who can’t take care of them. U.S. federal quarantine laws forbid importing non- human primates as pets, while California and other states ban private posses- sion of them without a per- mit, Primarily Primates re- ported.

Contact Martha Ross at

925-943-8254.

MR. ROADSHOW

Some bridges and highways are particularly accident prone

Q It seems like every week,

multiple times per week, stalls and accidents occur on the 1-mile “high rise” stretch of the San Mateo Bridge during commute

hours. Why? Are drivers impaired by 150 feet of altitude sickness? Why not station tow trucks at either end of all Bay Area bridges? Permanently. Dur- ing commute hours. On alert. Ready to Roll. Taxpayer-funded. Will pay for itself in time and money saved. Please.

pay for itself in time and money saved. P l e a s e . Gary

Gary

Richards

Columnist

maden Express- way and Highway 17. I drive it every weekday morning. There’s always a problem. Even on Christ- mas Eve there was a five-car crash with a roll-

over at 8:30 a.m. Being such a known accident area, more po- lice presence in that time slot may reduce the activity that causes these terrible accidents. — Robin Slusher, San Jose

A The CHP hears you. A few reasons

crashes are on the rise:

tailgating, rapid lane changing and speeding.

— John Mazotta, Oakland

A We do have the Freeway Service Pa-

trol where tow trucks roam Bay Area roads during commute hours, but you won’t see them parked at the end of bridges. Traffic is bad enough on nearby High- way 101 and Interstate 880 that they are often dispatched to incidents there. Crashes are up all across the Bay Area, such as on …

Q I swear north- bound Highway 85

is cursed between Al-

Q This may not be a qualifying ques-

tion for your column but maybe you have some suggestions. I drive an electric car that needs very little in the way of maintenance except when it comes to air in my tires. I am not good at checking air or at put- ting air in my tires. I do have a gauge. But who can I get to use my gauge, check my tires and inflate them as needed? I am a se- nior citizen and cannot bend over to do the job. I shall be grateful for

suggestions. — Dorothy Black, Oakland

A Jeff-the-Tire-Man says any tire shop

is very likely to help you

free of charge. But you

would be wise to call

a nearby shop before showing up.

Q I read the letter from SF Biker last

week about leaving your beater car unlocked if you had nothing inside to steal. Well, I tried that and within a month, some- one broke my side win- dow to gain access in- side even with the doors unlocked. Crazy. They still ransacked the con- sole and glove com- partment but there was nothing to steal. Oh, they did steal a 12-pack of Pepsi I had in the back seat. They must have been thirsty. — John McKay, San Jose

A I’m laughing now, but I bet you were

not laughing at the time.

Look for Gary Richards at Facebook.com/ mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@ bayareanewsgroup.com or 408-920-5037.

News of the weird

Anger mismanagement

H.W. Taylor III, 51, of Chatfield, Texas, was charged Dec. 12 with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after a parking dispute escalated outside a Domino’s pizza shop in Jerrell. Determined to park his tractor-trailer in a restricted area, Taylor removed a chain blocking the area and parked his truck there, even as store employees told him not to, the Austin American-Statesman reported. Williamson County sheriff’s deputies were called after Taylor pointed a gun at the chest of one the employees and then shot a 9 mm round into the ground nearby, causing a small piece of the bullet to strike the employee in the ear.

Send items to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com.

Birthdays

Actress Nichelle Nichols is 86. Actress Dame Maggie Smith is 84. Singer-mu- sician Edgar Winter is 72. Actor Denzel Washington is 64. TV personality Gayle King is 64. Singer Joe Diffie is 60. Actor Malcolm Gets is 55. Talk show host Seth Meyers is 45. Actor Joe Manganiello is 42. Actress Vanessa Ferlito is 41. Singer John Legend is 40. Actress Sienna Miller is 37. Singer David Archuleta is 28.

TODAY IN HISTORY

1612

Astronomer Galileo Galilei observed Neptune, but mis- took it for a star.

1832

John C. Calhoun became the first vice president of the United States to resign, stepping down because of differences with President Andrew Jackson.

1895

The Lumiere brothers, Auguste and Louis, held the first public showing of their movies in Paris.

1945

Congress officially recog- nized the Pledge of Alle- giance.

1981

Elizabeth Jordan Carr, the first American “test-tube” baby, was born in Norfolk, Va.

LOTTERY

WINNING

NUMBERS

Daily 3 Afternoon:

7,

Daily 3 Evening:

1,

Daily 4:

9,

Fantasy 5:

14, 16, 25, 27, 39 Daily Derby 1st: 5, California Classic 2nd: 1, Gold Rush 3rd: 6, Whirl Win Race Time: 1:40.33

7,

2

0,

3,

8

3,

5

SUPER

LOTTO

PLUS

Wednesday’s drawing:

1, 11, 31, 36, 47 Mega Number: 11 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $35 million

MEGA

MILLIONS

Tuesday’s drawing:

2, 8, 42, 43, 50 Mega Number: 6 Today’s estimated jackpot: $348 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s drawing:

5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million

THE GARDENS AT PALMDALE
THE GARDENS AT PALMDALE
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS
drawing: 5, 25, 38, 52, 67 Power Number: 24 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million THE GARDENS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 001 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A3
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BAY AREA NEWS GROUP

111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

PARTIAL GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

111 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 PARTIAL GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A statue of Benjamin Franklin stands in an empty corridor outside the Senate at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday.

Federal workers’ hope for a quick solution unlikely

By Juliet Linderman and Darlene Superville

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON » Three days, maybe four. That’s how long Ethan James, 21, says he can realistically miss work before he’s struggling. So as the partial government shut- down stretched into its sixth day with no end in sight, James, a mini- mum-wage contractor sidelined from his job as an office worker at the In- terior Department, was worried. “I live check to check right now,” he said, and risks missing his rent or phone payment. Contractors, unlike most federal employees, may never get back pay for being idled. “I’m get- ting nervous,” he said. Federal workers and contractors forced to stay home or work with- out pay are experiencing mounting stress from the impasse affecting hundreds of thousands of them. For those without a financial cushion, even a few days of lost wages during the shutdown over President Donald Trump’s border wall could have dire consequences. As well, the disruption is starting to pinch citizens who count on a va- riety of public services, beyond those who’ve been finding gates closed at national parks. For example, the government won’t issue new federal

flood insurance policies or renew ex- piring ones. Trump and congressional lead- ers appear no closer to a resolution over his demand for $5 billion for the border wall that could now push the shutdown into the new year. The House and Senate gaveled in for a perfunctory session Thursday, but quickly adjourned without action. No votes are expected until next week, and even that’s not guaranteed. Law- makers are mostly away for the hol- idays and will be given 24-hour no- tice to return, with Republican sen- ators saying they won’t vote until all parties, including Trump, agree to a deal. The president spent part of the day tweeting about the shutdown, insisting “this isn’t about the Wall,” but about Democrats denying him “a win.” “Do the Dems realize that most of the people not getting paid are Democrats?” he asked in one tweet, citing no evidence for that claim. That earned him a reprimand from Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, who tweeted: “Federal employees don’t go to work wearing red or blue jer- seys. They’re public servants.” Roughly 420,000 federal work- ers were deemed essential and are working unpaid, unable to take any sick days or vacation. An additional

380,000 are staying home without pay. While furloughed federal work- ers have been given back pay in pre- vious shutdowns, it’s not guaranteed. The Senate passed a bill last week to make sure workers will be paid. The House will probably follow suit. Many national parks have closed while some have limited facilities. The National Flood Insurance Pro- gram announced it will no longer re- new or issue policies during the shut- down. “I think it’s obvious that until the president decides he can sign some- thing — or something is presented to him — that we are where we are,” said Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., who opened the Senate for the minutes- long session. “We just have to get through this.” House Democrats tried Thursday to offer a measure to reopen govern- ment, but they were blocked from ac- tion by Republicans, who still have majority control of the chamber un- til Democrats take over Jan. 3. “Unfortunately, 800,000 federal workers are in a panic because they don’t know whether they’ll get paid,” said Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., who tried to offer the bill. “That may make the president feel good but the rest of us should be terribly bothered by that, and should work on overtime to end the shutdown now.”

CHECKING THE FACTS

Trump’s comments to troops about pay were not accurate

By Eli Stokols

Los Angeles Times

President Trump bragged Wednesday to troops sta- tioned in Iraq that he had secured them a massive pay raise, repeating a false claim he’s made repeatedly on the campaign trail. Trump made the boast during his first visit as pres- ident to troops in a combat zone. Trump, who spent more than three hours along with first lady Melania Trump at al-Asad Airbase near Bagh- dad, addressed several hundred servicemen and women, boasting that he had delivered them “one of the biggest pay raises you’ve ever received.” The president also stated — incorrectly — that he had authorized the first military pay increase in a decade. “You haven’t gotten one in more than 10 years,” Trump said. “More than 10 years. And we got you a big one. I got you a big one. I got you a big one.” Military pay, in fact, has risen every year for three decades. It was raised 2.4 percent in 2018 and will rise by 2.6 percent more in 2019, because of the National De- fense Authorization Act signed by Trump in Au- gust. Although the 2.6 per- cent increase is the largest

in nine years, Trump still exaggerated significantly, claiming that he delivered a pay raise some four times larger than that and, in an- other uncertain anecdote, that he fought for it over unnamed military person- nel who’d wanted a smaller increase. “They said, ‘You know, we could make it smaller. We could make it 3 percent. We could make it 2 percent. We could make it 4 percent,’ ” Trump claimed. “I said, ‘No. Make it 10 percent. Make it more than 10 percent.’ “Because it’s been a long time. It’s been more than 10 years. It’s been more than 10 years,” he continued. “That’s a long time. And, you know, you really put yourselves out there, and you put your lives out there. So congratulations.” Presenting himself as an ardent supporter of the mil- itary just days after the res- ignation of respected De- fense Secretary James N. Mattis, who cited policy dis- agreements with the presi- dent in an astonishing res- ignation letter, Trump also repeated another common falsehood — his claim that the new Pentagon budget is the largest increase in de- fense funding ever. The current budget au- thority for the Pentagon is not a record.

HE WAS 112

Nation’s oldest WWII vet dies

By The Associated Press

He died Thursday eve- ning at a rehab facility in Austin, Texas, she said. Richard Overton was in his 30s when he

volunteered for the Army and was at Pearl Harbor just after the Japanese attack in 1941. He once said that one secret to his long life was smoking

cigars and drink- ing whiskey, which he often was found doing on the porch of his Austin home. His recent birthdays drew national attention and strangers would stop by his house to meet him.

AUSTIN, TEXAS »

Richard

Overton, the nation’s old- est World War II vet-

eran who was also believed to be the oldest living man in the U.S., died Thurs- day in Texas, a fam- ily member said. He was 112. The Army vet- eran had been hos-

pitalized with pneu- monia but was released on Christmas Eve, said Shir- ley Overton, whose hus- band was Richard’s cousin and his longtime caretaker.

“They had done all they could,” she said.

caretaker. “They had done all they could,” she said. Overton DEFYING PUNDITS GOP share of Latino

Overton

DEFYING PUNDITS

GOP share of Latino vote remains steady under Trump

By Nicholas Riccardi

The Associated Press

LITTLETON, COLO. »

Pedro

Gonzalez has faith in Don- ald Trump and his party. The 55-year-old Colom- bian immigrant is a pastor at an evangelical church in suburban Denver. Initially repelled by Trump in 2016, he’s been heartened by the president’s steps to protect religious groups and ap- point judges who oppose abortion rights. More im- portant, Gonzalez sees Trump’s presidency as part of a divine plan. “It doesn’t matter what

I think,” Gonzalez said of the president. “He was put there.” Though Latino voters are

a key part of the Democratic coalition, there is a larger bloc of reliable Republi- can Latinos than many

think. And the GOP’s po- sition among Latinos has not weakened during the Trump administration, de- spite the president’s rheto-

ric against immigrants and the party’s shift to the right on immigration. In November’s elections,

32 percent of Latinos voted

for Republicans, according

to AP VoteCast data. The survey of more than 115,000 midterm voters — including 7,738 Latino voters — was conducted for The Associ- ated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago. Other surveys also found roughly one-third of Lati-

nos supporting the GOP. Data from the Pew Re- search Center and from exit polls suggests that a com-

parable share of about 3 in

10 Latino voters supported

Trump in 2016. That tracks the share of Latinos sup-

porting Republicans for the last decade. The stability of Repub- licans’ share of the La- tino vote frustrates Demo- crats, who say actions like Trump’s family separation policy and his demoniza- tion of an immigrant car- avan should drive Latinos out of the GOP. “The question is not are Democrats winning the Hispanic vote — it’s why aren’t Democrats winning the Hispanic vote 80-20 or 90-10 the way black voters are?” said Fernand Amandi, a Miami-based Democratic pollster. He argues Demo- crats must invest more in winning Latino voters. The VoteCast data shows that, like white voters, Lati- nos are split by gender — 61 percent of men voted Dem- ocratic in November, while 69 percent of women did.

And while Republican-lean- ing Latinos can be found everywhere in the country, two groups stand out as es- pecially likely to back the GOP — evangelicals and veterans. Evangelicals comprised about one-quarter of Latino voters, and veterans were 13 percent. Both groups were about evenly split between the two parties. Mike Ma- drid, a Republican strate- gist in California, said those groups have reliably pro- vided the GOP with many Latino votes for years. Sacramento-based the Rev. Sam Rodriguez, one of Trump’s spiritual advis- ers, said evangelical Lati- nos have a clear reason to vote Republican. “Why do 30 percent of Latinos still support Trump? Because of the Democratic Party’s ob- session with abortion,” Ro-

Setting the record straight

The Mercury News corrects all significant errors that are brought to the attention of the editors. If you believe we have made such an error, please send an email to: mncorrections@bayareanewsgroup.com, 4 North Second St., Suite 800, San Jose, CA 95113.

driguez said. “It’s life and religious liberty and every- thing else follows.” Some conservative Lati- nos say their political lean- ings make them feel more like a minority than their ethnicity does. Irina Vilariño, 43, a Mi- ami restauranteur and Cu- ban immigrant, said she had presidential bumper

stickers for Sen. John Mc- Cain, Mitt Romney and Trump scratched off her car. She said she never suf- fered from discrimination growing up in a predomi- nantly white south Florida community, “but I remem- ber during the McCain cam- paign being discriminated against because I supported him.”

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MASSACHUSETTS

STANISLAUS COUNTY

Police: Officer’s killer is migrant in U.S. illegally

Police: Officer’s killer is migrant in U.S. illegally THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Actor Kevin Spacey, above, tried

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actor Kevin Spacey, above, tried to grope his accuser who was a busboy at a bar in Massachusetts when the alleged incident occurred two years ago.

Spacey’s accuser says he has video of alleged abuse

The man claims the actor sexually assaulted him at a bar

By Cicero Estrella

cestrella@

bayareanewsgroup.com

The man who claims that actor Kevin Spacey sexually assaulted him two years ago at a Massachusetts bar recorded part of the alleged incident, according to po- lice reports. The 20-year-old man, who was 18 at the time of the alleged assault, told authorities that he was “texting and snapchat- ting” and caught Spacey on video reaching into his pants and groping his gen- itals, according to police reports obtained by People. Spacey is scheduled to be arraigned on a felony sex- ual assault charge in Nan- tucket on Jan. 7. According to the police report, the accuser worked as a busboy at the bar where he alleged the assault oc- curred. He had completed his shift as a busboy and ap- proached Spacey for an au- tograph. He told authorities that he lied to Spacey about his age, falsely saying that he was a 23-year-old college student. Spacey and the ac- cuser drank heavily that evening, and the accuser “didn’t want to get in trou- ble at work or get his work in trouble” as he tried to es-

cape the situation. At some point during the evening, the accuser texted his girlfriend that Spacey was hitting on him. He went on Snapchat af- ter she told him she didn’t believe him. “The video is one of the last times Spacey touched him,” according to the report. “(The accuser) said he had his phone in his left hand and he may have had a glass of whiskey in his right hand.” His girlfriend corrob- orated the story, and that she “received a Snapchat video from (the accuser) showing Spacey touching the front of (his) pants by his crotch.” The accuser said he tried to move Spacey’s hands and move away from him with- out success. He alleged that Spacey tried to grope him for about three minutes, and that he was able to leave only when Spacey went to the bathroom. The mother of the ac- cuser is former Boston news anchor Heather Unruh, who publicly accused Spacey of assaulting her son during a 2017 press conference. She said her son was a “star- struck, straight, 18-year-old young man who had no idea that the famous actor was an alleged sexual predator or that he was about to be-

come his next victim.” After news broke earlier this week about the pend- ing charge against Spacey, the actor posted a bizarre video on YouTube in which he appears to revive his character from “House of Cards,” U.S. President Frank Underwood. Titled “Let Me Be Frank,” Spacey seemingly blurred the line between reality and fiction. Taken on the surface, it seems to be Spacey trying to stir up public interest in some kind of revival of the Underwood character, who was killed off in the final season of the show. Within the context of the sexual allegations against Spacey, it’s darker. “If I didn’t pay the price for the things we both know I did do, I’m certainly not going to pay the price for the things I didn’t do,” Spacey/ Underwood says in the video. “Oh, of course they’re going to say I’m being dis- respectful, not playing by the rules. Like I ever played by anyone’s rules before. I never did. And you loved it.” As of Thursday after- noon, the video had been viewed more than 7.8 mil- lion times.

By Olga R. Rodriguez

The Associated Press

mil- lion times. By Olga R. Rodriguez The Associated Press STANISLAUS COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT VIA AP

STANISLAUS COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT VIA AP

This image from a surveillance camera video shows a suspect police are searching for in connection to the fatal shooting of Newman police officer Ronil Singh.

“The sheriff’s office will spare no ex- pense in hunting down this criminal,” Christianson said. Singh pulled over the attacker as part

of a drunken driving investigation and fired back to try to defend himself, Chris- tianson said. He was shot a few minutes after radio- ing that he was pulling over a gray pickup truck that had no license plate in New- man, a town of about 10,000 people, offi- cials said. Singh died at a hospital.

A ground and air search began for

the heavyset man pictured at the store

with short, dark hair and wearing a sil- ver chain, jeans, dark T-shirt and a dark jacket with white Ecko brand patches on the shoulders.

A truck believed to have been the one

stopped by Singh was later found in a garage in a mobile home park about 4 miles from the shooting, where law en- forcement officers were serving a search warrant, The Modesto Bee reported. In- vestigators were examining the vehicle, police said. Richardson said his department of 12 is grieving Singh, and other agencies are lending a hand. “He was living the American dream,” said Stanislaus County sheriff’s Deputy Royjinder Singh, who is not related to the slain officer but knew him. “He loved camping, loved hunting, loved fishing, loved his family.” Ronil Singh was never in a bad mood and always had a smile on his face, Rich- ardson said. Singh is survived by his wife, Anamika, and their 5-month-old son. “Please help us find this coward,” Rich- ardson said of Singh’s killer.

SAN FRANCISCO » Ronil Singh came to the U.S. from his native Fiji to fulfill a life- long dream of becoming an officer, join- ing a small-town police force in Califor- nia and working to improve his English. The day after Christmas, he stopped an- other immigrant, this one in the country illegally, who shot and killed the corpo- ral, authorities said Thursday. Authorities said they identified but won’t yet name the man who killed Singh of the 12-person Newman Police Department on

Wednesday and has not been captured. They believe the attacker is still in the area some 100 miles southeast of

San Francisco and is armed and dangerous. “This suspect is in our country illegally. He doesn’t belong here. He is a criminal,” Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson, whose agency is leading the in-

vestigation, told reporters. Newman Police Chief Randy Richard- son fought back tears as he described Singh, a 33-year-old with a newborn son, as an “American patriot.” “He came to America with one pur- pose, and that was to serve this country,” Richardson said. Singh drove more than two hours each way to attend the police academy in Yuba City, Richardson said. He joined the Mer- ced County sheriff’s office as a reserve of- ficer and worked as an animal control of- ficer in Turlock before being hired by the Newman force in 2011. English was Singh’s third language and he had a thick accent but took speech classes to improve his communication, the police chief said. His death comes amid a political fight over immigration, with President Donald Trump and Congress at an impasse over funding for a border wall that has forced a partial government shutdown. Trump tweeted about Singh’s killing Thursday, saying it’s “time to get tough on Border Security.” He ended the post with: “Build the Wall!” Authorities were looking for a man seen in surveillance photos at a conve- nience store shortly before Singh was killed. Officials pleaded for help from the public and said they were following up on several leads.

Singh

and said they were following up on several leads. Singh Contact Cicero Estrella at 408-859-5138. ALABAMA
Contact Cicero Estrella at 408-859-5138. ALABAMA Disinformation campaign may have violated law, attorney general says
Contact Cicero Estrella at
408-859-5138.
ALABAMA
Disinformation campaign may have
violated law, attorney general says
By The Washington Post
Alabama Attorney Gen-
eral Steve Marshall said
Thursday that his office is
exploring whether disin-
formation tactics deployed
against Republican Roy
Moore during last year’s
special election violated
state campaign laws and
said he was worried that
the operation could have
affected the closely fought
Senate race.
“The information is con-
cerning,” Marshall, a Re-
publican, said in a phone in-
terview. “The impact it had
on the election is something
that’s significant for us to
explore, and we’ll go from
there.”
Moore lost the election to
Democrat Doug Jones.
Marshall, who said he
learned of the disinforma-
tion campaign called Proj-
ect Birmingham through
news reports over the past
two weeks, stopped short of
announcing a formal inves-
tigation but said his office
was beginning to gather in-
formation about the effort.
“We’re planning to ex-
plore the issue further,”
Marshall said.
Jones on Thursday also
reiterated his support for
a federal investigation into
the matter, days after the
Democratic senator said the
Federal Election Commis-
sion and the Department
of Justice should probe the
effects of disinformation on
the race. The Democratic
senator said Thursday he
had directed his team “to
prepare a formal request
to file with the appropri-
ate federal authorities who
have jurisdiction over these
matters.”
“Illegal influence oper-
ations are a serious threat
to our democracy, regard-
less of where these activi-
ties originate or who they
seek to support,” Jones said.
The FEC did not respond
to a request for comment.
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A6 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP 111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

A6 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP 111 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Larry

KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Larry Laczko was the stranger in the white Silverado who rescued Fisher and her three dogs when her VW caught fire. “You were the only one who wanted to stop,” she told him later.

Videos

FROM PAGE 1

California ridge town of Paradise. The thousands who frantically fled are now coming to terms with the kind of per- sonal trauma that doesn’t fit neatly onto Christmas cards and confronting a new year where the future can look as bleak as the ruins of their homes. In its aftermath, dozens of videos coursed through social media, each re- cording various stages of panic — the faithful reciting Bible verses, parents singing to their frightened children, out- of-breath emergency workers with body cameras running through flames. For some, recording these perilous moments was an act of adrenaline-fu- eled optimism that they would survive to replay and share their near-death ex- periences on video, a rolling reassurance that they outwitted death. For others, it was a moment of frantic fatalism, as though their pocket-size pieces of metal and glass could take the heat and flames better than their skin and bones and that their last moments — like a message in a bottle — would be preserved. “I don’t know,” Fisher said in an inter- view this month. “I had my camera out in case this was it. They would find my

phone and know what happened.” Fisher and others who survived the flames shared their videos with this news organization and the stories behind their escapes to try to explain: What really happens when you look death in the face? Do you lose a piece of yourself? Can you truly recover? And what do you do when you’ve been given a second chance at life? The existential questions aren’t easy to contemplate when you’re sleeping in

a friend’s garage and wearing someone

else’s clothes and spending hours in line at FEMA centers and making lists for in- surance companies of all your lost pos-

sessions. “I’ve lost some of my identity in this,” said Michael Ranney, who, along with his

wife, Jennette, lost their home but saved

a neighbor’s and recorded bits of the sur-

real battle on video. “It’s like a different life, starting over again.”

Manifestos of the will to live

Some of the videos recorded that morning are horror films, survival guides and full-throated manifestos of the will

to live. Each offers clues to the survivors’ life stories — and how they might cope with what lies ahead. In a strange testimony to the inter- section of tragedy and technology, Cal- ifornians have the unfortunate distinc- tion of being able to offer plenty of exam- ples. Misha Usunov of Danville recorded what he was certain were his final mo- ments during last year’s mass shooting that killed 58 people at a Las Vegas con- cert. Bullets ping off the asphalt as he crouches near the bleachers. In regu- lar reunions with survivors since, he’s learned a lot about the effects of trauma, recorded or not. “Generally there are two ways people handle it,” he said. “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, and you cherish life on a level you never experienced before because you were so close to losing it. The flip side is some dwell on it and let

it pull them down so hard that it con-

sumes them.” Even before the Camp Fire, Fisher, 49, was fragile. She recently ended a bad re- lationship that put a strain on the rest of her family. Her beloved brother, Larry, had died unexpectedly a decade ago in his sleep at 45. Over the years, there were times she felt so low, she wished for the same fate. Paradise felt like a prison, a place of pain, loss and unfulfilled expec- tations.

TAMRA FISHER’S ESCAPE FROM PARADISE

“What do I do? What do I do? I don’t want to die.”

“Oh my god, don’t stop.

It’s so hot. It’s so hot.”

so sorry. These homes are like (expletive), they are gone, they’re gone.”

“These are people’s homes. Oh my god, people. I am

“These are people’s homes. Oh my god, people. I am Tamra Fisher recorded several videos as
“These are people’s homes. Oh my god, people. I am Tamra Fisher recorded several videos as
“These are people’s homes. Oh my god, people. I am Tamra Fisher recorded several videos as
“These are people’s homes. Oh my god, people. I am Tamra Fisher recorded several videos as

Tamra Fisher recorded several videos as she evacuated Paradise in her Volkswagen Beetle, the longest a 25-minute chunk with video going in and out as her phone moves around. She drives in a long line of cars toward what they all hope is safety. Fisher, driving with her three dogs, screams, cries, gasps at the hellish fire all around and begs for cars in front of her to keep moving. At one point, the frustration of Fisher and drivers around her boils over in a marathon cacophony of car horns. Eventually, pine needles at the base of Fisher’s windshield ignite and set her car ablaze, forcing her to abandon it. She catches a ride out of danger with Larry Laczko. As she rides in Laczko’s truck, they pass her VW, now aflame, far right. To see the video, go to www.mercurynews.com.

far right. To see the video, go to www.mercurynews.com. KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Michael and

KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Michael and Jennette Ranney, left, lost their home but saved the house of their neighbors, Carole and Travis Wright. The couples reunited this month.

As she fled the house where she rented a room on Pentz Road — on the eastern edge of town where the fire first hit — she grabbed things she had clung to for comfort: her brother’s ashes, a gold nug- get her grandfather panned out of nearby Butte Creek, a special Raggedy Ann doll from her childhood. She gathered up her three elderly dogs: Lucky who is blind, Sophia who is deaf, and Izzy, the schnau- zer who is toothless. Her panicked escape would go on for 25 minutes, stopping when her “empty” gas gauge pinged a warning and her car caught fire on Pearson Road, the east- west connector to the main roads out of town. She tried to flag down someone to help, but “It was every man and woman for themselves.” Finally, a stranger stopped — a man who emerged from the smoke in a big white Chevy Silverado truck — and opened his door. Fisher recorded their six tender min- utes of their encounter from the passen- ger seat of his truck, with her dogs also safe inside. In it, he is as calm as she is distraught, an interaction that would set the stage for healing.

20 seconds of horror

As the fire blew over Pearson Road, it roared onto Edgewood Lane, a side street just ahead. There, in a field behind his house, Travis Wright recorded the hell- ish landscape, just after he emerged from “the throat of this monster.” Where Fish- er’s video is 25 minutes of fear, Wright’s is 20 seconds of horror. He shows it to people “just to give them an idea of what I was up against,” he said. But he doesn’t like to watch it for himself: “It still pretty much plays in my head.” He simply closes his eyes and hears their screams and feels the heat. The panoramic video he shot at 11:29 a.m. is dark but for the orange flames crackling around him. But look closely, he says, and you can see his all-terrain- vehicle parked on the side of the hill. The worst part is at the end: the silhouettes of his neighbors, Paul and Suzie Ernest, burned and motionless behind a boulder. He thought they were dead. “It’s kind of messed me up,” he said. The three of them — like so many others on Edgewood Lane confronted by a dead end to the south and fire to

the north — couldn’t escape in their ve- hicles. Neither could neighbors Michael and Jennette Ranney, who in a bold and desperate attempt to save themselves ended up saving Wright’s house — and recording part of their last stand against the firestorm. Wright and the Ernests had fled on two ATVs. They briefly passed the Ran- neys, who were on foot with two cats in carriers. There was no way Wright could fit them all on his ATV. Leaving them be- hind still haunts him. Wright and the Ernests raced off to what he thought was their best hope for survival — rock outcroppings and low brush among the trails and fields behind Wright’s house. The fire caught up, forcing them off their ATVs and behind a 6-foot boulder. Paul covered Suzie and himself with his coat and took the brunt of the flames. Wright called his wife, Carole, who was stuck in gridlock near her Paradise den- tal office. “I told her I loved her,” Wright said, “and we said our goodbyes.” Then it struck. “It was right on me,” Wright said. “I could hear it. It was like a blizzard, a jet engine all at once, just loud, mostly the air whipping around, like a vacuum suck- ing the air out of my lungs, forcing me to exhale. It was so not natural.” As the fire rolled over, Wright heard the Ernests scream. He leaped up and jumped through the flames to the other side. An image of 9/11 flashed in his head — of the people jumping out the windows of the World Trade Center towers, come what may. After darting from one boulder to the next, he finally looked around and thought, “I’m alive.” But the Ernests had gone silent and motionless. He didn’t want to lock. “I was afraid of what I was going to find.” Overwhelmed by the devastation and needing to catch his breath, he decided to turn on his camera and pan the re- mains of the black and burning land- scape. You can barely see the Ernests crouching behind the rock. Clicking off the camera, Wright ap- proached his friends. He heard them

VIDEOS » PAGE 7

crouching behind the rock. Clicking off the camera, Wright ap- proached his friends. He heard them
crouching behind the rock. Clicking off the camera, Wright ap- proached his friends. He heard them
crouching behind the rock. Clicking off the camera, Wright ap- proached his friends. He heard them
crouching behind the rock. Clicking off the camera, Wright ap- proached his friends. He heard them

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A7

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A7 KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Eighty-six

KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Eighty-six crosses are installed along Skyway Road in Paradise, one for each life lost in the Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California history.

Videos

FROM PAGE 6

wildfire in California history. Videos FROM PAGE 6 COURTESY OF THE ERNEST FAMILY Paul and Suzie

COURTESY OF THE ERNEST FAMILY

Paul and Suzie Ernest are recovering at the UC Davis hospital from severe burns after trying to escape the blaze on an all-terrain vehicle.

after trying to escape the blaze on an all-terrain vehicle. KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Cindy
after trying to escape the blaze on an all-terrain vehicle. KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Cindy

KARL MONDON — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Cindy Hoover, left, and her sister, Tamra Fisher, returned to see the devastation. They each wore a rubber band to snap every time they had a worry or dark thought.

Wright had returned to his home, shocked that it was still standing and relieved that the Ranneys were still liv- ing. But he is still struggling with guilt

— that he left the Ranneys as he sped off, and that he survived with little more than singed hair. The Ranneys feel only gratitude for Wright and his well-built house that helped protect them. But the experience also has been humbling. They plan to move the trailer to their empty property and start again. The Wrights have offered the Ranneys their house for anything they need. The Ernests are still recovering at UC Davis hospital in Sacramento. Their son, Jessee, said his parents owe their lives to Wright. “He had a huge part in the fact that they even made it out alive,” he said. Wright, a technolo- gist who specializes in CT scans, was never one to reach out to strangers, to tell his stories. But the fire — and his new bond

with the Ranneys — has seemed to strip him of his shyness. “I kind of said, I don’t

care,” Wright said. “I’m going to be more open.” Wright has some heady emotional challenges ahead, he knows. He’s afraid to take his boots off for fear of another fire. His wife is afraid for him to leave her side. But their house is still stand- ing — the only one left on Edgewood Lane. It’s a solid foundation for what may come. And for that, he is grateful.

A rubber band around her wrist

When Tamra Fisher sees how other

Camp Fire survivors responded that day, she asks herself: “How are they so calm? Why did I scream like that?” “I feel very weak, seeing all those peo- ple’s videos,” she says. She used to be the kind of person to crank up the music in her car — and if she was the passenger, to stick her feet out the window. Now she’s still too scared to drive. Her therapist told her to wear a rub- ber band on her wrist and snap it every time a dark thought entered her head. She snapped it so often, it stung. “It wasn’t helping.” Her sister, Cindy Hoover, who lost her home in the fire, still wears hers. The same therapist told her to snap it every time she worried about Tamra. Counselors are extra busy in Chico now, helping traumatized victims real- ize they are safe now, that the fire is behind them, that if they work on their mental health and tell their stories,

post-traumatic stress might not settle in so deep. The house Fisher shared survived, but the storage shed in the backyard with her important things was de- stroyed. She’s trying to look at the fire as a fresh start, that maybe the bad memories in her past were burned away in the fire. “I feel terrible,” she said, “but I also feel cleansed.” Thanks to the stranger in the white truck, her worst fears weren’t realized. She reunited with him recently in the ruins of Paradise, close to where they met. She didn’t recognize Larry Laczko at first. He wasn’t wearing the ball cap or glasses he wore when he saved her. But she recognized that voice, the one that told her to take deep breaths, that they would escape, that she would be OK. “I’m sorry,” she said, hugging him. “You’re doing just fine,” he said, the same way he did over and over that dark day. “This is the voice. This is the voice that is so calming,” she told him. “I was so thankful for you. You were the only one who wanted to stop. You telling me your name was Larry, and I thought, OK, my brother is watching over me.” “I opened my door,” Larry said. “Trust me,” she said. “You opened more than a door for me.” Like the town of Paradise — where power lines are being restrung and the post office and the Feather River Health Center just reopened — those who came closest to death are starting to restore their lives. For Fisher, part of that recovery meant finding the car she abandoned — to see if there was anything left of the things she held most dear. She found it days before Christmas in a lot not far from Pearson Road, where all the metal carcasses had been towed. What had been a bright yel- low VW Beetle was reduced to a burned- out heap of metal. She leaned in and poked around. There was no sign of her Raggedy Ann. She didn’t expect to find her brother’s ashes, but she lit up when she found his ring, class of ’69, in the rim of what had been the VW’s spare tire. Then she plunged her hands back into what was left and felt something small, something hard. Something else cherished had sur- vived. “This is it,” she shouted, pouring bottled water over the muddy trinket, washing it clean of black goo. Her grandfather’s gold nugget glinted in the sunshine.

Contact Julia Prodis Sulek at 408-278- 3409 and Matthias Gafni at 925-952-

5026.

groan, saw them stir and reached for Paul’s hand. The skin slid off. He cooled them with ice packs from their cooler, then promised to return with help. “They didn’t want me to leave,” he said. “Suzie kept saying, ‘Please come back.’ ” That haunts him, too. An hour later, he returned with two firefighters on the back of his ATV. They carried the cou- ple gently, Wright said, cradling them like babies.

Pistol against an enemy brigade

Back at Wright’s house, Michael and Jennette Ranney were shielding them- selves from the swirling inferno on the back of the house, built with fire-resis- tant cement siding. For 1 minute and 33 seconds, Jennette records the amaz- ingly clear-headed operation that saved the Wrights’ house. Their own house had already burned to the ground. They already had survived one near- death moment at the bottom of the hill, when the flames shot three times higher than the trees and the sky rained bombs of flaming bark. A creek where they had sought refuge was only a trickle. “Are we going to die?” Jennette asked her hus- band. “She was, like, ready to say a couple of Hail Marys and close her eyes,” Ran- ney said. “I looked at her. I wanted to save her,” he said. “I didn’t want to die in a fire.” In the video, Michael stands against the firestorm with a garden hose — like a pistol against an enemy brigade. Winds whipped up bonfires around the house. The cats whine in their carriers. Michael barks an order:

“Can you get that fire out behind you?” The camera turns skyward as Jen- nette trips, falling backward. Michael pulls her up, then you hear the “stomp, stomp, stomp” of putting it out. It was a fraction of their 90-minute stand dousing rain gut- ters with garden hoses and cracking off siding to pull out smoking insula- tion. Bedroom windows exploded in the heat. “We weren’t trying to save a house to save a house,” Michael said later. “We were trying to save a house to save us.” It was a feeling of tri- umph that didn’t last long. Everything Ranney held dear, his vintage stereo collection, historic mining claims and favorite tools were all destroyed when his own house incinerated. They are living in a 17- foot donated trailer now, with their two outdoor cats inside. For the first month, they moved it from one Chico parking

lot to the next, running off thieves and seeking out showers. When they were recently rebuffed at

one shelter by an ornery volunteer — who harshly demanded they wash their hands before they entered — they both broke down in tears. “You don’t know what we’ve been through,” Ranney told her. “Several of our neighbors were killed. We’ve lost ev- erything but the clothes on our backs.’’ He couldn’t understand it. “We went from respectable citizens to fire trash. What happened?” He has the video to remind him of his bravery, to bring back his confidence.

to remind him of his bravery, to bring back his confidence. In video shot by Jennette

In video shot by Jennette Ranney, Michael Ranney wields a hose in a last bid to save the Wrights’ house.

wields a hose in a last bid to save the Wrights’ house. KARL MONDON— STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

KARL MONDON— STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite everything lost, Tamra Fisher found her grandfather’s gold nugget buried inside the wreckage of her burned out car.

everything lost, Tamra Fisher found he r grandfather’s gold nugget buried inside the wreckage of her
everything lost, Tamra Fisher found he r grandfather’s gold nugget buried inside the wreckage of her
everything lost, Tamra Fisher found he r grandfather’s gold nugget buried inside the wreckage of her
everything lost, Tamra Fisher found he r grandfather’s gold nugget buried inside the wreckage of her

A8 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP 111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

‘CLEARANCE RATE’ FALLS

Despite #MeToo, rape cases still confound police

By Jim Mustian and Michael R. Sisak

The Associated Press

NEW YORK » The #MeToo movement is empowering victims of sexual assault to speak up like never before, but what should be a wa- tershed moment for hold- ing assailants accountable has coincided with a trou- bling trend: Police depart- ments in the U.S. are be- coming less and less likely to successfully close rape in- vestigations. The so-called “clearance rate” for rape cases fell last year to its lowest point since at least the 1960s, according to FBI data provided to The Associated Press. That na- dir may be driven, at least in part, by a greater will- ingness by police to cor- rectly classify rape cases and leave them open even when there is little hope of solving them. But experts say it also reflects the fact that not enough resources are be-

ing devoted to investigat- ing sexual assault at a time when more victims are en- trusting police with their harrowing experiences. “This is the second-most serious crime in the FBI’s crime index,” said Carol Tracy, executive director of the Women’s Law Project in Philadelphia, “and it simply doesn’t get the necessary re- sources from police.” Police successfully closed just 32 percent of rape in- vestigations nationwide in 2017, according to the data, ranking it second only to robbery as the least-solved violent crime. That statis- tic is down from about 62 percent in 1964, despite ad- vances such as DNA testing. The FBI provided The AP with a dataset of rape statis- tics dating back to the early 1960s — a table that in- cludes more complete data than the snapshot the bu- reau releases each fall. The grim report card has prompted debate among criminal justice experts,

with some attributing the falling clearance rate to an antiquated approach to in- vestigations. “You’d figure with all the new technology — and the fact that the overwhelming majority of victims of sexual assault know their attacker — the clearance rates would be a lot higher,” said Joseph Giacalone, a former New York City police sergeant who teaches at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “It’s almost as if forensics and DNA has let us down,” he said. Experts agree that sexual assault is one of the most confounding crimes police confront. Many investiga- tions lack corroborating witnesses and physical ev- idence. A significant chunk of complaints are reported months or years after the fact. Researchers believe only a third of rapes are re- ported at all. Historically, some de- tectives also discour- aged women from pursu-

ing tough-to-prove charges against boyfriends, hus- bands or close acquain- tances. The declining clear- ance rate could mean that investigators in some places are finally classifying rape investigations properly, said Kim Lonsway, research di- rector at End Violence Against Women Interna- tional. Rather than hastily “clearing” certain tough-to- solve cases, she said, some police departments have begun “suspending” them, meaning they remain open indefinitely. That leaves open the possibility there could someday be an arrest. “This may be an indica- tor of some positive things,” Lonsway said. The FBI’s clearance num- bers provide an incomplete picture of how often rapists are brought to justice. That’s because they also include “exceptional clearances,” where police close an in- vestigation without charg- ing anyone, for reasons be-

yond the department’s con- trol. That could be because a victim stopped cooperating or the suspect died or is in- carcerated in another state, among other reasons. The figures do not spec- ify the percentage of rape cases that are exception- ally cleared compared with those resulting in arrests, but state data can fill out the picture in some places. In Detroit, for instance, police investigated 664 re- ported rapes last year but made just 44 arrests, ac- cording to Michigan data. Another 15 cases were closed for other reasons. That would give Detroit a clearance rate of 8.9 per- cent, even though only 6.6 percent of reported rapes resulted in an arrest. Sam Gaspardo said that when she reported in 2011 that she had been sexually assaulted, police in Wood- bury, Minnesota, lacked a sense of urgency. Investigators in the St. Paul suburb expressed frus-

tration that she delayed re- porting the attack for more than a year and couldn’t re- call the precise date. One time, when she phoned to follow up her case, she was put on hold indefinitely. “To me, it felt like it was invalidated,” Gaspardo said. “I was just completely dis- missed.” Woodbury Police Cmdr. Steve Wills acknowledged Gaspardo’s complaint fell through the cracks and was not investigated for years, something he called “a sys- tem failure.” “Obviously, we own that,” Wills said. Wills said authorities have “no reason not to be- lieve” Gaspardo but decided

a few weeks ago they could

not prove her alleged at- tacker had forced her into intercourse. He acknowledged police would have been in a far better position to investi- gate the case had they be- gun looking into the matter immediately.

Iraq

FROM PAGE 1

vanquished, and he de- fended his decision against all advice to withdraw U.S. troops from neighbor- ing Syria. He said the U.S. was once again respected as a nation, and declared:

“We’re no longer the suck- ers, folks.” The abruptness of his visit left lawmakers in Baghdad smarting and drawing unfavorable com- parisons to the occupation of Iraq after the 2003 in- vasion. “Trump needs to know his limits. The American occupation of Iraq is over,” said Sabah al-Saidi, the head of one of two main blocs in Iraq’s parliament. Trump, he said, had slipped into Iraq, “as though Iraq is a state of the United States.” While Trump didn’t meet with any officials, he spoke with Prime Minis- ter Adel Abdul-Mahdi by phone. A planned meeting between the two leaders was canceled over a “dif-

ference in points of view” over arrangements, accord- ing to the prime minister’s office. The visit could have un- intended consequences for American policy, with of- ficials from both sides of Iraq’s political divide call- ing for a vote in Parliament to expel U.S. forces from the country. The president, who kept to the U.S. air base ap- proximately 60 miles west of Baghdad, said he had no plans to withdraw the 5,200 troops in the coun- try. He said al-Asad Airbase could be used for U.S. air- strikes inside Syria. The suggestion ran coun- ter to the current sentiment of Iraqi politics, which fa- vors claiming sovereignty over foreign and domestic policy and staying above the fray in regional con- flicts. “Iraq should not be a platform for the Amer- icans to settle their ac- counts with either the Rus- sians or the Iranians in the region,” said Hakim al-Za- mili, a senior lawmaker in al-Saidi’s Islah bloc in Par- liament.

U.S. troops are stationed in Iraq as part of the co- alition against the Islamic State group. American forces withdrew in 2011 after invading in 2003 but returned in 2014 at the in- vitation of the Iraqi gov- ernment to help fight the ji- hadist group. Trump’s visit was the first by a U.S. pres- ident since Barack Obama met with then-Prime Min- ister Nouri al-Maliki at a U.S. base outside Baghdad in 2009. After defeating IS mil- itants in their last urban bastions last year, Iraqi pol- iticians and militia leaders are speaking out against the continued presence of U.S. forces on Iraqi soil. Supporters of the popu- list cleric Moqtada al-Sadr won big in national elec- tions in May, campaigning on a platform to curb U.S. and rival Iranian involve- ment in Iraqi affairs. Al-Sa- dr’s lawmakers now form the core of the Islah bloc, which is headed by al-Saidi in Parliament. The rival Binaa bloc, commanded by politicians and militia leaders close to Iran, also does not favor

and militia leaders close to Iran, also does not favor ANDREW HARNIK — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANDREW HARNIK — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump speaks to U.S. troops at al-Asad Airbase in Iraq on Wednesday.

the U.S. Qais Khazali, the head of the Iran-backed Asaib Ahl al-Haq militia that fought key battles against IS in northern Iraq, prom- ised on Twitter that Parlia- ment would vote to expel U.S. forces from Iraq, or the militias would force them out by “other means.” Khazali was jailed by

British and U.S. forces from 2007 to 2010 for managing sections of the Shia insur- gency against the occupa- tion during those years. Trump’s visit would be

a “great moral boost to the

political parties, armed factions, and others who oppose the American pres- ence in Iraq,” Iraqi political analyst Ziad al-Arar said.

Still, the U.S. and Iraq developed considerable military and intelligence ties in the war against IS, and they continue to pay off in operations against mili-

tants gone into hiding.

Associated Press reporters Ahmed Sami and Ali Jabar contributed to this report.

Vasquez

FROM PAGE 1

chase and, after the vehi- cle crashed into a fence, re- fused to get out and surren- der. Instead, police say, the driver put officers in mortal danger when she drove into the patrol car they were tak- ing cover behind. “We have to look at the to- tality of the circumstances here,” Garcia said. “Had these individuals just com- plied with the officers, and would have stopped, this would have ended very dif- ferently.” He wouldn’t say how many times Jennifer Vasquez, 24, was shot. She died from her wounds. Her passenger, Linda Carmona- Bruno, 28, was shot once and treated and released from a local hospital before being booked into the Santa Clara County jail on an out- standing misdemeanor war- rant. Police would discover af- ter the shooting that both women had had run-ins with police in the past. In partic- ular, Garcia said, Vasquez had been involved in other police pursuits involving a stolen vehicle. Recent mug- shots of both women were briefly displayed at the news conference. Vasquez’s family mem- bers say they don’t know why Vasquez fled, but her cousin Conseula Contreras speculated she must have been frightened. “She was scared. She was scared, for sure,” she said. “You know, when things happen, you don’t think.” She also said that Jennifer had borrowed the car from a friend. Family members said Vasquez was returning home to West San Jose — where she periodically lived with her parents — after having Christmas Eve din- ner in Los Banos in the Cen- tral Valley. “She was very kind, she

Los Banos in the Cen- tral Valley. “She was very kind, she A memorial stands Thursday

A memorial stands Thursday along Leigh Avenue in San Jose where Jennifer Vasquez was fatally shot by police Tuesday. Police said that after a high-speed chase, Vasquez used the stolen car she was driving to ram a police vehicle.

ARIC CRABB

— STAFF

PHOTOGRAPHER

to ram a police vehicle. ARIC CRABB — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTO BY JULIA PRODIS SULEK Maria

PHOTO BY JULIA PRODIS SULEK

Maria Elena Vasquez holds a photo of her daughter, Jennifer Vasquez, who was killed Christmas Day during an encounter with San Jose police.

had a lot of friends, always smiling,” Virginia Vasquez said, adding that her niece would often accompany her father to local flea markets to sell clothing and other goods. “She was a warm per- son, always making you feel welcome.” Vasquez’s parents, Maria

Elena Vasquez and Jesus Ra- mos, told reporters after the news conference that they are demanding a federal in- vestigation and the immedi- ate release of footage from police body cameras, which were in use at the time. The pursuit began after 2 a.m. Christmas morning,

Garcia said, when San Jose police responded to reports of gunfire near Story Road and Clemence Avenue in East San Jose. There, they found two people suffering gunshot wounds and a wit- ness pointing to a white car driving down the street that supposedly carried the sus-

pects. As officers followed the driver, who refused to pull over, they looked up the li- cense plate and determined the car was stolen. Police continued the five-mile chase from city streets onto Interstate 280 before the car exited onto Leigh Avenue and crashed into a chain- link fence at the corner of Fruitdale Avenue next to a playground. Garcia said the occupants refused orders from police

to get out of the car and sur- render. Instead, he said, the car rocked back and forth to dislodge from the fence, and when the officers took cover behind one of their patrol vehicles, the driver rammed the cruiser. That’s when four officers opened fire. More than a dozen gunshots can be heard on a witness’s video shared with KGO-TV. “Given the circumstances

… it was reasonable and jus- tified for the officers to feel that their lives were in dan- ger,” Garcia said. “They weren’t the individuals re- sponsible for the shooting

… but had they not been in

a stolen vehicle, had they

not led officers on a high- speed pursuit, had they not tried to ram officers’ car, we wouldn’t be here today. “At what point exactly they figured out it was a fe- male driving,” Garcia said, “I do not know.” Raj Jayadev, director of the watchdog group Silicon Valley De-Bug, accompanied the Vasquez family to the police station Thursday. He said that driving a stolen ve- hicle should not amount to a death sentence. “Law enforcement mis- takes can be lethal mis-

takes,” he said. “What con- stitutes an officer feeling the need to use lethal force has to be the highest of bars.” At the site where the women were shot — near Sherman Oaks Elemen- tary School near San Jose City College — mourners on Thursday brought can- dles, flowers and photos and set them along the bro- ken fence. All four officers who opened fire Tuesday were placed on paid adminis- trative leave, which is rou- tine after an officer-involved shooting. The Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office and the San Jose Po- lice Department’s homicide unit are conducting a joint criminal investigation and the case is being monitored by the department’s inter- nal affairs unit, the city at- torney’s office and the Of- fice of the Independent Po- lice Auditor. Tuesday marked the city’s sixth officer-involved shoot- ing in San Jose this year, and the second fatal incident. After Thursday’s news conference, Garcia met with the Vasquez family to offer his condolences. “I can support and defend the actions of my officers,”

he said, “while still having empathy and compassion for

a mourning mother.”

Contact Robert Salonga at 408-920-5002 and Julia

Prodis Sulek at 408-278-

3409.

and compassion for a mourning mother.” Contact Robert Salonga at 408-920-5002 and Julia Prodis Sulek at
and compassion for a mourning mother.” Contact Robert Salonga at 408-920-5002 and Julia Prodis Sulek at
and compassion for a mourning mother.” Contact Robert Salonga at 408-920-5002 and Julia Prodis Sulek at
and compassion for a mourning mother.” Contact Robert Salonga at 408-920-5002 and Julia Prodis Sulek at

A10

BAY AREA NEWS GROUP

111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

Opinion

Sharon Ryan: President and Publisher, Bay Area News Group

Neil Chase Executive Editor Bert Robinson Managing Editor Content Randall Keith Managing Editor Digital Ed Clendaniel Editorial Page Editor

Michael Turpin Executive Vice President and Chief Revenue Officer Lisa Buckingham Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Dan Smith Vice President Audience

Contact us: Phone: 408-920-5679 Email: eclendaniel@bayareanewsgroup.com

Letters to the editor

Spanking teaches children violence is a solution

Thanks to Leonard Ed- wards for his article “Let’s out- law spanking young children in California” (Opinion section, Dec. 23). People argue, “I was spanked as a child and I turned out fine.” Spanking teaches that it’s OK to solve problems with violence, for both kids — and adults. It of- ten results in people being more interested in not be- ing caught than in really do- ing well. There are other forms of dis- cipline that teach self-control, empathy and the difference be- tween right and wrong by in- stilling morals. Some adults that were hit as children identify with the power of their aggressor, and grow up believing in an au- thoritarian parenting style where their priority is to be seen as the most powerful. If others challenge them, they think those challenging them should be hit to “learn their place.” Let’s outlaw spanking not just of young children but also of all kids.

— Elizabeth Lee, licensed marriage and family therapist, Palo Alto

Halt the march to WWIII with education in history

A prime cause of World War

I was mindless nationalism, which continued after the war. Populism grew in the 1920s and, with nationalism, led to World War II. Now the world

is reverting to nationalism and populism, making World War

III a likelihood.

Unlike the previous wars, WWIII will be fought with weaponized electronics, eco- nomics and energy. Domina- tion, not destruction, of op- ponents will be the goals, be- cause this will allow the winner to exploit those subju- gated. Consider it an updated form of colonialism. The way to combat this trend is with education and by example. Teaching the lessons of history — how national-

ism and populism will lead to strife, poverty and loss of free- dom. Working together, help- ing each other, we will create

an exemplary world.

We must offer the world a better future — one that leads

to peace, prosperity and free- dom for all mankind. — John Cormode, Mountain View

Authorize more judges to process asylum cases

Under U.S. and interna-

tional law, asylum-seekers have the right to present themselves at the U.S. border and request

an asylum hearing.

It is vicious and dishonest to

HAVE YOUR SAY

Letters to the editor:

Letters of up to 150 words should be submitted online at www.mercurynews.com/letters. Commentaries: Submis- sions should be 600 words and include a tagline and daytime contact information. Email to mnopinion@bayareanewsgroup. com. No attachments please.

prevent asylum-seekers from doing so. It disgraces our na- tion, which in the past has wel- comed immigration and hon- ored international law. The asylum-seekers are fleeing life- threatening violence and eco- nomic hardship, conditions that are due at least partially, but probably largely, to the present and past policies of the United States. Prevented from entering the United States le- gally, these men, women and children have to live in squalid conditions on the Mexican side of the border. Our congressional represen- tatives and our U.S. senators should make public statements immediately condemning the Trump administration’s illegal, immoral and dangerous ac- tions and should pursue legis- lation authorizing more judges to hear the petitions for asy- lum and to process the asy- lum-seekers in good faith and as rapidly as possible. — Sandra Drake, Menlo Park

What about this indicates Gov. Brown ‘remarkable’?

Re: “Who’s on top? Histori- ans say Brown deserves seat among state’s finest leaders — for climate change efforts, di- versity in state government, standing up to Trump, avert- ing fiscal disaster” (Page A1, Dec. 23):

Jerry Brown “remarkable”? That’s hardly the case. California was recently ranked dead last in a study by U.S. News & World Report for quality of life. We have the highest poverty rate of any state in the country. We have one of (if not) the high- est homeless population of any state and it continues to grow. Our schools are ranked in the bottom third of the coun- try. We are one of the high- est taxed states in the coun- try. Our roads and infrastruc- ture are falling apart and the only solution we can think of is taxing the residents even more. Housing is unaffordable to a vast majority of the working population. Wealth inequality is a huge problem that contin- ues to grow. The CalPERS pen- sion system is billions of dol- lars in the hole. PG&E is now a convicted felon, while simul- taneously attempting to take more of our money. What about this is “remark-

able? — Devin Foley, Fremont

Cartoonist’s view

e ” ? — Devin Foley, Fremont Cart oo nist’s view NICK ANDERSON — THE WASHINGTON

NICK ANDERSON — THE WASHINGTON POST

ONLINE EXTRA Go to www.mercurynews.com/opinion to view our political cartoons.

AVOIDING REGRET

7 bad financial habits that you should break in the new year

By Michelle Singletary

WASHINGTON » I meet a lot of people who have spent years making a financial mess of their lives. They come to me deep in debt. They often have little money saved. Their retirement portfolios — if they have one — are so low that they better hope they stay healthy enough to work into their 70s. What strikes me most about these folks is their deep regret for not knowing better. But one of my favorite quotes that I use to inspire them to change is from Maya Angelou, who said, “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.” The first step in doing bet- ter is to acknowledge what you’ve done in the past to get where you financially are now. You need to be honest about the bad habits that you need to break. Here are seven finan- cial habits you should leave in

2018.

Not saving for an emergency:

Forty percent of adults said

that if they were faced with an unexpected expense of $400, they would either not be able to pay for it or would have to borrow money or sell some- thing to cover it, according to

a report last year by the Fed-

eral Reserve. You’ve got to save some- thing. If this means cutting ca- ble for a few months, then do it. If it means not eating out, skipping birthday celebrations or vacations, it must be done. You cannot continue to hope that nothing will go wrong and then — when it does — turn to

credit cards to bail you out.

Not budgeting: People love to bad-mouth budgeting. A bud- get is too restrictive, they ar- gue. It’s depressing, they moan. But how is not being intimately familiar with your inflow and outflow of cash working for you? If the numbers don’t add up, go back in there and cut some things. If the numbers are tell- ing you that you can’t live alone, you might need to con- sider a shared-housing situa- tion. Your budget isn’t your en- emy. It’s your guiding light.

Not opening your bills right away: I have worked with peo- ple who come to a budgeting session with stacks of bills un- opened. In one case, a utility company had scheduled to shut down someone’s service that very day. It took just one call to explain the crisis the person was in to reverse the decision. You’ve got to face the truth of the financial chaos you’ve cre-

ated.

Not paying off credit cards each month: Stop using credit to live your best life. If you have any credit cards with bal- ances, spend this year and however many more years it takes to get rid of that debt. Don’t charge another thing.

While you’re paying down the cards, don’t cancel them. Just take them out of your wal- let — all of them. For many of you, even my suggesting that you not carry the plas- tic is causing you palpitations right now. You protest: “What if I have an emergency?” And that is why you need a rainy day fund. If you can’t pay off

your credit-card balances each month, you are over your head financially.

Not being able to say no: Stop being the family ATM. Let me be clear. I’m not suggesting that you don’t help out friends and family. But you have to be more discerning in whom you help and for what. If you con- tinue to bail out irresponsible people, you are standing in the way of their financial growth. How will they ever be held ac- countable for their bad finan- cial decisions if you come to the rescue all the time? For years, because I have done well for myself, I felt guilty not giving family money. That was until I realized I was denying myself stuff so that I could save, and they weren’t doing the same.

Not having a plan to make

better financial decisions: What steps do you take to make sure

a decision you have to make is

sound? Think about a poor de- cision you’ve made in the past that you’re still paying for now.

Not contributing enough to your retirement account: Take

a look at the percentage of

your pay that you’re saving for retirement. If it’s less than 10 percent of your gross pay, it’s probably not enough. But if you can’t do more, at least do bet- ter. Try increasing the percent- age a little every year until you hit 10 percent to 15 percent.

Every year is an opportu- nity to be better. The question is: Will 2019 be your year for

change?

Michelle Singletary is a Washington Post columnist.

NEXT GENERATION’S WORKFORCE

Data key to ‘cradle to career’ educational success

By Lande Ajose and Ted Lempert

“Cradle to career” was a fre- quent refrain of Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom along the cam- paign trail and for the right reasons. Californians do best when investment in their edu- cation comes at the very start and continues through college into adulthood. But Califor- nia lags far behind other states in tracking those positive out- comes in a meaningful or con- sistent way. Just like laying the founda- tion for a strong home, moun- tains of research show early learning serves as a founda- tion for a child’s successful tra- jectory through school and into the workforce. Understanding how best to build on that foun- dation will require an over- haul of our fragmented state data systems. Experts on both ends of the learning continuum know solid, shareable informa- tion to assess the student expe- rience before kindergarten and

after high school in our state is spotty at best. Newsom’s early learning and higher education platforms come at a vulnerable time for the future of California, as we prepare for the next genera- tion’s workforce to shrink. In 1970, children made up 33 per- cent of California’s population; by 2030 that figure is expected to decline to just 21 percent, according to a report by Chil- dren Now. Coupled with a pro- jected shift in the ratio of se- niors to working-age adults, too few individuals will be pre- pared to fill the shoes of their predecessors in the work- force. In fact, California Com- petes has found the state will be short more than 2 million workers with a postsecond- ary credential by 2025. Sadly, many Californians won’t qual- ify for the great jobs our state produces. Here’s why: From the begin- ning and at every significant transition point, our students face barriers in the education- to-employment pipeline. These

barriers nudge then knock our children off paths to prosper- ity and pave the way for them to become adults who live on the wrong end of our state’s burgeoning income inequal- ity. What should be a pipe- line to opportunity instead be- comes an intergenerational cy- cle of hardship that threatens our state’s position as the fifth- largest global economy. Interventions are inconsis- tent and inequitable all along the way. Transitional kinder- garten — a publicly funded early learning option for 4-year-olds not old enough to enter kindergarten in the fall — and high-quality preschool boost language, literacy and math skills. However, only half of all 3- and 4-year-olds in Cal- ifornia attend preschool, dis- proportionately impacting kids of color, kids from low-income families, kids in foster care and dual language learners. Later in life, we find fewer than half of California’s high school students graduate ready for a four-year university, and

many who do enroll in col- lege don’t make it through. The latest research from Califor- nia Competes points out that 4 million Californians ages 25 to 64, a population as large as that of the city of Los Angeles, have completed college courses but left school without finish- ing a degree. These adults, like the kids, tend to be people of color and from low-income families. Data provides the connective tissue between these two poles. California produces very little information on what makes an excellent education for our stu- dents. When information is col- lected, it is not uniform across districts or segments, nor is it shared from early childhood through postsecondary sys- tems. For California to maintain its position as an economic leader, comprehensive improve- ments must be made through- out our education system. This means breaking down walls that traditionally elevate one part of the system or one seg-

ment of our population over others. Given the ever-changing de- mographics of California, our state’s leaders must invest in modernizing data systems that will lay the groundwork for smart, strategic improvements with the broadest impact. A modernized data system will connect every stage of a Cali- fornian’s learning pathway, al- lowing us to close achievement gaps that currently threaten our esteemed position in the world economy. California’s economic success will be determined by the ac- tion Gov.-elect Newsom and the incoming Legislature take for Californians at every point in the education-to-employment pipeline. Such success rests on how we prepare for the eco- nomic needs of tomorrow while meeting the learning needs of our children and adults today.

Lande Ajose is executive director of California Competes. Ted Lempert is president and CEO of Children Now.

today. Lande Ajose is executive director of California Competes. Ted Lempert is president and CEO of
today. Lande Ajose is executive director of California Competes. Ted Lempert is president and CEO of
today. Lande Ajose is executive director of California Competes. Ted Lempert is president and CEO of
today. Lande Ajose is executive director of California Competes. Ted Lempert is president and CEO of

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP A11

Other Views

JERRY BROWN RETROSPECTIVE, PART 4

Jury is out on what will shape his legacy

L ast January, as Jerry Brown was unveiling

his 16th and final state budget, a reporter asked him about his legacy as California’s longest-serv- ing governor.

“Can you tell me the legacy of Goodwin Knight? Or Gov. (Frank) Mer- riam. Or (George) Deukmejian?” Brown replied rather testily. “Governors don’t have legacies. That’s my No. 1 proposition.” That’s patently ridiculous, of course. Brown carefully avoided placing his father, Pat Brown, on his list of legacy-bereft gover- nors and, in fact, has often cited his father’s accomplishments, such as the life-changing State Water Project. Moreover, just days after dis- missing any thoughts of legacy, Brown devoted much of his final State of the State address to re- counting what he and the Legis- lature had done, presumably of lasting value, during his second governorship. “Simply put, California is prospering,” Brown told legisla- tors as he began his half-hour- long address. “While it faces its share of difficulties, we should never forget the bounty and end- less opportunities bestowed on this special place — or the dis- tance we have all traveled to- gether these last few years.” It’s highly likely that Brown sought the governorship again in 2010, 28 years after his first stint had ended, in large mea- sure to erase its rather thin re- cord and the somewhat flaky image he had acquired. As Brown said in 2012, re- garding one of the Capitol’s pe- rennial conflicts, “Analysis pa- ralysis is not why I came back 30 years later to handle some of the same issues. At this stage, as I see many of my friends dy- ing — I went to the funeral of my best friend a couple of weeks ago – I want to get s--- done.”

a couple of weeks ago – I want to get s--- done.” Dan Walters record of

Dan

Walters

record of Brown 2.0 against Brown 1.0 three decades earlier, when he often disengaged from governing California while perpetually cam- paigning for president or

the U.S. Senate. Even when he was en- gaged back then, he had to con- front an openly antagonistic Legislature controlled by his fellow Democrats. Many legis- lators saw him as an arrogant upstart who had ridden to elec- tion on his father’s name and by portraying the Capitol as a cesspool of corruption. The Legislature overrode his vetoes repeatedly, on issues large (capital punishment) and small, including budget items. Brown often resorted to gen- teel bribery, involving judge- ships and local highway proj- ects, to make even minimal gains. And even when he pre- vailed, the victories were often pyrrhic.

Brown conducted marathon negotiations to gain creation of an Agricultural Labor Relations Board, for example, hoping that

it would help the United Farm

Workers Union organize field hands. But despite the farm la- bor act and later laws to help the union, it is barely alive. The young governor’s ap- proval of collective bargain- ing for public employees had a more lasting effect, paving the way for their unions to become the Capitol’s dominant interest group. But that hegemony also had questionable effects, such

as big increases in pension ben- efits that led to gigantic pen- sion fund deficits. Brown put much effort into winning legislative approval of

a “peripheral canal” that would

carry water around the Sacra- mento-San Joaquin Delta and complete his father’s immense water project. But in 1982, a ref- erendum killed the canal — al- though it was later revived in the form of twin tunnels whose fate is uncertain as he leaves of-

S o did he get it done? Yes, if one judges the

CALmatters columnist Dan Walters joined the Capitol press corps in 1975, just as Jerry Brown began his first run as governor. This week, in a four-part series, as Brown prepares to leave Sacramento, Walters examines his political career:

• Tuesday: The son also rises

• Wednesday: Could he have been president?

• Thursday: A second act in California politics commences

• Today: What will be his legacy?

fice again. The biggest issue of Brown’s first governorship, however, was Proposition 13, the 1978 ballot measure to limit property taxes. He denounced it as “a ripoff” before the election, but quickly declared himself a “born-again tax cutter” after its passage and sponsored a state income tax cut as he sought re-election. The state tax cut, coupled with a “bailout” of schools and local governments to off- set their loss of property taxes, put the state budget into an im- mediate operational deficit. Within a few years, Brown had burned through reserves and bequeathed a large deficit to his Republican successor, George

Deukmejian.

E ver since, the state budget has been plagued by a vola-

tile mismatch between revenues and spending and by the time Brown returned to the gover- norship in 2011, the budget had a $27 billion deficit, which he pledged to close. The much older, more en- gaged Brown 2.0 did close the deficit, thanks to holding down spending, an economy that be- gan climbing out of severe re- cession and, finally, his per- suading voters to approve a hefty increase in taxes on the

highest-income Californians. To his credit, Brown has socked away more than $15 bil- lion in “rainy day” reserves and this time will leave his succes- sor, Democrat Gavin Newsom, with a healthy balance sheet. That said, the budget’s struc- tural problem — too much

dependence on taxing the wealthy, whose incomes fluc- tuate heavily — is even more acute. Brown’s own budget staff estimates that a moderate re- cession would slash revenues by $60 billion over three years, four times the state’s rainy day reserves. Brown could have sought tax reform that would have re- duced revenue volatility, but he was unwilling, apparently be- cause it would be a heavy polit- ical lift. The budget is just one of Brown’s purported accomplish- ments that only partially ad- dressed their targeted issues and whose ultimate effect is very uncertain. Another is the Local Control Funding Formula, a rewrite of school finance law that directed more resources into helping poor and English-learner stu- dents close the “achievement gap” with more privileged classmates. But critics say lo- cal education officials have di- verted the extra money into other purposes, and so far, the achievement gap remains stub- bornly wide. Brown is trying, in the last weeks of his governorship, to resolve a number of water is- sues — particularly whether ag- ricultural supplies should be cut to help river flows for fish — in hopes that the Delta tunnels can win approval, but their fate remains uncertain. The other big public works project he has championed, a north-south bullet train system, is likewise up in the air. Al- though some track is being laid

in the San Joaquin Valley, fi- nancing for an extension to one of the state’s metropolitan ar- eas is lacking. Last week Brown insisted, “They will be built” as their positive effects gain apprecia- tion. The ultimate effect of an- other supposed accomplish- ment, a mild reform of public employee pensions, is also un- certain. Even if it survives le- gal challenges, now being con- sidered by the state Supreme Court, the reform will have only marginal effect on the multi- billion-dollar “unfunded liabil- ities” plaguing state and local government pension systems.

A lthough willing to accept half-a-loaf responses to

many other issues, Brown 2.0 fully committed himself to two causes — making California a global leader in reducing car- bon dioxide emissions to slow climate change, which he terms “an existential threat,” and un- doing lock-’em-up crime laws that he and other governors and voters had enacted during the 1970s and 1980s. Spurred by federal court or- ders to reduce prison over- crowding, Brown embraced measures to reduce penal- ties for some crimes and send fewer felons to prison, bucking opposition from law enforce- ment officials who said the re- forms could touch off a surge of crime. Brown sought not only to es- calate carbon reductions, but make himself a global figure on the issue — especially in contrast to President Donald Trump — and it’s likely to be

his chief cause after leaving of- fice. Whether Brown’s legacy goes further will depend on whether the other things he championed

— such as his school finance

plan, criminal justice reforms,

the bullet train and the tunnels

— ultimately succeed or fall by the wayside.

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111

SECTION B

SANTA CLARA COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY

Mushroom grower faces $67M suit

Morgan Hill company accused of intentionally dumping wastewater containing ammonia into stream

By Lisa M. Krieger

lkrieger@bayareanewsgroup.com

The Bay Area’s largest mush- room grower faces a $67 mil- lion lawsuit, accused of pollut- ing a Bay Area creek with ma- nure, according to officials with the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office. The county filed the lawsuit

today against Monterey Mush- rooms Inc., based in Morgan Hill, charging that it intention- ally dumped wastewater con- taining toxic levels of ammo- nia into Fisher Creek, a 14-mile long stream that flows into Coy- ote Creek, through the Coyote Valley of southern Santa Clara County, then into the San Fran- cisco Bay.

“Businesses should never make illegal and dangerous trade-offs between pollution and profit,” District Attorney Jeff Rosen said after his office filed the complaint alleging doz- ens of unfair business practices and violations of California Fish and Wildlife regulations. “We will vigilantly protect the health of our county’s waterways.” The county’s suit contends that Monterey Mushrooms in- tentionally pumped toxic waste- water — created by the use of

used horse stable hay and poul- try manure in the company’s production process — from its holding ponds into waterways in order to dispose of the waste without incurring any cost. In addition, contaminated storm water from compost pro- cessing areas was allowed to flow into waterways, the suit alleges. Overflow pipes, culverts and hoses diverted wastewater into fields — which then flowed into Fisher Creek, according to the

suit. Other pipes pumped waste- water directly into Fisher Creek. During an investigation last January, experts estimated that the company pumped 700,000 gallons of wastewater into the creek over a single two-day pe- riod. In response, Monterey Mush- rooms said it was “shocked and disappointed at the filing of this lawsuit, as the company has been in active communica- tion and dialogue with the Santa

LAWSUIT » PAGE 2

SAN JOSE

Rabid college football fans living it up on billboard

JOSE Rabid college football fans living it up on billboard PHOTO BY ARIC CRABB — STAFF

PHOTO BY ARIC CRABB — STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

College football fans Jeanette Kim, Llyas Ross Sr., and Ruben Hunter, who are living on a billboard for the next 12 days leading up to the College Football Playoff National Championship Game, check their phones on Thursday in San Jose.

The stunt will promote ESPN’s telecast of the national championship game at Levi’s Stadium

By Jon Becker and Emily DeRuy

Staff writers

From the outside looking up,

it may seem as though the four people living atop a billboard

in downtown San Jose are tak-

ing the tiny home craze to the

extreme. But a closer look reveals they’re just zealous college

football fans getting fired up for the national championship

at nearby Levi’s Stadium.

The four superfans tempo- rarily residing on an ESPN

billboard at the intersection of Almaden Boulevard and Park Avenue represent each

of the College Football Playoff

teams and are participating in the network’s advertising cam- paign promoting the Jan. 7 ti- tle game.

advertising cam- paign promoting the Jan. 7 ti- tle game. Chosen fans of Alabama, Oklahoma, Clemson

Chosen fans of Alabama, Oklahoma, Clemson and Notre Dame, college football teams competing for the national championship, climbed 45 feet to the billboard Thursday morning.

Chosen fans of Alabama, Oklahoma, Clemson and Notre Dame climbed 45 feet to the billboard Thursday morning, where they’ll live while com- peting in challenges as long

as their respective team stays alive in the playoff. That means the two fans of the teams making it to the na- tional championship in Santa Clara will spend the next 12

days on the 40-foot-wide, 8-foot-deep platform. Each fan has a tent and sleeping bag. They’ll also have a large-screen TV (tuned to ESPN, no doubt)

BILLBOARD » PAGE 2

WEATHER

2019 will start out on a dry note

Temperatures are expected to dip into the mid-30s by weekend

By Rick Hurd

rhurd@bayareanewsgroup.com

The final hours of 2018 will shuffle off into the history

books just as they kicked off the year — with a blue and rel- atively clear sky covering the Bay Area. But hold off on that talk about the dire need for rain.

A weeklong forecast for dry

weather may be a familiar one, but it doesn’t signal a concern — yet. “You look around the Bay Area, and every area is mostly about 75 percent of what would be considered a normal total,” veteran meteorologist Steve Anderson of the National Weather Service said. “So even though there’s nothing in the immediate forecast, we haven’t really been lacking.” Indeed, storms have proven to be more than just a once-in- a-blue-moon visitor since Oct.

1. Two significant storms in

late November, as well as rains in early December helped the state’s rainfall total following a bleak October. With no rain forecast for at least a week, San Jose will en- ter January with 3.48 inches of total rain since July 1, about an inch below the normal total of 4 ½ inches, Anderson said. Oakland is hovering just over 5 inches, about 74 percent of normal total of 6.85. Totals for Contra Costa County were not available, but Anderson said, “you can safely assume that it’s also in that 75

percent of normal range.” Those totals are more en- couraging than at the end of 2017, when rainfall for the Bay Area was between 45 and 50 percent of normal, depend- ing on the location. Too, the state was only eight months removed from the official de- clared end by Gov. Jerry Brown of a state-wide drought that began in 2014. The drought was declared as the state endured four straight years (2011-15) with less than 20 inches of rain.

WEATHER » PAGE 2

NOMINATING PROCESS

State’s earlier primary makes it a crucial stop for candidates

Associated Press

Go west, 2020 presidential candi- dates? Early voting in California’s primary will overlap with the traditional early nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina. That could force the sprawling field of Democrats to navigate those states as well as California’s notoriously complex landscape, where campaigning is done through paid political ads. Strategists estimate it could cost at least $5 million for a candidate to com- pete in California, an amount that could be prohibitive for all but the best-funded contenders. Nascent campaigns are ask- ing themselves if they should gamble on California. “Everyone’s going to play in Iowa, ev- eryone’s going to go to New Hampshire,” said Ben Tulchin, a San Francisco-based pollster who worked for Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential bid. “But there are only 3-4 of the top-tier candidates who will compete in California.” The nation’s biggest and second-most- diverse state has long complained about being effectively shut out of the presi- dential nominating process because its primary usually comes months after the initial four contests in Iowa, New Hamp- shire, Nevada and South Carolina. Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill mov- ing the state’s primary up to the earliest date permissible. California is slated to vote on March

3, the first day allowed for a state that’s

PRIMARY » PAGE 2

HORSESHOE BEND

South Bay girl dies in fall from Arizona overlook

By Thy Vo

tvo@bayareanewsgroup.com

A San Jose-area girl died after fall- ing about 700 feet from a scenic over- look in Arizona on Christmas Eve, ac- cording to the Coconino County Sher- iff’s Department. The girl and her family, who were vis-

iting from San Jose, parked in a lot half

a mile from an overlook at Horseshoe

Bend, a scenic area along the Colorado River. The girl, whose name wasn’t re- leased, ran down the trail ahead of her family, according to Jon Paxton, a spokesman for the Cococino Sheriff’s De- partment. When they could not find the girl, family members reported her missing around 2 p.m. and officials with the sher- iff’s search-and-rescue unit, Arizona De- partment of Public Safety and National Park Service responded within two hours to search for the teen, Paxton said. She was spotted at the bottom of Horseshoe Bend, about 700 feet below the overlook, but because it was about to get dark, rescuers couldn’t get to her body that day, according to the sheriff’s office. Rescuers returned around 10 a.m. on Christmas Day to recover her body, which was transported to the county

medical examiner’s office in Flagstaff, Ariz. The fall appears to have been an accident, but is still under investigation. Authorities don’t intend to release the girl’s name until the investigation

is complete.

The overlook gives a view of a U- shaped bend of the Colorado River about five miles south of Lake Powell’s Glen Canyon Dam. Although a small viewing platform overlooking Horseshoe Bend has safety railings, most of the overlook isn’t fenced.

Although a small viewing platform overlooking Horseshoe Bend has safety railings, most of the overlook isn’t
Although a small viewing platform overlooking Horseshoe Bend has safety railings, most of the overlook isn’t
Although a small viewing platform overlooking Horseshoe Bend has safety railings, most of the overlook isn’t
Although a small viewing platform overlooking Horseshoe Bend has safety railings, most of the overlook isn’t

B2 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP 111

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

Billboard

FROM PAGE 1

to help pass the time in be- tween the trash-talking. For those wondering, a bathroom and shower are available for the contes- tants’ use. ESPN3 will be live-streaming all the non- bathroom and shower ac- tion up on the billboard. How did these lucky fans score this coup? They were each chosen by ESPN from the nearly 700 who submitted video testimo- nials explaining why they deserved to be here. The four are Alabama fan Llyas Ross Sr. from Tuscaloosa, Ala, a three- tour Army veteran; Notre

Dame fan Jeanette Kim from New York City; Clemson fan Nancy Vol- land from Mount Dora, Fla.; and Oklahoma fan Ruben Hunter from Tulsa, Okla., who is actually a former Sooners walk-on player. For Kim, the contest is a homecoming of sorts. The 25-year-old lived in San Jose several years ago. “It’s nice to be back,” Kim said. The sleeping outside part? Not so nice, but, Kim said, she’s up to the task. Hunter agrees. At 6-foot-2, the former linebacker spent the first night with cold shoulders sticking out of the sleeping bag ESPN provided. (The company came through

with an upgrade the next day.) The 24-year-old, who was a member of the Okla- homa team that beat Ala- bama in the 2014 Sugar Bowl, still has friends on the team. “They all think I’m crazy,” he said. Besides earning the op- portunity to be somewhat uncomfortable throughout their stay, the participants can earn cash and prizes in some challenges, many based on fan engagement on social media. On Thursday at about 9:30 a.m. — after break- fast from Noah’s Bagels as the temperature hovered around 50 degrees — the contestants pitched vol- leyballs from the billboard

into red trash cans on the ground below in an effort to win a thicker mattress pad. At the same time, a separate battle for votes was playing out on Twitter. That prize? A mini fridge stocked with Dr Pepper. “I was really worried about it being really cold,” Volland, 59, said of the first night, “but it was actually not bad.” The only prenuptial agreement she and her hus- band set, Volland joked, was that she attend three games a year. This year, the superfan went to six. Two of them will be spending just two days on the billboard, since the fan of the losing team during Saturday’s Cot- ton Bowl Classic between

Notre Dame and Clemson, as well as the one of the Orange Bowl between Ala- bama and Oklahoma, will be eliminated. Ross, who was born and raised in Tuscaloosa, ex- pects to be on the billboard until the final champion- ship game. “They will get it done,” Ross said of his team. The first night “brought me back to my old military days,” the 39-year-old said. During his three tours of Iraq, Ross kept his spirits up by watching Alabama play. To be selected by ESPN for a possible seat at the championship game “is the chance of a lifetime,” he said. While there’s been some good-natured ribbing, liv-

ing in such unusual and tight quarters has brought the four fans together. “We know it’s all fun and games,” Ross said. “ESPN wouldn’t be where we are without our fans. This billboard cel- ebrates the unique fan- dom and passion in col- lege football by putting it on display for the nation to see and engage directly with the fans,” said Emeka Ofodile, ESPN’s vice pres- ident of marketing. “The College Football Playoff is more than just the game on the field — it’s a unique cul- tural event, and these fans represent that.”

Contact Jon Becker at 925-977-8588 and Emily DeRuy at 408-920-5077.

Primary

FROM PAGE 1

not in the traditional early state lineup. And because of California’s early-voting system, voters will get pri- mary ballots starting 30 days before the primary, which coincides with the Iowa caucuses. Alex Padilla, Califor- nia’s secretary of state and

a Democrat, said there are

already “a heck of a lot more calls for people who know California to join certain teams.” Especially for Democrats, California is a fixture on presidential aspirants’ itin- eraries because of the trove of high-end donors there. But Padilla and other Cal- ifornia politicos hope can- didates now feel they must reach out to the state’s vot- ers, too. “The voters of Califor- nia deserve a larger role in selecting the nominees of both parties,” Padilla said. California won’t be the

only state voting on March 3. It will join at least eight others — including an- other behemoth, Texas — on what’s known as Super Tuesday. It’s possible that more states will move their primary dates up to in- crease their clout, especially since California has jumped to the front of the pack. The enormous amount of votes up for grabs that day, coupled with the astronom- ical price tag of competing

in California, may end up increasing the importance of the early states — es- pecially overwhelmingly white and rural Iowa and New Hampshire, which are least like California. That’s because winners in those states are likely to receive heavy attention and, with that, donations that could fund a Califor- nia operation. Once Super Tuesday is over, a huge per- centage of Democrats will have voted, making it hard for candidates who aren’t in first to catch up. “You win early or you go home,” said Josh Putnam, a

professor at the University of North Carolina-Wilming- ton who tracks presiden- tial primaries. The mas- sive number of delegates up for grabs on Super Tues- day “doesn’t mean it’ll set- tle things, but it’ll get us a measure of the way there,” he said. Bob Shrum, a veteran of several Democratic presi- dential campaigns who is now director of the Cen- ter for the Political Future and the Unruh Institute of Politics at the University of Southern California, said Iowa and New Hampshire will still be critical. “They winnow the field,” he said. Paradoxically, Shrum added, California could also be a bulwark for President Donald Trump, who’s made it a perennial political tar- get and symbol of what’s wrong with liberal Amer- ica. The president remains popular enough among the GOP that it’s unlikely he’ll have a serious primary challenge. But if he did and lost an early state, the state’s beleaguered Republi-

can voters would help him.

“As it has shrunk,” Shrum said of the California GOP, which is now outnumbered by both Democratic and independent voters in the state, “it has gotten more and more Trump-esque.” Several potential Dem- ocratic presidential candi- dates hail from California

— most prominently Sen.

Kamala Harris, Los An-

geles Mayor Eric Garcetti and billionaire Tom Steyer

— and that state’s earlier

primary date could help them. But there’s no guarantee that loyalty to a local will overcome a candidate who catches fire with the party’s base after Iowa and New Hampshire. Just ask Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who was trounced by Trump in his state’s Republican presiden- tial primary in 2016. “If Beto O’Rourke held a rally at Los Angeles or San Francisco City Hall, he’d get a larger crowd” than Garcetti or Harris, said Mike Trujillo, a veteran

Democratic operative in Southern California. Trujillo added there’s no guarantee that O’Rourke, the Texas congressman who narrowly lost his challenge to Sen. Ted Cruz, can main- tain that level of grassroots enthusiasm in 2020. But he said candidates who have that support will gain the

edge in California, regard- less of whether it’s their home state. Trujillo ran Hillary Clin-

ton’s California field opera- tion in 2008, the last time the state’s primary leap- frogged to Super Tues- day. It was no panacea for California’s status in pres- idential politics — Tru- jillo recalls repeatedly be- ing pulled from California and sent to early-state Ne- vada to help out. “I don’t see that dynamic changing for any presidential campaign,” he said. Still, Trujillo said can- didates will still have to learn California’s ins and outs quickly because, as in 2008, it will become a crit- ical part of the long march

to the nomination. Trujillo says the state’s numerous Latinos are particularly up for grabs in the primary. The California presiden- tial primary is like 53 indi- vidual elections because it allocates delegates based not on statewide vote to- tals but the results in each of its congressional dis- tricts. Those stretch the equivalent of the distance from Maine to North Car- olina, through teeming cit- ies, empty rural areas and affluent suburbs. But in the end, California voters are not that different from other ones, said An- drea Steele, a veteran Cal- ifornia-based Democratic operative who runs Emerge, a group that helps female candidates run for office. She expects traditional is- sues like the economy and health care to dominate, along with growing Demo- cratic concerns like climate change. “I don’t think Califor- nians are so different from people in Iowa and New Hampshire,” Steele said.

Weather As for when the next rainfall will hit, forecast- ers can only wait. A
Weather
As for when the next
rainfall will hit, forecast-
ers can only wait. A cool
trough of low pressure is
entering the state from the
Gulf of Alaska, but it’s not
bringing any precipitation,
Anderson said.
It will bring a much
colder start to 2019. Over-
night low temperatures are
expected to fall into the
mid-30s in most Bay Area
locations by Friday, and
those cold tallies figure to
on New Year’s Eve 2017.
The temperatures in
the Sierra Nevada will go
even lower, and the wind-
chill there will dip into sin-
gle digits.
“It’s going to be blus-
tery,” he said.
And the air will be rel-
atively clean, too. The Bay
Area Air Management Dis-
trict does not anticipate
the need for a Spare the
Air Day in the near future;
its five-day forecast show
shows the air quality is ex-
pected to be between good
and moderate.
Lawsuit
5 miles
San Jose
FROM PAGE 1
FROM PAGE 1
85
According to meteorol-
ogist Jan Null, the state
received a total of 23.26
inches in 2015-16, a fig-
ure that fell within nor-
mal, then was deluged
with 32.34 inches the fol-
lowing season. In 2017-18,
Clara County District At-
torney’s office.”
It said the pollution re-
sulted from winter storms
of late 2016 and early 2017,
when its facility was inun-
dated by rains and its pro-
cessed water — “primar-
ily rainwater,” it asserts
101
Facility
charged
with
Morgan
dumping
Hill
152
Monterey
Gilroy
17.53 inches of rain fell.
“In a sense, California
Mushroom
left the property.
Since then, the com-
pany has collaborated
with county and state
agents and spent millions
of dollars to install addi-
tional storage, as well as
engineer the separation
of stormwater, according
to Bruce Knobeloch, vice
president of marketing
and product development.
Fisher Creek is a tribu-
tary to the largest freshwa-
ter wetland in Santa Clara
County, Laguna Seca, with
seasonal ponds that pro-
vide habitat for many spe-
cies of wildlife. It flows
into Coyote Creek, home to
steelhead trout, California
tiger salamanders and Cal-
ifornia red-legged frogs.
Monterey Mushrooms,
founded in 1971, is the
largest grower of mush-
rooms in North America,
according to its website.
Known for popularizing
the portabella mush-
rooms, it has since ex-
panded to 10 farms across
North America.
The company’s Morgan
1
Inc.
Watsonville
is
always recovering,” Null
said. “It’s always on that
thin line.”
stick around through Dec.
31, he said. Thermometer
readings were in the 60s
BAY AREA NEWS GROUP
The Daily Commuter
Hill facility is located on
Hale Avenue, near Coyote
Valley Open Space Pre-
serve and Cinnabar Hills
Golf Course.
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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP B3

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP B3 Titles and showtimes are subject to
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018 111 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP B3 Titles and showtimes are subject to

Titles and showtimes are subject to change. Call theaters for information.

Showtimes for:

Friday, December 28, 2018

 

ATTRIBUTES KEY

Green Book (PG-13) Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch (PG) Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)

Swing Kids (seu-wing-ki-jeu)AMC Select Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) DVS Zero (Hindi) (NR) AMC Select

Bumblebee (PG-13) Bumblebee (PG-13) Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) Second Act (PG-13) Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) Mary Poppins Returns (PG) Mortal Engines (PG-13) The Mule (R) Spider-Man: Into the Spider- Verse (PG) Mary Queen of Scots (R) Creed II (PG-13) Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG) Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch (PG) Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) Century Cinemas 16

Bumblebee (PG-13) DP,CC/DVS

- No Passes ( ) Bargain Matinee CC - Closed Captions DVS - Descriptive Video Service RPX - Regal Premium Experience XD - Cinemark XD (Large Format)

Bumblebee (PG-13) CC/DVS

Second Act (PG-13) CC/DVS

 

ALAMEDA COUNTY

A

Star is Born (R)

Antariksham 9000 kmph (NR) AMC Select K.G.F (Kannada) (NR) AMC Select Mary Poppins Returns (PG) DVS Mortal Engines (PG-13) DVS The Mule (R) DVS Spider-Man: Into the Spider- Verse (PG) DVS Mary Queen of Scots (R) AMC Select