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Using HPE OneView Study Guide (Exam HPE2-T34)

First Edition

HPE Press 660 4th Street, #802 San Francisco, CA 94107

Renata Golden

 

Using HPE OneView Study Guide (Exam HPE2-T34)

Renata Golden

© 2018 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP.

Published by:

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Press 660 4th Street, #802 San Francisco, CA 94107

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review.

ISBN: 978-1-942741-87-9

WARNING AND DISCLAIMER This book provides information about the topics covered in the HPE Product Certified - OneView [2018] exam (HPE2-T34). Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied.

The information is provided on an “as is” basis. The author, and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Press, shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages arising from the information contained in this book or from the use of the discs or programs that may accompany it.

The opinions expressed in this book belong to the author and are not necessarily those of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Press.

TRADEMARK ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS All third-party trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

 

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Publisher: Hewlett Packard Enterprise Press

HPE Contributors: Ralph Luchs, Brian Beneda, Jeff Holderfield, Chris Lynch, Chris Powell

HPE Press Program Manager: Michael Bishop

 

About the Author

Renata Golden is a writer, editor, and instructional designer specializing in data center and cloud computing. Throughout her 20-year career, she has developed instructor-led and web-based courseware for HP/HPE as well as knowledge assessments and certification exams in a variety of industries. Renata has a bachelor’s degree from Arizona State University and a master’s degree from the University of Houston, and is a member of the Association of Test Publishers (ATP) and the Association for Talent Development (ATD).

Introduction

This guide is based on the Using HPE OneView, Rev. 18.11 course, which is designed to teach learners how to install, configure, and use HPE OneView 4.0 and later. The book helps readers prepare for the Using HPE OneView (HPE2-T34) exam, which tests candidates’ knowledge and skills on the HPE OneView product and solutions. This certification validates that a successful candidate has the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and use HPE OneView in a data center environment.

Areas of study include the ability to:

• Install and configure HPE OneView in HPE Synergy, BladeSystem, and ProLiant rack server environments

• Add and manage HPE servers, enclosures, and storage systems

• Manage, monitor, and migrate server hardware

• Create and manage server profiles

• Define connections and uplinks for networking and storage

• Manage a secure HPE OneView environment

• Perform resource health monitoring

• Use the Environmental Resource Manager

• Use the HPE OneView UI, the REST API, and the PowerShell Library

Certification and Learning

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) Partner Ready Certification and Learning provides end-to-end continuous learning programs and professional certifications that can help

 

you open doors and succeed in the idea economy. We provide continuous learning activities and job-role based learning plans to help you keep pace with the demands of the dynamic, fast paced IT industry; professional sales and technical training and certifications to give you the critical skills needed to design, manage and implement the most sought-after IT disciplines; and training to help you navigate and seize opportunities within the top IT transformation areas that enable business advantage today.

As a Partner Ready Certification and Learning certified member, your skills, knowledge, and real-world experience are recognized and valued in the marketplace. To continue your professional and career growth, you have access to our large HPE community of world-class IT professionals, trend-makers and decision-makers. Share ideas, best practices, business insights, and challenges as you gain professional connections globally.

To learn more about HPE Partner Ready Certification and Learning certifications and continuous learning programs, visit: http://certification-learning.hpe.com

Audience

This book is intended for consultants, sales engineers, and presales engineers who will recommend, design, and demonstrate HPE technology solutions, particularly using HPE OneView. Typical candidates for the Using HPE OneView certification are IT organizations or data center professionals who have the responsibility to achieve and improve the availability and manageability of a data center or stand-alone IT solutions.

Assumed Knowledge

The Using HPE OneView Study Guide is an advanced-level book. Before reading this book, you should be familiar with HPE server and storage platforms such as Synergy solutions, BladeSystem enclosures, and ProLiant rack servers, as well as HPE 3PAR StoreServ storage solutions. In addition, you should have an understanding of basic networking configuration and management. It is assumed that you are familiar with HPE data center accessories, including power distribution units and racks.

Minimum Qualifications

To pass the Using HPE OneView (HPE2-T34) exam, you should have a minimum of 12 months hands-on experience or the equivalent in at least one of the core HPE areas (server, storage, and networking) and six months hands-on experience or the equivalent

 

in other HPE solutions and technologies.

Relevant Certifications

After you pass the Using HPE OneView (HPE2-T34) exam, your achievement might be applicable toward more than one certification. To determine which certifications can be credited with this achievement, log in to The Learning Center and view the certifications listed on the exam’s More Details tab. You might be on your way to achieving additional certifications.

Preparing for Exam HPE2-T34

This self-study guide supports exam preparation for the Using HPE OneView (HPE2- T34) exam. However, completing the study guide alone does not guarantee that you will have all the knowledge you need to pass this exam. It is expected that you will also draw on real-world experience.

Recommended HPE Training

Recommended training to prepare for each exam is accessible from the exam’s page in The Learning Center. See the exam attachment, “Supporting courses,” to view and register for the courses.

Obtain Hands-on Experience

You are not required to take any specific recommended or supported courses, and completion of training alone does not guarantee that you will pass the exams. Hewlett Packard Enterprise strongly recommends a combination of training, thorough review of courseware and additional study references, and sufficient on-the-job experience before taking any exam.

Exam Registration

To register for an exam, go to:

Chapter 1

Managing the Infrastructure with HPE OneView Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge HPE OneView Infrastructure automation made simple Simplify life cycle operations HPE Composable Infrastructure partner ecosystem Deploy infrastructure at cloud-like speed OneView addresses two approaches to IT management Two methods for an enhanced user experience OneView dashboards OneView default Dashboard OneView Global Dashboard Viewing Global Dashboard information Global Dashboard benefits REST APIs: Designed for automation Why REST is important REST API features Using REST APIs to manage resources OneView REST API URI OneView integrated resource model OneView domains Software-defined resources OneView architecture Activity—Mapping OneView capabilities to a customer scenario Customer scenario Questions Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 2

HPE OneView Requirements

Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge Managing, monitoring, and migrating server hardware Minimum firmware requirements for managed and monitored devices Appliance VM and host requirements OneView minimum resource requirements Installing OneView Updating the appliance Configuring the OneView appliance Using the OneView UI to configure the appliance network Appliance networking configuration settings Management networks OneView licensing Installing OneView Standard and Advanced licenses Activity—OneView licensing Customer scenario Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 3

HPE OneView Platform Support Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge OneView and HPE Synergy Differences between Synergy Composer and the OneView appliance OneView and Synergy storage Integrated Remote Support for Synergy interconnect modules OneView and HPE BladeSystem Logical interconnects Logical interconnect groups and enclosure groups Virtual Connect Ethernet Module support Virtual Connect Fibre Channel module support OneView and HPE ProLiant rack servers ProLiant ML/DLhardware discovery OneView integrations

 

OneView for VMware vCenter OneView for VMware portfolio HPE OneView for Microsoft System Center Activity—Exploring OneView product support Customer scenario Questions Learning check Learning check answers Summary

 

Chapter 4

Managing a Secure HPE OneView Environment Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge Using the REST API for basic operations Creating resources by using the POST method Reading resources by using the GET method Updating resources by using the PUT method Deleting resources by using the DELETE method Browser REST clients Using a browser REST client REST call response data

 

Retrieving OneView appliance version information

Retrieving

OneView

appliance

version

information—Response

 

messages OneView API error codes 4xx errors 5xx errors Using the OneView PowerShell Library PowerShell for OneView cmdlets HPE OneView security Scopes Permissions Scope-based access control SBAC compared with role-based access control SBAC implementation process Resource categories

 

Assigning resources to multiple scopes User roles Adding new users and setting their permissions Two-factor authentication Strict two-factor authentication SNMPv3 support Certificate handling OneView certificate support Usability and security Implementing a Certificate Authority-signed certificate Submitting certificate request contents to a CA Advanced OneView security considerations Essential security aspects implemented Deploying the OneView appliance securely TCP and UDP ports used by the appliance Security control procedures Obtaining a one-time password Management user authentication OneView management users Java Authentication and Authorization Service Active Directory integration support Adding an enterprise directory server—Editing security settings Adding directory server specifications Completing the setup Identifying server groups Backing up an appliance Backups Recovering from catastrophic failures Creating support dump files Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 5

Adding and Configuring Components in HPE OneView Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge

OneView configuration process Synergy configuration experience Configuring networks in OneView OneView network management with Synergy fabric Smart Link LACP on S-channels/downlinks Connections without an assigned network Pause flood detection Quality of service for network traffic Mixed-speed master/satellite interconnect modules Synergy and Virtual Connect HPE Virtual Connect SE 16Gb FC Module port trunking HPE Virtual Connect SE 40Gb F8 Module enhancements Storm control Private network support Increased VLAN scale for network sets OneView network management with Virtual Connect OneView and Virtual Connect interconnects OneView networks compared with Virtual Connect networks Tunnel networks Untagged networks Using network sets Adding BladeSystem enclosures to OneView Adding an enclosure that will be monitored Adding an enclosure that will be managed Enclosure refresh operation Virtual Connect domain migration Adding, managing, and monitoring servers Automated server discovery Finding healthy servers Server provisioning Adding a ProLiant BLserver blade Server blade and enclosure removal Managing a ProLiant BLserver blade Monitoring a ProLiant BLserver blade Adding a ProLiant DLserver Managing a ProLiant DLserver

Server refresh operation Adding, configuring, and managing storage systems Unified SAN storage user experience across OneView Physical storage components supported in OneView Software-defined storage support Adding a storage system HPE 3PAR StoreServ domains Adding a storage system—Direct-attach scenario Flat SAN Storage System page actions Creating a volume template Locking volume template properties Volume consistency validation Creating a storage volume Growing a volume dynamically Storage snapshots and clones Deleting storage volumes from OneView SAN connectivity and synchronization with the appliance Adding a SAN manager Automatic SAN data path configuration load balancing Firmware management Frictionless firmware updates Automated change management with driver and firmware updates Applying Smart Components Updating by using a template Virtual Connect firmware updates in OneView Updates using HPE iSUT Firmware updates using HPE SUM Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 6

Creating and Managing Server Profiles Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge Introduction to server profiles

Server profile configurations Server profile templates Synergy templates Server hardware types and enclosure group attributes Server hardware attribute types Advanced attributes of a server profile—Server blade Advanced attributes of a server profile—Rack server CHAP secrets Managing server profile addresses and identifiers Applying virtual identifiers Address and ID pools Configuring server profile advanced attributes Assigning serial number and UUID values Restrictions and considerations Applying a server profile Intelligent Provisioning works in the background Enabling secure boot in a server profile Reapplying a server profile Performing the reapply action Copying a server profile Restrictions and considerations Changing server hardware type and enclosure group Managing boot order and BIOS settings Boot order considerations and issues Managing server BIOS/UEFI settings Editing the BIOS and UEFI settings through a server profile BIOS/UEFI settings after a server profile is created BIOS settings troubleshooting Creating server profile connections Ethernet connections Fibre Channel connections Advanced connection management Port assignment choices for Ethernet connections Port assignment choices for other connections Networks on a physical server port Bandwidth allocation Attaching storage

Adding an existing storage volume to a server profile Adding a new storage volume to a server profile SAN storage provisioning example Consequences to volumes when profiles are deleted Integrating DAS configuration with profiles Drive Sanitize Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Resource Health Monitoring Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge Resource health monitoring operations SNMP trap receiver processing Alert Aggregation Service processing System health monitoring SAN health and diagnostics Events and alerts OneView Activity page Alert email notifications OneView reporting Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Environmental Resource Manager Customer scenario Malanga Communications Networks Gauge your knowledge Environmental Resource Manager in the data center Managed objects Environmental Resource Manager integration HPE power solutions for data centers HPE Intelligent Power Distribution Units HPE Power Discovery Services

iPDU discovery Adding an iPDU iPDU operations—Power and locator light control Manual power configuration Utilization data collection and display Utilization details Data collection problems and status conditions Diagnosing persistent pending Topology configuration Manual device positioning Data center configuration Learning check Learning check answers Summary

Chapter 9

Practice Test Introduction Who should take this exam? Exam details HPE2-T34 testing objectives Test preparation questions and answers Questions Answers

 

Chapter 1

Managing the Infrastructure with HPE OneView

 

Learning objectives

After completing this chapter, you should be able to:

• Explain how Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) OneView simplifies DevOps as well as daily data center operations

• State the difference between the default OneView dashboard and the OneView Global Dashboard

• Explain why Representational State Transfer (REST) application programming interfaces (APIs) are important

• Describe the structure of the OneView integrated resource model

 

Customer scenario

When working your way through this study guide, it is helpful to keep a customer in mind. You can imagine the customer’s business and technical needs within the context of a real-world scenario and apply what you learn as the business grows and evolves through the study guide.

Consider the following fictitious customer as you work through this chapter. Use it as a model when trying to recommend and design a solution to meet the customer’s business and technical objectives. Refer to it also as you engage with activities throughout this study guide.

Malanga Communications Networks

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-1 Malanga Communications Networks manages systems across 24 islands and 12 countries

Figure 1-1 Malanga Communications Networks manages systems across 24 islands and 12 countries

Malanga Networks was a private corporation that provided access services for cable television, digital video, high-speed internet, and digital telephony. For more than 20 years, the company provided telecom capacity and IP services to international telecom carriers and internet service providers. Malanga primarily operated in the United States but had satellite offices in Central and South America.

Recently, Malanga Networks and Caribbean Cable Communications merged in order to accelerate growth strategies and optimize customer service, as illustrated in Figure 1-1. The new company now employs 500 people across the Americas.

Julie Jarret-Jones, the CEO of the new Malanga Communications Networks, has said that with this acquisition, the company faces the challenge of managing systems across 24 Caribbean islands and 12 countries in Central and South America. She believes that a system that is easily replicated could minimize the cost of making changes in their environment. “With these programs, we need to be able to respond quickly when a

|||||||||||||||||||| change needs to be made. And we need to copy those changes across our
||||||||||||||||||||
change needs to be made. And we need to copy those changes across our data centers
reliably,” Jones says.
Gauge your knowledge
Before proceeding with this chapter, take some time to consider the following questions.
Answer each question as completely as possible. Pay attention to the answers you are
less certain about.
1. Which features of OneView can help Malanga Communications Networks automate
tasks such as adding more storage to a service, modifying network connectivity, or
updating firmware?
2. How can OneView manage other aspects of the Malanga Communications Network
data centers, such as life cycle management?
3. What other features of OneView would help Malanga Communications Networks as
they evolve through the merger?
Make note of areas in which you need more information and concentrate on the material
covered in those areas. Feel free to skim any material you might already know.
Remember that to achieve the HPE Product Certified—OneView [2018] certification,
you must pass the HPE2-T34 “Using HPE OneView [2018]” exam associated with this
training.
||||||||||||||||||||
 

HPE OneView

||||||||||||||||||||   HPE OneView Figure 1-2 HPE OneView main menu OneView is a unified infrastructure management

Figure 1-2 HPE OneView main menu

OneView is a unified infrastructure management platform designed to address the operational challenges that infrastructure administrators face as they attempt to simplify operations, improve integrations across management processes and tools, and seek more unified, automated management strategies that help staff work more efficiently.

OneView is a modern, API-driven infrastructure management platform optimized for software-defined and hybrid cloud environments that experience frequent changes to infrastructure configurations and resource assignments. It offers customers a platform to uniformly define and maintain firmware and system configurations while maintaining consistent availability and control across virtualized, containerized, and bare-metal resources.

OneView enables customers to streamline complex life cycle operations and application delivery activities across network, compute, storage, and composable infrastructure, including:

• HPE Synergy (with Composer powered by OneView)

• HPE ProLiant BL, DL, and MLservers

• HPE Apollo

 

• HPE Superdome X systems

• HPE 3PAR StoreServ storage systems

• HPE StoreVirtual VSA

By providing a consistent management platform to configure and provision this broad range of resources, OneView can significantly improve operational productivity and overall business agility.

The key benefit of OneView is that it is one tool that uses one dataset to present one view to the administrator, combining complex and interdependent data center management capabilities in a unified interface, as shown in Figure 1-2.

Infrastructure automation made simple

shown in Figure 1-2 . Infrastructure automation made simple   Figure 1-3 OneView streamlines infrastructure,
 

Figure 1-3 OneView streamlines infrastructure, tools, and processes

 

OneView simplifies hybrid IT, transforming servers, storage, and networking into a software-defined infrastructure. OneView also reduces the risk of unauthorized user access to system management resources with enhanced authentication and encryption security features of SNMPv3, two-factor authentication, and scope-based access.

As shown in Figure 1-3, OneView enables you to:

Simplify IT life cycle operations by rapidly bringing hundreds of servers into a OneView environment with just a few clicks, dramatically shortening server setup time with autodiscovery.

• Deploy infrastructure at cloud-like speed by managing across compute, storage, and fabric with an easy-to-use interface for single console infrastructure management. A single console provides a unified view of the health of servers, profiles, enclosures, storage, and networking, which enables administrators to rapidly design, provision, monitor, and update IT resources. Administrators can proactively monitor the heath of the entire infrastructure and identify problems before they result in downtime.

• Develop new apps and services faster by leveraging a modern, standards-based API and a large and growing composable partner ecosystem while efficiently managing traditional IT. This approach gives customers the confidence that they are investing in an architecture for the future with solid support.

in an architecture for the future with solid support. Note To watch a video on What’s

Note To watch a video on What’s New with OneView 4.0, click the hyperlink.

Simplify life cycle operations

Simplify life cycle operations Figure 1-4 HPE OneView Global Dashboard OneView eliminates

Figure 1-4 HPE OneView Global Dashboard

OneView eliminates complexity, removes silos across various IT organizations, and

simplifies the overall infrastructure life cycle management. These capabilities alleviate the burden and time spent managing hardware and free up more time to spend developing and delivering new applications and IT services.

The OneView Dashboard screen provides a graphical representation of the general health and capacity of the resources in the data center. From the Dashboard, you can immediately see the areas that need your attention.

Additional functionality is provided with the OneView Global Dashboard software, shown in Figure 1-4, which provides an at-a-glance view and health status of multiple servers, profiles, and enclosures around the world and across a OneView managed environment—up to 54 enclosures and 25 appliances. With the Global Dashboard, you can obtain better infrastructure visibility and faster, more informed decision-making.

visibility and faster, more informed decision-making. Important Global Dashboard is different from the default

Important Global Dashboard is different from the default dashboard provided in OneView.

OneView keeps the infrastructure running at peak performance with minimal workload disruption. Infrastructure device drivers and firmware updates can be automated with the least possible impact to the production environment. Templates, used in combination with HPE Software Update Tools (SUT), enable updates to be staged, scheduled, and installed without rebooting the system. This frictionless, nondisruptive update feature has now been extended to the Synergy composable server platform through the Synergy Composer powered by OneView. Changes to the templates are immediately reflected in profile compliance status, so you can quickly pinpoint systems that need attention and efficiently roll out updates.

In addition, OneView enables you to receive 24x7 monitoring, prefailure alerts, automatic call logging, automatic parts dispatch, and contract/warranty display through integrated remote support—which is now extended to include Synergy interconnect modules and ProLiant Gen10 firmware. HPE Proactive Care Services are also available to provide a personalized and proactive hands-on approach to maintaining an agile, healthy, and reliable infrastructure.

HPE Composable Infrastructure partner ecosystem

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-5 Growing customer adoption and support for OneView Customer adoption and support for

Figure 1-5 Growing customer adoption and support for OneView

Customer adoption and support for OneView continues to grow. Interviews with organizations that have deployed OneView to support their server, storage, and network infrastructure reveal that they are achieving significant value with OneView by making their daily IT operations more efficient and effective. These organizations benefit from having a single console to manage their environments, as well as software-defined processes and automation.

In addition, OneView 4.0 has expanded capabilities to leverage new partners in the HPE Composable Infrastructure Partner Ecosystem program, as summarized in Figure 1-5. You can enable hybrid cloud management through API integrations with Composable Infrastructure Ecosystem partners, including:

• Morpheus Data—With integration into OneView and 3PAR storage, Morpheus enables Unified Ops Orchestration of both DevOps pipelines and multi-cloud infrastructure including visibility, analytics, and physical state management of an HPE infrastructure running bare-metal servers, virtual machines (VMs), or containers in hybrid environments.

• CANCOM—OneView with CANCOM allows users to create a fully integrated

 

digital workspace solution including hardware, software, and services to ensure seamless and automated deployment with real-time monitoring, maintenance, and daily operations capabilities.

 

InContinuum—Using OneView with InContinuum software, organizations can perform life cycle management and automation of bare-metal, virtual, and hybrid cloud deployments including control functions such as platform as a service, DevOps, and containers from a unified view.

Deploy infrastructure at cloud-like speed

Through software-defined intelligence, OneView takes a template-driven approach to provisioning, updating, and integrating compute, storage, firmware/device drivers, and networking infrastructure. This approach not only reduces the risk of human error by enabling administrators to develop a template once and then replicate as needed but also helps boost productivity of administrators and software developers. In addition, change operations can be implemented by using templates so that tasks such as adding more storage to a service, modifying network connectivity, or updating firmware are implemented automatically.

Continuous, automated life cycle operations reduce cost, save time, and increase time to value for businesses. With templates, you can simplify system updates and enforce compliance to ensure infrastructure stability. You can also manage deployment plans and create bootable images from capturing, cloning, or customizing golden images. Furthermore, customers can enforce compliance by using templates to quickly provision, update, or roll back images to minimize maintenance windows.

For customers with HPE BladeSystems, OneView automates the creation of Fibre Channel and Ethernet connections, reducing setup time from hours to minutes. Integration with HPE Networking’s Intelligent Management Center (IMC) and HPE Virtual Connect advances this process further. IMC listens for newly provisioned BladeSystem enclosures, and then automatically connects them to the production network.

Develop more apps faster

The OneView unified API, together with the growing ecosystem of partner integrations, enables you to accelerate application and service delivery; developers, IT administrators, and independent software vendors (ISVs) can automate infrastructure with a single line of code.

 

A

substantial portion of operations work consists of routine tasks related to

infrastructure life cycle management, including designing, provisioning, monitoring, and updating. OneView is designed to automate day-to-day responsibilities by simplifying time-consuming tasks leading to increased productivity and reduced operational costs. It is an automated infrastructure provider under any environment that supports traditional, virtualized, and cloud workloads, including VMware, Microsoft, and OpenStack.

OneView addresses two approaches to IT management

OneView makes daily IT operations more efficient and effective by enabling large and small enterprises to manage their environments from a single, centralized console. OneView also enables programmatic instantiation and management of the infrastructure through a standards-based API. When software-defined processes are combined with automation, less IT staff time is needed to deploy, manage, and support core infrastructure, saving much-needed IT resources and simplifying management.

For example, when you add a device to an environment, OneView automatically detects

the

hardware and prepares it for monitoring and management. If it already has a server

profile, it is allocated and fully configured. If it does not yet have a server profile, the hardware is available in a global pool awaiting a new configuration. This supports dynamic hardware reconfiguration and makes it easy to provision a new server profile just like the last one. It guarantees that the server profile will successfully deploy to the allocated hardware based on knowledge of the server hardware type and enclosure group.

In

addition to facilitating daily IT operations, OneView also benefits enterprise

DevOps, where the rate of IT infrastructure provisioning, configuration, and deployment activity is dramatically increasing. New code often is deployed monthly or weekly or even more frequently. The OneView unified infrastructure management platform is designed to enable customers to streamline complex life cycle operations and application delivery activities across data center resources. OneView combines software-defined resources with template-driven provisioning and management to provide the right resource at the right time for each workload in the data center.

|||||||||||||||||||| Note To watch a video about using the integration between OneView and the ServiceNow cloud

Note To watch a video about using the integration between OneView and the ServiceNow cloud portal to increase IT operational efficiencies, click the hyperlink.

Two methods for an enhanced user experience

The OneView UI approach is designed to enhance the interaction among IT staff and to match work practices in the data center. It is simple, efficient, and consistent, and is inspired by commonly used web technology. It works on desktops, tablets, and mobile devices. You can right-click the OneView UI to open in a new tab, copy and paste browser bookmarks, email links to colleagues, and print diagrams and data. Search capabilities, newsfeeds, and other functions work as expected in a web experience.

The OneView UI builds functionality around an administrator’s work practices and puts resources in the menu. The combination of Java compatibility checks and security updates creates an operational burden, so OneView uses HTML5 as well as CSS3, JavaScript, and AJAX.

You also have the choice of programmatic interfaces based on REST APIs. REST APIs involve the use of relatively basic create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) operations that are applied to resources (objects) by using standardized HTTP POST, GET, PUT, and DELETE commands. Using the REST API support available in OneView, you can manipulate resources in a way that is consistent with the equivalent actions you perform using the OneView UI. The REST APIs integrate with a broad ecosystem of management partners. This includes service desk, orchestration, monitoring tools, configuration management database (CMDB), and more.

The OneView UI and REST APIs are organized by resource. The online help for each screen in the UI describes the resources and, as needed, their configuration rules.

 

OneView dashboards

OneView offers two ways to view data center status information:

• The default Dashboard screen for single OneView instances

• The OneView Global Dashboard for multiple instances

OneView default Dashboard

Dashboard for multiple instances OneView default Dashboard Figure 1-6 Dashboard for a single OneView instance The

Figure 1-6 Dashboard for a single OneView instance

The default Dashboard provides a unified IT management console that serves as a single point of view across the entire data center. This centralized console eases management and deployment by enabling you to manage resources from a single location.

The default Dashboard screen, shown in Figure 1-6, displays a graphical representation of the general health and capacity of resources in the data center. From the Dashboard screen you can immediately see the areas that need attention. The screen displays the status of the most relevant resources that are associated with assigned user roles. If you are assigned multiple roles, such as Network and Storage roles, it displays the combination of resources that each role would see on the dashboard. You can customize

the display by adding, deleting, and moving resource panels.

For direct access to resources needing your attention, click the resource name.

Status—Summarizes health status. The number displayed next to the resource name indicates the total number of resource instances known to the appliance. To learn more, click the resource name to display the resource’s main screen and view detailed health and status information. A dark-gray chart slice indicates the number of resources that are not reporting information because they are either disabled or not being managed by the appliance.

Servers with profiles—Reports the number of server hardware instances with server profiles assigned to them. If the circle is not solid blue, hover your cursor over the light-gray slice to see the number of servers without server profile assignments.

Blade bays—Reports the count of server hardware instances in all managed enclosure bays. If the circle is not solid blue, hover your cursor over the light-gray chart slice to see the count of empty enclosure bays.

OneView Global Dashboard

the count of empty enclosure bays. OneView Global Dashboard Figure 1-7 OneView Global Dashboard main screen If

Figure 1-7 OneView Global Dashboard main screen

If you are planning to deploy multiple OneView appliances or have Synergy compute

nodes in an environment, you can use HPE OneView Global Dashboard. Global Dashboard aggregates the information from up to 25 OneView instances into a single view, as shown in Figure 1-7. For example, if you have a data center with OneView deployed on 25 different appliances, Global Dashboard enables you to aggregate all the data from those 25 instances into a single “global” dashboard.

OneView 4.0 includes HPE OneView Global Dashboard 1.3 software. With OneView 4.0, customers receive enhanced dashboard capabilities with the Global Dashboard. At no additional cost, customers can download and run the Global Dashboard alongside OneView with the default OneView dashboard.

Important Global Dashboard is a product separate from the default OneView Dashboard.

Important Global Dashboard is a product separate from the default OneView Dashboard.

Global Dashboard enables you to manage multiple HPE BladeSystem c-Class, HPE ProLiant DL, HPE Hyper Converged 380, HPE Synergy, HPE Apollo, HPE ML350 Gen9 Server, and HPE Superdome X systems as one infrastructure.

Viewing Global Dashboard information

as one infrastructure. Viewing Global Dashboard information |||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-8 Global Dashboard

Figure 1-8 Global Dashboard proactively monitors the entire infrastructure at scale

Global Dashboard provides a unified view of the health of servers, profiles, and enclosures across multiple virtual and physical appliances. As shown in Figure 1-8, the dashboard proactively monitors the entire infrastructure at scale, alerting you of problems before they result in downtime. If you click one of the server profiles in the list, it shows information about that profile on the right. If you click the links in the right side, it opens the OneView instance where that profile resides.

Global Dashboard provides better infrastructure visibility, which allows for more informed and faster decision-making. Single sign-on provides device-level life cycle management and removes the need to navigate between appliances.

Global Dashboard helps IT staff troubleshoot alerts and view core inventory data across the OneView managed environment. There is no fee or extra license required for this capability; it is included with the purchase of a OneView 4.0 Advanced license.

with the purchase of a OneView 4.0 Advanced license. Note You can download the HPE OneView

Note You can download the HPE OneView Global Dashboard appliance file free of charge from the HPE Software Depot by click the hyperlink.

Global Dashboard benefits

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-9 Global Dashboard provides greater visibility across the data center The latest
||||||||||||||||||||
Figure 1-9 Global Dashboard provides greater visibility across the data center
The latest enhancements to Global Dashboard enable you to email reports and view
server host names. Global Dashboard also enables you to simplify compliance, view
current inventory, quickly understand resource status, automate global reporting, and
minimize bandwidth consumption.
Figure 1-9 summarizes the additional benefits that the Global Dashboard provides:
• Unified view of infrastructure across data centers in multiple locations—Global
Dashboard provides a unified view of the health of HPE servers, profiles,
enclosures, and HPE 3PAR storage systems across multiple appliances for ease of
management. It also provides a unified view across multiple versions of OneView
including 2.0, 3.0, 3.1, and 4.0 in addition to Synergy Composer.
Global Dashboard aggregates critical activities from multiple appliances into a
single feed to quickly identify issues occurring on monitored hardware for prompt
resolution. It generates reports for monitored assets so you can view inventory, and
compliance reports allow you to verify that your equipment meets corporate
standards.
• Easy access to reporting of inventory and health status—Global Dashboard
||||||||||||||||||||

delivers compliance reports that make it easy to identify what is not included in your current firmware baseline to accelerate configuration compliance and consistency. Integrated reporting for inventory allows you to see server hardware inventory, including associated firmware versions. You can quickly verify that there are no duplicate resource identification numbers (serial number, World Wide Identifier [WWID]) in the environment.

Faster decisions enabled by near real-time search feature—Global Dashboard has a Smart Search function that delivers access to devices of interest across data centers in seconds for better visibility of the systems enabling you to make faster decisions. You can search for attributes associated with a resource to quickly find and navigate to the desired item. In addition, you can easily filter a view down to the set of resources that are having problems, enabling you to focus on only those items that need remediation.

you to focus on only those items that need remediation. Note To view a video about

Note To view a video about Global Dashboard, click the hyperlink.

 

REST APIs: Designed for automation

  REST APIs: Designed for automation Figure 1-10 Message buses and REST API provide a

Figure 1-10 Message buses and REST API provide a closed-loop automation system

A complementary relationship exists between the REST API and the OneView message buses, which are messaging brokers or intermediaries for exchanging messages. A message bus is well suited for large-scale management of virtualized and cloud environments. OneView provides two message buses:

• The state change message bus (SCMB) contains messages about any change in the resources managed by OneView.

• The metric streaming message bus (MSMB) contains metrics such as temperature and power or CPU utilization for managed resources.

HPE pairs the message buses with an industry-standard REST API. Together, they form a symbiotic relationship that allows OneView to serve as a closed-loop automation hub, as pictured in Figure 1-10. OneView “listens” to changes in the environment and publishes messages about the changes to all the consumers on the bus. Message bus consumers can then leverage the REST API to carry out CRUD operations or integrate with other systems. This powerful combination of the REST API and the message buses provides the foundation for building higher-level IT automation.

Why REST is important

The advantages of the REST methodology include the ability to create web services using an accepted and prevalent interface that is used to manage large-scale environments. This well-documented, public API is useful for developers and users who want to create their own apps or provide integration capabilities with other applications they use.

REST has significant advantages over other well-known interface methods, such as Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), especially when combined with simple and widely adopted JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) payloads. Developers can use REST to easily create and modify a resource without the heavyweight toolkits required for SOAP. REST has lighter bandwidth requirements—REST requests and responses can be short, unlike SOAP where such exchanges require data wrappers. REST with JSON describes a resource’s configuration in a standard text-based format. Because REST is based on a simple use of the ubiquitous HTTP protocol, REST API calls can be made from a variety of tools and almost any programming language, including cURL, Microsoft Windows PowerShell, Python, Ruby, Perl, and other tools that support making calls to HTTP servers.

Security is always a key aspect of any enterprise product, so all REST API calls are required with HTTPS. OneView generates self-signed certificates but HPE recommends uploading a certificate authority (CA) signed certificate to your management appliance.

The OneView appliance supports an extensive number of REST APIs. Requests for these functions can be issued by any client, not just a browser.

functions can be issued by any client, not just a browser. Note OneView REST APIs are

Note OneView REST APIs are fully documented in the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library. To visit the library, click the hyperlink.

REST API features

OneView makes it possible to easily monitor, configure, and manage physical and logical server, network, and storage resources through either a GUI or by using REST APIs.

The REST APIs:

• Provide an industry-standard interface for open integration with other management platforms

• Are designed to be ubiquitous—every resource has one Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and represents a physical device or logical construct

• Enable you to automate anything you can do from the UI using your favorite scripting or programming language

• Are designed to be highly scalable

Note A URI is defined as a string of characters used to identify the name

Note A URI is defined as a string of characters used to identify the name of a web resource. Technically, a URI can be classified as a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), a Uniform Resource Name (URN), or both. A URN functions like someone’s name and defines an object’s identity; a URL functions like someone’s street address, providing a method for finding the object. A URL is simply a URI that points to a physical resource over a network. The term “URL” is widely used in a nontechnical context and in software.

The features of the REST API include:

Client/server interface model—A uniform interface separates the clients from the servers. For example, the client side has no need to be concerned with data storage maintained on the server side, which allows for easier portability of client code. Likewise, servers are not concerned with the user state, which allows server-side code to be simpler and scalable. The REST-based server and client-side components can be developed and replaced independently if the interface between them is not modified.

Stateless mode of operation—The method of client/server communication involves no client context or state information being stored on the server between the various requests sent by a given client. Each request from a client contains all the information necessary to service the request, and any session state data is maintained on the client. One option that the server-side component can use to maintain session state information is to temporarily store it in a database. This allows state data to be persistent for a period of time—for example, to maintain authorization privileges.

When a client needs to transition to a new state, it sends a request. The representation of each state involves the use of links that can be used the next time the client chooses to initiate a new state transition. Because no client context is

stored on the server between requests, server reliability and scalability are enhanced.

Cacheable response data—Just like in typical web environments, a REST client can cache the data provided by the server in its responses. Each response indicates if it is cacheable, which prevents a client from reusing stale or inappropriate data in response to further requests. Well-managed caching can reduce the number of client/server interactions, which can improve scalability and performance.

Layered system model—In the REST design, a client does not necessarily connect directly to a server-side component—an intermediary server node can be implemented. Use of an intermediary server can improve system scalability by enabling load balancing and by providing shared caches, and might even enforce security policies.

Using REST APIs to manage resources

Table 1-1 REST API commands and HTTP commands

 

REST

operation

HTTP method

Description

C r e a t e POST <uri + resource-data> Create a new resource with

Create

POST <uri + resource-data>

Create a new resource with relevant data in payload

C r e a t e POST <uri + resource-data> Create a new resource with relevant
Read GET <uri> Return the requested resource’s data

Read

GET <uri>

Return the requested resource’s data

Read GET <uri> Return the requested resource’s data
U p d a t e PUT <uri + resource-data> Update an existing resource using

Update

PUT <uri + resource-data>

Update an existing resource using the update data

U p d a t e PUT <uri + resource-data> Update an existing resource using the
 

Delete

DELETE <uri>

Delete the specified resource

REST APIs identify an architectural class with simple principles that include a uniform interface and a fixed set of basic operations (such as PUT, POST, GET, PATCH, and DELETE found in HTTP) and associated properties you can set or modify. A REST API uses these basic HTTP operations to submit or return a JSON formatted resource to or from a URI on the OneView appliance.

The stateless APIs contain these common data elements:

Resource—Any meaningful information or model within the managed infrastructure.

Resource identifier—Address of a resource or URI representing a particular view of a physical or logical resource or some metadata. All resources are addressable.

 

Representation—How the resource is represented. For example, JSON or XML metadata and control information can be used. Another example is HTTP headers such as an entity tag (ETag).

With modern scripting languages, you can easily write simple REST clients for REST APIs. Most languages, such as Python, can transform JSON into internal data structures, such as dictionaries, allowing for easy access to data. This enables you to write custom code directly to the REST API instead of using intermediate tools such as HPE HPQLOCFG or CONREP.

Table 1-1 shows the simple one-to-one correspondence between the REST API commands (operations) and HTTP commands (methods). The REST CRUD operations map to the HTTP POST, GET, PUT, and DELETE methods.

As the example in the table indicates, retrieving data about an existing resource, such as a single rack server or server blade, might be as simple as issuing an HTTP GET request (containing a REST Read). After examining the supplied server data, the client can locally set a parameter or variable that implies the power state should be “on.” Then the server resource is updated using an HTTP PUT request (containing a REST POST), which results in the server being powered on by the appliance.

An example of this process includes these steps:

1. Retrieve the current resource.

 

GET /rest/servers/<server-id> request

Retrieve resource data from the OneView appliance.

 

2. Set the desired state.

 

In retrieved data, set the appropriate parameter such as Server.powerState On.

 

3. Update the resource with the new state.

 

PUT /rest/servers/<server-id> response

The OneView appliance applies the change.

 

OneView REST API URI

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-11 A URI uniquely identifies a resource or collection of resources The URI has various

Figure 1-11 A URI uniquely identifies a resource or collection of resources

The URI has various textual components. The HTTPS protocol is required, as is the relative placement of the string identified as “/rest”.

relative placement of the string identified as “/rest”. Note All URI text is case-sensitive except for

Note All URI text is case-sensitive except for the protocol (HTTPS) and the appliance’s Domain Name Server (DNS) name, if used instead of its IP address.

The resource category is a required URI component. It might consist of a single text string or it might consist of multiple text strings separated by forward slashes. Some examples include:

• Licenses

• Server-hardware

• Appliance/status

• Appliance/nodeinfo/version

The resource identifier is a relatively long identifier that is used to identify a resource or resource collection. A resource might be a network, whereas a resource collection could be a network set. The resource identifier is applicable only in a URI that is intended to specify a resource or a collection. An example is shown in Figure 1-11 for the server-hardware resource.

The attributes included vary widely, depending on the type of resource and whether the message is a request or a response.

 

Resource revision, concurrency, and client caching

  Resource revision, concurrency, and client caching Figure 1-12 An entity tag, or eTag, is a string

Figure 1-12 An entity tag, or eTag, is a string value attribute used to identify the current revision of a resource

Each OneView resource has an attribute called an entity tag or eTag. The eTag is a string value attribute carried in the URI and is used to identify the current revision of a resource, as shown in Figure 1-12. An important purpose of the eTag is to determine whether a REST client is working with the most current revision of a resource. The attribute is returned for each resource as result of a GET, POST, or PUT. Depending on whether one or multiple resources are involved, the eTag is carried as an HTTP response header or it is located in the response body.

OneView uses a technique known as optimistic concurrency control to manage the updating of resources by one or more REST clients. REST clients might be multiple OneView GUI users, programmers using the REST API explicitly, or a combination of both. As a result, as with any database-like system, a mechanism is critical to ensure that only the most recent revision of a resource can be updated.

Whenever a REST client wants to modify a resource, the client includes the resource’s eTag in any PUT and DELETE requests, either in the request body or in an If-Match type of HTTP header. If the eTag provided is not current, implying the resource has changed because the client retrieved data for that resource, then the OneView server will fail the REST Update or Delete operation. The OneView server returns an HTTP status of 412, which is defined as Precondition Failed.

Related to resource revision and concurrency control of modifications to a resource is the client caching feature. Client caching offers a performance advantage in terms of reducing network traffic by avoiding the unnecessary download of resource data. That is, client caching enables a client to hold attribute data locally for a brief time. This means attributable data does not necessarily need to be reloaded over the network during intermediate activities.

The OneView server returns an HTTP status of 304—Not Modified, without the resource data, if the REST client’s eTag is current, implying the client has the most

current copy of the resource’s data. This method applies to specific resource references, such as when the HTTP If-Match header is used.

OneView REST API versioning

Each OneView version supports multiple REST API versions, going back several OneView releases. Backward compatibility ensures that customer and partner scripts and integrated software continue to work after an upgrade of the OneView virtual appliance. It also allows time for customers and partners to update their code to take advantage of the latest OneView functionality.

As a result, it is necessary to have a programmatic mechanism to enable the OneView server to recognize which REST API version is being used by the calling program. To enable the OneView server to detect the REST API version being used, an attribute named X-API-Version must be supplied as an HTTP header in each REST call. For example, if the developer is using code built on OneView 3.0, the setting should be X-

API-Version:301.

on OneView 3.0, the setting should be X- API-Version:301 . Note This header must be sent

Note This header must be sent in all requests. Otherwise, the API might not behave as expected. If this header is included in all requests, the API behavior will not change.

Certain OneView patches and versions have increased the X-API version number to support new features or additional hardware that OneView manages. Existing applications that use the OneView API do not have to be updated immediately to use the latest X-API version. However, without the latest version, some features or hardware might not be managed from the earlier API version that is being used. The latest version of OneView still supports earlier versions of the X-API.

HTTP request headers

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-13 Required and optional HTTP headers Figure 1-13 describes the HTTP headers that are
||||||||||||||||||||
Figure 1-13 Required and optional HTTP headers
Figure 1-13 describes the HTTP headers that are either required to be included in REST
API requests and responses, or they are optional.
The Auth header carries a login session identifier or a token string. When you establish
a login session with OneView, you are assigned a session identifier that is persistent. It
is persistent until you log out or explicitly delete it; deleting the session identifier is in
effect the equivalent of logging out. The session identifier is persistent even if the
OneView appliance is rebooted. After you have successfully logged in to the OneView
appliance and a session identifier is provided to the client, you must supply the session
identifier in all subsequent calls to OneView.
Several other request headers are listed in the figure. Some headers support only a
single value but enable the product to be extended should that be useful in the future. For
example, the HTTP Accept header indicates the type of REST document or data
container that is supported in the REST calls.
Currently, only the JSON application type is supported as opposed to other possible
formats such as XML that can be used in other REST-based products. JSON is an open-
standard format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of
attribute-value pairs. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web
application, as an alternative to XML. Although originally derived from the JavaScript
||||||||||||||||||||

scripting language, JSON is a language-independent data format. Code for parsing and generating JSON data is available in many programming languages. The official internet media type for JSON is application/json and the file name extension is .json.

When you use the OneView REST API to manage resources, you use a JSON document to exchange data between a client and the OneView server. The client-side component can be, for example, a web browser or a PowerShell script.

can be, for example, a web browser or a PowerShell script. Note If the server is

Note If the server is managed by OneView, information about the OneView instance is included in the root resource. The content of this sub-object includes a reference back to the OneView server. Many server settings are configured specifically for OneView use. Use care in modifying REST API properties directly when the server is managed by OneView or else the server might be out of sync with the OneView view of the system.

OneView resource attributes

the OneView view of the system. OneView resource attributes Figure 1-14 Common resource attributes Individually, the

Figure 1-14 Common resource attributes

Individually, the URI and the resource category are technically classified as attributes. However, the attributes are essentially the various strings that follow the resource category and resource ID (when present).

In Figure 1-14, the table on the left lists some of the most common attributes that are associated with a resource. The table on the right lists several other common attributes that are applicable if a resource is managed. Several other attributes are listed in the JSON text block but are specific to a resource. In the following example, attributes such as VLAN ID, Smart Link, and Private Network should look familiar because they are applicable to a OneView network configuration element—equivalent to the Virtual

|||||||||||||||||||| Connect classic Ethernet network object. Figure 1-15 Network example using JSON Note The
||||||||||||||||||||
Connect classic Ethernet network object.
Figure 1-15 Network example using JSON
Note
The JSON-formatted text block shown in Figure 1-15 was edited for readability
purposes so that the overall content of a URI and associated other message
components can be more easily visualized. The actual REST message
transmitted between a REST client and the OneView appliance would be an
HTTP request or response with a string of characters and no spaces.
||||||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||||||| OneView integrated resource model Figure 1-16 Resource model summary OneView uses a resource
||||||||||||||||||||
OneView integrated resource model
Figure 1-16 Resource model summary
OneView uses a resource model that reduces complexity and simplifies the management
of the data center. This model provides logical resources, including templates, groups,
and sets, that when applied to physical resources, provides a common structure across
the data center. Figure 1-16 illustrates the model and shows the dependencies and
relationships between OneView objects. The graphic summarizes some of the most
frequently used resources in the following categories:
• Templates are reusable objects that an administrator can copy when creating a new
server profile or connection object.
• Virtual resources include the server profile, connection, network, and network set
objects. A network can identify a single virtual local area network (VLAN) or
consist of multiple VLANs, which function as a network set. A connection
corresponds to the specification of a virtual NIC or host bus adapter (HBA). A
server profile is a relatively complex object including a variety of specifications
Technet24
||||||||||||||||||||

affecting network and storage connectivity, along with server BIOS, firmware, and local disk settings.

Physical resources include a range of objects representing intelligent power racks, storage pools, enclosures, device bays, network I/O bays, and interconnects.

Physical resource types differentiate the various rack and server blades, types of enclosures, and types of network and storage interconnect modules.

Pools and groups represent collections of objects. For example:

A data center represents the collections of systems in the racks.

A server pool corresponds to a set of servers with common hardware features.

A storage array corresponds to a collection of virtual volumes.

connection is the logical representation of a connection between a server and a

A

network or network set. A connection can be configured in server profiles and specifies the following settings:

The network or network set to which the server is to be connected

Configuration overrides (such as a change to the preferred bandwidth) to be made to the default configuration for the specified network or network set

Boot order

connection template defines default configuration characteristics, such as the

A

preferred bandwidth and maximum bandwidth, for a network or network set. When you create a network or network set, OneView creates a default connection template for the network or network set.

Note The OneView UI does not display or refer to connection templates, but connection templates

Note The OneView UI does not display or refer to connection templates, but connection templates determine the default values displayed for the connection when you select a network or network set.

An enclosure group is a template that defines a consistent configuration for a logical enclosure. Network connectivity for an enclosure group is defined by the logical interconnect groups associated with the enclosure group. Using enclosure groups, you can quickly add many enclosures and have them configured into identical logical enclosures.

A

logical enclosure represents a logical view of a single enclosure with an

 

enclosure group serving as a template. If the intended configuration in the logical enclosure does not match the actual configuration on the enclosure, the logical enclosure becomes inconsistent. A logical enclosure is automatically created when a BladeSystem c7000 enclosure is added.

 

A

logical interconnect is a set of physical interconnects, such as two Virtual

 

Connect FlexFabric modules and the specifically configured links. A logical interconnect represents the available networks, uplink sets, and stacking links for a set of physical interconnects in a single enclosure. The logical interconnect is automatically created based on the logical interconnect group when an enclosure is managed by OneView.

 

A

logical interconnect group is the container for logical interconnects that can

 

contain at most one logical interconnect definition. The logical interconnect definition consists of one or more pairs of Virtual Connect modules that share the same configuration for network connectivity. A logical interconnect group contains a set of configurations that are preselected before enclosures are added. After all enclosures are added, interconnects in the same logical interconnect group should have the same configurations applied to them.

 

A

network set represents a group of tagged, Ethernet networks identified by a

 

single name. Network sets are used to simplify server profile configurations and server profile templates. You define a network set to assign a set of networks to a connection within a server profile. When a connection in a server profile specifies a network set, it can access any of the member networks. Additionally, if networks are added to or deleted from a network set, server profiles that specify the network set are isolated from the change. One common use for network sets is as a trunk for multiple VLANs to a vSwitch. Network sets are useful in hypervisor environments where a server profile connection might need to access multiple networks.

 

A SAN manager enables you to bring systems that manage SANs under management

 

of

OneView. A SAN manager is added to OneView when the storage system is

fabric attached. When you add a SAN manager to OneView, the SANs that it

manages become available to associate with OneView networks that you can attach

to

server profiles.

 

Two additional objects in Figure 1-16 are the domains and the appliance. A OneView domain represents the overall collection of systems and components. The appliance corresponds to the OneView management system, which can be a physical appliance or virtual appliance such as a VM.

 

OneView domains

|||||||||||||||||||| OneView domains Figure 1-17 Configuration consistency across the data center A OneView domain

Figure 1-17 Configuration consistency across the data center

A OneView domain consists of one or more logical interconnect groups, uplink sets, and networks and helps define how server profiles consume these resources. When you define a network, it is available within a OneView domain for consumption by logical interconnect groups, logical uplink sets, logical interconnects (for one-off configuration requirements), or server profiles (for internal-only networks).

In OneView, the domain resource describes the management domain for the appliance. All resources managed by the appliance are part of a single management domain. In that sense, when you apply a server profile, it can be applied to any server blade in any enclosure.

The OneView UI does not actually display or refer to a domain configuration element. However, the domain resource is used to manage information about limits such as the total number of enclosures supported and the maximum number of networks that you can add to the appliance. These components are illustrated in Figure 1-17.

Enclosure stacking in OneView is not supported—only Virtual Connect Ethernet modules (FlexFabric-20/40 F8, FlexFabric 10 Gb/24-port, Flex-10/10D, and Flex-10) within the same enclosure can be stacked. Horizontal stacking is implemented automatically across the midplane. Vertical stacking of modules within the same enclosure requires the use of external cabling between external uplink ports.

|||||||||||||||||||| Note Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules (8 Gb 20-port and 8 Gb 24-port) that
||||||||||||||||||||
Note
Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules (8 Gb 20-port and 8 Gb 24-port) that
are supported in OneView cannot be stacked in OneView, just as they cannot be
stacked in Virtual Connect configurations.
In a Virtual Connect domain, each domain consists of one to four enclosures and each
domain is independent. Therefore, a server profile can be applied to any server blade
within a given domain, but it cannot be applied to a server blade in another Virtual
Connect domain.
Software-defined resources
Figure 1-18 OneView physical and logical resources
Technet24
||||||||||||||||||||

The OneView appliance provides several software-defined resources (illustrated in Figure 1-18) that enable you to capture best practices for implementation across networking, storage, hardware configuration, and operating system build and configuration:

Profiles enable servers that are licensed using OneView Advanced to configure the Virtual Connect capabilities and support dynamic network changes. Virtual Connect administrators can change pre-existing connection networks and connection bandwidth without powering down server blades.

Logical interconnect groups are created for configuring the Virtual Connect module with its uplinks and associated networks, enabling efficient application to multiple Virtual Connect environments.

If you change uplink sets for an existing logical interconnect group, then the updated uplink sets are applied to any logical interconnects that are added to the existing logical interconnect group, and existing logical interconnects are reported as not being consistent with the logical interconnect group. You can then request that those existing logical interconnects be updated with the new configuration.

Network sets use a single name for several Ethernet links. They are used to easily update multiple networks in various profiles from a single location, rather than updating each network separately. Network sets are useful in virtual environments where each profile connection needs to access multiple networks.

OneView keeps these best-practice approaches intact as companies grow, but allows for customization. This facilitates faster provisioning, greater consistency, and fewer errors.

Role-based access control and various configuration elements in the form of groups, sets, and server profiles allow system administrators to provision and manage several hundred servers without involving the networking and storage systems experts in every server deployment.

Note A software-defined infrastructure—profiles, groups, and sets—requires the purchase of a OneView Advanced license.

Note A software-defined infrastructure—profiles, groups, and sets—requires the purchase of a OneView Advanced license.

OneView architecture

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 1-19 OneView architecture diagram OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance to manage HPE

Figure 1-19 OneView architecture diagram

OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance to manage HPE infrastructure environments or as a hardware appliance (called Composer) to manage HPE Synergy environments. The OneView virtual appliance is a preconfigured virtual machine ready to be deployed on a hypervisor host.

The OneView appliance uses a resource model that reduces complexity and simplifies management of the data center. This REST-based resource model provides logical resources, including templates, groups, and sets that when applied to physical resources provide a common structure across the data center.

The resource-oriented architecture of the OneView appliance provides a REST API foundation that offers a uniform way of interacting with resources, as shown in Figure 1- 19. This integrated resource model removes the need to enter and maintain the same configuration data more than once. It encapsulates and abstracts many underlying tools behind the integrated resource model, so you can operate with new levels of simplicity, speed, and agility to provision, monitor, and maintain the data center infrastructure. The integrated resource model is critical for diagnosing problems or determining the risk of making a change by seeing affected resources and how they are interconnected before making the change.

OneView is designed as a set of cooperating resource managers that run on the OneView management appliance. Resource managers focus on a specific type of resource, including servers, storage, and networking and provide the REST APIs for those resources, as well as publish state change messages (SCMs) and metrics to the message buses when their resources are changed in any way.

 

Resource managers detect state changes both in response to user-initiated changes and by monitoring the actual environment using device-level APIs and protocols such as SNMP. Both types of changes are consistently reflected in the REST API and SCMs that are published to the SCMB to notify interested parties such as partner integrations or higher-level automation.

In the resource model, all state information is exposed as a resource. This includes:

• All managed device information, control, and state (such as inventory, configuration, and statistics)

• All logical resources representing concepts or configurations (such as networks and connections)

• All metadata describing the physical and logical resources

Storage Resource Manager

the physical and logical resources Storage Resource Manager Figure 1-20 Storage Resource Manager architecture diagram

Figure 1-20 Storage Resource Manager architecture diagram

The Storage Resource Manager (Figure 1-20) enables storage provisioning with automated zoning. Storage devices can be connected to the enclosures by using either Fibre Channel fabric-attach (SAN switch) connections or Fibre Channel direct-attach (flat SAN) connections.

A direct-attach method of connectivity implies that the HPE 3PAR systems are directly attached to the Virtual Connect modules. This connectivity method is also known as a flat SAN because intermediate SAN switches are not used.

Fabric-attach connections imply SAN switches connect the storage systems to Virtual Connect modules (FlexFabric or native Fibre Channel models). When HPE 3PAR StoreServ storage systems are deployed in the data center, you also have the option of directly connecting them to Virtual Connect FlexFabric 10 Gb-24-Port and Virtual Connect FlexFabric-20/40 F8 modules.

Using the OneView UI or REST API, you identify the storage systems (or arrays) that will be managed by OneView. Using the server profile, you present storage volumes to a server. OneView automates the process of allocating the virtual volumes to a server. OneView can present boot storage and shared storage volumes to a server.

Physical Server Resource Manager

volumes to a server. Physical Server Resource Manager Figure 1-21 Physical Server Resource Manager architecture

Figure 1-21 Physical Server Resource Manager architecture diagram

The Physical Server Resource Manager (Figure 1-21) uses core foundation services to access the physical components of the data center that are responsible for managing the rack servers and server blades. The Physical Server Resource Manager manages the configuration elements and data structures in the environment, including:

• Server templates and server profiles

• Server hardware and server hardware types

• Server pools (addresses)

• Enclosures, enclosure groups, and enclosure types

 

One of the key configuration elements is the server profile, which captures aspects of the server configuration in one place, enabling you to provision converged infrastructure hardware consistently.

A server profile is also associated with the following other elements:

• Exactly one server hardware resource, which can be either unassigned or can be located in a specific enclosure and enclosure bay

• Exactly one server hardware type resource

• Exactly one enclosure group resource

Connectivity Resource Manager

one enclosure group resource Connectivity Resource Manager Figure 1-22 Connectivity Resource Manager architecture

Figure 1-22 Connectivity Resource Manager architecture diagram

The Connectivity Resource Manager (CRM), illustrated in Figure 1-22, uses the core foundation services to access the physical components of the data center that it is responsible for managing—the edge switches for LAN and SAN connectivity that correspond to Virtual Connect modules.

You use a connection resource to specify one or more connections from the server to a network or network set. If you do not specify at least one connection, the server cannot connect to data center networks. The networks and network sets that are available to a server profile connection depend on the configuration of the logical interconnect of the enclosure that contains the server hardware.

The primary functions of the CRM are:

Configuring hardware and maintaining inventory—The CRM maintains an inventory of the configurations and firmware versions used for the configuration elements known as interconnects. It stores the global interconnect settings and uplink configurations and ensures the connection templates are maintained coherently.

Implementing logical resources—The CRM simplifies the management, presentation, and monitoring of the logical networking resources of the resource model for which the CRM is responsible. The CRM includes templates that help an administrator standardize the creation and configuration of physical resources.

Managing server connectivity—The CRM manages connection policies for the Ethernet and Fibre Channel storage networks. These policies ensure that the networks are coherently assigned to server profile connections and avoid violating usage rules.

Monitoring and troubleshooting—The CRM provides logging support and maintains the interconnect and adapter port-level statistics. It provides interconnect health monitoring and status reporting, handles the configuration of SNMP on interconnects, and manages SNMP trap collection, forwarding, and analysis.

 

Activity—Mapping OneView capabilities to a customer scenario

To complete this activity, read the following customer scenario. Then apply what you have learned in this chapter to answer the questions regarding the customer’s business and technical requirements. Feel free to use your experience with other customers in other industries or make educated guesses when answering the questions.

Customer scenario

You are a solutions architect for an HPE partner in the Americas. On a site visit to the Malanga Communications Networks headquarters in Jamaica, you meet with Rosa Alfaro, the Senior Director of Technology at Malanga Communications Networks, to discuss the company’s business and technical requirements. She asks for your advice to help the company create a strategic plan for their IT infrastructure after the merger.

During this initial meeting, Alfaro takes you on a tour through the primary Malanga data center. She provides you with a current inventory list that includes the following hardware:

• Six HPE BladeSystem c7000 enclosures, fully populated

• Three HPE 3PAR StoreServ 8440 storage systems

She tells you that each HPE ProLiant server blade runs VMware ESXi 6.5 and is part of a vSphere cluster. The enclosures use HPE Virtual Connect modules to connect to the production Ethernet and Fibre Channel fabrics, and are configured in a Virtual Connect domain. HPE 3PAR StoreServ 8440 storage systems are used to store virtual machines for a VMware vSphere cluster. The server, storage, and networking environments are all managed separately by using third-party software. Malanga also has a small management environment that uses ProLiant DL360 Gen9 servers.

“Now, a result of the merger, we are adding three Virtual Connect Ethernet interconnect modules to the data center,” Alfaro adds.

During the site tour, you make several notes. According to Alfaro, the immediate goal is to create an easily duplicated system that can handle the erratic power spikes and different voltage requirements found in the variety of remote environments they cover. In addition, Malanga needs a way to manage these systems effectively across all 24 Caribbean islands and 12 Central and South American countries.

“We can’t afford to have customers without service, so high availability and business continuity are priorities,” Alfaro says.

You notice that the company has a small but expert IT staff that is responsible for maintaining stable server installations in remote and unreliable power environments. You also learn that Malanga manages their devices in separate silos. Alfaro tells you that since the acquisition of Caribbean Communications, different teams are responsible for servers, storage, networking, and VMware. Malanga hopes to increase efficiency and productivity by changing its management style.

When you suggest OneView as a possible solution for Malanga Communications Networks, Alfaro asks you to describe the business benefits that OneView can offer the company.

Questions

To describe the business benefits that OneView can offer Malanga, you first need to determine the answers to the following questions.

1. How will OneView help the company meet its immediate goals?

2. Which hardware components does Malanga currently operate that can be managed with OneView?

3. If Malanga implements OneView, which company teams will be better able to interact?

4. What additional business benefits can you describe for Alfaro?

 

Learning check

 

1. Name at least three advantages of using REST APIs over a method like SOAP.

 

2. Global Dashboard is software you can use in addition to the dashboard provided by OneView.

a. True

 

b. False

3. OneView is delivered as a infrastructure environments or as a manage HPE Synergy environments.

to manage HPE converged to

4. Put a check mark or the letter “Y” in the column to indicate OneView support for the infrastructure component listed.

 
|||||||||||||||||||| 5. What is optimistic concurrency control? ||||||||||||||||||||
||||||||||||||||||||
5.
What is optimistic concurrency control?
||||||||||||||||||||
 

Learning check answers

1. Name at least three advantages of using REST APIs over a method like SOAP.

You can use REST to easily create and modify resources without the heavyweight toolkits required for SOAP

REST has lighter bandwidth requirements—REST requests and responses can be short, unlike SOAP where such exchanges require data wrappers

REST with JSON describes a resource’s configuration in a standard text- based format

Because REST is based on the HTTP protocol, REST API calls can be made from a variety of tools and almost any programming language, including cURL, Microsoft Windows PowerShell, Python, Ruby, and Perl

2. Global Dashboard is software you can use in addition to the dashboard provided by OneView.

a.

True

b.

False

3. OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance to manage HPE converged infrastructure environments or as a hardware appliance (called Composer) to manage HPE Synergy environments.

4. Put a check mark or the letter “Y” in the column to indicate OneView support for the infrastructure component listed.

 
 
 

5.

What is optimistic concurrency control?

 

Optimistic concurrency control is a technique used by OneView to manage the updating of resources by one or more REST clients

 

Summary

This chapter presents a high-level view of how to use OneView to manage a data center infrastructure.

• OneView provides simplified, single-console life cycle management for the complex devices across a data center—servers, networking, software, storage, and more.

• OneView uses software-defined intelligence with a template-driven approach to rapidly provision, update, and deploy servers, storage, and networking.

• OneView supports the use of the REST API. Using the REST API, you can manipulate resources in a manner that is consistent with the equivalent actions you perform using the OneView UI. The combination of the REST API and the OneView message buses provides the foundation for building higher-level IT automation.

• Features of the REST API include:

– Client/server interface model

– Stateless mode of operation

– Cacheable response data

– Layered system model

• Every OneView resource has one URI that represents either a physical device or a logical construct. A URI is defined as a string of characters used to identify the name of a web resource. The OneView REST API URI has several textual components including a resource category, resource identifiers, and attributes.

• OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance to manage HPE infrastructure environments or as a hardware appliance (named Composer) to manage Synergy environments.

• With OneView, you can manage the complete infrastructure of a data center from one simple dashboard interface, either the default dashboard provided with OneView or the Global Dashboard designed for managing multiple resources.

 

Chapter 2

HPE OneView Requirements

Learning objectives

After completing this chapter, you should be able to:

• Explain the processes involved with managing, monitoring, and migrating server hardware with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) OneView

• List the appliance virtual machine (VM) and host requirements for OneView

• Summarize the high-level steps involved in an initial configuration of a OneView appliance

• Name the types of licensing available for OneView

|||||||||||||||||||| Customer scenario Consider the following fictitious customer scenario as you work through this
||||||||||||||||||||
Customer scenario
Consider the following fictitious customer scenario as you work through this chapter.
Try to relate what you learn about OneView to this customer’s business and technical
objectives. Refer to this scenario as you engage with activities throughout this chapter.
Malanga Communications Networks
Figure 2-1 Malanga Communications Networks requires a mission-critical level of
availability
Malanga Communications Networks remembers the issues that followed the last major
hurricane in the area and took action based on lessons learned. They added more
||||||||||||||||||||
 

redundancy to their environment and made availability a higher priority. Rosa Alfaro, the Senior Director of Technology at Malanga Communications Networks, says, “Our new equipment in our data center must be integrated in a way that maintains a mission- critical level of availability. We also need to keep in mind that we’ll have to make sure the firmware is current on all the equipment we bring in.”

 

You tell Alfaro that OneView can address the challenges she is facing as a result of the merger, as illustrated in Figure 2-1. She replies, “Our virtual machines need to be right- sized for the workloads they need to handle, and configured for optimal performance. We also need to be sure that we have both the memory and storage capacity we need as we go forward. What if OneView minimums are beyond what we have in our environment?”

“I would be happy to demo the solution for you, to show you how OneView can provide a management solution you can use across your ecosystem,” you say.

Alfaro tells you she has already met with Julie Jarret-Jones, the CEO of Malanga Communications Networks, and Jerren Nixon, Director of Finance. They are working out a budget that will allow them to implement changes in their data center over time. Based on your recommendation, she feels that the group would be interested in seeing a demo of OneView. “But will OneView work in our environment as it is or would we need to make changes to the infrastructure?” she asks. “We’re not in a position to make major changes like reconfiguring the environment to run a different operating system or to operate on a different storage protocol.”

Gauge your knowledge

Before proceeding with this chapter, take some time to consider the following questions. Answer each question as completely as you can. Pay attention to the answers you are less certain about.

1. Would you recommend the same management virtual local area network (VLAN) or a separate VLAN for access to the management interfaces of rack servers, storage systems, and other data center equipment?

2. What differentiates whether a device is monitored or managed in OneView?

3. What kind of licenses might Malanga need in their environment?

Managing, monitoring, and migrating server hardware

Managing, monitoring, and migrating server hardware Figure 2-2 Adding server hardware to OneView Server

Figure 2-2 Adding server hardware to OneView

Server hardware such as enclosures and HPE ProLiant rack servers can be added to OneView, as shown in Figure 2-2. Server hardware can be added in one of the following ways, depending on the enclosure type:

Managed—If you add a managed server to OneView, either in an enclosure or a rack, you can apply configurations, deploy server profiles, monitor operation status, collect statistics, and alert users to specific conditions. Managing server hardware requires OneView Advanced licensing. For more information, see “About managed c7000 enclosures” in the OneView online help.

Monitored—If you add a monitored server to OneView, either in an enclosure or a rack, you can monitor it for inventory and hardware status only. Monitoring server hardware uses a free OneView Standard license. For more information, see “About monitored enclosures” in the online help.

Because a monitored enclosure cannot be managed, OneView does not create various configuration objects for a monitored enclosure. These include an enclosure group, logical interconnect group, logical interconnects, and server profiles. Objects including the enclosure, server hardware, and server hardware type are created.

Migrated—Enclosures from HPE Virtual Connect Manager (VCM) and Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager (VCEM) can be migrated to OneView with the configuration information, so that the enclosure can be managed by OneView. The managed enclosure requires OneView Advanced licensing. For more information about migrating, see “About migrating c7000 enclosures managed by other management systems” in the online help.

HPE ProLiant DL rack servers, like ProLiant BL server blades, can be monitored or managed. For a ProLiant DL server, you can view system health information (CPU, power, and temperature data) as you can with a monitored ProLiant BL server. You can also launch the HPE integrated Lights-Out (iLO) console and see basic Map view information. Because you cannot view adapter (LAN on motherboard [LOM] and mezzanine) ports of a managed ProLiant DLserver, such information is not available for a monitored ProLiant DLserver.

You can find server hardware instances for each server blade on the Server Hardware page. You also can find a data center rack object populated with the enclosure because this is considered a monitoring feature.

Minimum firmware requirements for managed and monitored devices

firmware requirements for managed and monitored devices Figure 2-3 Minimum firmware version required for discovery

Figure 2-3 Minimum firmware version required for discovery of devices

For OneView to discover a device and determine its type, the device must meet a minimum firmware version, as listed in Figure 2-3. This is not the firmware version

required for active management or monitoring. A device with discovery-only level of firmware can be upgraded to the minimum requirements with an HPE Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP). SPP releases are system maintenance tools that enable you to systematically update server hardware and server blade infrastructures (enclosures, enclosure groups, and interconnects). An SPP package contains firmware, drivers, and utilities delivered as a single PXE-bootable ISO image. You can upload and install these firmware bundle updates in a repository to simplify maintaining baseline configurations across devices.

 
Note Starting with OneView 3.1, the appliance does not ship with a default SPP. You

Note Starting with OneView 3.1, the appliance does not ship with a default SPP. You must download the latest SPP from hpe.com/info/SPP and then upload it to the appliance, unless a custom baseline (created by HP SUM 6 or newer) is required.

Firmware components are upgraded when the device is added into OneView as managed. For monitored devices, or for devices with firmware versions earlier than that required for OneView discovery, you must manually update the firmware version outside of OneView to the minimum requirements.

 
Note Firmware for monitored devices is managed outside of OneView.

Note Firmware for monitored devices is managed outside of OneView.

When you add enclosures and servers as managed, you can specify a firmware baseline for the Onboard Administrator, interconnects, and iLO modules.

Appliance VM and host requirements

On a ProLiant rackmount or BladeSystem platform, OneView is a virtual appliance running on supported hypervisor hosts. The hypervisor host requires ProLiant G7 servers or later.

You can deploy OneView to a hypervisor in the following hardware environments:

• ProLiant DLrack servers

• BladeSystem

OneView 4.0 is supported as a virtual appliance running in a hypervisor VM. The following hypervisors are supported:

• VMware vSphere ESXi 5.5 and later

• Microsoft Hyper-V on the following Windows platforms with the Hyper-V role installed:

– Windows Server 2012 and later

– Windows Hyper-V Server 2012 and later

• Red Hat Linux KVM hypervisor 7.2 and later

Note With VMware, a licensed version of vSphere is required for the OneView virtual appliance. The With VMware, a licensed version of vSphere is required for the OneView virtual appliance. The free vSphere license is not supported on ProLiant hardware, and therefore it is not supported for OneView.

Note For details on hypervisor host minimum requirements, refer to the HPE OneView 4.0 Installation Guide For details on hypervisor host minimum requirements, refer to the HPE OneView 4.0 Installation Guide or the OneView Support Matrix available from the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library. To visit the library, click the hyperlink.

HPE Synergy Composer must be running OneView 3.10 or later to recognize ProLiant Gen10 servers in a Synergy frame. Update OneView to version 3.10 or later before installing supported Gen10 servers. Gen10 servers require Synergy frame link modules with a minimum firmware version of 2.00.

frame link modules with a minimum firmware version of 2.00. Note Gen10 servers require 4.00.Gen10.20171214 HPE

Note Gen10 servers require 4.00.Gen10.20171214 HPE Software Release Set version. To download this file, visit: www.hpe.com/downloads/synergy

HPE Synergy Image Streamer is used to host software used to deploy and customize operating systems for use by Synergy compute modules. You can launch the Image Streamer GUI from the OneView OS Deployment Servers screen.

OneView minimum resource requirements

Servers screen. OneView minimum resource requirements Figure 2-4 Appliance VM requirements As listed in Figure

Figure 2-4 Appliance VM requirements

As listed in Figure 2-4, the minimum hardware resource requirements of the host supporting OneView 4.0 are:

• Four 2 GHz virtual CPUs

• 16 GB of memory

• 275 GB of thick provisioned disk space

Connection to the management LAN

Note HPE highly recommends that you deploy the OneView virtual appliance on a hypervisor environment

Note HPE highly recommends that you deploy the OneView virtual appliance on a hypervisor environment that is dedicated to management functions and separate from the production hypervisor environment.

• Power management options under BIOS settings:

– Power Regulator set to Static High Performance Mode

– Power Profile set to Maximum Performance

• Network Time Protocol (NTP) configured—Correct operation of the virtual appliance requires an accurate time source. Two options are available:

– NTP on the hypervisor—Configure the hypervisor host to use NTP and configure OneView to use the hypervisor host as its time source.

– NTP in HPE OneView—Configure OneView to use three or more NTP servers.

Note HPE recommends that you upgrade installed iPDU power delivery devices to the latest firmware

Note HPE recommends that you upgrade installed iPDU power delivery devices to the latest firmware before adding new iPDU devices into OneView 4.0.

Required plug-ins and settings

The required plug-ins and settings for OneView are:

• JavaScript enabled

• Image loading enabled

• Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) 3.0 or Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 security options

• Cookies enabled

Note Adobe Flash and Java browser plug-ins are not required to access OneView.

Note Adobe Flash and Java browser plug-ins are not required to access OneView.

Best practices for disk allocation

Best practice for deploying the OneView appliance in a BladeSystem environment is to use fully provisioned disks.

• For vSphere ESXi, HPE recommends that you select Thick Provision Eager Zeroed when deploying the VM. This way, the disk space is reserved on the file system and disk blocks are zeroed at that time. Although this takes additional time when deploying the virtual appliance, this disk allocation method provides optimal performance when the VM is running because no zeroing of blocks occurs on demand.

If you select thin provisioning instead, the appliance VM is suspended when the system runs out of disk space. If this occurs when upgrading firmware, applying a profile, or performing a backup of appliance updates, it can result in failures that are difficult to diagnose and might require a service call to resolve.

• For Hyper-V, HPE recommends importing the appliance using a fixed disk size. Otherwise, if the VM host disk runs out of space, the appliance will likely encounter errors, terminate unexpectedly, and not recover. If this happens, you will need to install a new appliance and restore it from a backup file. You can implement the equivalent of thick provisioning after the VM is imported by configuring the VM to use a fixed size disk. To do this, modify the settings for the virtual hard disk by selecting Convert and then the Fixed size option. Then change the size of the virtual hard disk to the new fixed-size disk you just created.

Installing OneView

the new fixed-size disk you just created. Installing OneView Figure 2-5 HPE Software Depot portal for OneView

Figure 2-5 HPE Software Depot portal for OneView Management Software

OneView is delivered in the following formats:

VMware vSphere hypervisor—OneView is packaged as an Open Virtual

Appliance (OVA) file containing an Open Virtual Format (OVF) package. You can deploy the OVA using:

– vSphere Client (a Windows application) or the vSphere Web Client installed on the host system

– The command line interface (CLI)

– Representational

application programming interfaces

state

transfer

(REST)

(APIs)

Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor—OneView is packaged as an image zip file. To install OneView with this .zip file, the Hyper-V role must be installed on the Windows server.

Red Hat Linux KVM hypervisor—OneView is packaged as a tar.gz file.

HPE Synergy Composer—OneView is embedded in the Synergy Composer. You do not need to download or install additional OneView software.

Safari and Opera web browsers are not supported. Supported web browsers are:

• Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 and later

• Mozilla Firefox 29 and later

• Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) 24.x and later

• Google Chrome 34 and later

Release (ESR) 24.x and later • Google Chrome 34 and later Note You can download the

Note You can download the files from the HPE Software Depot webpage, shown in Figure 2-5. To open this webpage, click the hyperlink.

Because of download file size limitations with Internet Explorer 9 and 10, use Internet Explorer 11, Firefox, or Chrome when downloading large files from the HPE Software Depot. For details, refer to the OneView 4.0 Support Matrix, available from the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library.

Updating the appliance

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 2-6 Process to update the OneView appliance You can update directly to OneView 4.0 from

Figure 2-6 Process to update the OneView appliance

You can update directly to OneView 4.0 from version 3.00.08 or later. An update from version 3.00.04 or 3.00.05 to version 4.0 fails.

Figure 2-6 shows the process flow when updating the OneView appliance. The update requires an appliance reboot. The time to complete an update, including the reboot, takes approximately 60 minutes.

Before upgrading OneView, ensure that:

• The VM host and its resources meet the minimum requirements for OneView 4.0.

• You are logged in to the appliance as a user with Infrastructure administrator privileges.

• No other users are logged in to the appliance, and no one logs in during the update.

• You have backed up the appliance using the appliance UI or REST APIs.

From the appliance UI, you can perform a manual or a remote backup. You can perform a manual backup by using the REST APIs.

During update processing, you can expect an outage to the OneView appliance in respect to the managing devices. The devices under management are not affected during the update, except for certain conditions such as the appliance being unable to process incoming events.

When the update completes, you can access the Settings page to see the updated OneView version.

After updating the appliance, remember to create a new backup file. If you need to

restore the appliance, you can only do so from a backup file that was created on an appliance of the same version.

|||||||||||||||||||| Configuring the OneView appliance Figure 2-7 Recommended configuration task flow in a
||||||||||||||||||||
Configuring the OneView appliance
Figure 2-7 Recommended configuration task flow in a BladeSystem/DLenvironment
Figure 2-7 shows a high-level overview of the recommended configuration task flow in
a BladeSystem/ProLiant DL server environment. After updating the appliance to the
latest firmware, drivers, and software, the next step in the process of setting up
OneView is to use the UI or the REST API to create and configure the appliance
network.
Using the OneView UI to configure the appliance network
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|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 2-8 Provide login credentials to access OneView After you acknowledge the OneView EULA and

Figure 2-8 Provide login credentials to access OneView

After you acknowledge the OneView EULA and Support access pages, the OneView login page opens, as shown in Figure 2-8. Immediately after the initial startup of OneView, the default user credentials are:

• User name: administrator

• Password: admin

You are required to change the password to include at least eight characters. The default password cannot be reused later. By default, typical password complexity rules are not enforced.

Using REST APIs to configure appliance networking

Alternatively, you can use a REST API POST operation with the /rest/appliance/network-interfaces API that includes all the networking settings needed to configure appliance networking for the first time.

Appliance networking configuration settings

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 2-9 Configuring the network on a VM appliance After changing the default password, you are

Figure 2-9 Configuring the network on a VM appliance

After changing the default password, you are directed to the Appliance Networking page automatically.

To configure the appliance network on a VM appliance, you can configure IP addresses in two ways:

• Manually using a static IP address

• Using DHCP with static reservations, which ensures the appliance is always issued the same IP address

ensures the appliance is always issued the same IP address Note For Hyper-V VMs, you must

Note For Hyper-V VMs, you must configure the appliance network from the virtual console because the Linux Integration Services do not report the IP address of the VM if DHCP is available on the management network.

As shown in Figure 2-9, most of the information on the Appliance Networking screen is provided for you. However, you must enter the following information:

Appliance host name—The default name ci-<mac-address> appears in the field, but you can change the name to something of your choice.

|||||||||||||||||||| Note If you specify Domain Name Service (DNS) either directly or indirectly, you must specify

Note If you specify Domain Name Service (DNS) either directly or indirectly, you must specify the fully qualified domain name (FQDN).

IPv4 address—OneView requires a static IPv4 address. You can configure a static IPv6 address on the appliance and use it to connect to the appliance from a browser. However, OneView requires IPv4 to communicate with managed resources.

DNS server addresses (optional)—You can enter a primary and secondary DNS IP address. OneView uses DNS to resolve DNS names and IP addresses for configuration settings and managed resources.

IPv6 address (optional)—If you are using IPv6 for address assignment, select Manual or DHCPv6.

The OneView appliance can use IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC). SLAAC can be used by IPv6 hosts to auto-configure an IP address through the Neighbor Discovery Protocol and ICMPv6 router discovery messages. When first connected to a network, an IPv6 host sends a link-local router solicitation multicast request for its configuration parameters. Routers respond to such a request with a router advertisement packet that contains configuration parameters.

Management networks

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 2-10 The OneView virtual appliance is connected to the management network Figure 2-10
||||||||||||||||||||
Figure 2-10 The OneView virtual appliance is connected to the management network
Figure 2-10 illustrates placement of the OneView virtual appliance within the network.
Like many network management devices, the OneView virtual appliance is connected to
the management network. The management network is typically a VLAN used for access
to network infrastructure equipment such as the CLI of switches and routers.
The same management VLAN or possibly a separate VLAN might be implemented for
access to each enclosure’s Onboard Administrator and the iLO interface of the server
blades. Similarly, that management VLAN would be used to access the management
interfaces of rack servers, storage systems, and other data center equipment.
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OneView licensing

||||||||||||||||||||   OneView licensing Figure 2-11 Comparison of OneView Standard and OneView Advanced licensing

Figure 2-11 Comparison of OneView Standard and OneView Advanced licensing features

A OneView license is required for any managed server hardware. Figure 2-11 compares the options available with the two types of licenses available for OneView 4.0:

HPE OneView Standard is a no-fee license for the software. The standard license is licensed per physical server and enables monitoring of supported HPE hardware. With the Standard license, annual 9x5 support is available for an additional fee.

HPE OneView Advanced provides full-featured licenses for purchase. All OneView Advanced versions are licensed per physical server. These licenses include three years of 24x7 technical support and software updates (TS&U) with web-based training to build basic product proficiency. Trial versions of OneView Advanced can be used for 60 days without charge. There are two types of OneView Advanced licenses:

OneView Advanced without iLO is for server hardware that has an existing HPE iLO Advanced license or that does not require the features enabled by iLO.

OneView Advanced with iLO includes an iLO Advanced license for the server hardware, which enables advanced management features.

Detailed server support includes:

• With OneView Advanced:

BladeSystem c7000 enclosures—BladeSystem c7000 enclosures are supported; the enclosure must be populated with at least one pair of Virtual Connect Flex- 10, Flex-10/10D, FlexFabric 10 Gb, or FlexFabric-20/40 F8 modules. Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules are also supported, but one of these Virtual Connect module types must be installed. In addition, Cisco Fabric Extender modules for BladeSystem are supported in the enclosure, for which OneView provides monitoring-only service.

ProLiant BL server blades and WS workstation blades—Only the Flex-10, Flex-20, and FlexFabric (LOM, FlexibleLOM Blade [FLB], or mezzanine) server adapters in ProLiant BL servers and workstation blades are supported by OneView 4.0.

ProLiant BL G7 servers—ProLiant BL G7 servers that are supported allow a Virtual Connect type of server profile to be assigned. Therefore, these types of server profiles do not include boot order, BIOS, or firmware settings. This is due to the lack of iLO 4 and Intelligent Provisioning features.

ProLiant DL Gen8, Gen9, and Gen10 rack servers—ProLiant DL120, DL160, DL180, DL360, DL380, DL580, and DL560 Gen9 and Gen10 servers are supported. The ProLiant DL385 Gen10 server is also supported. Server profile management is supported, but the connection management functions are not. The management of BIOS settings is supported on ProLiant DLservers.

• With OneView Standard:

ProLiant DL Gen8, Gen9, and Gen10 rack servers—These rack servers are supported for OneView Standard health and alert management functions.

for OneView Standard health and alert management functions. Note In OneView, you can add a server

Note In OneView, you can add a server or an enclosure in either monitored or managed mode. Monitored mode (OneView Standard) grants some basic monitoring features and does not require a license. Managed mode unlocks all features available in OneView but requires an OneView Advanced license.

|||||||||||||||||||| Note OneView ships embedded on the Synergy Composer; Synergy users do not need a separate

Note OneView ships embedded on the Synergy Composer; Synergy users do not need a separate license for OneView. Refer to the HPE QuickSpecs for the latest SKUs. To download the OneView 4.0 QuickSpecs PDF, click the hyperlink.

Installing OneView Standard and Advanced licenses

Installing OneView Standard and Advanced licenses Figure 2-12 All OneView licenses within an enclosure must

Figure 2-12 All OneView licenses within an enclosure must be the same type, either Advanced or Standard

The OneView management appliance controls licenses. You can use the same management appliance for OneView Standard and OneView Advanced licenses, as shown in Figure 2-12. You make this choice when you initially add a system to the OneView management appliance. This decision must be made on the enclosure level and not on the server level.

Standard—You can install the OneView virtual appliance (ESXi or Hyper-V) and add various ProLiant server blades and rack servers for monitoring purposes. However, a OneView license will not be assigned to each server. It is important to note that OneView can manage a collection of enclosures and rack servers and simultaneously monitor other systems.

Advanced—You must license each ProLiant BL or DL server in order to use the

management and configuration capabilities of OneView. Technically, the licensing requirement is not enforced through the OneView application. The customer is expected to adhere to the user licensing agreement based on how they intend to manage their ProLiant servers. A customer can choose to only monitor some ProLiant servers and manage others. These mixed environment scenarios are supported by OneView, but with some basic restrictions for enclosures.

 

OneView licenses purchased with a factory-integrated enclosure or server have the license key embedded at the factory. The iLO Advanced license is also applied at the factory if the iLO Advanced product is purchased.

Note iLO Advanced remote management is accessible only to OneView customers running OneView Advanced.

Note iLO Advanced remote management is accessible only to OneView customers running OneView Advanced.

Technically, there is no enforcement for nearly any operations, including server profile actions. However, an iLO license is required for the OneView features that involve collecting and viewing server utilization data or launching the remote console.

 
Note Launching of a remote console only applies to ProLiant DLrack servers.

Note Launching of a remote console only applies to ProLiant DLrack servers.

Activity—OneView licensing

To complete this activity, read the following customer scenario. Then apply what you have learned in this chapter to answer the questions regarding the customer’s business and technical requirements. Feel free to use your experience with other customers in other industries or make educated guesses when answering the questions.

Customer scenario

Julie Jarret-Jones, the CEO of Malanga Communications Networks, has asked you to make a presentation to management, including Rosa Alfaro, the Senior Director of Technology, and Jerren Nixon, Director of Finance. Jones is especially interested in learning about the various options OneView can offer Malanga.

Nixon tells you that the company will consider OneView as a management solution for their environment, but is concerned about licensing costs.

“It seems to me that I can get everything I need from a OneView Standard license on each physical server. I understand that a license ships preloaded on our BladeSystems. Why should I purchase an Advanced license when I can get everything I need for free with a Standard license?” Nixon says.

Questions

To prepare for your meeting with Malanga management, answer the following questions. Refer to the OneView QuickSpecs for more information on the types of licensing available. Keep in mind everything you have learned about OneView and Malanga’s business and technical requirements in this study guide.

1. Which OneView license type should Malanga use and why?

2. How would you explain the differences between OneView Standard and Advanced licenses?

4. Which hardware components does Malanga currently operate that can be managed with OneView?

5. What additional business benefits can you describe for Alfaro?

 

Learning check

1. Name the hypervisors supported by OneView 4.0.

2. What is the minimum number of virtual CPUs required to host OneView 4.0?

 

a. 1

b. 2

c. 4

d. 8

 

3. Place a check mark in the column to indicate the type of license each server type requires.

 
 
 

4. When you install OneView, HPE recommends configuring separate networks for management and data.

 

a. True

 

b. False

5. Select the options that are included only with the OneView Advanced license. (Select three.)

a. Firmware management

b. Map View

c. REST API access

d. Storage provisioning

e. Partner integrations

f. Health monitoring

Learning check answers

1. Name the hypervisors supported by OneView 4.0.

 

VMware vSphere ESXi 5.5 and later

Microsoft Hyper-V

 

Windows Server 2012 and later 

Windows Hyper-V Server 2012 and later– Microsoft Hyper-V   Windows Server 2012 and later   – Red Hat Linux KVM hypervisor

 

Red Hat Linux KVM hypervisor 7.2 and later

2. What is the minimum number of virtual CPUs required to host OneView 4.0?

 

a.

1

b.

2

c.

4

d.

8

3. Place a check mark in the column to indicate the type of license each server type requires.

 
 

4. When you install OneView, HPE recommends configuring separate networks for management and data.

 

a.

True

b.

False

5. Select the options that are included only with the OneView Advanced license. (Select three.)

 

a.

Firmware management

b.

Map View

c.

REST API access

d.

Storage provisioning

e.

Partner integrations

f.

Health monitoring

 
 

Summary

This chapter highlights the technical resources needed to support OneView appliance VMs and hosts.

• On ProLiant rack and BladeSystem platforms, OneView is a virtual appliance running on supported hypervisor hosts.

• On Synergy systems, OneView is embedded in Composer.

• OneView software can be installed as a VMware ESXi or a Microsoft Hyper-V virtual appliance.

• HPE recommends deploying the OneView virtual appliance on a hypervisor dedicated to management and separate from the production hypervisor environment.

• You can use the OneView UI or the REST APIs to configure the appliance network.

• A OneView license is required for any managed server hardware. The devices that OneView 4.0 supports depend on the type of license.

• You can use the same management appliance for OneView Standard and OneView Advanced licenses.

Chapter 3

HPE OneView Platform Support

 

Learning objectives

After completing this chapter, you should be able to:

• Describe Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) OneView managed device support for:

– HPE Synergy

– HPE BladeSystem

– HPE ProLiant DLservers

• Describe the integrations OneView offers for virtualization management products:

– VMware vCenter

– Microsoft System Center

|||||||||||||||||||| Customer scenario Consider the following fictitious customer scenario as you work through this
||||||||||||||||||||
Customer scenario
Consider the following fictitious customer scenario as you work through this chapter.
Try to relate what you learn about OneView to this customer’s business and technical
objectives. Refer to this scenario as you engage with activities throughout this chapter.
Malanga Communications Networks
Figure 3-1 Malanga Communications Networks has asked for a pilot of OneView
The company’s data center has become more heterogeneous as a result of the merger,
with a variety of third-party servers, storage, and networking devices. During your site
tour of the Malanga headquarters in Jamaica, you learned that the server blades in the
BladeSystem enclosures connect to their three HPE 3PAR StoreServ 8440 storage
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systems, which are configured as a Fibre Channel storage area network (SAN). You also saw that in addition to the six BladeSystem enclosures populated with ProLiant Gen9 server blades that Malanga Communications Networks currently has in their main data center, the company acquired dozens of ProLiant rack-mounted servers.

After your site visit, you meet with Jerren Nixon, Director of Finance at Malanga Communications Networks. She tells you that the company is ready to pilot OneView as a management solution, as noted by Figure 3-1. She asks you to first demo the solution on one of their HPE ProLiant DL360 Gen9 servers in their management environment. Because they need to integrate many new servers into the data centers, they are especially interested in automated hardware discovery and firmware management.

As you gather more information as you progress through this chapter, keep in mind Malanga’s business and technical objectives. Use this information to plan how you would demonstrate the features, functions, and benefits of OneView.

Gauge your knowledge

Before proceeding with this section, take some time to consider the following questions. Answer each question as completely as possible. Pay attention to the answers you are less certain about.

1. What are the ways Malanga can use OneView to discover new hardware?

2. How does OneView manage firmware?

3.

What

integration?

HPE

hardware

can be

viewed

from a

OneView

for

vCenter

partner

4. Would Malanga benefit from one of the OneView integrations?

|||||||||||||||||||| OneView and HPE Synergy Figure 3-2 HPE Synergy 12000 Frame with compute nodes installed and
||||||||||||||||||||
OneView and HPE Synergy
Figure 3-2 HPE Synergy 12000 Frame with compute nodes installed and the Synergy
Composer module pulled out
Synergy is a single infrastructure of physical and virtual pools of compute, storage, and
fabric resources. Its management interface allows you to instantly assemble and re-
assemble resources in any configuration. The Synergy framework leverages OneView as
the single interface point that brings together the compute, storage, and networking
fabric.
OneView—hosted on the HPE Synergy Composer appliance installed within an HPE
Synergy 12000 Frame—enables you to comprehensively manage a Synergy system
throughout the hardware life cycle. Composer is the primary appliance for managing
Synergy systems, as highlighted in Figure 3-2. Composer deploys, monitors, and updates
the infrastructure from one interface and one Unified API, which is also native to
OneView.
Each Synergy system is managed by a Synergy Composer (or pair of Composers for
high availability) running OneView. OneView makes it possible to easily monitor,
configure, and manage physical and logical compute resources through either a GUI or
by using Representational State Transfer (REST) application programming interfaces
||||||||||||||||||||

(APIs).

Servers (compute modules), storage, networking (fabric), and management appliances (such as HPE Synergy Image Streamer) are easily plugged in to the frame. Frames are automatically discovered and brought into OneView as monitored enclosures. After confirming that the Synergy frames are installed correctly, you can manage the frames in OneView by creating a logical enclosure.

 

Synergy frames can be connected as a group of frames to form a dedicated management network. With one instance of OneView on one Synergy Composer, you can manage the entire group of frames. The OneView experience allows admins to use software-defined templates for multiframe configurations, consume templates for storage, and apply templates to compute that are all-inclusive of the resources needed to run the application, including the operating environment.

The software-defined management layer of OneView is layered on top of the Synergy platform. This platform is designed to run both traditional and cloud-native applications for businesses that want the benefits of running a hybrid infrastructure.

Note ProLiant rack servers are managed by a virtual version of OneView. Rack servers cannot

Note ProLiant rack servers are managed by a virtual version of OneView. Rack servers cannot be composed by the Synergy hardware version of OneView. A BladeSystem c7000 enclosure does not communicate with a Synergy Composer powered by OneView.

Composer enables you to select a managed volume as the boot target using a simplified server profile boot configuration. This action enables the software-defined intelligence in OneView to internally perform cut-and-paste functions. The user configures the connections as bootable and then selects a managed volume from which to boot. Boot- from-SAN capabilities are available for HPE 3PAR StoreServ (Fibre Channel or Fibre Channel over Ethernet [FCoE]) volumes and HPE StoreVirtual (iSCSI) volumes on Synergy with HPE Virtual Connect.

 

Software-defined intelligence provides a rich set of interconnect features such as easy moves, adds, and changes to OneView-based profiles. These features and flexible connections help to minimize the impact on an existing SAN/LAN infrastructure.

Note Synergy Composer must be running OneView 3.10 or later to recognize ProLiant Gen10 servers

Note Synergy Composer must be running OneView 3.10 or later to recognize ProLiant Gen10 servers in a Synergy frame. Update OneView to version 3.10 or later before installing supported Gen10 servers.

Differences between Synergy Composer and the OneView appliance

OneView powered by Synergy Composer is a hardware appliance that enables you to manage and monitor a Synergy environment. The OneView appliance virtual machine requires KVM, Microsoft Hyper-V, or VMware ESXi hypervisors. It manages and monitors the following HPE servers:

• BladeSystem

• HyperConverged

• ProLiant

• Apollo

• Superdome X

• HyperConverged • ProLiant • Apollo • Superdome X Note Not all features are available for

Note Not all features are available for all platforms.

OneView and Synergy storage

OneView provides automated, policy-driven provisioning of supported storage resources for Synergy. It is fully integrated with server profiles so that you can manage a new or existing storage infrastructure. With OneView you can view and manage your storage system and storage pools. You can add existing volumes and create new volumes and then you can create volume templates to provision multiple volumes with the same configuration.

Switched fabric, direct attach, vSAN topologies, as well as iSCSI connections are supported.

Storage systems and storage pools are added to the appliance before volumes, which are associated with networks. The volumes can then be attached to server profiles.

You can also add SAN managers to make their managed SANs available to the appliance. Managed SANs can be associated with Fibre Channel or FCoE networks on the appliance to enable automated zoning and automatic detection of connectivity.

Supported storage automation features include:

Automated storage provisioning—When you import supported storage systems and existing storage pools, OneView can quickly create volumes.

Automatic SAN zoning—OneView automatically manages SAN zoning through server profile volume attachments.

Storage integration through server profiles—Create and make new private volumes accessible to the server hardware by adding volume attachments to the server profile. Make existing private or shared volumes accessible to server hardware by adding volume attachments to the server profile. OneView tracks the connection status between server profiles and SANs.

A boot from SAN (BFS) configuration, specified in a server profile or server profile template, enables the primary/secondary assignment and storage system target port selection to be load balanced uniformly over SANs and storage system targets.

Volume management—You can use OneView to manage the full life cycle of volumes. You can add existing volumes, create new volumes, grow volumes, and remove or delete volumes using OneView. You can use volume templates to define a standard configuration for storage volumes. Volume templates also enable you to choose which configuration settings are locked, making them unable to be changed on volumes created from the volume template. Volume settings can be managed in volume templates, volumes, server profiles, and server profile templates. With HPE 3PAR StoreServ, you can also create volume snapshots, create a volume from a snapshot, and revert a volume to a snapshot using OneView.

Zoning policies—OneView enables you to set a zoning policy for your managed SANs. You can choose single initiator/all targets, single initiator/single storage system, or single initiator/single target.

Zone naming and aliases—OneView uses rules-based zone naming to give you full control of zone names. You can use zone naming to incorporate your current naming structure, which OneView uses during the automated zoning process. OneView enables you to create aliases for initiators, targets, and target groups in place of their WWPNs.

targets, and target groups in place of their WWPNs. Note The HPE Synergy D3940 Storage Module

Note The HPE Synergy D3940 Storage Module is the drive enclosure supported by OneView for Synergy. HPE 3PAR StoreServ and HPE StoreVirtual storage systems are also supported.

|||||||||||||||||||| Integrated Remote Support for Synergy interconnect modules Figure 3-3 Remote support data
||||||||||||||||||||
Integrated Remote Support for Synergy interconnect
modules
Figure 3-3 Remote support data
Synergy Composer provides integrated remote support from the management appliance
to reduce downtime, increase diagnostic accuracy, and get a single consolidated view of
the environment in the HPE Support Center portal. Synergy Composer enables remote
support of Synergy 12000 frames and compute modules. By connecting, you will
experience 24x7 monitoring, automatic support case creation, and automatic parts
dispatch. Remote support data collected is shown in Figure 3-3.
Through settings in the OneView interface, you can:
• Check a single box to enable remote support for all eligible devices
• Quickly register data center contacts, designated service partners, and reseller
partners
||||||||||||||||||||

• Automatically trigger creation of a support case with display of the case ID from service events associated with hardware failures

• Sign in to HPE Support Center to view case details, contract and warranty details, and a dashboard of all connected devices

• Display a single consolidated view of devices connected through Insight Remote Support in HPE Support Center along with OneView Remote Support connected devices.

Center along with OneView Remote Support connected devices. Note Refer Information Library by click the hyperlink.

Note

Refer

Information Library by click the hyperlink.

to

the

OneView

Online

Help

in

the

Hewlett

Packard

Enterprise

OneView and HPE BladeSystem

|||||||||||||||||||| OneView and HPE BladeSystem Figure 3-4 Consistent, automated enclosure configuration For

Figure 3-4 Consistent, automated enclosure configuration

For BladeSystems, the server profile encapsulates all the network connectivity for the server blade and works with the interconnect modules in the enclosure, as shown in Figure 3-4.

When you deploy OneView on ESXi hosts on a single-enclosure, non-high availability hypervisor BladeSystem environment, the best practice is to monitor, not manage, the enclosure. Do not power off the VM host where the OneView appliance is executing.

For a single enclosure or multi-enclosure environment where the enclosures are added to OneView in managed mode, the enclosure must include non-Virtual Connect interconnect modules. The storage and network connectivity for the hypervisor hosts supporting the OneView virtual appliance must be restricted to using these non-Virtual Connect interconnect modules. When performing server profile operations and power operations, refrain from having the OneView virtual appliance execute on the specific host where those operations are being performed.

specific host where those operations are being performed. Note Maximums supported: • 40 enclosures • 240

Note Maximums supported:

• 40 enclosures

• 240 interconnects

• 6 interconnects per enclosure

|||||||||||||||||||| Logical interconnects Figure 3-5 One logical interconnect group with three logical interconnects
||||||||||||||||||||
Logical interconnects
Figure 3-5 One logical interconnect group with three logical interconnects
An interconnect supports three types of communications links:
• Uplinks to data center LAN and SAN switches—Correspond to the uplink sets
you define.
• Downlinks to the server blades—Are the internal 10GbE-KR links established
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across the midplane between an interconnect module and up to 16 server blades. For example, a Virtual Connect module in interconnect bay 1 of an enclosure services the first 10 Gb physical adapter port installed in a server blade.

Stacking links—Are the horizontal and vertical connections among modules in the same enclosure.

An enclosure has at least one logical interconnect, as illustrated in Figure 3-5. A logical interconnect corresponds to a set of interconnect modules. The currently supported interconnect modules in OneView are the Virtual Connect Flex-10, Flex-10/10D, Virtual Connect 8 Gb and 16 Gb Fibre Channel, and FlexFabric modules.

For example, a logical interconnect in OneView might consist of two Virtual Connect FlexFabric-20/40 F8 modules; four Virtual Connect Flex-10/10D modules; two Virtual Connect Flex-10 with two Virtual Connect 24-port Fibre Channel modules; or some combination of these types. The basic requirement is the same as in a Virtual Connect domain—namely, horizontally adjacent modules must be the same model.

Note If a local edit of a logical interconnect is made, that logical interconnect is

Note If a local edit of a logical interconnect is made, that logical interconnect is flagged as noncompliant with the template and must be updated. One of the key attributes maintained at the template level is the firmware baseline.

Logical Interconnect page

The OneView Logical Interconnect page provides a graphical view of the logical interconnect configuration in an enclosure and allows you to manage the uplink sets for the logical interconnect.

For the network admin, the Logical Interconnect page provides information describing the Ethernet stacking topology, uplink connectivity, network reachability status, statistics, troubleshooting information, and the desired versus actual I/O bay occupancy.

For the server administrator, the Logical Interconnect page provides details about the networks (LAN and SAN) that are reachable from the server interfaces, the associated downlink capabilities such as whether a virtual port is FlexNIC- or FlexHBA-capable, the virtual port count, and the link speed of each virtual port.

Logical interconnect groups

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 3-6 Virtual Connect physical configurations matching the logical interconnect group
||||||||||||||||||||
Figure 3-6 Virtual Connect physical configurations matching the logical interconnect
group configuration
All Virtual Connect physical configurations need to match the desired configuration of
the logical interconnect group, as illustrated in Figure 3-6. For example, they should all
have the same physical interconnect type and bay location that were specified when the
logical interconnect group was created. They also need to be at the same firmware level
to operate.
Combining the logical construct of a logical interconnect group with the logical
construct of an enclosure group allows you to provision multiple enclosures with
consistent network configurations quickly. As a result, a network administrator is not
required to redefine underlying configuration attributes every time an enclosure is
installed. This is true because the network configuration is predefined as part of the
enclosure group definition—through the logical interconnect group (and underlying
logical interconnects) that is assigned to the enclosure group.
The logical interconnect group describes the desired LAN and SAN connectivity, is
used for server profile deployment and mobility, and ensures compliance between the
logical interconnects contained in the logical interconnect group.
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|||||||||||||||||||| Logical interconnect groups and Virtual Connect domains Figure 3-7 A logical interconnect group
||||||||||||||||||||
Logical interconnect groups and Virtual Connect domains
Figure 3-7 A logical interconnect group provides the type of configuration support that
a Virtual Connect domain provides
To better understand the concept of a logical interconnect group, think of a logical
interconnect group as providing the configuration support that a Virtual Connect domain
provides. To take the analogy a step further, a logical interconnect group can be viewed
as governing the configuration of a set of Virtual Connect modules, like how a server
profile template governs the configuration of one or more servers. Figure 3-7 illustrates
the structure of a logical interconnect group.
Many Virtual Connect features are supported in OneView. This includes defining an
uplink set that includes one or more uplink ports. When multiple uplink ports are
assigned to an uplink set, they can be configured to operate in failover mode or as a
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) link aggregation group (LAG). An LACP
LAG is formed automatically when the upstream physical switch (or logical switch,
HPE Intelligent Resilient Framework [IRF], Cisco Virtual Switching System [VSS], or
Cisco virtual PortChannel [vPC]) is configured for LACP.
When an uplink set has ports on different interconnects, the uplink set operates in
||||||||||||||||||||

active/standby mode as opposed to active/active mode. In active/standby mode, the single uplink or LAG of one interconnect supports traffic flow to and from the upstream switch. If all uplink ports of the active uplink set fail, the standby uplink set becomes active.

Logical interconnect groups and enclosure groups

active. Logical interconnect groups and enclosure groups Figure 3-8 An enclosure group is assigned a unique logical

Figure 3-8 An enclosure group is assigned a unique logical interconnect group configuration

When you add a BladeSystem c7000 enclosure to the OneView appliance and assign it to an enclosure group, the interconnects in the enclosure are configured automatically according to the logical interconnect group associated with that enclosure group. The enclosure group enables you to provision multiple enclosures in a consistent, predictable manner.

The enclosure group specifies how to construct an enclosure resource and provides a common configuration for all member enclosures. The enclosure group references a logical interconnect group that is used for constructing and maintaining logical interconnects. Figure 3-8 illustrates the relationship between enclosure groups and logical interconnect groups.

The maximum number of enclosures supported in OneView is 40. You can have one

enclosure group with up to 40 enclosures or 40 enclosure groups each with one enclosure. The maximum number of interconnects that can be managed is 240, and the maximum number of interconnects per enclosure is six.

Each enclosure group can contain one or more enclosures and one or more logical interconnect groups. In each logical interconnect group, there are one or more interconnects. For example, in enclosure group EncGrp 01, there are two logical interconnects, one per enclosure. The interconnects are necessarily symmetrical in terms of the Virtual Connect modules and their placement in the interconnect bays.

Each of the other two enclosure groups reference different logical interconnect groups. These logical interconnects in each enclosure can differ in terms of the composition of Virtual Connect module types and the number of modules in each enclosure.

module types and the number of modules in each enclosure. Note Users cannot apply multiple logical

Note Users cannot apply multiple logical interconnect group configurations to the same interconnect bay.

Interconnect states

|||||||||||||||||||| Figure 3-9 Interconnect module states while under management Figure 3-9 presents two tables that
||||||||||||||||||||
Figure 3-9 Interconnect module states while under management
Figure 3-9 presents two tables that summarize the key states of an interconnect module
when it is being managed within the logical interconnect configuration element.
Virtual Connect Ethernet Module support
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Figure 3-10 Server adapter connectivity

 

Figure 3-10 lists server blade support based on which interconnect module types are installed and providing network I/O connectivity to the server blade adapters. The first column in the table categorizes the interconnect module types:

Virtual Connect FlexFabric modules—These modules include the FlexFabric 10 Gb/24-Port and FlexFabric-20/40 F8 models. These modules can be:

 

– Connected to LAN switches on any ports

– Fabric attached to SAN switches on selected ports

– Directly attached to HPE 3PAR StoreServ storage arrays on selected ports

 

These modules provide FlexNIC and FlexHBA functionality, where a given physical server adapter port might be configured with up to four FlexNIC connections or up to three FlexNIC and one FlexHBA connection. A FlexNIC might be used for standard Ethernet or software iSCSI initiator access. A FlexHBA might be used for FCoE or hardware iSCSI initiator operations.

Virtual Connect Ethernet modules—Modules include the Flex-10 and Flex- 10/10D models. They support a given physical server adapter port being configured with one to four FlexNICs only. A FlexNIC might be used for standard Ethernet or software iSCSI initiator access.

Ethernet switches—These are native Ethernet switches such as the HPE 6120 and 6125 models. These interconnect modules do not support FlexNICs, regardless of the types of adapters installed in the server blades.

Notes 1 Not managed by OneView; physical ports left in an unconfigured, default state 2 Four 1 Not managed by OneView; physical ports left in an unconfigured, default state 2 Four physical 1 Gb ports, two for all others

The remaining columns in the table identify the types of server adapters that might be installed in server blades and the resulting connectivity based on the interconnect module.

FlexFabric adapters—Support FlexNIC and FlexHBA configurations depending on the type of Virtual Connect module that is mapped to those server adapter ports. The listed models support dual 10 Gb physical ports, meaning 10 Gb of bandwidth can be allocated across one to four connections per physical port.

Flex-20 adapters—Support FlexNIC and FlexHBA configurations depending on the type of Virtual Connect module that is mapped to those server adapter ports. However, the listed models support dual 20 Gb physical ports, meaning 20 Gb of bandwidth can be allocated across one to four connections per physical port.

Flex-10 adapters—Support only FlexNIC configurations, provided that a Virtual Connect module is hardware-mapped to the adapter ports. With a native Ethernet switch, FlexNIC technology is not applicable. A total of 10 Gb of bandwidth can be allocated across one to four connections per physical port.

Ethernet adapters—Can be any of various server adapter models that do not include FlexNIC or FlexHBA technology. A few of the adapter models are listed in the table.

Note The Ethernet adapters listed in the last column are not managed by OneView. OneView leaves The Ethernet adapters listed in the last column are not managed by OneView. OneView leaves the physical ports in their unconfigured, default state. You can obtain network connectivity using a standard Ethernet interconnect or Ethernet pass-through module in other interconnect bays of the enclosure. Check the HPE OneView Support Matrix and release notes available from the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library for the latest information. To visit the library, click the hyperlink.

Virtual Connect Fibre Channel module support

Virtual Connect Fibre Channel module support Figure 3-11 Server adapter connectivity (Fibre Channel)

Figure 3-11 Server adapter connectivity (Fibre Channel)

OneView also supports Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules, as shown in Figure 3- 11. These modules include the HPE 8 Gb 20-port, 8 Gb 24-port, and 16 Gb 24-port models. The uplink ports of these modules can be connected to SAN switches only. For an enclosure to operate with Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules, at least one pair of Virtual Connect Ethernet modules must also be installed in interconnect bays 1 and 2.

These Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules support Fibre Channel HBAs installed in ProLiant server blades, either the LOM or mezzanine card slots.

Note Use of Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules requires that Virtual Connect Ethernet modules also be Use of Virtual Connect Fibre Channel modules requires that Virtual Connect Ethernet modules also be installed in the enclosure; Virtual Connect Fibre Channel module uplinks operate at a maximum of 8 Gb/s.

Notes 1 16 Gb Fibre Channel HBAs support 8 and 16 Gb/s transmission rates on downlinks 1 16 Gb Fibre Channel HBAs support 8 and 16 Gb/s transmission rates on downlinks (4 Gb/s downlink speed not supported with 16 Gb Fibre Channel HBA). 2 8 Gb Fibre Channel HBAs support 2 Gb/s, 4 Gb/s, and 8 Gb/s transmission rates on downlinks.

 

OneView and HPE ProLiant rack servers

 

can availability configurations:

OneView

monitor

ProLiant

rack

servers

in

high-availability

and

nonhigh-

• Deploying to a hypervisor cluster configuration for high availability is the best practice, using OneView to monitor, not manage, the ProLiant DL hypervisor hosts in the cluster. In monitored mode, before powering off a host using OneView, make sure that the appliance is not running on that host. If it is, the OneView appliance must be migrated to a different cluster member.

Note that in a high-availability configuration, where the OneView virtual appliance can be migrated between hosts, using a VM migration approach is error prone. The virtual appliance cannot detect the hypervisor host on which it is running, and therefore cannot warn the user regarding an unsupported operation.

• In a nonhigh-availability configuration with a single ProLiant DL server hypervisor host, adding the ProLiant DL server hypervisor host into OneView as managed server hardware is not supported. Add the host in monitored mode. In monitored mode, do not power off the hypervisor host from OneView, because doing so would inadvertently power off the virtual appliance.

If the ProLiant DL hypervisor hosts are added into OneView in managed mode, the following additional restrictions apply:

• You cannot apply or edit the server profile for the hypervisor host on which the OneView virtual appliance is currently executing because this requires the server hardware to be powered off.

• You must migrate the appliance to a different host in the cluster before applying the server profile.

|||||||||||||||||||| Note OneView 4.0 also supports HPE ProLiant XL servers and ProLiant ML350 Gen9/Gen10 servers.
||||||||||||||||||||
Note
OneView 4.0 also supports HPE ProLiant XL servers and ProLiant ML350
Gen9/Gen10 servers. For a complete list of currently supported servers, check
the HPE OneView Support Matrix in the HPE Enterprise Information Library.
To visit the library, click the hyperlink.
h17007.www1.hpe.com/us/en/enterprise/integrated-systems/info-
library/index.aspx?
cat=ci_mgmt&subcat=oneview&lang=1#.WkxKod9KtPY
ProLiant ML/DL hardware discovery
Figure 3-12 OneView allows auto-discovery for ProLiant DL/MLservers based on IP
range pinging
The benefits of using OneView server auto-discovery include:
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• Reduces operational time to add multiple systems

• Extends existing Add Server Hardware dialog

• Allows more than one iLO to be specified at once

Discovered iLOs are added as managed or monitored; there is no intermediate “discovered” state. These two options are shown in Figure 3-12.

You can filter out server blades (unless their Onboard Administrator has been added to OneView). You can also filter out ProLiant DL servers that have been claimed by other appliances.

IP range pinging enables you to add a list of hostnames, IP addresses, and IP address ranges. Any errors are reported on individual hostnames and IP addresses, but when ranges are entered, a summary of what was done and not done appears, but without a list of errors.

OneView integrations

 

Typically, shifting from one management tool to another, each with a partial view of available data, is both time-consuming and complex. OneView includes integrations that reduce the time needed to make important administrative changes. These integrations provide additional support for partner management platforms.

 

OneView integrations deliver comprehensive system health and alerting, driver and firmware updates, operating system deployment, detailed inventory, and HPE Virtual Connect fabric visualization. System administrators can gain insight and control of virtualized environments while reducing the time it takes to make important changes, increase capacity, or manage planned and unplanned downtime. You can gain greater control of environments by integrating the management features of:

• HPE Synergy

 

• HPE ProLiant servers

• HPE BladeSystem

• HPE Storage

When used with the automation power of OneView, data center best practices can be defined once and reused many times to provision an entire cluster with compute and storage fully configured. This integration provides consistency for software deployment and updates and enables a faster response in the event of server or storage failure, reducing the risk of downtime.

 

OneView offers the following plug-ins for virtualization management products:

HPE OneView for VMware vCenter—Delivers useful HPE hardware management capabilities to virtualization administrators, enabling comprehensive deployment, provisioning, monitoring, remote control, and power optimization directly from the vCenter console. Integration includes an end-to-end connectivity diagram available in vCenter.

HPE OneView for Microsoft System Center—Supports health monitoring and alerting with server profile provisioning to create or grow a Hyper-V cluster.

Note These integration products purchased separately. are not included with OneView and must be

Note These integration products purchased separately.

are not included with OneView

and must be

|||||||||||||||||||| OneView for VMware vCenter Figure 3-13 OneView for VMware vCenter Figure 3-13 shows the OneView
||||||||||||||||||||
OneView for VMware vCenter
Figure 3-13 OneView for VMware vCenter
Figure 3-13 shows the OneView for VMware vCenter user interface. It brings the native
manageability of the HPE infrastructure to VMware environments.
Note
OneView for VMware vCenter supports Synergy Gen10 compute modules,
Synergy Composer, HPE Storage products (3PAR StoreServ, MSA,
StoreVirtual), and Synergy Image Streamer.
OneView for VMware vCenter 9.0 seamlessly integrates the manageability features of
ProLiant, BladeSystem, Virtual Connect, and storage with VMware solutions. It reduces
the time needed to make changes, increase capacity, or manage planned and unplanned
downtime.
Note
OneView for VMware vCenter 9.0 is compatible with BladeSystem c7000 and
Synergy enclosures with OneView 3.10 and 4.0.
||||||||||||||||||||

By leveraging OneView software-defined templates and the OneView REST API, OneView for VMware vCenter simplifies the process of deploying a complete vSphere cluster. Users can deploy ESX/ESXi hosts directly from vCenter by right-clicking a cluster or deploying a VMware hypervisor on a bare-metal server. When the process is complete, the new hypervisor is added to the appropriate cluster.

Other functions include:

• Simplify administration with VMware console access to HPE infrastructure management for health, inventory, and configuration monitoring.

• Reduce planned and unplanned downtime by automating responses to hardware events and access to detailed resolution information for health alerts.

• Proactively manage changes with detailed relationship dashboards that provide insight into the relationship between the physical and virtual infrastructure, from the VM to the network edge.

• Maintain stability and reliability with online firmware inventory and deployment.

• Consistently and repeatedly deploy bare-metal servers.

OneView for VMware portfolio

deploy bare-metal servers. OneView for VMware portfolio Figure 3-14 HPE storage management and automation

Figure 3-14 HPE storage management and automation portfolio for VMware

 

The OneView for VMware portfolio provides comprehensive life cycle management of HPE converged infrastructure directly from the vCenter consoles, as detailed in Figure 3-14. These plug-ins:

• Are

ideal

for

customers

who

have

standardized

on VMware

tools

as

their

management platform

 

• Integrate directly into VMware consoles

 

• Leverage the OneView infrastructure automation engine

 

• Reduce complexity by using the same VMware tools for HPE management tasks

 

• Simplify the admin learning curve by using the VMware tools they are already familiar with

The following VMware extensions are available as part of each OneView Advanced license:

HPE OneView for VMware vRealize Operations is a development and process automation tool. It provides a predefined set of libraries and workflows that can be used to access and control third-party applications, technologies, and infrastructure. This plug-in provides health, utilization, and performance metrics in the context of the HPE hardware hierarchy so administrators can monitor critical trend changes. Its dashboards facilitate the identification of root cause problems and impacted resources across the converged infrastructure.

HPE OneView for VMware vCenter Log Insight allows deep troubleshooting of an environment by analyzing unstructured data contained in iLO and Onboard Administrator (OA) logs. Information is displayed in the d