Sei sulla pagina 1di 459

bib.ge/sheep/list.

php

A B C D
Afrino Babydoll Southdown California Red Dalesbred
Altay Badger Face Welsh California Variegated Damara
American Mountain Mutant Debouillet
Blackbelly Balwen Welsh Mountain Cambridge Delaine Merino
Apennine Barbados Blackbelly Cameroon Derbyshire Gritstone
Aragonesa Bavarian Forest Castlemilk Morrit Devon and Cornwall
Arapawa Belgium Milk Charmoise Hill Longwool
Assaf Beltex Charollais Devon Closewool
Australian Merino Bergamasca Chios Dohne Merino
Avranchin Berrichon du Cher Churra Dormer
Awassi Beulah Speckled-Faced Clun Forest Dorper
Black Hawaiian Coburg Dorset
Black Welsh Mountain Columbia Dorset Down
Blackheaded Persian Comisana Drysdale
Bleu du Maine Coopworth
Blue Texel Cormo
Bluefaced Leicester Corriedale
Bond Cotswold
Booroola Merino
Border Cheviot
Border Leicester
Borderdale
Boreray
Brecknock Hill Cheviot
Brillenschaf
British Milk
Brown Headed Meat
Brown Mountain

E F G H
East Friesian Faeroes Gansu Alpine Finewool Hampshire
Easy Care Finnsheep German Blackheaded Han
Est à Laine Mutton Hebridean
Merino German Gray Heath Heidschnucke
Exmoor Horn German Merino Herdwick
German Mutton Merino Hill Radnor
German Whiteheaded Hog Island
Mutton Hu
Gotland
Greyface Dartmoor
Growmark
Gulf Coast Native
Gute

I J K L
Icelandic Jacob Kamieniec Lacaune
Ile de France Jezersko-Solcava Karakul Landschaf
Imroz Katahdin Leicester Longwool
INRA 401 Kelso Leine
Kerry Hill Limousine
Kivircik Lincoln
Lleyn
Lonk

1/3
M N O P
Manchega Navajo Churro Old Norwegian Painted Desert
Manx Loaghtan New Mexico Dahl Ossimi Panama
Masham New Zealand Halfbred Ouessant Pelibüey
Meatlinc Nolana Oxford Perendale
Meatmaster Norfolk Horn Pitt Island
Miniature Cheviot North Country Cheviot Polish Merino
Mirror North of England Mule Polish Mountain
Montadale North Ronaldsay Polwarth
Morada Nova Polypay
Mouflon Pomeranian Coarsewool
Portland
Priangan

Q R S T
Rabo Largo Saeftinger Tan
Racka Santa Cruz Targhee
Rahmani Santa Inês Teeswater
Rambouillet Sardinian Texas Dall
Red Engadine Scotch Mule Texel
Red Masai Scottish Blackface Tong
Rhoen Scottish Greyface Tsigai
Rideau Shetland Tukidale
Romanov Shetland-Cheviot Tunis
Romney Shropshire Turki
Rouge de l'Ouest Skudde Tyrol Mountain
Rough Fell Soay
Roussin Solognote
Royal White Somali
Ryeland South African Meat
Merino
South Suffolk
South Wales Mountain
Southdown
Spael
Spanish Merino
St. Croix
Steinschaf
Suffolk
Swaledale
Swifter
Swiss Black-Brown
Mountain
Swiss White Alpine

U V W X
Ujumqin Valachian Welsh Mountain Xinjiang Fine Wool
Valais Blacknose Welsh Mule
Van Rooy Wensleydale
Vendéen West African
Vlaams schaap White Horned Heath
Voskop White Mountain
White Polled Heath
White Suffolk
Whiteface Dartmoor
Whiteface Woodland
Wiltipoll
Wiltshire Horn
Wrzosówka

2/3
Y Z
Zwartbles

3/3
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Afrino
During the late 1960's, a request was made to the Department of Agriculture by the wool
industry, via the South African Agricultural Union, to develop a white-wooled breed for
extensive sheep grazing areas. In 1976, it was evident that the crossing of 25 percent
Merino, 25 percent Ronderib Afrikaner, and 50 percent South African Mutton Merino best
fullfilled the requirements set for the new breed.

It was decided to retain only this cross for further upgrading and development of the breed
known today as the Afrino. Eighty percent of the income from Afrino sheep is generated
through meat production and 20 percent through wool production. The Afrino produces
Merino-type wool, with a fiber diameter ranging from 19 to 22 microns.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Altay
The Altay originated in the regions of China typified by dry, cold mountain basins. They
belong to the Kazakh group of sheep which are found in the desert and mountainous
areas in west Xinjiang. Altay belong to the fat-rumped, carpet wool type. They gradually
formed the fat tail (or rump) as a biological characteristic. The tail (or rump) weighs about
15 pounds (7 kg).

Due to the sharp seasonal contrast in forage availability in these pastorial areas, the
sheep tend to deposit a large amount of fat in the body in order to meet nutritional
demands during the winter and spring. In addition, the herdsmen working under these
climatic conditions need fat as the main source of energy supply and so have selected
sheep with high fat deposits.

Breed category: fat-rump, carpet wool, meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

American Blackbelly
The American Blackbelly is a composite breed resulting from the crossing of Barbados
Blackbelly on the Mouflon and Rambouillet breeds. As the name implies, the underbelly of the
American Blackbelly is black, as is the inside of the legs, the back part of the thighs, and the
hair inside the ears. Two black facial barbs extend down the muzzle medial to the eye, giving
the breed an exotic appearance.

Through selective breeding, the American Blackbelly has retained the coloration of its
Barbados Blackbelly parent stock, but can be easily distinguished by the presence of horns on
the rams. It is harder to identify which breed a ewe represents because American Blackbelly
females may be polled, scurred, or horned, with the majority being polled. Because this sheep
is popular with the trophy hunting markets, "trophy racks" are heavily selected for in American
Blackbelly breeding stock.

The American Blackbelly is a hair sheep, although in some areas of the U.S., American
Blackbelly may develop a winter undercoat of fine wool fiber that is shed in the spring. The
American Blackbelly is known for its vitality, thrift, easy lambing, and lean carcass.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Apennine
The Apennine breed was founded in the 1970's in central Italy, mainly in the Toscana,
Emilia, Umbria, Arche, and Abruzzi regions of Italy; crossbreeding the local breed with
other Italian or exotic breeds such as Bergamasca and Ile-de-France. It is a medium
wool breed kept primarily for meat production. It is polled and has semi-lopped ears.

The breed is reared in small or medium size flocks that usually are not the only
economic source of the farm. There are an estimated 250,000 head, spread out over
central and southern Italy.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Aragonesa
The Rasa Aragonesa sheep is the second most important Spanish breed after the Merino
breed. Spanish sheep breeds of medium quality wool are considered to have originated
from the crossbreeding of fine-wool strains (Merino) and those with coarse wool (Churra
and Lacha), though this viewpoint is overly simplistic.

The Rasa Aragonesa breed, which owes its name to the region where it is of most
importance, as well as to the length of its wool ("rasa" = threadbare), is raised mainly for
its meat. Among the outstanding qualities of the Rasa Aragonesa are its high degree of
ruggedness, gregarious instinct, pasturing ability, and adaptability to the harsh
environment in which it is raised.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Arapawa
The most probable origin for the Arapawa feral sheep is that they are escapees of a flock of
mainly Merino origin, known to have been introduced in 1867, the original stock having
undoubtedly come from Australia. It is possible that they were introduced earlier by whalers
who were the first European occupants of the Island. They are considered a rare and
endangered breed. Arapawas are rather prehistoric-looking wild sheep.

They are not large sheep, being rather lean and light-boned. Their bulky fleece is of Merino-
like fineness with a natural tendency to be shed, as occurs in most wild sheep.There are still
some Arapawa sheep on the island and several thousand are now found in flocks throughout
New Zealand.

Breed category: rare, feral

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Assaf
The Assaf sheep is the result of crossbreeding the Awassi and East Friesian Milk sheep. In
1955, researchers of the Israeli Agricultural Research Organization (A.R.O) started this project
aiming to improve the fecundity of the Awassi sheep. A combination of 3/8 East Friesian and
5/8 Awassi blood emerged as the best cross.

Most dairy sheep breeders in Israel have adopted the Assaf, which is considered not only a
top quality dairy sheep and excellent mutton producer, but is also well-adapted to semi-
extensive to extensive production systems. Under Israeli conditions, in which ewes have
approximately 3 lambings in 2 years, the annual milk yield is 450 liters. The demand for Assaf
sheep is increasing every year. They have been exported to Spain, Portugal, Chile and Peru.

Breed categories: dual-purpose (dairy and meat)

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Australian Merino
More than 80 percent of all Australian sheep are pure Merino, with most of the remainder at
least part Merino blood. Merino is grown primarily for its heavy fleeces of fine wool. Although the
Australian Merino derives its name and basic appearance from the Spanish breed, it is a distinct
breed in its own right, developed and adapted in Australia to the specific conditions of this
country. Merino sheep were brought to Australia from the Cape Colony, England, Saxony (South
East Germany), France, and America. The Australian Merino is not a single homogenous breed
but a number of strains of sheep all of which, regardless of their origins, are uniquely Australian.
The major factor determining the Merino’s development has been the requirement for
environmental suitability.

Merino Strains The four basic strains of Australian Merino are Peppin, Saxon, South Australian,
and Spanish. The Peppin Merino is suited to the harsher conditions of inland Australia. Its heavy
fleece falls in the mid-range of Merino wool qualities. As many as 70 percent of today's
Australian Merinos are said to be directly descended from the Peppin-developed sheep. The
South Australian Merino is suited to semi-arid conditions of 250 mm (10 in.) of rain or less and is
found in South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland and New South Wales. The wool from
these sheep is at the strongest (i.e. thickest in fiber diameter) end of the range of Merino wool
types. The Saxon Merino is without peer in the quality of wool produced. It is best suited to cool
to warm conditions with 500 mm (20 in.) or more of rainfall and is found in the highlands of
Tasmania, the cooler areas of Victoria, and the tablelands of New South Wales. Though
relatively few in number, there is a distinct strain of the Australian Merino that is directly
descended from Merino sheep of "Spanish" blood imported into the colony.

Other Types of Merinos in Australia The development of the Australian Poll Merino is relatively
new. Polled rams have been selected and mated to Merino ewes and selection continued for the
quality of pollness. The result is a pure Merino without horns.The Fonthill Merino was developed
in the 1950's by crossing American-bred Rambouillet-Merino rams with a fine-wool Saxon strain
of Merino. The second most populous breed of sheep in Australia is the ewe progeny from
Border Leicester rams mated to Merino ewes: the "Border/Merino."

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Avranchin
The Avranchin is a grassland breed, hardy and well adapted to the ocean climate,
usually living outdoors in small flocks. It is one of the most prolific French breeds. With a
large or medium-sized frame, it produces lambs of good butchering quality, with very fine
textured meat.

The selection of the Avranchin sheep breed tends towards the maintenance of high
prolificacy (the optimum sought is the ewe which regularly produces twins at each
lambing), and the improvement of the milk value of the dams. Rams for breeding are
chosen according to their conformation and the prolificacy and milk value indexes of their
dam.

Breed categories: meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Awassi
The Awassi evolved as a nomadic sheep breed through centuries of natural and selective
breeding to become the highest milk producing breed in the Middle East. The breed is of
the Near Eastern fat-tailed type. The average Awassi ewe has single lactations over 300
liters (650 pounds) per 210-day lactation, and it is not uncommon for outstanding females
to have 210 day lactations above 750 liters (1,625 lbs).

As a comparison, the lactation of the average U.S. sheep breed is about 100 to 200
pounds per lactation. The breed also has the advantage of natural hardiness and grazing
ability. The males are horned and the females are usually polled. The fleece is mostly
carpet type with a varying degree of hair.

Breed categories: dairy, fat-tailed, carpet wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Babydoll Southdown
The Olde English Babydoll Southdown is a miniature variety of the Southdown breed. The
Southdown breed of sheep originated in the Southdown hills of Sussex County, England. It is
one of the oldest purebred sheep breeds in the world. Southdowns were imported to the
United States in the early 1800's. The 1960's saw increased importation of the larger New
Zealand Southdown to upscale the American Southdown.

Around 1990, small flocks of the original smaller Southdowns were rediscovered and labeled
Olde English Babydoll Miniature Sheep to differentiate them from the larger modern breed.
This miniature sheep is only 19 to 23 inches tall. Babydolls usually have off white wool with
cinnamon or gray faces and legs. Currently people raise these docile sheep for their wool, as
pets, and grass trimmers perfect for today's smaller acreage farms.

Breed categories: medium wool, novelty

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Badger Face Welsh Mountain


The Welsh Mountain Badger Face is a color variation (a recessive trait) of the Welsh
Mountain. It is an ancient Welsh breed, which was once common in the Welsh Mountains.
Numbers of the breed fell during the Middle Ages when the cloth trade demanded a white
wool. Numbers are now on the increase. The main type is known by Torddu which means
blackbelly, but there is also a rarer Torwen which is the reverse coloration, black with a white
belly.

The Torddu variation have a distinctive broad striped face with a black band from jaw to belly
and extending to the underside of the tail. The main fleece varies from pure white to light tan.
Rams have dark spiral horns and the ewes are polled. The Badger is a good breed for
crossing, especially on ewe lambs.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Balwen Welsh Mountain


The Welsh Mountain Sheep can be termed as an umbrella description to describe many of the
breeds indigenous to Wales. Through breeding and selection over the centuries, the Welsh
Mountain has developed into many distinct breeds; the Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep being
one of these. Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep originate from one small area of Wales: the Tywi
Valley. The name Balwen is welsh for white blaze.

The Balwen sheep has a base color of black, brown, or dark grey. It has a white blaze on the
face, four distinct white feet, and a half to two-thirds white tail. All males must have horns.
Horns are not allowed on females. The Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep is a small, very hardy
breed. They are easy to manage, having very few health problems associated with many of the
larger breeds. It is thought farmers over the years used the Balwen as landmarks on the hills as
a means of recognizing one's flock.

Breed categories: rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Barbados Blackbelly
The Barbados Blackbelly is an indigenous breed to the Caribbean island of Barbados. It
descends from sheep brought to the islands from West Africa during the slave era.
Blackbellies are "antelope like" in appearance, brown tan or yellow in color, with black
points and under-parts. Both ewes and rams are polled or have only small scurs or
diminutive horns.

They may have some visible fuzzy wool undercoat within their hair coat, but it should
shed along with the hair each year. Barbados Blackbelies are noted for their extreme
hardiness and reproductive efficiency. They are one of the most prolific sheep breeds in
the world.

Breed category: hair (meat)

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bavarian Forest
The Bavarian Forest, the successor of the Bavarian Zaupel, is decreasing in popularity
and appears in the Bavarian herdbook only since 1987. Nevertheless it is an old and
once wide-spread breed in its native region. It is a small to medium sheep, mostly
white, though brown and black animals do occur.

The fleece contains a mixture of fibers: kemp, hetero type, and wool fibers. Forest
sheep are aseasonal. They usually lamb 3 times in 2 years.Their fertility amounts to
about 180 percent. They are a hardy, weather and disease-resistant breed. They have
good mothering ability.

Breed category: rare, landrace, double-coated

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Belgium Milk
The Belgium Milk Sheep is strongly influenced by Friesian Milk Sheep. In all probability,
the Belgium Milk Sheep descends from Flemish sheep. Since the 19th century, Flemish
sheep were selected for milk character. After the Second World War, the other milk
sheep breeds were added.

The Belgium Milk Sheep is a finely-built sheep which stands on high legs. The body is
wedge-shaped. The head is covered with fine white hair. The abdomen is wooly, but
slightly hairy. A typical characteristic of Belgium Milk Sheep is the so-called "rat-tail." The
fertility of the breed is high. The udder is well-developed and the animals give much milk
with a creamy taste.

Breed categories: dairy, rat-tail

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Beltex
Beltex sheep were first introduced to Britain from Belgium in 1989. They originate from
hybrid sheep bred in Belgium. The breed's main characteristics are double-muscled
highquarters, coupled with fine bones which ensures maximum killing-out percentage of
the finished lamb.

The Beltex is primarily a terminal sire to cross with British sheep and half-bred
continental sheep. Beltex-sired lambs are born with ease and are thrifty. Conformation is
the breed's main attribute in producing prime lamb. Finished lambs yield a high killing-
out percentage and a carcass with well-fleshed legs, good eye muscle, and a long loin.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bergamasca
The Bergamasca originated in the North of Italy, possibly from Sudanese sheep.
They are a multi-purpose animal, raised for meat, milk, and wool. They are prolific
and produce and average of 250 kg of milk with 6 percent fat over a 6 month
lactation period.

The Bergamasca is a basic breed of the Lop-eared Alpine group and is polled. They
are the foundation of the other Lop-eared Alpine breeds of Fabrianese, Pavullese,
Perugian Lowland, and Zakynthos.

Breed categories: multi-purpose (meat, milk, and wool), coarse wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Berrichon du Cher
The Berrichon du Cher was established in the Berry region of France. The original
breed was crossed with a Merino in the mid-1780's. Further improvements were
made in the 1800's with the introduction of the Dishely Leicester.

The Berrichon due Cher is a polled, white-faced sheep with a medium fleece of
high quality. Their body is compact, well-muscled, and medium to large in status.
They are used primarily as a terminal sire.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Beulah Speckled-Faced
Speckled-face sheep have been bred on the hills of Eppynt, Llanafan, Abergwesyn and
Llanwrtyd Wells for over 100 years, without introduction of female stock. On the hill, the
ewes are normally purebred, providing flock replacements, finished lambs for the meat
trade, or store lambs for finishing on lowland farms.

The Beulah ewe is also idea for crossing with most continental rams, as well as Suffolk
and Down rams to produce high quality carcasses. Rams have found great demand in
many mountain flocks to improve size and wool quality. The breed gives a fleece of very
clean soft handling wool. Ewes are hornless, as are the majority of rams.The face is free
from wool and distinctly speckled.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool, hill

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/list.php

A B C D
Afrino Babydoll Southdown California Red Dalesbred
Altay Badger Face Welsh California Variegated Damara
American Mountain Mutant Debouillet
Blackbelly Balwen Welsh Mountain Cambridge Delaine Merino
Apennine Barbados Blackbelly Cameroon Derbyshire Gritstone
Aragonesa Bavarian Forest Castlemilk Morrit Devon and Cornwall
Arapawa Belgium Milk Charmoise Hill Longwool
Assaf Beltex Charollais Devon Closewool
Australian Merino Bergamasca Chios Dohne Merino
Avranchin Berrichon du Cher Churra Dormer
Awassi Beulah Speckled-Faced Clun Forest Dorper
Black Hawaiian Coburg Dorset
Black Welsh Mountain Columbia Dorset Down
Blackheaded Persian Comisana Drysdale
Bleu du Maine Coopworth
Blue Texel Cormo
Bluefaced Leicester Corriedale
Bond Cotswold
Booroola Merino
Border Cheviot
Border Leicester
Borderdale
Boreray
Brecknock Hill Cheviot
Brillenschaf
British Milk
Brown Headed Meat
Brown Mountain

E F G H
East Friesian Faeroes Gansu Alpine Finewool Hampshire
Easy Care Finnsheep German Blackheaded Han
Est à Laine Mutton Hebridean
Merino German Gray Heath Heidschnucke
Exmoor Horn German Merino Herdwick
German Mutton Merino Hill Radnor
German Whiteheaded Hog Island
Mutton Hu
Gotland
Greyface Dartmoor
Growmark
Gulf Coast Native
Gute

I J K L
Icelandic Jacob Kamieniec Lacaune
Ile de France Jezersko-Solcava Karakul Landschaf
Imroz Katahdin Leicester Longwool
INRA 401 Kelso Leine
Kerry Hill Limousine
Kivircik Lincoln
Lleyn
Lonk

1/3
M N O P
Manchega Navajo Churro Old Norwegian Painted Desert
Manx Loaghtan New Mexico Dahl Ossimi Panama
Masham New Zealand Halfbred Ouessant Pelibüey
Meatlinc Nolana Oxford Perendale
Meatmaster Norfolk Horn Pitt Island
Miniature Cheviot North Country Cheviot Polish Merino
Mirror North of England Mule Polish Mountain
Montadale North Ronaldsay Polwarth
Morada Nova Polypay
Mouflon Pomeranian Coarsewool
Portland
Priangan

Q R S T
Rabo Largo Saeftinger Tan
Racka Santa Cruz Targhee
Rahmani Santa Inês Teeswater
Rambouillet Sardinian Texas Dall
Red Engadine Scotch Mule Texel
Red Masai Scottish Blackface Tong
Rhoen Scottish Greyface Tsigai
Rideau Shetland Tukidale
Romanov Shetland-Cheviot Tunis
Romney Shropshire Turki
Rouge de l'Ouest Skudde Tyrol Mountain
Rough Fell Soay
Roussin Solognote
Royal White Somali
Ryeland South African Meat
Merino
South Suffolk
South Wales Mountain
Southdown
Spael
Spanish Merino
St. Croix
Steinschaf
Suffolk
Swaledale
Swifter
Swiss Black-Brown
Mountain
Swiss White Alpine

U V W X
Ujumqin Valachian Welsh Mountain Xinjiang Fine Wool
Valais Blacknose Welsh Mule
Van Rooy Wensleydale
Vendéen West African
Vlaams schaap White Horned Heath
Voskop White Mountain
White Polled Heath
White Suffolk
Whiteface Dartmoor
Whiteface Woodland
Wiltipoll
Wiltshire Horn
Wrzosówka

2/3
Y Z
Zwartbles

3/3
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Afrino
During the late 1960's, a request was made to the Department of Agriculture by the wool
industry, via the South African Agricultural Union, to develop a white-wooled breed for
extensive sheep grazing areas. In 1976, it was evident that the crossing of 25 percent
Merino, 25 percent Ronderib Afrikaner, and 50 percent South African Mutton Merino best
fullfilled the requirements set for the new breed.

It was decided to retain only this cross for further upgrading and development of the breed
known today as the Afrino. Eighty percent of the income from Afrino sheep is generated
through meat production and 20 percent through wool production. The Afrino produces
Merino-type wool, with a fiber diameter ranging from 19 to 22 microns.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Altay
The Altay originated in the regions of China typified by dry, cold mountain basins. They
belong to the Kazakh group of sheep which are found in the desert and mountainous
areas in west Xinjiang. Altay belong to the fat-rumped, carpet wool type. They gradually
formed the fat tail (or rump) as a biological characteristic. The tail (or rump) weighs about
15 pounds (7 kg).

Due to the sharp seasonal contrast in forage availability in these pastorial areas, the
sheep tend to deposit a large amount of fat in the body in order to meet nutritional
demands during the winter and spring. In addition, the herdsmen working under these
climatic conditions need fat as the main source of energy supply and so have selected
sheep with high fat deposits.

Breed category: fat-rump, carpet wool, meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

American Blackbelly
The American Blackbelly is a composite breed resulting from the crossing of Barbados
Blackbelly on the Mouflon and Rambouillet breeds. As the name implies, the underbelly of the
American Blackbelly is black, as is the inside of the legs, the back part of the thighs, and the
hair inside the ears. Two black facial barbs extend down the muzzle medial to the eye, giving
the breed an exotic appearance.

Through selective breeding, the American Blackbelly has retained the coloration of its
Barbados Blackbelly parent stock, but can be easily distinguished by the presence of horns on
the rams. It is harder to identify which breed a ewe represents because American Blackbelly
females may be polled, scurred, or horned, with the majority being polled. Because this sheep
is popular with the trophy hunting markets, "trophy racks" are heavily selected for in American
Blackbelly breeding stock.

The American Blackbelly is a hair sheep, although in some areas of the U.S., American
Blackbelly may develop a winter undercoat of fine wool fiber that is shed in the spring. The
American Blackbelly is known for its vitality, thrift, easy lambing, and lean carcass.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Apennine
The Apennine breed was founded in the 1970's in central Italy, mainly in the Toscana,
Emilia, Umbria, Arche, and Abruzzi regions of Italy; crossbreeding the local breed with
other Italian or exotic breeds such as Bergamasca and Ile-de-France. It is a medium
wool breed kept primarily for meat production. It is polled and has semi-lopped ears.

The breed is reared in small or medium size flocks that usually are not the only
economic source of the farm. There are an estimated 250,000 head, spread out over
central and southern Italy.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Aragonesa
The Rasa Aragonesa sheep is the second most important Spanish breed after the Merino
breed. Spanish sheep breeds of medium quality wool are considered to have originated
from the crossbreeding of fine-wool strains (Merino) and those with coarse wool (Churra
and Lacha), though this viewpoint is overly simplistic.

The Rasa Aragonesa breed, which owes its name to the region where it is of most
importance, as well as to the length of its wool ("rasa" = threadbare), is raised mainly for
its meat. Among the outstanding qualities of the Rasa Aragonesa are its high degree of
ruggedness, gregarious instinct, pasturing ability, and adaptability to the harsh
environment in which it is raised.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Arapawa
The most probable origin for the Arapawa feral sheep is that they are escapees of a flock of
mainly Merino origin, known to have been introduced in 1867, the original stock having
undoubtedly come from Australia. It is possible that they were introduced earlier by whalers
who were the first European occupants of the Island. They are considered a rare and
endangered breed. Arapawas are rather prehistoric-looking wild sheep.

They are not large sheep, being rather lean and light-boned. Their bulky fleece is of Merino-
like fineness with a natural tendency to be shed, as occurs in most wild sheep.There are still
some Arapawa sheep on the island and several thousand are now found in flocks throughout
New Zealand.

Breed category: rare, feral

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Assaf
The Assaf sheep is the result of crossbreeding the Awassi and East Friesian Milk sheep. In
1955, researchers of the Israeli Agricultural Research Organization (A.R.O) started this project
aiming to improve the fecundity of the Awassi sheep. A combination of 3/8 East Friesian and
5/8 Awassi blood emerged as the best cross.

Most dairy sheep breeders in Israel have adopted the Assaf, which is considered not only a
top quality dairy sheep and excellent mutton producer, but is also well-adapted to semi-
extensive to extensive production systems. Under Israeli conditions, in which ewes have
approximately 3 lambings in 2 years, the annual milk yield is 450 liters. The demand for Assaf
sheep is increasing every year. They have been exported to Spain, Portugal, Chile and Peru.

Breed categories: dual-purpose (dairy and meat)

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Australian Merino
More than 80 percent of all Australian sheep are pure Merino, with most of the remainder at
least part Merino blood. Merino is grown primarily for its heavy fleeces of fine wool. Although the
Australian Merino derives its name and basic appearance from the Spanish breed, it is a distinct
breed in its own right, developed and adapted in Australia to the specific conditions of this
country. Merino sheep were brought to Australia from the Cape Colony, England, Saxony (South
East Germany), France, and America. The Australian Merino is not a single homogenous breed
but a number of strains of sheep all of which, regardless of their origins, are uniquely Australian.
The major factor determining the Merino’s development has been the requirement for
environmental suitability.

Merino Strains The four basic strains of Australian Merino are Peppin, Saxon, South Australian,
and Spanish. The Peppin Merino is suited to the harsher conditions of inland Australia. Its heavy
fleece falls in the mid-range of Merino wool qualities. As many as 70 percent of today's
Australian Merinos are said to be directly descended from the Peppin-developed sheep. The
South Australian Merino is suited to semi-arid conditions of 250 mm (10 in.) of rain or less and is
found in South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland and New South Wales. The wool from
these sheep is at the strongest (i.e. thickest in fiber diameter) end of the range of Merino wool
types. The Saxon Merino is without peer in the quality of wool produced. It is best suited to cool
to warm conditions with 500 mm (20 in.) or more of rainfall and is found in the highlands of
Tasmania, the cooler areas of Victoria, and the tablelands of New South Wales. Though
relatively few in number, there is a distinct strain of the Australian Merino that is directly
descended from Merino sheep of "Spanish" blood imported into the colony.

Other Types of Merinos in Australia The development of the Australian Poll Merino is relatively
new. Polled rams have been selected and mated to Merino ewes and selection continued for the
quality of pollness. The result is a pure Merino without horns.The Fonthill Merino was developed
in the 1950's by crossing American-bred Rambouillet-Merino rams with a fine-wool Saxon strain
of Merino. The second most populous breed of sheep in Australia is the ewe progeny from
Border Leicester rams mated to Merino ewes: the "Border/Merino."

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Avranchin
The Avranchin is a grassland breed, hardy and well adapted to the ocean climate,
usually living outdoors in small flocks. It is one of the most prolific French breeds. With a
large or medium-sized frame, it produces lambs of good butchering quality, with very fine
textured meat.

The selection of the Avranchin sheep breed tends towards the maintenance of high
prolificacy (the optimum sought is the ewe which regularly produces twins at each
lambing), and the improvement of the milk value of the dams. Rams for breeding are
chosen according to their conformation and the prolificacy and milk value indexes of their
dam.

Breed categories: meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Awassi
The Awassi evolved as a nomadic sheep breed through centuries of natural and selective
breeding to become the highest milk producing breed in the Middle East. The breed is of
the Near Eastern fat-tailed type. The average Awassi ewe has single lactations over 300
liters (650 pounds) per 210-day lactation, and it is not uncommon for outstanding females
to have 210 day lactations above 750 liters (1,625 lbs).

As a comparison, the lactation of the average U.S. sheep breed is about 100 to 200
pounds per lactation. The breed also has the advantage of natural hardiness and grazing
ability. The males are horned and the females are usually polled. The fleece is mostly
carpet type with a varying degree of hair.

Breed categories: dairy, fat-tailed, carpet wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Babydoll Southdown
The Olde English Babydoll Southdown is a miniature variety of the Southdown breed. The
Southdown breed of sheep originated in the Southdown hills of Sussex County, England. It is
one of the oldest purebred sheep breeds in the world. Southdowns were imported to the
United States in the early 1800's. The 1960's saw increased importation of the larger New
Zealand Southdown to upscale the American Southdown.

Around 1990, small flocks of the original smaller Southdowns were rediscovered and labeled
Olde English Babydoll Miniature Sheep to differentiate them from the larger modern breed.
This miniature sheep is only 19 to 23 inches tall. Babydolls usually have off white wool with
cinnamon or gray faces and legs. Currently people raise these docile sheep for their wool, as
pets, and grass trimmers perfect for today's smaller acreage farms.

Breed categories: medium wool, novelty

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Badger Face Welsh Mountain


The Welsh Mountain Badger Face is a color variation (a recessive trait) of the Welsh
Mountain. It is an ancient Welsh breed, which was once common in the Welsh Mountains.
Numbers of the breed fell during the Middle Ages when the cloth trade demanded a white
wool. Numbers are now on the increase. The main type is known by Torddu which means
blackbelly, but there is also a rarer Torwen which is the reverse coloration, black with a white
belly.

The Torddu variation have a distinctive broad striped face with a black band from jaw to belly
and extending to the underside of the tail. The main fleece varies from pure white to light tan.
Rams have dark spiral horns and the ewes are polled. The Badger is a good breed for
crossing, especially on ewe lambs.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Balwen Welsh Mountain


The Welsh Mountain Sheep can be termed as an umbrella description to describe many of the
breeds indigenous to Wales. Through breeding and selection over the centuries, the Welsh
Mountain has developed into many distinct breeds; the Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep being
one of these. Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep originate from one small area of Wales: the Tywi
Valley. The name Balwen is welsh for white blaze.

The Balwen sheep has a base color of black, brown, or dark grey. It has a white blaze on the
face, four distinct white feet, and a half to two-thirds white tail. All males must have horns.
Horns are not allowed on females. The Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep is a small, very hardy
breed. They are easy to manage, having very few health problems associated with many of the
larger breeds. It is thought farmers over the years used the Balwen as landmarks on the hills as
a means of recognizing one's flock.

Breed categories: rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Barbados Blackbelly
The Barbados Blackbelly is an indigenous breed to the Caribbean island of Barbados. It
descends from sheep brought to the islands from West Africa during the slave era.
Blackbellies are "antelope like" in appearance, brown tan or yellow in color, with black
points and under-parts. Both ewes and rams are polled or have only small scurs or
diminutive horns.

They may have some visible fuzzy wool undercoat within their hair coat, but it should
shed along with the hair each year. Barbados Blackbelies are noted for their extreme
hardiness and reproductive efficiency. They are one of the most prolific sheep breeds in
the world.

Breed category: hair (meat)

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bavarian Forest
The Bavarian Forest, the successor of the Bavarian Zaupel, is decreasing in popularity
and appears in the Bavarian herdbook only since 1987. Nevertheless it is an old and
once wide-spread breed in its native region. It is a small to medium sheep, mostly
white, though brown and black animals do occur.

The fleece contains a mixture of fibers: kemp, hetero type, and wool fibers. Forest
sheep are aseasonal. They usually lamb 3 times in 2 years.Their fertility amounts to
about 180 percent. They are a hardy, weather and disease-resistant breed. They have
good mothering ability.

Breed category: rare, landrace, double-coated

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Belgium Milk
The Belgium Milk Sheep is strongly influenced by Friesian Milk Sheep. In all probability,
the Belgium Milk Sheep descends from Flemish sheep. Since the 19th century, Flemish
sheep were selected for milk character. After the Second World War, the other milk
sheep breeds were added.

The Belgium Milk Sheep is a finely-built sheep which stands on high legs. The body is
wedge-shaped. The head is covered with fine white hair. The abdomen is wooly, but
slightly hairy. A typical characteristic of Belgium Milk Sheep is the so-called "rat-tail." The
fertility of the breed is high. The udder is well-developed and the animals give much milk
with a creamy taste.

Breed categories: dairy, rat-tail

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Beltex
Beltex sheep were first introduced to Britain from Belgium in 1989. They originate from
hybrid sheep bred in Belgium. The breed's main characteristics are double-muscled
highquarters, coupled with fine bones which ensures maximum killing-out percentage of
the finished lamb.

The Beltex is primarily a terminal sire to cross with British sheep and half-bred
continental sheep. Beltex-sired lambs are born with ease and are thrifty. Conformation is
the breed's main attribute in producing prime lamb. Finished lambs yield a high killing-
out percentage and a carcass with well-fleshed legs, good eye muscle, and a long loin.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bergamasca
The Bergamasca originated in the North of Italy, possibly from Sudanese sheep.
They are a multi-purpose animal, raised for meat, milk, and wool. They are prolific
and produce and average of 250 kg of milk with 6 percent fat over a 6 month
lactation period.

The Bergamasca is a basic breed of the Lop-eared Alpine group and is polled. They
are the foundation of the other Lop-eared Alpine breeds of Fabrianese, Pavullese,
Perugian Lowland, and Zakynthos.

Breed categories: multi-purpose (meat, milk, and wool), coarse wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Berrichon du Cher
The Berrichon du Cher was established in the Berry region of France. The original
breed was crossed with a Merino in the mid-1780's. Further improvements were
made in the 1800's with the introduction of the Dishely Leicester.

The Berrichon due Cher is a polled, white-faced sheep with a medium fleece of
high quality. Their body is compact, well-muscled, and medium to large in status.
They are used primarily as a terminal sire.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Beulah Speckled-Faced
Speckled-face sheep have been bred on the hills of Eppynt, Llanafan, Abergwesyn and
Llanwrtyd Wells for over 100 years, without introduction of female stock. On the hill, the
ewes are normally purebred, providing flock replacements, finished lambs for the meat
trade, or store lambs for finishing on lowland farms.

The Beulah ewe is also idea for crossing with most continental rams, as well as Suffolk
and Down rams to produce high quality carcasses. Rams have found great demand in
many mountain flocks to improve size and wool quality. The breed gives a fleece of very
clean soft handling wool. Ewes are hornless, as are the majority of rams.The face is free
from wool and distinctly speckled.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool, hill

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Black Hawaiian
There is some controversy on how the Black Hawaiian breed was started. Some say it is
a cross of Mouflon and black hair sheep from the Hawaiian islands. Others say they are
Barbados with a dilution of the red color gene making them black. They have a thick
black coat and are usually black all over, although some sport a white muzzle.

Like the other species of sheep of this type, the horns grow up, back, down, forward, up
again, and then tip out. The horns of the Black Hawaiian are jet black. Males can weigh
up to 140 to 150 pounds while females usually weigh about half that much. They are
raise primarily for trophy hunting.

Breed categories: hair, exotic

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Black Welsh Mountain


In the Middle Ages, the mutton of black-fleeced Welsh Mountain Sheep was prized for
its richness and excellence and much sought-after by merchants. During the mid-19th
century, some breeders began to select specifically for the black fleece color and the
result is the Black Welsh Mountain sheep.

The Black Welsh Mountain is a small, black sheep with no wool on the face or on the
legs below the knee and hock. It is the only completely black breed of sheep found in
the United Kingdom. Introduced into the U.S. in 1972, the fleece from the Black Welsh
Mountain has generated special interest among hand spinners and weavers.

Breed categories: primitive, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Blackheaded Persian
The Blackheaded Persian originated in the arid regions of east Africa in what is now
Somalia. It is one of the fat-rumped breeds and both sexes are polled. Blackheaded
Persians have a white body and black head and neck with the two colors sharply
distinguished.

The breed found its way to the tropics of the Caribbean region via South Africa many
years ago. The Caribbean population has adapted well to the humid tropics. The
Blackheaded Persian is one of the breeds that was used to develop the Dorper.

Breed categories: hair, fat-rumped

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bleu du Maine
The Blue du Maine originated in Western France in the region of Mayenne. The breed
was developed from crossing Leicester Longwool and Wensleydale which were imported
during a period from 1855 to 1880 with the now extinct Choletais breed. The Blue du
Maine is a large breed. The breed has no wool on its head or legs. The face is dark gray
or blue color. Both sexes are polled.

In comparing the Blue du Maine with the Texel breed, they show a higher litter size and
age of sexual maturity. Their average daily gain, carcass leanness, milk yield, and
lambing interval are similar to the Texel, but the Blue du Maine are lighter muscled.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Blue Texel
The Blue Texel is a color variant of the normal white Texel sheep. The Blue Texel came from
white Texels who carry the color factor "blue" with them. This factor is a recessive factor. From a
mating of two white Texels who both carry the factor for the blue colour, there is a 25 percent
chance blue lambs will be born while a mating between a Blue Texel and another Blue Texel
always gives blue lambs. Texel sheep evolved as a result of crossbreeding the Dutch polder
sheep with several English breeds, such as Leicester, Wensleydale, and Lincoln at the
beginning of the 20th century.

Today, as a result of efficient selection, the Texel breed has developed into a meat-type sheep
of outstanding lean meat quality that has become popular throughout the world as a sire of
crossbred slaughter lambs. When Texel lambs with a different color were orginally born, most
breeders were very ashamed of this. It was not until the late 70's that some breeders started with
the breeding of this rare colored sheep: the Blue Texel.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bluefaced Leicester
The Bluefaced Leicester evolved near Hexham in the county of Northumberland, England
during the early 1900's. They are descendants of Robert Bakewell’s improved Dishley
Leicester. The breed originated from Border Leicester individuals selected for the blue
face (white hairs on black skin) and finer fleeces. It was was developed as a sire of high
quality crossbred ewes.

The crossbred progeny of the Bluefaced Leicester is the Mule, the ewe famous throughout
the U.K. as the best commercial breeding ewe on the market. Bluefaced Leicesters were
imported to Canada in the 1970's where they eventually made their way to the United
States. Frozen semen from the United Kingdom is being used to expand the genetic base
of the breed in the U.S. and Canada.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bond
Bonds evolved in Australia in 1909 as a dual-purpose breed, using Peppin Merinos and
imported Lincoln rams. Bonds are tall, long-bodied sheep, heavy in the bone and with
open faces and a robust constitution. They produce bulky, long-stapled, bright 22-28
micron wool. Lambs are long, lean, and fast growing. Bond rams weigh up to 150 kg
(330 lbs.).

Bond sheep are mainly found in the south east portion of Australia. They have the ability
to produce economic results in a wide range of climatic conditions of rainfall from 350-
1140 mm (14 to 45 inches).

Breed categories: dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Booroola Merino
The Booroola Merino was developed on the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales,
Australia. It differs from the normal Merino in two ways. First, its fertlity is as high as any breed
in the world. The number of lambs born per ewe lambing is 2.4, with a range of 1 to 6. Half-
Booroola ewes on average wean 20 percent more lambs than comparable Merinos under the
same conditions. Secondly, Booroolas have the ability to breed at most times of the year, thus
extending the breeding season.

The high prolifacy of the Booroola Merino is due to the action of a single gene. Booroola
actually refers to a gene called the B gene (also called F for fecundity). The B gene can be
transferred into any breed sheep and does not appear to be influenced by nutrition.

Breed categories: fine wool, prolific

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Border Cheviot
The Border Cheviot originated as a mountain breed, native to the Cheviot Hills between
Scotland and England, where the climate is harsh and the conditions are rugged. Cheviots are
extremely hardy and can withstand harsh winters and graze well over hilly pastures. They were
bred to look after themselves. Recognized as early as 1372, the breed is reported to have
developed from sheep that swam ashore from shipwrecked Spanish ships that fled northward
after the defeat of the Armada.

The Cheviot is a distinctive white-faced sheep, with a wool-free face and legs, pricked ears,
black muzzle and black feet. It is a very alert, active sheep, with a stylish, lively carriage.
Cheviot wool has a distinctive helical crimp, which gives it that highly desirable resilience.

Breed category: meat, hill

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Border Leicester
One of three distinct breeds of Leicester sheep, the Border Leicester was founded in 1767 by
George & Matthew Culley of Fenton, Northumberland, England. They were friends of Robert
Bakewell and had access to his improved Leicesters. Some feel that the Culley brothers
developed the Border Leicester by crossing Bakewell's improved Leicester rams with
Teeswater ewes. Others argue that Cheviot blood was introduced.

In any case, the breed was firmly established in England by 1850 and Border Leicesters have
now surpassed the old English Leicester in popularity in the British Isles and in other
countries. Border Leicesters are moderately prolific, good milkers, and mothers. They have
been used throughout the world to sire crossbred females. They yield a long-stapled, lustrous,
coarse wool that is much in demand by hand spinners.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Borderdale
The Borderdale was developed in New Zealand. It is the result of breeding the Border
Leicester and Corriedale breeds and interbreeding each generation until the F5 stage.
Borderdales are a medium-large, hardy, long-woolled breed, with a comparatively low
susceptibility to foot rot. They have a good growth rate.

Ewes are often used for crossbreeding with terminal sires from the meat breeds.
Borderdales are found mainly on the plains, dowlands, and foothills of Canterbury (New
Zealand).

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Boreray
The Boreray originated on the island of Boreray which is in the St. Kilda group. The
breed was developed during the late 19th century from Scottish Blackface and a
Hebridean type of Old Scottish Shortwool. The breed has been largely feral since 1930.
The Boreray is a small breed with no wool on face or lower legs. The extremities are
black or tan colored.

The fleece is white to light tan, but occasionally an individual animal will be darker. Both
sexes are horned. The ram's horns are large and spiraled. Adult ewes weigh about 28 kg
(62 lbs) and stand 55 cm (22 inches) at the withers.

Breed category: primitive, rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brecknock Hill Cheviot


The Brecknock Hill Cheviot was developed from the Scottish Cheviot that was
introduced to Wales in the 1850's. Purebred Brecknock sheep come in all colors
except spotted. They tend to be naturally small like their ancestors. However, their
nature is much more gentle than the other Cheviot sheep.

In Wales, Brecknock Hill Cheviots are not part of the three Cheviot sizes . They are a
Welsh hill breed of sheep. In the hills, they are kept in pure flocks for breeding
replacements.

Brecknock Hill Cheviot have small erect ears with white faces and legs. They do have
not wool on the face or below the knees or hock. Ewes and usualy rams are polled.
They breed is recognized for its longevity.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brillenschaf
The Brillenschaf from Carinthia is one of the endangered livestock breeds in Austria.
Since 1938, it has almost completely died out. It is named for the eyeglass marks
around its eyes, under the eyes, and on its ears. It is a cross between the old
Landschaf breed with the Bergamasca and Paduaner Schaf.

It is a member of the Alpine Mountain Sheep Breeds. The hardy, frugal Brillenschaf
can cope with high precipitation and is expert in climbing, therefore it is used for
grazing high alpine areas which are inaccessible to cows.

Breed category: meat, coarse wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

British Milk
British Milk Sheep are a composite breed whose exact make-up is in conflict. Breeds
that comprise the composite include the East Friesian, Bluefaced Leicester, Polled
Dorset, Lleyn, and perhaps other breeds. The breed was established and released in
1980. Animals of this breed are medium to large in size, polled, with white, woolless, face
and legs.

British Milksheep are the most prolific breed in the United Kingdom with yearling litter
size averaging 2.21, 2-year-olds at 2.63 and 3.07 in mature ewes. A milk yield of 650-
900 liters (173 to 238 gal) has been reported during a 300-day lactation. The milk solids
is also particularly high. British Milksheep produce a large, lean carcass.

Breed category: dairy / Distribution: United Kingdom, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brown Headed Meat


The Braunköpfiges Fleischschaf is one of the four predominant sheep breeds in
Switzerland. It is the heaviest breed. It was developed by crossing Oxfords from
England and German Blackheaded Mutton sheep onto landrace sheep.

The breed is seasonal, lambing once per year, usually in the winter, averaging 1.7
lambs.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brown Mountain
The home of this breed is the alpine regions of Bavaria (Germany), Tyrol (Austria),
Southern Tyrol (Italy), and the Swiss Canton of Engadine. In recent years, the Brown
Mountain Sheep has gained popularity beyond its original borders. The Brown Mountain
Sheep descended from the Tyrolean Steinschaf (Stone Sheep), which can be of all
colors, one color per sheep, and is rarely white.

The Braunes Bergschaf is a medium-sized sheep with a slender, hornless head, and a
Roman nose profile. Its ears are long, broad, and hanging. It has strong legs with hard
hoofs. It is extremely hardy and shows no fear of heights. Non- seasonal breeding is
possible three times in two years, and twins are the norm.

Breed category: long wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

California Red
The California Red was developed in 1970. It is a cross between Barbados and Tunis
sheep. Considered medium-sized sheep, mature rams weigh 225 to 250 pounds and
ewes range from 130 to 150 pounds. Both sexes are naturally hornless. Lambs are born
a solid rust or cinnamon red color, a color that is retained as they mature.

At maturity, the fleeces turn a beige or oatmeal color. The legs and faces are free of
wool with long pendulous ears which emphasize the animal's appearance. The wool is
silky in texture and has found a specialty market with hand spinners and weavers. Year-
round breeding is another charactertistic of the breed.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

California Variegated Mutant


The Romeldale is a breed of sheep developed by A.T. Spencer, who felt the Romney breed
would increase the staple, length, and carcass quality of his Rambouillets. Through many years
of selection, the Romeldale breed was developed, with fleece properties of 60-64's, extremely
high yield, and uniformity including carcass cutability superior to the other whiteface breeds.
During the 1960's, Glen Eidman, a partner of J.K. Sexton, found in his purebred Romeldale flock
a multi-colored ewe lamb.

Two years later a ram lamb of the same barred pattern was born and when crossed with the
ewe, the resulting offspring were of the same color pattern. Through subsequent breeding and
further mutants from the Romeldale flock, the C.V.M. Breed was born. These sheep, christened
C.V.M.'s or California Variegated Mutants, were kept by Eidman who then placed emphasis on
spinability of the fleece, twinning, and lambing ease. The CVM is classified as a "critical" breed
by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: medium wool, rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cambridge
The Cambridge is a dark faced, medium sized sheep with an average quality white fleece. It
was founded in 1964 at Cambridge University. The female foundation stock consisted of very
prolific ewes selected within native breeds. Most ewes were from the Clun Forest breed, but
the Lleyn, Llanwenog and Kerry Hill breeds also contributed signficantly, and the Radnor,
Ryeland, Border Leicester, and Suffolk to a lesser extent.

These ewes were crossed with Finn rams and the resultant F1 males were backcrossed with
the foundation stock to reduce the Finn contribution to 20 percent. The particular value of the
Cambridge is for crossing with other breeds and crossbreeds to produce a superior halfbred
ewe. The breed has a very high prolificacy, most of which can be attributed to the presence of
a single gene which has a major effect on ovulation.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, prolific

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cameroon
The Cameroon sheep is a hair sheep from West Africa. Instead of wool, they carry
a hair coat that in the autumn forms an additional undercoat, which is shed after
winter. Cameroon sheep do not require shearing.

Cameroon sheep are very prolific and reach puberty very early. They are aseasonal
and can produce two lamb crops per year. They are a resistant, problem-free
sheep. Their most common color is brown with a black belly, head, and legs.

Breed categories: hair, landrace

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Castlemilk Morrit
During the early years of the 20th century, the late Sir Jock Buchanan-Jardine began a breeding
program on his Castlemilk Estate in Dumfriesshire. Using Manx Loghtan, moorit Shetland, and
wild Mouflon, he developed a breed to beautify his parkland and provide fine, kemp-free moorit
colored wool. On the death of Sir John Buchanan-Jardine the flock was dispersed in 1970, and
six ewes and a ram were bought by Joe Henson at the Cotswold Farm Park.

All of today’s Castlemilk Moorits are descended from these few sheep. The Castlemilk Moorit is
one of the larger primitive-type breeds, with mature ewes weighing in the region of 40 kgs. (85
lbs.) and rams 55 kgs. (120 lbs.) The ewes exhibit two uniform and wide spreading horns which
are much heavier and evenly spiralled in the rams. Light brown or moorit in color, they have
definite mouflon pattern markings to include white underparts around the eyes, lower jaw, belly,
knees and inside lower leg and tail together with a rump patch.

Breed categories: primitive, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Charmoise Hill
The Charmoise sheep originated in the hills of France and has been used in the production of
continental terminal breeds such as the Charollais and the Rouge. The Charmoise is a
genuine hill breed, the first to be imported to Britain from the Continent. The breed was formed
in France in the late 18th century by the introduction of Kent rams from England, which were
crossed on the indiginous hill and mountain breeds to give them a better shape.

The exceptional confirmation of the breed is the principal reason for the success of the
Charmoise ram in commercial crossbreeding schemes for the production of quality primestock
lamb. It is found in the rougher hill areas of France today where it is bred pure to produce a
high quality small lamb. In France it is the only top confirmation breed to be classified as "race
rustique" (hardy breed).

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Charollais
Charollais sheep are from the same region of France as Charolais cattle. They originated
in the early 1800's from a cross of the British Dishley Leicester with local landrace
breeds. The Charollais breed is a medium sized, heavy sheep, with a long loin and well
muscled hindquarters. Their clean head is pinkish grey. Their wool is fine to medium and
dense.

They are used primarily as a terminal sire to increase the muscling and growth rate of
lambs. They are the second most popular terminal sire breed in the United Kingdom.
Carcasses from Charollais lambs are lean and heavily muscled, especially in the loin and
hindquarters. Dressing percentage is above average.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Chios
Like many breeds, the exact origin of the Chios is unknown. Some sources suggest it is
the result of crossbreeding between local sheep of the island of Chios (Greece) and
breeds from Anatolia (Turkey). The Chios is typically white with black, occasionally
brown, spots around the eyes, and on the ears, nose, belly and legs. The entire head is
often black.

Female conformation is typically dairy. The breed is classified as semi-fat-tailed. Milk


production for the breed varies from 265 to 660 pounds (120-300 kg) of milk per lacation
depending on management and husbandry conditions. The highest production recorded
is 1,317 pounds (597.4 kg) during a 272 day lactation.

Breed cateogories: dairy, semi-fat-tailed / Distribution: Greece, Mediterranean

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Churra
The Churra sheep is an native breed raised in Castile and León in northwestern
Spain. It is a milk production breed of great hardiness, well suited to the continental
climate of Castile and León, with long, severe winters, very short springs, and hot dry
summers.

Zamorano cheese is a classic Spanish sheep’s milk cheese. It is made with full
cream milk, coming mainly from the Churra sheep. Navajo Churro sheep descend
from the Spanish Churra.

Breed categories: dairy, carpet wool / Distribution: Spain, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Clun Forest
The Clun Forest originated in the mountainous district of South West Shropshire in
England, adjoining the Welsh Border, and are the most numerous sheep of the Marshes
of Wales. They take their name from the ancient market town of Clun. Some authors
attribute the breed to a combination of Hill Radnor and Shropshire, with Kerry Hill
breeding also introduced in about 1865.

Cluns are considered a hardy, moderately prolific, easy care breed of medium size. They
are a relatively new breed in the United States, first imported in 1959. Clun Forests are
darkfaced with no wool on the head and legs. They produce a medium wool fleece and
are known for their longevity.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Coburg
In the 19th century this landrace sheep populated the European hilly ranges abundantly.
These red fox-colored sheep could be found under names that indicated their color or living
area, such as Golden Fox, Eisfelder Fox Sheep, Eifeler Sheep, Ardenais Solognotes, or
Rousse Tetes. In the beginning of the 20th century, 60% of the sheep in the German
Coburg area were of this landrace with the red fox-colored heads, but by World War II they
were nearly extinct.

It took Otto Stritzel, a breeder and weaver from Bavaria to publicize the favorable
characteristics of the Fuchsschaf, which laid the foundation for its continued existence. The
Coburger Fuchsschaf is frugal, hardy, and prolific. Longevity and non-fussiness of food
make it a perfect choice for keeping on rough hilly ranges. It is possible to breed them three
times in two years. The specialty of the Coburger Fuchsschaf is its long wool. Lambs are
born with a dark red-brown fleece that lightens at age 6-12 months

Breed categories: rare, long wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Columbia
The Columbia is truly an All-American breed, the first to originate in the United States.
Columbias were developed in 1912 from Lincoln and Rambouillet crosses. The object of
the cross was to create a breed that produced more pounds of wool and lamb and could
replace crossbreeding on the range.

Though originally bred for range conditions, the Columbia has found widespread
acceptance throughout the United States and is used increasingly to sire crossbred
market lambs. Columbias are one of the larger-sized breeds. Rams weigh between 225
and 300 lbs (100-135 kg) and females weigh between 150 and 225 lbs. (68-102 kg).

Columbia sheep produce a heavy, medium-wool fleece with good staple length and
hardy, fast-growing lambs.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Comisana
The Comisana is one of the most important breeds of Mediterranean sheep. The breed is
valued for its high milk yield, processed on site to produce a variety of home-made high quality
cheeses, following a tradition lasting thousands of years. The average production of Comisana
ewes is 200 liters per lactation.

In well managed flocks, many individuals are producing in excess of 2 liters of milk per day,
indicative of the breed's high potential. The Comisana sheep originated in the Southeast region
of Sicily from where it spread throughout Italy, mainly to Toscana, Lazio, Abruzzo, Basilicata,
Puglia and Calabria regions. The breed is well suited for the entire spectrum of production
systems, from extensive to intensive. The total population is about 700,000 sheep, of which
54% are found in Sicily.

Breed categories: dairy, coarse wool / Distribution: Italy, Mediterranean

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Coopworth
The Coopworth is a medium sized, dual-purpose, white faced sheep with an alert but
quiet disposition. It is one of the most dominant breeds in New Zealand. It originated in
New Zealand in the 1960's from Border Leicester and Romney crosses, and was first
imported into the United States during the late 1970's.

It is a highly productive sheep, intensively selected for easy care lambing, prolificacy,
and good mothering ability. Coopworth wool is relatively coarse and long and is popular
with hand spinners.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, North
America, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cormo
Cormo is a system of breeding in which selection is based on scientific measurement of
commercially desirable characteristics. Selection criteria include clean fleece weight,
fiber diameter, growth or body weight, and fertility. Originating in Tasmania, Australia, the
Cormo derives its name from its two parent breeds: Corriedale and Superfine Saxon
Merino.

Cormo sheep were first introduced into the United States in 1976. They are not being
promoted as a show sheep, but rather as one of economic value. Cormos sheep produce
a long stapled, high yielding fine-wool fleece with a high degree of fiber uniformity. They
cross well with American breeds.

Bred category: fine wool / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Corriedale
The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred wool breeds, a Merino-Lincoln
cross developed in Australia and New Zealand and first brought to the United
States in 1914. Corriedales are a dual-purpose sheep with good meat and wool.

Their dense fleece is medium-fine and high yielding, with good length and softness,
somewhat between medium wool and long wool. It is favored by hand spinners.
Corriedale lambs produce good quality carcasses and have a high pelt value.

Breed categories: medium wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cotswold
The Cotswold is an ancient breed of sheep descended from sheep that grazed the
Cotswold Hills at the time of Caesar's conquest of Britain. In the Middle Ages, Cotswold
wool was a major export of England, contributing greatly to the wealth of the country as a
whole and particularly to the Cotswold region, where the wool churches and large houses
remain as evidence of its importance at that time.

Cotswolds are a large breed, noted for their long, coarse fleece of naturally wavy curls and
the tuft of wool on their foreheads. The earliest record of Cotswolds in the United States is
1832. The Cotswold is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds
Conservancy.

Breed category: long wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dalesbred
The Dalesbred is found in Upper Wharfdale and Central Pennines in England. The breed
originated from the Swaledale and Scottish Blackface breeds. The breed shows a black
face with a distinct white mark above and on each side of the muzzle. The legs are
similarly colored. They have have no wool on either the face or legs. Both sexes have a
round, low set of horns.

Dalesbred wool is of typical carpet quality. The fleece is curly on the outside with a dense
undercoat. Dalesbred sheep are very adaptable to climatic changes and can survive in
the harsh environmental conditions. Dalesbred ewes are often crossed with Teeswater
rams to produce the Masham which is one of the most famous of British crossbreeds.

Breed category: carpet wool, heritage / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Damara
The Damara originated from the Hamites of Eastern Asia and Egypt and moved down to the
present day Namibia and Angola. For many years, the sheep were in an isolated region of
Namibia and thus remained free of influence from other breeds. Damara sheep can survive in
a harsh environment and under poor nutritional conditions.

Research has indicated that up to 64% of the diet of the Damara sheep can consist of
browsing material. This places the Damara in the same feeding category as goats. Hair is
mostly short with a tendency to a fine layer of woolliness developing under the hair during
winter. The sheep has a wide range of colors which are all equally acceptable and desirable.
With the exception of the tail and the rear rump, there is no visible localized fat.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Debouillet
The Debouillet was developed in New Mexico in 1920 from Delaine Merino x
Rambouillet crosses.The breed is best adapted to the range conditions of the
southwestern United States. The Debouillet is a medium-sized sheep with white hair
on the face and legs.

They are hardy and gregarious and adaptable to unassisted pasture lambing. They
produce a fine wool fleece with a deep, close crimp.

Breed category: fine wool, rare / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Delaine Merino
Several strains of Merinos evolved in the United States. The type "A" Merino was developed in
Vermont through selection and inbreeding. This Merino carries a very heavy, wrinkly hide. In
form, the type A is angular and has little carcass value. It is not advocated for commercial
lamb and wool production. The "B" type Merino was developed principally in Ohio, a result of
breeders selecting for a heavy fleece on a sheep that has a fair mutton form.

Its body is fairly free of wrinkles, but it carries heavy neck folds and frequently wrinkles or
heavy folds behind the shoulders and on the thighs and rear flanks. The type B is larger and
better adapted to everyday conditions than the type A. The type "C" or Delaine Merino is the
most practical Merino and is especially adapted to range sheep production in the western and
southwestern parts of the U.S.

The Delaine Merino is of medium size. Mature ewes with full fleece average from 125 to 180
pounds. Rams are larger ranging in weight from 175 to 235 pounds. The Delaine has a
smooth body and is free of wrinkles. In the U.S., over 95 percent of Merinos are smooth or
nearly smooth.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Derbyshire Gritstone
One of the oldest British sheep breeds, the Derbyshire Gritstone was originally bred by
the farmers of the Peak District to survive in a harsh environment and to thrive on the poor
quality grazing found on the moors. They are concentrated today around Derbyshire,
Cheshire, Yorkshire, and Lancashire, but Gritstone rams have been used widely on
Welsh sheep to increase their size.

Gritstones are big, strong sheep with a good weatherproof fleece, the finest of all the
fleeces found in the hill breeds. Both sexes are polled (hornless). The face and legs are
black and white.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Devon and Cornwall Longwool


The Devon Longwoolled is a mutton and long-wool producing breed found in
northern Devon in England. The breed is similar to the South Devon but
smaller. Both sexes are polled.

They were developed from Leicester Longwool crossed with Southam Nott
and Bampton Nott. Their wool is very strong and is used mainly in the
manufacture of rugs and carpets.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Devon Closewool
The Devon Closewool is a medium sized, white faced, hornless sheep with a dense white
fleece of medium length and staple which contributes to its valued quality of hardiness.
The wool of the Devon Closewool is ideally suited to the home spinner and also modern
manufacturing processes. It should contain no black fiber, and therefore commands a
premium price.

The wool is close and fine with a wool count of 48-53. The fleece enables the Closewool
to withstand wind and rain. The breed is primarily a grassland sheep and is very hardy. A
well established breed the Devon Closewool's original home was Exmoor but it is now
spread throughout Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and parts of Wales.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dohne Merino
The Dohne Merino is a synthetic, dual-purpose Merino developed by the South African
Department of Agriculture using Peppin-style Merino ewes and German Mutton Merino
sires. The progeny were interbred and selected for high fertility, rapid lamb growth rate,
and fine Merino wool under commercial rangeland conditions.

The breeding program was initiated in 1939 and the Breed Society was formed in 1966.
Selection since 1970 has been done with the aid of performance and progeny testing and
comprehensive production records. All recorded animals are maintained in a
computerised flock recording scheme. The Dohne Merino is one of the leading woolled
breeds in South Africa.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, fine wool / Distribution: South Africa, Australia, New
Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dormer
The Dormer is a cross between Dorset Horn rams and German Merino ewes (presently
known as the South African Mutton Merino). It was a direct consequence of a series of
extensive slaughter lamb experiments carried out at the Elsenburg Research Station of
the Department of Agriculture since 1927 over a period of more than ten years. The name
Dormers is an abbreviation of the linkage Dorset-Merino.

The main object with the development of the Dormer was to breed a mutton breed which
could adapt to conditions in the winter rainfall area of South Africa (cold and wet) and from
which suitable rams could be produced for cross breeding purposes. The Dormer is well
known for its high fertility, excellent mothering abilities, long breeding season and easy
lambing.

Breed category: meat / Distribution: South Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorper
The Dorper breed is numerically the second largest breed in South Africa. Their popularity
has spread to many countries throughout the world, including the United States in 1995.
The Dorper was developed in South Africa in the 1930's, through crossing of the
Blackheaded Persian ewe (a native fat-tailed sheep) with the Dorset Horn (a mutton
breed).

The breed has a characteristic black head (Dorper) or can be all white (White Dorper).
Dorpers are a well-proportioned breed with heavy muscled hindquarters. Their skin
covering is a mixture of hair and wool and it will drop off without being sheared. The
Dorper has a thick skin which is highly prized and protects the sheep under harsh climatic
conditions. It is the most sought after sheepskin in the world.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorset Down
The Dorset Down originated in England around 1800 by mating Southdown rams with the
large Hampshire Down, Berkshire and Wiltshire ewes. The Dorset Down is a solid,
medium sized, dark-faced, polled sheep. It has a short, close white fleece with wool round
the cheeks, between the ears, on the forehead, and down the legs.

The wool is generally of high quality. The breed produces early maturing lambs and as
such is an ideal terminal sire. Ewes will take a ram in most months of the year, making the
breed ideal for the Christmas or early spring lamb market when prices are at a seasonal
high. Carcass conformation is good with fine bone and shoulder, being well fleshed with
delicately flavoured tender meat.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, terminal sire, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom,
Europe, New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorset
Dorsets are best known for their ability to produce a lamb crop any time during the year.
History tells us that centuries ago when Spain wished to conquer England, Merino sheep
were brought into southwest England and crossed with the Horned Sheep of Wales. The
result was a desirable, all-purpose sheep that spread over Dorset, Somerset, Devon and
most of Wales.

The first Horned Dorsets were brought to the United States in 1885. In 1948, a dominant
gene for polledness occurred resulting in Polled Dorsets which are now popular in the
farm flock states. Dorset ewes are prolific, heavy milkers that produce lambs with
moderate growth and maturity that yield heavy muscled carcasses.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Drysdale
The Drysdale is a dual-purpose breed whose wool is used mainly for carpet
manufacture. Drysdale sheep carry the dominant Nd gene, a mutant which occurred
in the Romney breed. The Nd gene causes a high abundance of coarse, very hairy
fibers, called halo-hairs.

The wool of the Drysdale is without crimp, highly medullated, with a fiber diameter of
40 microns. It is known for its whiteness and dyeing versatility. The Drysdale is found
in most environments throughout New Zealand. They are sheared twice a year.

Breed categories: carpet wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

East Friesian
(Friesian Milk Sheep, Ostfriesisches Milchschaf) The origin of the Friesian sheep breeds
is the region of Friesland extending along the North Sea coast westward from the Weser
River in the northeast of Germany along the north coast of the Netherlands and south to
the Schelde (Scheldt) River at the border of the Netherlands and Belgium.

The German East Friesian Milk Sheep is the best known and most important of the
Friesian breeds and is the breed known in the scientific literature as the "East Friesian."
The East Friesian is considered to be the world's highest producing dairy sheep. They are
highly specialized animals and do poorly under extensive and large flock husbandry
conditions. Friesian sheep cross well with local adapted breeds.

Breed categories: dairy, short-tailed / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Easy Care
The guiding principle behind Easy Care is straightforward. Centuries ago, sheep didn't naturally
have huge fleeces, merely a winter coat which was shed in springtime, as with most wild
animals. However, man began to breed sheep for wool because of its value. In recent times,
the value of wool has fallen so dramatically that its production is uneconomic. Meat production
without the overhead and extra shepherding required in wool production would be much more
profitable.

By using highly selective breeding to combine the rapid growth rate, lambing quality, and other
strengths of his naturally wool-less pedigree Wiltshire Horn flock with the smaller, hardy Welsh
Mountain and combining some of the strengths of other breeds, Iolo Owen has achieved his
aim: a breed of sheep with all the qualities sought after by the modern farmer with fewer of the
drawbacks.

As well as being woolless, Easy Care are extremely hardy, thrive on grass and inexpensive
feeds, have a superb lambing ratio (180% is the average), and produce excellent meat.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Est à Laine Merino


At the end of the 18th century, Merino blood was introduced into German sheep in the
borders with France, and gradually these large "meat" Merinos were kept in large
numbers in the Alsace Lorraine region of France. This strain became known as the Est
à Laine, which translated means East and Wool.

The Est à Laine Merino is an attractive, strong, large-framed sheep with very fine white
wool. The head is long, white in color, with long, drooping ears. The sheep is naturally
polled (no horns), unlike the original Merinos. The neck of the Est à Laine Merino has
no folds or dewlap, making it easier to shear.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Exmoor Horn
Though ancient in origin, the Exmoor Horn, which has existed since time immemorial
in the west of England, is well adapted to modern requirements. The Exmoor can be
described as a dual purpose breed to keep pure on the higher moorland; in fact, they
are classified as a hill breed.

The Exmoor Horn is an excellent crossing ewe. The Bluefaced Leicester cross
produces the Exmoor Mule which is docile and prolific in lowland areas. The Exmoor
is white faced, with horns, cherry colored skin, and a white fleece of medium length
and good quality.

Breed categories: hill, dual purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Faeroes
The origins of the Faeroes breed goes back to the Old Norwegian, Icelandic, and perhaps
Shetland breeds. They are not gregarious and tend to be territorial. The Faeroes will
forage in small groups, spreading to cover the entire area, behaving somewhat like the
Icelandic sheep. These sheep are small and well adapted to mountainous terrain. The
color varies from white, grey, light red, dark red, chestnut brown, to black.

However, due to the low price of wool, they are sheared primarily for the comfort of the
sheep. The lambs reach a slaughter weight of 20 to 45 pounds at 5 months of age. A good
ewe will weigh about 45 pounds at 6 to 7 years of age. Rams weigh from 45 to 90 pounds.
Bone structure is light, but strong. These animals are seasonal breeders, with singles
being most common.

Breed categories: short-tailed, primitive / Distribution: Denmark

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Finnsheep
Finnsheep or Finnish Landrace, as they are known in their native country of Finland
are considered to be several hundred years old, descending from the Mouflon that
live in the wild on Sardinia and Corsica and also said to be related to other
Scandinavian short-tailed sheep.

First imported to the United States in 1968, the primary use of Finnsheep was the
production of crossbred ewes. Finn ewes are hardy, will lamb on an accelerated
lambing program, have strong maternal instincts, and are highly prolific. Lambs are
noted for their high livability.

In the last 20 or so years, more research work and data has been compiled in the
United States involving Finnsheep and their crosses than any other breed of sheep. In
more recent years, Finnsheep have become valued for their soft fleeces of medium
wool.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gansu Alpine Finewool


The Gansu Alpine Finewool was one of a number of finewool breeds in China which made
use of Xinjiang Finewool, along with Russian Merino rams in its development. The Gansu
Alpine Finewool was initially based on Mongolian and Tibetan ewes and was developed
through backcrossing to Merino type, followed by selection.

The breed was developed in the Huangchen District of Gansu Province, China, which has
an altitude of 2,600 to 4,000 m (8,530-13,123 ft), an annual mean temperature of 0 to 3.8°C
(32-39°F), an annual precipitation of 257 to 461 mm, and an average humidity of 35 to 58
percent. The sheep are well adapted to this particular ecological condition. The average
weight of grease fleece in ewes is about 4.6 kg (10.1 lbs), and the wool quality is 60-64's
(20-25µm).

Breed categories: fine-wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Blackheaded Mutton


In 1850, blackheaded meat breeds, such as Leicester, Southdown, and Hampshire were
imported from England into Saxony to be crossed with local breeds. Thirty years later,
breeding of these sheep started more in Westfalia and Eastern Prussia than in Saxony.
The Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep) was prevalent in Saxony.

Westfalia, with its high precipitation was the perfect area for the Schwarzkopf
Fleischschaf, and it is still the main breeding area. German Blackheaded mutton sheep
are medium-sized, white sheep that are wide and long with dark-brown to black head,
ears, and legs. They grow crossbred wool with a tight and firm staple that protects them
in a wet climate.

Breed category: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Gray Heath


The German Gray Heath is the symbol of the Lueneburger Heide in Germany. Their
ancestors, the Mouflon were at home in Corsica. Single lambs are born in spring with a curly,
black fleece. After the sheep’s first yearly shearing, its wool turns silver gray with a black bib.
Head and legs are black and free of wool. Rams weigh up to 80 kg (176 lbs) and have
imposing horns that curl close to the face. Ewes weigh about 45 kg (100 lbs) and have short
horns.

Their meat tastes like venison. The dual-coated fleece of a ewe weighs 2.2 kg (4.4 lbs.), of a
ram 4 kg (8.8 lbs).. The coarse, straight outer coat is 25 cm (11.4 in.) long. The downy
underwool grows 6 cm (2.7 in) long and has a fiber diameter of 25-30 microns. The wool used
to be sent to Belgium and Turkey to be worked into carpets.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Merino
In the 18th century, Southern German Landsheep were crossed with French and Spanish
Merinos, which produced the Merinolandschaf. This sheep breed is the most wide-spread one
in Germany today, with 40% of the total German sheep population. The Merinolandschaf of
today started with the dual- coated Zaupelschaf, which already in 1539 was not liked because it
produced inferior wool. For that reason it was crossed with the Marschschaf from the Lower
Rhine.

This sheep was large, prolific, and could march, and its wool had a fiber diameter of 33 to 36
microns. Later, Merino wool sheep from Spain and France were used to improve the wool
quality. The Merinolandschaf has a large frame, a straight head with a small woolly tuft on top,
no horns, and rough, large ears that stick out to the side, with legs free of wool. It is in no way a
landrace, but a highly adaptable breed.

Breed category: fine-wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Mutton Merino


There are three German Merino breeds: Merinolandschaf (Merino landsheep),
Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep), and Merinolangwollschaf (Merino longwool
sheep). Although all three breeds produce Merino wool and are similar in meat yield, they
went through a different historical and genealogical development. The Merinofleischschaf is at
home east of the Elbe river, spreading all the way to the Ural Mountains.

It is suited for intense production in arid or in agricultural areas. It is highly resistant and easily
adapts to any climate and keeping conditions. It grows easily with good meat yield. Non-
seasonal breeding cycle (3 breedings in 2 years), high fecundity, and good mothering instincts
make the Merinofleischschaf a good choice for intense milk-lamb production.

Breed category: dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Whiteheaded Mutton


This breed was developed along the North Sea coast in the middle of the last century. English
Leicester, Cotswold, Hampshire, and Oxfordshire were imported and crossbred with the local
Wilstermarschschaf, a northern German marsh sheep. Breeders succeeded in retaining the
wanted qualities of the marsh sheep, such as high fecundity, fast development, and large size. In
the 1930’s, a new breed, the Deutsches Weißköpfiges Fleischschaf started to roam the grassy
areas next to the North Sea.

It is the perfect breed to withstand the rough, damp sea climate and suited for life on the dikes.
The sheep fatten on the lush dike grass, pound down the earth and encourage new grass
growth, thus helping to stabilize the North Sea dikes which makes them resistant against storm
floods. The sheep need to be rugged and to protect them against the weather, they have a long,
rough fleece with a fiber diameter of 37 to 41 microns. The white wool, also known as Eider
wool, has a good crimp which is unusual for such rough wool.

Breed category: dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gotland
Gotland sheep were first established on the large Baltic island of Gotland, off the east
coast of Sweden. The Vikings brought Karakul and Romanov sheep back from Russia
and crossed them with native landrace sheep, such as the Gute. Gotlands are polled.
They have short, hair-tipped tails and do not require crutching.

Lambs are born black and grow quickly, many turning to grey as they mature. Gotlands
produce a quick growing, lustrous, colored, curly fleece of medium micron. The Gotland
is found throughout Sweden where it is kept for its pelt and meat production. The breed
was recently established in the United States via artificial insemination.

Breed categories: fur, primitive / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, Australia, New
Zealand, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Greyface Dartmoor
The Greyface Dartmoor is also known as the Dartmoor or "Improved" Dartmoor. Descended
from the local breeds, which grazed the low ground in and around Dartmoor, they have
immense strength of constitution developed through withstanding the severe winters and
exposed conditions, which exist around the Moor. Improvements were carried out during the
19th century using the local Longwools (Notts) and the Leicester.

The Dartmoor fleece is classified as Lustre Longwool. They are a medium sized sheep
(approx. 60 kg/132 lbs), hornless, deep bodied, short legged, with well woolled head and legs.
The white face should be mottled or spotted with black or grey with matching feet.

Breed categories: long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Growmark
Development of the Gromark began in 1965 in northern New South Wales, Australia. The
Gromark is fixed at approximately 50 percent Corriedale and 50 percent Border Leicester.
It is a dual-purpose sheep which evolved from objective selection for high growth rate and
fertility with final selection being based on visual criteria: wool quality, frame, and carcass
attributes.

The Gromark is a large-framed breed (ewes average 80 kg/175 lb) producing large lean
lambs and good fleeces with wool fiber diameter being about 30 microns. Breed
categories: dual-purpose

Breed categories: dual-purpose / Distribution: Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gulf Coast Native


Spanish sheep first arrived in Florida in the 1500's. Later importations of Spanish and
other breeds of sheep mixed with the earlier population, all evolving under the strong
natural selection of the native range conditions of Florida and the other Gulf Coast
states. Today a remnant of this population survives and is known as the Gulf Coast.

Gulf Coasts are best known for their resistance to internal parasites. The Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station in Gainesville has a flock which has been maintained
without the use of anthelmintics since 1962. The Gulf Coast Native is classified as a
"critical" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gute
Gute sheep are the most primitive breed in the collection of breeds that make up the
Swedish Landrace breed group. These breeds belong to the North European Short Tailed
Breeds and are related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, Spelsau, Shetland,
Faroe, Orkney, and Icelandic sheep.

Both rams and ewes have two well-developed, slightly turned, converging or diverging,
symmetrical horns which are strongly curved and deeply ringed. The rams' horns are large
and strong; the ewes' are thinner. Gute wool is coarse and may be straight or wavy. It is a
mixture of fine wool, long coarser hair, and kemp fibers. Most sheep shed their fleece
partly or entirely in the beginning of the summer.

Breed categories: Swedish landrace, primitive, short-tail, coarse wool / Distribution:


Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hampshire
The Hampshire sheep acquired its name from the agricultural county of Hampshire in
southern England where it was developed from Old Hampshire, Southdown, Wiltshire
Horn, and Berkshire Knot crosses. Hampshires were first brought to the United States in
1860, but all of the flocks were either destroyed or scattered during the Civil War.

Importations in large numbers did not resume until the 1880's. Hampshires are a large
breed, with black faces and legs and wool on the legs and head. Their fast growth rate
and superior carcass merit make them a popular choice to sire crossbred market lambs.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool, down / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Han
The Han is a type of Mongolian sheep. It was developed in the semi-humid agricultural areas of
China (Henan, Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces). There are two types of Han
which in 1982, were claimed as two different breeds: Large-tail Han and Small-tail Han. The
Large-tail Han are polled and are characterized by a long, broad, fat tail, with a thin twisted end
turing upwards between two lobes, and broadest at the base. Maximum weight being 25 kg.

Since the tail is too heavy for the sheep to move around easily during grazing, this type (or
breed) is only adaptable to the plains. Han sheep are precocious and highly prolific, their
fecundity levels being 163% for the Large-tail Han and 229% for the Small-tail Han. Recent
reports have given even even higher figures of 192 percent for the Large-tail Han and 270
percent for the Small-tail.

Breed categories: fat-tail / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hebridean
The Hebridean, a sheep breed now classified as rare, originated in the islands off the
western coast of Scotland. They are classified as one of the Northern Short-tailed breeds.
Over the centuries, Hebridean ewes have been selected by natural systems for hardiness
in all weathers, ease of lambing, milkiness and good mothering instincts.

Because Hebrideans have not been modified by artificial selection they remain a small,
economically efficient breeding ewe with a surprising ability to produce quality cross-bred
lambs. Both sexes are usually horned with either two or four horns, four horns being the
most common. They have shown a greater tendency to browse than other sheep breeds
which has made them useful in ecological projects where the control of brush and weeds
was needed.

Breed categories: Rare, Northern European short-tail / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Heidschnucke
The Heidschnucke are a fairly small sheep, initially originating from Niedersachsen in
Germany. There are several varieties of Heidschnucke sheep: the grey horned
Heidschnucke, the white horned Heidschnucke, and the moorschnucke (marsh sheep). At
one time, the Heidschnucke were the most important sheep in northern Germany, but
their numbers have declined substantially.

Lambs are black at birth, but their fleece discolors their first year of life, until it gets its
characteristic grey color. Both rams and ewes have beautiful horns. Lambing percentage
is usually low, only about 100 percent.

Breed categories: rare, primitive / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Herdwick
They name Herwick is derived from an old Norse word that means sheep pasture. It
is believed that the ancestors of Herdwick sheep were introduced by early Norse
settlers. Herdwick sheep are considered the most hardy of British hill sheep.

They are raised mostly in the central and western dales of the Lake District and are
noted for their foraging ability in rough terrain. They produce a good crossbred lamb,
but their wool is considered to be of low quality and low value. The produce a coarse,
grey wool, a carpet wool.

Breed categories: rare, heritage / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hill Radnor
The Hill Radnor is a hardy hill sheep with a long history attached to the central marshes
of Wales.

The Hill Radnor has a light brown face and legs, free from wool. The rams are horned,
with horns of varying size; ewes are naturally polled. Compared to some other hill
breeds, the fleece is white and dense, with a fine staple, and is popular with local hand-
spinners and weavers. Like many hill breeds they are thrifty and good foragers

Breed categories hill, medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hog Island
About 200 years ago, a flock of sheep was established on Hog Island, one of Virginia's barrier
islands located off its Eastern Shore. The sheep were already native to the area and are
believed to have had a substantial amount of Merino blood in them. There were occasional
subsequent introductions to the population, the last being in 1953, when a Hampshire ram was
taken to the island. In 1974, the island was sold to The Nature Conservancy, which decided to
remove all the sheep and cattle.

Gunston Hall Plantation in Fairfax County, Virginia, eventually became the owner of the greater
number of these sheep and exhibited them as part of their replication of 18th century plantation
life. Hog Island sheep evolved and survived for over 200 years in an extremely harsh
environment on a limited diet and no medical attention. It is estimated that there are
approximately 200 Hog Island breeding ewes, mostly in Virginia.

Breed categories: medium wool, rare, heritage / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hu
Hu sheep originated from Mongolian sheep. They are distributed in the Zhejiang Jiangsu
provinces of China and the suburbs of Shanghai. Hu sheep are well recognized for their
beautiful wavy lambskins, early sexual maturity, aseasonal breeding, prolificacy, and the
adaptability to a hot and humid climate. Hu sheep are raised indoors all year round. The
lambskins taken from lambs slaughtered within the day of birth have distinctive wave-like
stripes which are still retained after processing.

Hu sheep lambskins are traditional export item of Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. The first
estruses in ewes occur at the age of 4-5 months. Rams are capable of mating at the age of 4
months. Ewes cycle all year round. The average ovulation rate is 2.38 with higher ovulation
rate of 2.60 in autumn and lower rate of 2.2 in spring. Under normal conditions, ewes lamb
twice a year with litter size 2-3 lambs in most cases, and 7-8 lambs occasionally.

Breed categories: fur, meat / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Icelandic
The modern Icelandic Sheep is a direct descendant of the sheep brought to Iceland by the
early Viking settlers in the ninth and tenth century. They are of the North European Short
Tailed type, related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, and Shetland. A major
gene controlling prolificacy has been identified in the Icelandic breed. This gene exhibits
action similar to the gene found in the Booroola Merino.

The fleece from Icelandic sheep has an inner and outer coat typical of the more primitive
breeds, and it is the wool for which Iceland is known. It is illegal to import any sheep into
Iceland.

Breed categories: double-coated, short-tailed / Distribution: North America, Iceland,


United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ile de France
The Ile de France is the result of crossing the English Leicester and the
Rambouillet. The breed was originally known as the Dishley Merino.

The breed is widespread in France and was introduced to Great Britain in the
1970's. The breed is wide and thick set. Both sexes are polled. The Ile de France is
widely used throughout the world as a terminal sire for quality lamb production.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Imroz
The Imrov is among the smallest sheep breeds in Turkey. They are raised for meat,
milk, and wool. Animals are predominantly white, with black marks around the mouth,
nose and eyes, on the ears and rarely on the tip of the legs.

The tail is thin and long, usually reaching below the hocks. Rams have strong spiral
horns extending sideways; ewes are usually polled, but up to 30% of the ewes may
have small scurs. The head is narrow and its profile is straight. The wool is very coarse
and long, and it covers the top of the head

Breed categories: dual-purpose, carpet wool / Distribution: Turkey

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

INRA 401
The creation of the INRA 401 sheep bloodline began in France in 1970, after a series of
experiments crossing the Berrichon du Cher x Romanov which began in 1963 with the
Romanov breed.

Matings were carried out for several successive generations, between breeding stock of
the same generation chosen in priority to maintain the origins represented in the
foundation generation. The INRA 401 is a highly productive ewe, with a 200 percent
prolificacy, excellent out-of-season fertility, good milk production, and outstanding
mothering ability.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Jacob
The Jacob is a unique breed. Their most striking features are their four horns, two vertical
center horns and two side horns curling along side of the head, and their spotted black and
white fleece which is prized by hand spinners and weavers. The Jacob is an old, unimproved
breed whose origins are obscure to say the least. Some say they are the result of the earliest
recorded selective breeding as referenced in the Bible.

Others claim they descend from Moorish sheep brought from Spain or Africa or from Norse
sheep from Scandinavia and the northern Scottish islands. Jacobs came to Britain via the
Iberian Peninsula and have been raised there for over 350 years. Until recent times, Jacobs
were kept at only a few large estates in England and thought to be in danger of extinction, but
they are making a comeback. The Jacob is classified as a "rare" breed by the American
Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Jezersko-Solcava
Jezerskosolflorinavska sheep resulted from the crossbreeding of native white sheep with the
Bergamasca sheep and with the Padova sheep. It resembles the Austrian Bergschaf that has
a similar origin. The breed got its name after the breeding centers of Jezersko and
Solflorinava. Its head has a convex profile and hanging ears. Its legs are long and strong. This
breed is very convenient for lamb production in the Alpine and Pre-Alpine region.

Since 1980, Jezersko-Solflorinavska sheep has been crossed by Romanovska sheep, hence
number of pure breed animals has been decreased quickly. Therefore, a special program on
preservation the pure breed has been started in 1991. An ewe has 1.42 lambs per lambing.
Ewes are non-seasonal breeders and pregnancy usually occurs during the lactation period.

Breed categories: meat / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kamieniec
Kamieniec are a Polish breed. They were created in the years 1954-1965 in the
Kamieniec farm of the Breeding Center in Susz, near Olsztyn. The starting point was a
flock of primitive ewes of the Pomeranian type, from individual farms in the regions of
Gdansk and Koszalin or brought from settlers from the East. They were initially crossed
with Leine and Texel rams, and then mated to Romney Marsh rams.

After selection, the progeny was interbred in order to obtain genetic consolidation of the
required traits and a more uniform type. Sheep of this strain have rather large, deep, and
broad bodies. Their wool covering much of the body is uniform in quality, with long staples
and hgh clean yield. This variety is also highly resistant to diseases, especially foot rot.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: Eastern Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Karakul
The Karakul may be the oldest breed of domesticated sheep. Archeological evidence indicates
the existence of the Persian lambskin as early as 1400 B.C. and carvings of a distinct Karakul
type have been found on ancient Babylonian temples. Native to the plains of Central Asia,
Karakuls differ radically in conformation from most other American breeds. They are of the fat
broad tailed type of sheep. In their large tail is stored fat, a source of nourishment, similar in
function to the camel's hump.

In Central Asia and South Africa , large flocks of Karakuls are still raised for pelt production from
very young lambs. The skins of baby lambs with their tightly curled wool are used in the "Persian
lamb" fur trade. Karakuls were introduced to the United States between 1908 and 1929. They
are a specialty breed in the U.S. Their fleeces, long and colorful, are prized by hand spinners.
Karakul wool is the wool upon which the art of felting evolved. The Karakul classified as a "rare"
breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: double-coated, fat-tailed, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Katahdin
The Katahdin is an improved breed of hair sheep, the first hair breed to meet North American
industry standards for carcass quality. The Katahdin is a cross between British meat breeds,
notably the Suffolk, African Hair sheep, specifically the St. Croix, and later the Wiltshire Horn.
They were developed in the 1950's by amateur geneticist Michael Piel and take their name
from Mt. Katahdin in Maine where the Piel farm was located.

The Katahdin is an easy-care, low-maintenance meat-type sheep that is naturally tolerent of


climateic extremes and capable of high performance in a variety of environments. One of the
most outstanding characteristics of the Katahdin is its natural resistance to internal parasites.
The Katahdin is one of the most popular breeds of registered sheep in the U.S.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: North America, Caribbean, Asia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kelso
The Kelso is one of several composite breeds developed in New Zealand. Unlike
traditional breeds, which are bred for appearance as well as productivity, composites are
bred for productive traits alone. The Kelso is continually being upgraded and modified to
meet changing market needs.

Kelso uses the best tools available to ensure genetic progress. Kelso is a sheep genetics
company which has developed two large scale breeding programmes over the last 50
years. The Kelso (Maternal Sire) and Ranger (Terminal Sire) breeding flocks are run on
five farms from Gisborne to Southland all genetically linked. Breed categories: composite

Breed catetories: meat, composite / Distribution: New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kerry Hill
The Kerry Hill breed is from Powys, on the English/Welsh borders, and it derives its
name from the village of Kerry, near Newtown. There are records of this distinctive breed
in this area dating back to 1809, and the first Flock Book was published in 1899.
Registered Kerry Hill Sheep can be found throughout the British Isles, Ireland, and
Holland.

It is a handsome sheep, with a black nose and sharply defined black and white markings
on the head and legs. The fleece handles well and is amongst the softest of British
wools. The breed crosses well with Hill and Long wool breeds to make crossbred ewes.

Breed categories: hill, dual-purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kivircik
The Kivircik is found in northwestern Turkey, where it is kept for milk and meat
production. Their fleece is of carpet-wool type, but the wool is of better quality than
the wool of all other indigenous breeds in Turkey.

They are white with white or spotted faces, similar to the Karnobat and the Tsigai.
Black and brown varieties are also found. Rams have horizontal spiral horns
extending sideways; ewes are usually polled. Tails are long and thin, usually
reaching the hocks.

Breed categories: multi-purpose, carpet wool / Distribution: Turkey

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lacaune
The Lacaune is the most numerous sheep breed in France. It has been selected in
France for increased milk production under a sophisticated selection program
incorporating artificial insemination, milk recording, and progeny testing of sires for
longer than any other dairy sheep breed in the world.

Annual genetic improvement for milk yield in the French Lacaune is estimated at 2.4%
or 5.7 kg (12.5 lbs). Lacaune ewes produce milk with higher total solids than the East
Friesians, but in slightly less volume.The sheep of the Lacaune breed produce the milk
which is responsible for the famous Roquefort cheese.

Breed categories: dairy / Distribution: Europe, North America, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Landschaf
This member of the heath-sheep landrace is a cross between German and Dutch heath
sheep and a marsh sheep. Since 1934, it has been bred in the northern German Emsland
area, especially in the county of Bentheim. The highly endangered, frugal Bentheimer
Landschaf is used for landscape preservation. It is the largest of the German heath and
moor sheep with long legs and hard hoofs.

A slender, long head, Roman nose, small ears, no horns, long and woolly tail, describe
the sheep. The sheep is white, but dark pigmentation is permitted around the eyes, on the
ears and on its legs. Fleece weight is 3-4 kg (6.6-8.8 lbs), with a fiber diameter of 34-40
microns.

Breed categories: landrace, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Leicester Longwool
The Leicester Longwool was important to the development of other long wool breeds and
has made a large contribution to the sheep industries in Australia and New Zealand. The
breed originated in the Leicester region of England and although it is a very old breed,
Robert Bakewell, a pioneer in the field of animal genetics, is given credit for improving it
during the 18th century.

Leicesters are a big sheep with a heavy fleece of curly, lustrous wool that is even in length
and fiber diameter. The breed was first imported into the United States during the time of
the American Revolution, and it is believed that George Washington used Leicester sheep
to improve his flock at Mt. Vernon. The Leicester Longwool is classified as a "rare" breed
by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Leine
The Leine breed comes from the region of Nordheim (Hannover), in particular from the Leine
river valley (hence the name).

It was created through crossbreeding of local breeds with Friesian, Merino, and Berrichon du
Cher rams as well as rams of the English Leicester, and Cotswold breeds. In effect, a white
hornless sheep of the dual purpose type was obtained. Medium-early maturing with uniform
medium coarse wool, it is a hardy and healthy breed, well adapted to difficult conditions and to
walking over long distances. In Germany, the breed is nearly extinct.

Breed categories: dual purpose, coarse wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Limousine
Limousine sheep orginated in the region of France which gave them their name.

The Limousine sheep breed has great hardiness and excellent adaptability in very
varied regions, notably on non-chalky, acid soils. It is a breed notable for its female
qualities: early sexual maturity, a sure aptitude for off-season breeding, maternal
instinct, and milk value.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lincoln
The Lincoln is one of the world's largest breeds of sheep. Its fleece is the heaviest,
longest-stapled and most lustrous of any breed in the world.

Lincolns originated in a fertile area on the East Coast of England, bordering the North
Sea and the county of Lincolnshire. They were first brought to the United States in
1825, where they contributed to the development of several commercially-important
American breeds including the Columbia and Targhee.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lleyn
Lleyn sheep originate from the Lleyn peninsula in Wales and until recently were a
relatively unfamiliar breed of sheep in the UK. Over the past 10 years the Lleyn breed has
caught the eye of many farmers, and now Lleyn sheep can be found almost all over the
Country.The Lleyn ewe is renowned for her tremendous mothering ability, ease of
lambing, longevity, and prolificacy.

Lleyn rams are an ideal way to inject maternal traits, fertility, and hybrid vigour back into
breeding ewes. They are also becoming popular for crossing onto hill and lowland ewes
to produce a quality prime lamb or to produce a Lleyn cross female replacement that
carries the qualities of the Lleyn ewe.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lonk
The Lonk has been bred on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Pennines from time
immemoria. It is an aristocrat by virtue of origins as ancient as the hills on which it roams.
It is one of the largest native hill breeds in England. The face is pure black and white,
and the legs are speckled black and white. Both sexes are horned.

Lonk ewes are prolific and good mothers. They are often crossed with Down and
Continental tups (rams) to produce a long lean lamb suitable for the modern consumer.
Lonk tups are often put to ewes of other hill breeds such as Swaledale, Dalesbred,
Scottish Blackface, and Welsh ewes to produce bigger lamb carcasses and improve
wool quality.

Breed categories: carpet wool, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Manchega
The Manchega sheep comes from the Entrefino breed and has a double production use:
milk and sheepmeat. Among this breed, there are two accepted varieties: black and white.
The latter one makes up more than 90% of the animals. The average milk production is
100 liters (26.4 gallons) per animal a year, being markedly seasonal during the months of
April, May and June.

Manchego cheese is the most important and well-known sheep’s milk cheese in Spain.
True Manchega cheese is made only from whole milk of the Manchega sheep raised in
the "La Mancha" region. This region is a vast high plateau, more than 600 meters (1,969
ft) above sea level.

Breed categories: dual purpose (dairy and meat) / Distribution: Spain, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Manx Loaghtan
The Manx Loaghtan is found on the Isle of Man off the coast of Great Britain. It is
member of the Northern Short-tailed group, similar to the Hebridean, but slightly larger.
It's wool is chocolate brown with paler tips. The Manx Loaghtan is descended from the
primitive sheep once found throughout Scotland and the coastal islands of Britain.

Manx Loaghtan are horned with four horns being preferred. In England, the majority is
two-horned. Individuals are also found with six horns. The horns are small on the ewes,
but are larger and stronger on the males. They sometimes shed their natural colored
wool in the spring. The meat is appreciated as a delicatesse and is protected by EU law.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tail / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Masham
Masham sheep have been bred for over a centry on the hill farms in the Northern
Counties of England. They are produced by crossing a Teeswater ram onto either a
Dalesbred or Swaledale ewe, both hardy hill breeds.

It is from these parent breeds that the Masham gains its hardiness, longevity, heavy
milking qualities, strong moterhing insticts and high prolificacy. The Masham ewe is
medium sized and hornless. Her fleece is long staples, 8-10 inches on a yearling and 6
to 7 inches on a ewe, with a good degree of lustre.

Breed categories: half-breed, dual purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Meatlinc
The Meatlinc is a British breed, in the Terminal Sire category, developed from a breeding
program originated by Henry Fell in the early 1960’s.Originally a mixture of chosen
individuals from five breeds, two British and three French, the Meatlinc evolved as a result
of many years of rigorous and disciplined selection based on performance recording
carried out under strictly commercial conditions.

The breed was closed to any further use of outside genetic material in 1975. It is thus a
genuine pure breed with recognizable uniformity. It is amongst the biggest of the British
breeds, a mature ram weighing 140 kg (over 300 lbs).

Breed categories: meat, terminal sire / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Meatmaster
In the early 1990's, determined to utilize the advantages of the indigenous fat-tailed hair
breeds and realizing the huge gap between the fat-tailed breeds and the well-muscled
British and European breeds and the need for a truly good pure hair breed with good meat
qualities, a group of South African farmers decided to develop a composite breed.

Various fat-tailed breeds were thus crossed with well-muscled breeds and the dream of
the Meatmaster emerged. Meatmaster sheep are selected solely for economic factors
under natural conditions. They have been exported to Namibia, Australia, and Canada.
The Meatmaster must just have a percentage of Damara blood in it. The rest can be that
of any other sheep breed.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Africa, Australia, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Miniature Cheviot
Cheviot sheep originated in the Cheviot Hills between England and Scotland. They were
introduced to the U.S. in 1838. Border Cheviots are small, hardy sheep that spend their lives on
the moors. In the U.S., they have become larger than their ancestors from the UK, so the
Brecknock Hill Miniature Cheviot registry was formed to preserve the original size. The registry
recently dropped "Brecknock Hill" from its name to differentiate American Miniature Cheviots
from the Brecknock Hill Cheviots that originated in Wales and are slightly different.

Miniature Cheviots are usually white, with small heads and erect little pointed ears. Their fleeces
provide a medium wool with a distinctive helical crimp and a long staple, perfect for
handspinning. Maximum height at two years of age is 23 inches at the top of the shoulder when
sheared. Mature ewes weigh 45 lbs to 85 lbs; mature rams 55 lbs to 100 lbs.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, miniature / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Mirror
The Mirror Sheep has a characteristic head design. Besides its otherwise white color,
it has black eye marks, black ear points, and a black nostril. A medium-sized sheep,
Mirror Sheep are undemanding compared to other sheep.

They descend from old Bündner sheep races like the Prättigauer sheep and probably
have influences of the silk sheep and the Luzeiner sheep. Austrian races might have
participated like the Montafoner and the eyeglass sheep in the emergence of the
Mirror Sheep.

Breed categories: meat / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Montadale
The Montadale was developed in the United States from Cheviot and Columbia crosses. E.H.
Mattingly, a well-known commercial lamb buyer is given credit for developing the breed. His
idea was to bring together the qualities of big western-white faced sheep and the popular
mutton characteristics of Midwestern sheep. His result was a good meat type, dual- purpose
animal with the head and legs free of wool and with the stylish appearance and agile body of
the Cheviot.

For fifteen years, many of these Montadale lambs were carcass tested for characteristics which
are now the standard in the industry, but which at that time were yet to become widely
accepted as the ideal. The Montadale breed is considered a dual-purpose breed noted for
producing both high-quality carcasses as well excellent wool.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Morada Nova
The Morada Nova comes from northeast Brazil and is probably of African origin. It
may also be related to a Portugal breed called Bordaleiro. The breed originated from
selection of individuals of the Brazilian Woolless. Both sexes are polled.

The rams do not have a throat ruff. It has been reported that they have a litter size of
1.32 to 1.76. The predominant color is red to cream, but white animals are also found.
The breed is small with mature lamb and ewe weights of about 40 (88 lbs) and 30 kg
(66 lbs), respectively.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Mouflon
The Mouflon is thought to be one of the two ancestors for all modern sheep
breeds. It is red-brown with a dark back-stripe, light colored saddle patch and
underparts. The males are horned and the females are horned or polled.

It is now rare, but has been successfully introduced into central Europe, including
Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovak Republics, and Romania.

Breed categories: native (wild) / Distribution: Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Navajo Churro
The Navajo-Churro was the first domesticated sheep introduced into North America.
Brought from Southern Spain in 1514, Churro sheep became the mainstay of Spanish
ranches and villages along the Rio Grande.

Native Indians acquired flocks of Churro for food and clothing through raids and trading
and eventually incorporated them into their lifestyle. After nearly becoming extinct
through a government sheep "improvement" program in the mid-1900's, the breed is
now recovering and becoming more popular, though still considered a "rare" breed.

They are a small breed, hardy, and disease resistant. Rams may carry four horns. The
Churro fleece is long, fine, and coarse. It has two layers and is low in oil. Native Navajo
tribes still use the Churro fleece to weave their famous rugs and blankets. The Navajo
Churro is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

New Mexico Dahl


New Mexico Dahl Sheep are an almost extinct Spanish Colonial heritage hair sheep breed
under development at Terra Patre Wildlife Preserve & Teaching Farm in Colorado and New
Mexico. The goal in developing these unique sheep is to produce a truly multi-marketable, low-
maintenance product. These hardy, no-shear sheep are beautiful and majestic with the rams
supporting magnificent horns. They are also very excellent sources of lean, less muttony tasting
meat.

The NM Dahl is taking this one step further and wanting to increase the meat marketability
along with increasing the growth of the horns not only on rams but also on the ewes for even
better future horn genetics. With this in mind, New Mexico Dahl Sheep are hybrids of the best
horned and meat hair sheep.

Beginning with the descendents of hair sheep brought to the USA in 1598 by the Onate
Spanish Colonists, and not being limited to breeding within the Corsican Sheep family (Texas
Dall, Black Hawaiian, and Painted Desert Mouflon crosses), breeding is based solely on a
focus of easy care, big horns and heavy meat carcasses, as well as maintaining the shedding
ability in these wonderful hybrids.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

New Zealand Halfbred


The New Zealand Halfbred is a registered breed of sheep, originally developed in
the 19th century by crossing one of the English longwool breeds such as Lincoln,
English Leicester, or Romney, with the Merino.

New Zealand Halfbreds are mainly farmed in the foothills of the South Island high
country. Their wool has a fiber diameter of 25-31 microns, intermediate between
Corriedale and Polwarth. Staple length is 3 to 4 inches.

Breed categories: half-bred, medium-wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New


Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Nolana
The breeding aim of the Nolana sheep is to combine the advantages of hair sheep with
the advantages of native wool sheep. Nolana sheep are hair sheep. They don’t produce
wool, but carry a smooth coat during summer and a 4-5 cm (1.6-1.8 in) thick pelt during
winter which they shed naturally in spring. Therefore, they don’t need to be shorn.

Two types of sheep have evolved during the development of the Nolana sheep: a meat-
type (fleischscafe) and a landrace-type (landscafe) for more extensive settings and
landscape management. The meat-type is mostly white, while the landrace-type is more
variable in color and type.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Norfolk Horn
The Norfolk Horn originated in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridge, England. It is one of
the ancient "Heath" breeds now being revived in small numbers. The Norfolk Horn
was used along with Southdown in the development of the Suffolk breed.

It is a medium-sized breed with a long body and legs. The face and legs are black or
dark brown and free of wool. The fleece is white with new born lambs being mottled.
Both sexes are horned and the horn pattern is an open spiral. The feet are black.

Breed categories: landrace, rare, medium-wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North Country Cheviot


North Country Cheviots are a "hill breed" of sheep. They evolved on the rugged Scotch
highlands and of necessity had to thrive unattended by man and search for food on wild
unimproved land. In these conditions the ewes usually lambed alone, and the newborn
lambs survived by their near-miraculous ability to get-up, nurse, and run just minutes
after their birth.

North Country Cheviot sheep are intelligent, self-reliant, resourceful, and among the
healthiest and most long-lived breeds. The North Country is an tough sheep that
produces both a superior lamb crop and a fleece that delights handspinners. It has
outstanding crossbreeding ability and can be used as either the sire or the dam breed.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North of England Mule


This medium- sized crossbred sheep, sired by the Bluefaced Leicester, has a Swaledale or
Northumberland type Blackface dam. The latter two breeds are born and reared on the Northern
fells and moors and noted for their qualities of hardiness, thriftiness, and longevity. The Mule
ewe has the ability to produce and rear prolific crops of lambs under any system.

Lambs from the Mule by a Down or continental type breed of sire give a first class carcass, at 17
to 22 kg (37-48 lbs), ideal for both the UK and continental markets. The fleece of the Mule has a
staple length of 10-25 cm (4-10 in) and a Bradford Count of 46's-54's. It is mainly used for the
manufacture of knitwear and carpets. The Mule is hornless with a brown/black face, clera of
wool, with a tendency towards a "Roman" nose. Ears and legs are white with brown markings. It
is the most popular crossbred ewe in the UK.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North Ronaldsay
The North Ronaldsay is a small rare breed of sheep of the Northern short-tailed group of
breeds. They have remained virtually unchanged. Their most unique feature is their diet,
which consists mostly of seaweed. Mature ewes rarely exceed 25 kg (55 lbs); rams about
30 to 35 kg (66-77 lbs.). The animals are primitive and fine-boned and have evolved in a
specialized seashore environment on their native island.

They adapt well to mainland management including conservation grazing. Rams are
horned, but ewes can be horned, polled, or scurred. Virtually any color of wool is possible.
Wool is fairy fine, with some kemp. Rams develop a mane and beard of coarse hair.
There are about 3,700 of these sheep still on the island of North Ronaldsay.

Breed categories: rare, primitive, short-tailed / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Old Norwegian
The Old Norwegian Sheep is a small primitive type of sheep which inhabited Norway and the
rest of Scandinavia as well, including Iceland and Faeroes. Probably only the feral Soay Sheep
of St. Kilda are more primitive. The sheep are small framed, with good legs and a fleece varying
in colour from almost white to greyish, dark brown, badger-faced, muflon pattern and black.

Adult males weigh on average 43 kg (95 lbs) and females 32 kg (70 lbs). The fleece is
remarkably fine and in contrast to the mouflon, the inner fleece is highly developed. The outer
coat has long fibers, up to 30 cm (11.8 in) around the neck on the males. Normally, the sheep
shed their fleece naturally in early July. All the males of this breed are horned with approximately
10 % of the ewes also being horned. This breed of sheep has a unique pattern of flight (escaping
an enemy), which makes it suitable for use in grazing areas with predators.

Breed categories: primitive, rare, Northern European short-tailed, double-coated / Distribution:


Norway

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ossimi
The Ossimi breed originated in the Ossim village in the Giza Governorate of Egypt and
is the most popular among the Nile and Delta sheep breeds. It is thought to be
expanding its range at the expense of other breeds.

The breed is adapted to variable conditions and is usually raised under intensive
cropping conditions. They are a medium sized sheep, narrow, with a shallow body and
long legs. They are multi-colored, usually white with a brown head, neck, and legs. They
produce coarse/carpet wool and have a fat tail. Rams are horned.

Breed categories: fat-tailed, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: Middle East, Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ouessant
The Ouessant is one of the smallest sheep breeds in the world. They originated on Ile
d'Ouessant, a small island off the coast of Brittany, France.

Most animals are black in coloration with a few white individuals also occurring. The
average thickness of their wool is 27 to 28 microns. It is suitable for suitable for fine
knitting yarns and soft weaving yarns. Ushants are a dwarf breed with the males being
horned and the females polled (naturally hornless). The breed is rare.

Breed categories: rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Oxford
The Oxford or "Oxford Down," originated in Oxford County, England. The breed was the
result of crossing Cotswolds and Hampshires. It has been contented that very early in the
development of the Oxford breed, a small amount of Southdown blood was introduced.
The breed has never become prominent outside of its own native area in England.
Oxfords have been exported to many major sheep countries.

The Oxford is one of the largest breeds of sheep . It produces the heaviest fleece of any of
the Down breeds. In the U.K., it is a specialist breed to cross with commerical crossbred
ewes for meat production. The first Oxfords were imported to the United States in 1846.
They are a relatively minor breed in the U.S.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, down / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Painted Desert
The Painted Desert Sheep is a spotted hair sheep that received most of its influence from the
Mouflon. Before being established as a separate breed, it was considered by many to be a
parti-colored Corsican. Other early influence came from Merino and Rambouillet, and a few
four-horned individuals stem from Jacob or Churro ancestry. Long desired by hunters because
of the large horns and aesthetic, flashy looks, the Painted Desert is now popular among exotic
and alternative livestock fanciers.

These sheep shed their short winter wool naturally each spring, leaving a glossy, slick coat.
Colors can be very wild with mixes of up to four or five colors. They breed out of season and
lamb twice a year, with twins and even triplets occurring often. They produce a carcass of lean
meat without a muttony taste. Rams must show Mouflon influence by sporting a luxurious
mane in addition to large, heavy horns of homonymous, supracervical or polycerate types.
Some ewes may be horned.

Breed category: hair, exotic / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Panama
The Panama breed of sheep is one of only two recognized breeds of sheep which were
developed in the United States by private sheep breeders. Originating in Idaho in the early
1900's, the Panama began as a cross between Rambouillet rams and Lincoln ewes.
Following approximately five years of crossbreeding, rams and ewes were mated among
themselves to establish the breed.

The Panama is a hardy breed that is highly adapted to range areas with ample feed
conditions. They are polled, resemble the Columbia breed, but are more intermediate in
size, and produce a heavy, dense medium-grade fleece with a long staple length.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pelibüey
The Pelibüey is a hair sheep, probably closely related to the West African, Red African,
African or Africana breed of Columbia and Venezuela. It is descended from the West
African Dwarf and is found in Cuba, coastal areas of Mexico, and other locales in the
Caribbean. It comprises 75 percent of sheep population in Cuba.

Hair color ranges from beige, brown, dark brown, red, white, black, and roan, with both
solid and a combination of colors found. Males do carry a throat ruff, but usually do not
have horns.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: Caribbean, Mexico, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Perendale
The Perendale was developed in New Zealand during the 1950's at Massey University
to meet the needs of hill country farmers on developing country. It is still a very popular
breed in New Zealand. Developed from the Cheviot and Romney, the Perendale is a
dual-purpose sheep producing a 28-32 micron wool with a 125 mm (5 in) staple length.

The Perendale is characteristically a high fertility animal, and has great potential to
produce a prime lamb dam when crossed with the Merino. As a purebred, its hardiness
makes it ideally suited to colder, high rainfall areas. The Perendale is easy to care for;
the ewes have little trouble lambing and are good mothers.

Breed category: dual purpose, long wool / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pitt Island
The Chatham Islands, inhabited by about 50 people, lie about 750 kilometers (469 miles) east
of the Mainland of New Zealand. In 1841, Saxony Merino sheep were introduced to the Island.
They have been untended for about 80 years. Natural selection has resulted in self-shedding
fleeces and natural parasite resistance. Originally, they were all white. Half were black by
1950.

Since 1997, 90 percent of flock has been pigmented, most being solid black and about 5%
moorit. Almost 97 percent of the rams have horns. The horns can be massive, forming
complete spirals up to 95 cm (38 in) around the curve. In 1981, 305 of these feral sheep were
placed in a specially created scientific reserve on Pitt Island. Some have been exported to the
mainland of New Zealand where they are maintained by rare breeds enthusiasts.

Breed category: feral, rare / Distribution: New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polish Merino
The first Merino sheep were introduced to Poland from Spain in 1786. In the early 19th
centural, Electoral Merinos were imported. After 1860, Merinos of the Rambouillet and
Precoce types were brought to Poland, and work towards a dual-purpose type of sheep was
begun. In the period between 1918 and 1939, the breed was improved for meat traits using
such breeds as the Mele and Ile de France, created on the basis of English Longwool sheep.

After 1945, Fleischmerinos and Landmerinos were introduced into some of the Merno flocks
which survived the war. The Polish Merino flocks are located mostly in western Poland. The
Polish Merino shows both meat and wool traits.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polish Mountain
Polish Mountain Sheep evolved from the old Carpathian Cakiel, and especially one of its
varieties - the primative Podhale sheep. The breed can be found in the whole Polish part
of the Carpathian mountains; however, it is most frequently found in the Podhale region
near the town of Nowy Sacz, where the breed traditionally originates. It has a light build,
thin but strong legs and narrow rump.

Polish Mountain sheep are milked. The milk yield is 50 to 100 liters per lacation and 40 to
80 liters in a milking period of 150 days with a fat content of 7 to 8%. Meat production is
rather poor. The wool is white and coarse, suitable for carpet manufacture. The thatch-like
coat consists of loose locks, with a characteristic parting line along wthe back.

Breed category: carpet wool, dairy / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polwarth
The Polwarth is a dual-purpose sheep, developed in Victoria, Australia, in 1880. It is 75
percent Merino and 25 percent Lincoln. Polwarths are well suited to areas with improved
pastures and are mainly found in the higher rainfall districts of southern Australia. The
breed has been successfully exported to many countries, particularly South America
where they are know as "Ideals".

The Polwarth breed contains both polled and horned sheep with the polled types
predominating. It is large framed, robust, and produces a high-yielding, soft-handling
fleece of 22-25 micron fiber diameter. Much of the emphasis within the breed has been
directed towards developing and improving the wool aspects.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, South
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polypay
The Polypay is a synthetic breed, developed in the 1970's at the U.S. Sheep
Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho, and Nicholas Farms at Sonoma, California.
Targhee x Dorset and Rambouillet x Finnsheep crosses were mated to form a 4-breed
composite that could produce two lamb crops and one wool crop per year.

Polypays are a medium-sized, prolific breed with an extended breeding season. Good
mothers and milkers, they produce lambs with acceptable growth and carcass quality.
The name Polypay comes from "poly" for many or much and "pay" to indicate a return
on investment and labor.

Breed category: medium wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pomeranian Coarsewool
The Pomeranian Coarsewool is a landrace sheep that used to be kept in small flocks along
the Baltic Sea in Pomeranian (Pomerania) and Mecklenburg for its wool, meat, and milk. The
Pomeranian are highly resistant against parasites. They are not fussy eaters, thrive on sandy,
as well as moory ground and can be kept alone or in small flocks. They attach themselves to
people, are hardy and not demanding.

They lamb easily by themselves on the pasture and can be bred three times in two years. It is
a dual-coated breed, with an outer coat of 14-22 cm long wool and a fine downy undercoat.
The Pomeranian turn lighter as they age, therefore a silver-gray lamb will turn white and
should be culled. Handspinners love the wool with its interesting shades of gray, and they turn
the yarn into rugged, indestructible sweaters and jackets.

Breed category: landrace, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Portland
The Portland, once common in Dorset, is now one of England's rarest breeds. It is most
likely that the Portland is all that is left of the Western Tanfaced horn, common in the
Southwest during the Middle Ages.The Portland was one of the breeds used in the
development of the Dorset breed. Portlands are small. They are free of wool on the face
and lower legs, which are tan.

The lambs are born fox red in color and lighten to either white or gray during the first few
months of life. Both sexes are horned, with the ram's horns having a heavy spiral. This
breed will sometimes breed out of season. In fact, it was the first breed of sheep in Britain
able to have lambs at any time of the year.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Priangan
In the Priangan residency of West Java which includes the five districts of Bandung, Garut,
Sumedang, Ciamis and Tasikmalaya, there is a breed of sheep which has been developed
primarily for ram fighting (Ketangkasan Seni Domba). The rams are selected for size, horn size,
and for fighting ability. The champion rams are highly priced and may fetch up to 300,000 rupiah
(US$ 1 = 415 rupiah). However, they are not used for breeding during their fighting career as it is
feared that mating would deprive them of their taste for fighting.

The Priangan is a variety of the Javanese Thin-tailed. Some indications are that Africander and
Merino breeding were introduced in the 19th century. They are usually black or pied,
occasionally individuals will be gray or tan. Males are horned and females are polled. Individuals
often lack external ears.

Breed category: meat / Distribution: Indonesia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rabo Largo
Rabo Largo, meaning broad tail, are found in northeastern Brazil. They
originated from fat-tailed hair breeds which were brought from Africa and
crossed with the native Crioulo.

They are white, pied, or white, with a colored head. Both sexes are horned.
Individuals within the breed vary between hair and carpet wool. The breed is
one of the long fat-tailed breeds.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Racka
The Racka is a unique breed with both ewes and rams possessing long spiral shaped
horns. The breed is of the Zackel type and originated in Hungary. The breed is used for
milk, wool and meat production. Mature males may have horns as long as two feet or
more. The minimum standard length is given as 50 cm (20 inches) for rams and 30 cm
(12-15 inches) for ewes.

The cork-screw horns protrude almost straight upward from the top of the head. The
Racka has been described as a hardy animal and is often used in crossbreeding due to
its ability to pass this survivability to its offspring. The breeds unique appearance and
quiet disposition would make it a desirable animal for hobby situations.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rahmani
The Rahmani originated in northern Syria and northern Turkey and was introduced
into Egypt in the 9th century. The original stock is the Red Karman from Turkey. The
breed is named after Rahmania, a village in the Beheira Governorate in the North of
the Delta.

This breed is believed to have some resistance to internal parasites. The animals
breed all year round. The twinning rate is relatively high. They are the largest of the
Egyptian sheep breeds. They produce coarse/carpet wool and have a fat-tail. Their
color is brown, which fades with age.

Breed category: fat-tailed / Distribution: Middle East

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rambouillet
The Rambouillet is the "backbone" of the American Sheep Industry, forming the foundation of
most western range flocks and raised throughout the United States. The Rambouillet
descends entirely from the Spanish Merino. In fact, it is the French version of the Merino
developed when Louis XVI imported 386 Spanish Merinos in 1786 for his estate at
Rambouillet.

Though named for the town in France, the breed owes much of its development to Germany
and the United States. The Rambouillet is a dual purpose sheep, producing a desirable
carcass and good fine wool. Rambouillets are large sized, rugged and long-lived with a strong
flocking instinct. Rambouillet ewes possess many desirable traits which have resulted in their
inclusion in crossbreeding programs to improve lamb production.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Red Engadine
Red Engadine sheep orginated in Switzerland in Lower Engadin and in the bordering
Tirolian and Bavarian valleys. They originate from local varieties, from the Stone Sheep
and the Bergamask sheep. They are medium to large framed and are distinguished by
their ram nose and their long, hanging ears.

They have a dark-brown body and a red-brown, medium to coarse wool which with
increasing age becomes lighter. They are an easy-care sheep, well suited to extensive
production situations. In the 1980's, the breed was almost extinct in Switzerland, but
conservation efforts reversed the trend and in 1992, the Swiss Engadine Sheep Breeders
Club was formed.

Breed category: rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Red Masai
Red Masai are an East African fat-tailed type of hair sheep used for meat
production. They are found in northern Tanzania, south central Kenya, and
Uganda.

Masai are red-brown, occasionally pied. Males are horned or polled.


Females are usually polled. Red Masai are known for being resistant to
internal parasites.

Breed category: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: Africa, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rhoen
One of the oldest landraces in Germany was mentioned in 1844 in the files of the convent of
Fulda: “The common sheep of the Rhoen farmer is a normal German sheep with peculiar
characteristics, which even in foreign countries is known as Rhöenschaf. It is yellow-white with
a black hornless head and is clothed in coarse, non-elastic wool, with little crimp. Its body is
large, the bones are strong, and it lends itself to fattening.”

Pictures from 1873 show that the Rhöenschaf then was similar to the one of today, despite
crossbreeding attempts with Cotswold, Oxfordshire, and Merino rams. Even today it is a
medium to large-sized sheep with long legs and no horns. It is the only breed with white legs
and black head that is free of wool.

This extremely hardy and frugal landrace is well suited for the wet climates of rough highlands,
where it is useful in landscape preservation. In the higher regions, the sheep feed on rough
grasses and tree sprouts; in lower areas, they groom the meadows that are dotted with fruit
trees.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rideau
Rideau sheep are one of three Canadian breeds. Their development began in 1968 at
Agriculture Canada's Animal Research Centre in Ottawa when the Centre's Suffolk,
Shropshire, and Dorset sheep were combined with imported breeds: Finnish Landrace
and East Friesian. In 1974, the Rideau was closed to the introduction of new genetic
material.

From 1974 to 1977, the numbers within the breed were multipled with minimal culling to
broaden the genetic base. From 1977 to 1986, selection emphasis was on high fertility
and the potential for yearround lambing and to a lesser extent retail cut yield. In 1988
and 1989, the breed was released to nucleus flockowners.

Since 1989, the breed's popularity has grown rapidly. Rideau sheep should be used in
commercial flocks to improve the maternal traits within that flock. Approximately 50% of
Rideau ewes carry three lambs or more during pregnancy and another 40% carry twins.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Romanov
The Romanov sheep breed originated in the Volga Valley, northeast of Moscow. The name
“Romanov” comes from the old royal family of Russia. These sheep were first noticed in the
18th century, and were later imported into Germany and then France. In 1980, the Canadian
government brought in 14 Romanov ewes and 4 rams for testing and put them into quarantine
for 5 years. After that, some were brought to the United States

Romanov ewes tend to lamb by the litter. Most other sheep give birth to singles and twins,
while the Romanov average about 2-5 lambs per lambing. When the lambs are born they are
pure black but when they get older they turn gray. Romanov wool (a mixture of gray wool and
black guard hair) is used for rugs, mats, and wall hangings.

Breed category: meat, prolific, short-tailed / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Romney
The Romney is truly a versatile breed, as demonstrated by its ability to produce quality meat
and wool under diverse climate conditions and management systems. It is so-named for the
Romney Marsh region in Kent, England where it was developed as a dual purpose sheep.
Due to the extreme geographic and climatic conditions of the region, Romney sheep
developed some specific breed characteristics which include hooves which are resistant to
footrot and fleeces which remain heavy in harsh weather.

Due to similar land topography, Romneys made an easy transition to the Southern Island of
New Zealand and the Falkland Islands where they quickly established themselves as the
most predominant breed. The first Romneys came to the United States in 1904. Their long,
lustrous fleeces are sought by hand spinners.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rouge de l'Ouest
The Rouge is a medium sized breed of excellent conformation without excessive bone. As its
name suggests, its head, which is hornless, can vary from pink to deep red and is covered with
fine hair. The breed is strong and deep through the chest with good length in back and loin, but
it is the exceptional hind quarters and muscling that are immediately recognized as the
powerhouse of the Rouge.

The Rouge de l'Ouest is of the same origin as the Bleu du Maine, but with a distinctive pink
face and legs. It is used primarily for market lamb production, though was originally kept as a
dairy sheep to produce Camembert cheese. However; French breeders concentrated on
breeding their animals for superior conformation, whilst retaining prolificacy and milkiness. The
name Rouge de l'Ouest (usually shorted to Rouge) translates as Red of the West, describing
both the color and origin of the breed.

Breed category: meat, medium wool Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rough Fell
The Rough Fell is an exceptionally docile sheep that excels in hardiness and has no
equal in its power to exist under adverse conditions.

It is well fitted to endure the hardships of the mountains and valleys of Northern England
including the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. Drafted to lower ground, the Rough
Fell is a dual purpose breed and is found in many counties of the United Kingdom. They
are ideal for crossing. The breed has a horned black head with a definite white patch on
the nose.

Breed category: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Roussin
Roussin Sheep were developed from, the Brittany Heath Sheep. Dishley Leicester and the
Southdown. In the 1960's the breed was improved using Suffolk and Avranchin. In 1977, the
breed was closed and the characteristics established. The main areas in France the Roussin are
the Cherbourg peninsular, Normandy, and Brittany. The French sheep breeds tend to stay in
their local areas. However Roussin Rams have been taken down to the Carmangue to be used
on the feral sheep to produce fat lambs off the salt marsh.

Roussin sheep are now found throughout Europe and the UK, able to adapt to any soil or
climatic conditions. Roussin are hardy and prolific, capable of achieving with 200% lambing
average. Ewes have plenty of milk and lamb growth rates are averaging 340 grams (0.75 lbs.)
per day upto 100 days. Lambs finish at 18 to 21 kg (40-46 lbs.) dead weight. The carcasses are
noted for their exceptional meat to bone ratio.

Breed category: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Royal White
The Royal White® is a new breed of hair sheep privately funded and developed by
William Hoag, of Dorpcroix Sheep Farm in Hermeleigh, Texas. The breed is a cross
between the Dorper and St. Croix.

They are pure white. They grow a longer hair in the winter that is shed off naturally in
the spring. Ewes and rams are naturally hornless. Texas Tech and Texas A & M
University are currently doing research with the breed with regards to meat production
and scrapie resistance.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ryeland
Ryelands are a white-faced, polled (no horns), small to medium sized, down-type breed
whose antecedents were developed by monks at Leominster in the rye growing district of
Herefordshire, England, in the 15th Century. It was one of the breeds used to introduce
the poll gene to the Dorset breed in the development of the Poll Dorset. The Ryeland
breed first came to New Zealand in 1903 and later to Australia.

Initially a dual purpose sheep, the breed was, in latter years, used mainly as a terminal
sire. There has been a recent upsurge in interest in the Ryeland as a breed ideally suited
for small farmers who want the truly all-purpose type of sheep; not too big to handle
safely, docile, fertile, thrifty, and capable of providing both fine wool for hand-spinning and
high quality meat for the table.

Breed category: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Australia, New
Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Saeftinger
The Saeftinger breed originated around 1986 by crossing a Romanov ram onto
Suffolk ewes. The breed takes its name from the salt meadows where it grazes.

The meat from the Saeftinger is a culinary specialty. Mature ewes average 2.2
lambs per lambing; ewe lambs, 2.0. Three lamb crops in two years is common.
Ewes and rams are both hornless.

Breed categories: meat, short-tailed / Distribution: Belgium, Netherlands

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Santa Cruz
There is considerable uncertainty as to the exact origin of the sheep of Santa Cruz Island, even
to the century in which sheep were placed there. Speculation is that Merino, Rambouillet, and
perhaps some Churro figure in the Santa Cruz sheep's background, and it is certain that the
sheep have been feral for the last 70 years. The Nature Conservancy acquired 88% of the
island (located off the coast of southern California) during the 1970's and began an eradication
program in 1980.

In 1988, twelve lambs were brought off the island by a team of Nature Conservancy and ALBC
volunteers and were placed with five California breeders to begin a population rebuilding effort.
The Santa Cruz Island sheep breed is an important genetic resource. Its historic background,
long period of isolation, and adaptation to a challenging environment have given the breed an
array of characteristics not found among commercial breeds.

Breed categories: feral, rare, heritage / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Santa Inês
The Santa Inês is a breed of hair sheep found in Brazil. It is generally thought to be a
cross of Morada Nova, the course-wooled Italian breed, Bergamasca, and the native
coarse-wooled Crioula, followed by a period of selection or evolution for absence of
fleece. Colors range from red, black and white and can be spotted or solid. They have
large bodies, are long-legged and have large pendulous ears and are polled.

Rams do not have a throat ruff. They have a low litter size of 1.25. Mature weights of the
ewes in the field fall between 40 and 50 kg. (88 to 110 lbs.), and if well fed, the rams can
weigh as much as 100 kg (220 lbs).

Breed categories: hair (meat), skin / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Sardinian
The Sardinian breed originated from the local lowland breed which were large,
polled, and had white wool. Merino and Barbary breeding were also used in
developing the breed. The males are occasionally horned and the females are polled
(hornless).

Sardinian sheep are primarily keep for milk production. Pecorino sarda cheese is
made only from Sardinian sheep milk coming from the island of Sardinia off the
coast of Italy. In Sardinia, there are more sheep than people.

Breed categories: dairy, carpet wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scotch Mule
The Scotch Mule is an intentionally produced crossbred sheep out of Scottish Blackface ewes
and sired by Bluefaced Leicester rams. The term "mule" (when it refers to sheep) is used for an
intentionally produced crossbred sheep that is sired by a Bluefaced Leicester ram. In the United
Kingdom, Mule ewes are the backbone of the commercial sheep industry. The various types of
Mules are the most popular commercial ewes in the UK, and the Bluefaced Leicester is the
number one crossing sire there.

The advantages of the Mule as a commercial ewe are many, and the Bluefaced Leicester
imparts many highly desirable qualities in his crossbred daughters. The Mule ewe will have
improved maternal qualities such as early maturity, increased prolificacy, improved milk
production, more capacity, in addition to hybrid vigor.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scottish Blackface
The Scottish Blackface is by far the most important blackface sheep in all of Great Britain.
They are primarily used for crossing, usually with the Border or Bluefaced Leicester. They
originated as a mountain sheep in Scotland, and there is a tradition that they came from a
Spanish ship wrecked during the northward flight of Armada in 1588. The Scottish Blackface
has a light weight fleece of long, coarse wool. Both sexes have horns.

In addition to an attractive and stylish fleece, their roman nose and unusual black and white
face markings set them apart in appearance. The Scottish Blackface is found in the Highlands
and Borders of Scotland, Pennines, Dartmoor and Northern Ireland. They have also been
exported to the United States, Italy and Argentina.

Breed categories: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America, South
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scottish Greyface
By using the Border Leicester ram with the Scottish Blackface ewe, the Scottish
Greyface is produced.

The Scottish Greyface ewe has the same purpose as other Halfbred and Mule
ewes,namely to produce quality prime lamb when put to a terminal sire. As the name
suggests, she has a speckled face, gray in color. The body is long, well-sprung, and
evenly fleshed. The Scottish Greyface can be found in all parts of the British Isles.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shetland
The Shetland's roots go back over a thousand years, probably to sheep brought to the
Shetland Islands by Viking settlers. They belong to the Northern European short-tailed group
of sheep, which also includes Finn sheep, Icelandic sheep, and Romanovs. The Shetland is a
primitive, unimproved breed noted for its natural hardiness, lambing ease, longevity, and ability
to survive under harsh conditions. It is one of the smallest breeds of sheep.

Shetlands are known primarily for their production of colorful wool upon which the Shetland
woolen industry is based. Shetland comes in one of the widest ranges of colors of any breed.
There are 11 main colors as well as 30 markings, many still bearing their Shetland dialect
names. Shetlands naturally shed their wool during late spring/early summer.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tailed / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shetland-Cheviot
From the turn of the 20th century, North Country Cheviot rams have been bred with the
Shetland ewe to produce what has become locally as the Shetland-Cheviot. The hybrid
vigor prdouced from the crossing the two pure breeds ensures that the Shetland-Cheviot
retains the features of both. She is a hardy, thrifty, and milky with her sire's excellent
conformation.

Following the realization that a small ewe crossed with a large, fast growing sire could
produce prime lamb very efficiently, producers outside Shetland turned to the breed,
which has spread into the Orkneys, Caithness and down through Scotland. The
Shetland-Cheviot's main purpose is to produce quality lamb when put to a suitable ram,
usually a terminal sire.

Breed categories: half-breed, medium wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shropshire
Shropshires are a good, middle-of-the-road sheep, medium to large in size, with dark
faces and wool on the legs. They originated in central western England in the counties of
Shropshire and Stafford from native stock, Southdown, Leicester, and Cotswold crosses.
First imported into the United States in 1855, until the 1930's, the Shropshire was the
most popular and influential breed in the country.

Called the "Ideal Farm Sheep," Shropshires were boasted to have "wool from the tip of
the nose to the tip of the toes." Over the last few decades, Shropshires have evolved into
a very modern and productive breed, perfect for families with youth projects.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Skudde
The Skudde is a nordic, short-tailed heather sheep. Its original homeland was East Prussia and
the Baltic States. Today a few small herds can be found in these areas. The most noticeable
feature of the Skudde ram is the imposing snail horn. The ewes are hornless or carry horn
stumps. In individual cases, it occurs that ewes carry chamois-like “hornlets.” The animals are
slender, the weight of the rams lies between 35 and 50 kg (77-110 lbs), that of the ewes from
25 to 40 kg (55-88 lbs).

The wool mixture typical of this breed consists of fine wool fibers, dispersed with short hairs and
course cover hair. The colors are white, brown, black, and gray. White Skuddes have small
pigment spots on the head. Lambs have a rust-colored marking in the nape of the neck and on
the legs. This coloring disappears in adults.

Skuddes are not kept for their meat. They are suited for pasturing more barren areas. The meat
is held to be a delicacy in circles of connoisseures. Skuddes come into heat aseasonally.
Lambs are born at any time of the year. As a rule three lambings are possible in two years.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Soay
The Soay has been called the only living example of the small, primitive sheep
which inhabited the British Isles before the coming of the Norsemen and Romans.

Their name is derived from the island of Soay off the coast of Scotland. Soays were
originally imported to North America in 1974. They are a small framed sheep with a
fleece that varies from light to dark brown in color and is shed naturally in the
summer.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tail, double-coated / Distribution: United Kingdom,


Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Solognote
The Solognote is an old breed that derives its name from Sologne, France, where
it was developed in the 15th century.

The breed was very widespread in the 1850's. It has been exported to Germany,
Belgium, the Netherlands, and Morocco. The Solognote is a very rustic breed that
is able to tolerate diseases and poor feeding conditions.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: Europe, Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Somali
The Somali is a hair sheep native to Somali in Africa where they are reared primarily for
meat production.

They are white with a black head. Both sexes are polled and the breed belongs to the
fat-rumped type. Somali sheep are the immediate ancestor of the Blackheaded Persian
which was developed in South Africa in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and that
has been widely used for crossbreeding in many parts of Africa and elsewhere in the
tropics.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-rumped / Distribution: Africa, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South African Meat Merino


SAMMs were imported into South Africa by the Department of Agriculture from 1936 to 1974
from Germany where the Deutsche Fliesch Merino is a common meat sheep of Germany,
Austria, and Poland. In South Africa, the name was translated as Duits Vleis Merinoand then
into English as German Mutton Merino. In 1974, the South African Breed Society changed the
name to the South African Mutton Merino.

When imported into Australia in 1996, Western Australian SAMM breeders registered the name
Prime SAMM, as the Australian usage of the word "'Mutton" relates to a description of
extremely old and inedible sheepmeat. The translation used in Australia is "South African Meat
Merino." The SAMM is bred specifically to produce a slaughter lamb at an early age (35 kg/77
lbs. at 100 days of age), while still being able to produce good volumes (4 kg/8.8 lbs) of medium
to strong wool.

Breed categories: Merino, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South Suffolk
The South Suffolk is a fixed cross between the Suffolk and Southdown breeds. It is a
large, comparatively heavy meat breed of sheep.

Rams are for use as terminal sires, used in cross breeding for early prime lamb
production. South Suffolks can be found in most states of Australia and in New
Zealand, where the breed originated. The wool is of the fine Downs type and measures
24 to 26 micron in fiber diameter. Fertility levels are high.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South Wales Mountain


South Welsh Mountain sheep have been reared on the harsh hill pastures of South Wales
for centuries. Their ability to thrive where lesser breeds have failed has ensured their
predominance in the area. They are a dual purpose breed. They are similar in appearance
to other Welsh Mountain breeds, and rams are frequently used to improve the size and
conformation of the other Welsh Mountain breeds.

When crossed with a Suffolk ram, the South Wales Mountain ewe produces ewe lambs
that are much sought after as lowland breeding ewes, being hardy, prolific and good
milkers with strong conformation. Their fleece is dense with an even mixture of white
kempy fiber.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Southdown
The Southdown takes its name from the Chalk Hills of Sussex County in extreme
southeastern England where they are said to have roamed from time immemorial. They are
one of the oldest sheep breeds, having contributed to the foundation stock of all other
down breeds: Suffolk, Hampshire, and Oxford.

Historians are not agreed as to when the first Southdowns were imported to America, but it
is known that they were introduced very early in the history of the country. Governor
Winthrop, early Connecticut governor is said to have acquired a flock of Southdown ewes
in 1648. Southdowns adapt well to intensive management, pass their superb conformation
onto their offspring, and can thrive and maintain flesh where many other breeds would
virtually starve.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Spael
The Norwegian Spael sheep is named after the short, nearly wool-less tail (spælen). It
originates from the old Norwegian landrace of sheep. In 1912, two breeding stations were
established to prevent extinction of the breed. Icelandic sheep were crossed onto the Spael
sheep through semen import in the 1960's and 1970's. Finnsheep and Faeroe Island sheep
were also used in the breeding of Spael sheep.

The sheep are most commonly white, but there are also black, brown, grey and blue-grey
animals and various forms of piebald are found. Most animals are polled, with about 10%
occurrence of horned in both sexes. The wool is double coated, with mean fibre diameter 31.5
micron of underwool and 57.1 micron of outer hair.wool is used for many different products
and woolskins and nappa leather are made out of the pelts.

Breed categories: Swedish landrace, short-tailed, double-coated / Distribution: Northern


Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Spanish Merino
A number of sheep breeding nations, including Phoenicia, Italy, and Spain, are believed to
have played a part in the development of the Merino sheep. However, it is generally agreed
upon that the Moors, who dominated Spain through the eighth to thirteenth centuries, were
primarily responsible for selectively breeding the animals to such an extent that the wool they
produced became superior to that of all other sheep.

Indeed, the word Merino may be of Moorish origin, possibly evolving from their word for a
judge that settled disagreements about flocks between shepherds. By the eighteenth century,
Merino wool was considered so luxurious and valuable only the sovereign of Spain was
permitted to send Merino sheep out of the country, which he occasionally conveyed as gifts.

The Merino fleece sits at the top of the grading charts for fineness; it is the standard against
which all others are measured. Merino sheep are also noted for their hardiness and their
herding instincts and have been used as parents of several other breeds, notably the
Rambouillet of France.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

St. Croix
The St. Croix is a hair sheep that originated in the Virgin Islands, where it is called the
"Virgin Island White." The breed is believed to have descended from the hair sheep of
West Africa, but some feel it is a cross of the Wiltshire Horn and the native Criollo. Most
of these sheep are white with some solid tan, brown, black or white with brown or black
spots.

Both sexes are polled, and rams have a large throat ruff. Exceptional parasite resistance
compared to British sheep breeds has been documented in studies at several
universities. The St. Croix is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock
Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Caribbean, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Steinschaf
The Steinschaf is a direct descendent of the now extinct Zaupelschaf. It had developed
characteristics that made it perfect for life in the high mountains in the Eastern Alpine regions.
In the beginning of the 20th century the Steinschaf still roamed the meadows of Bavaria,
Germany, especially the areas around Berchtesgaden, Traunstein, and Rosenheim. In
Austria, its range was mainly in the Salzburg area

.The original Steinschaf used to be a dual-coated, small, and wiry high mountain sheep,
weighing 28- 30 kg (62-66 lbs). It was bred twice a year and it had 20-70 % twins. The modern
Steinschaf is a robust, small to medium-sized sheep with a coarse, dual-coated fleece, that
can be of all colors and markings. It would benefit the breed if it could be kept exclusively on
high alpine meadows, in order to retain its excellent characteristics.

Breed categories: double-coated / Distribution: Germany, Austria, Italy

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Suffolk
Suffolks are found throughout the world's sheep producing countries. In the United States,
they are by far the most popular pure breed of sheep, accounting for more than fifty percent
of purebred sheep registrations. In the British Isles, they are the leading terminal sire breed.
The Suffolk breed originated almost 200 years ago on the rugged southeastern coast of
England, the result of crossing Southdown rams and Norfolk Horn ewes. Originally, they
were called Southdown Norfolks or just "Black faces."

The first Suffolks were brought to the United States in 1888, but it wasn't until after the
second World War when the sheep industry moved towards a larger, meatier, open faced
sheep that Suffolks gained in prominence. They are a large breed with a distinctive all-black
head and legs that are free of wool. Suffolk lambs grow faster than any other breed and yield
heavy, high cutability carcasses of the type demanded by today's health conscience
consumers.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swaledale
The breed's origin almost cerainly emerged from the genetic group of horned sheep from
which also came the Blackface, the Rough Fell, and other localized types.

Slowly over time a "Swaledale" breed type emerged from within these horned sheep.The
Swaledale can now be found in both the hills and lowlands of Britain, producing both pure
bred and the well-known North of England Mule (a Blue Faced Leicester cross). The
Swaledale has proven itself to be a bold hardy sheep, well-fitted to endure the hardships
of exposed and high lying situations. Wool is medium.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swifter
The Swifter is a new, highly productive sheep breed, which was developed in the 1970's
by the Agricultural University in Wageningen, the Netherlands, to increase the productivity
of the Dutch sheep stock. Swifters are used as dams for slaughter lambs.

The Swifter is a product of a cross between the Texel and Flemish breeds. To obtain
excellent, fast-growing lambs for slaughter, the Swifter ewe is tupped by a ram for
slaughter lamb production: the Charollais, the Suffolk, or the Texel. Pedigree Swifters
produce 2.5 lambs per lambing on average. 80% of ewes give birth to two or more lambs
in their first year. Births are virtually always without problems.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swiss Black-Brown Mountain


The Swiss Black-Brown Mountain originates from the ancient Swiss breeds Jura, Simmentaler,
Saanen, Frutiger, Roux de Bagnes and Freiburger. It is a polled, medium-sized sheep, deep,
and broad. The coat color is either black, chestnut colored, or light brown. Head and legs are
clear of wool, covered with short black or brown hairs. The fleece of the Swiss Black-Brown
Mountain is of single-color, thick, and close-cropped.

Due to the Merino ancestry, the wool is fine and strong and is remarkable for its strength and
elasticity. No kemp or white fibers are allowed. The ewes lamb quite often twice a year and
have 1.7 lambs on average, thus making them an ideal mother race for crossings with meat
producing rams. Swiss Black-Brown Mountain lambs, both purebred or crossbred, kill out
significantly better than the Tyrol Mountain. Their bone is light, with a commendable meat to
bone ratio.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swiss White Alpine


The Swiss White Alpine is a short-wooled breed kept primarily for meat. The
breed originated in Switzerland in 1936 from a cross between the Swiss White
Mountain and 50 to 75% Ile-de-France.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

Distribution: Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tan
Tan sheep are famous for their fur with long curled hair. The wool of Tan sheep is
soft, light and puffy, with long and even fiber, suitable for making high-grade
blankets, shawls and scarves. Tan sheep are raised in the desert and semi-desert
regions of China.

Breed categories: fur, meat

Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Targhee
The Targhee is one of America's youngest breeds. It was developed in 1926 at the U.S.
Sheep Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho, from Rambouillet, Columbia and Corriedale
crosses. The Targhee derives its name from the Targhee National Forest on which the
experiment station's flock grazes in the summer. The forest was named for a chief of the
Bannock Indians who had lived in the area in the 1860's.

The Targhee is a dual-purpose sheep with good meat type and a heavy fleece of high
quality wool. They are especially popular in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota, where
their ¾ fine wool and ¼ long wool breeding is favored by western ranchers.

Breed categories: crossbred wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Teeswater
Teeswater, a longwool sheep from Teesdale in the County of Durham, located in
Northern England, have for almost 200 years been bred by farmers in that area of the
north. Until the 1920's, the breed was comparatively rare, but now they are to be
found in almost every part of the U.K.

Their wool should be fine long-stapled lustre wool with each lock hanging free and
with no tendancy to mattiness. There should be no dark fibers in the fleece, which
should be uniform in texture over the whole body. The Teeswater produces a kemp
free fleece, a characteristic it passes on.

Breed category: long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Texas Dall
The Texas Dall has no relation to the Alaskan Dall. It is a hybrid, a cross between
domestic sheep (Rambouillet and Barbados Blackbelly) and the European Mouflon.

Although most are white, they can range in color from white to blond or pale
champagne. Some even have spotted markings, usualy fawn in color. Their horns
are large and spectacular. They are raised primarily for trophy hunting.

Breed categories: hair, exotic / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Texel
The Texel originated on the Isle of Texel off the coast of the Netherlands early in the
nineteenth century. They became available to U.S. sheep producers in 1990 when they
were released from quarantine at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center,
Nebraska, where they were evaluated for their potential in crossbred lamb production.

The most outstanding characteristics of the Texel are its remarkable muscle
development and leanness. Texel-sired lambs show an advantage of one full leg score in
breed comparisons and less total carcass fat—especially seam fat. The Texel has
become the dominant terminal-sire breed in Europe and is gaining popularity as a sire
breed in the United States.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tong
Tong sheep originate from Mongolian sheep. They are able to withstand unfavorable
environmental conditions and are found in the high plains of the northern Shaaxi
Province of China, where the average temperature is 13°C and annual precipitation is
520 to 600 mm (20-24 in). Their wool is carpet wool. Wool production is low.

Tong sheep have the ability to deposit fat in the tail. Tong lambs have beautiful curls
that look like pearls. Coats made from the pelts provide warmth with light weight.

Breed categories: fat-tail, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tsigai
Tsigai sheep originated in Southeast Europe, where they are raised for
meat and milk. There are many variations of the breed.

Some Tisigai populations have been improved by Merino and British meat
breeds. Tsigai sheep have long tails. They are good meat and milk
producers.

Breed categories:dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: Eastern and


Central Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tukidale
Technically, the Tukidale is a not a new breed of sheep, but rather a Romney sheep carrying
the T gene for hair. The breed originated on M.W. Coop's property in New Zealand from a
ram born November 26, 1966. The ram possesed the T gene, which is dominant. The T gene
is responsible not only for producing the specialty carpet-type fleece, but also the formation of
horns in the in the male and, to a lesser extent in females.

Tukidale sheep are easy care sheep of good conformation and high fertility, with carcass
accepability. High fleece weight with a diameter in the range of 35-45 microns, with a high
percentage of medulated fibers. They have an extremely fast rate of wool growth, resulting in
two wool clips per year at a premium price.

Breed category: carpet wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tunis
The Tunis is one of the oldest sheep breeds, said to have roamed the hills of Tunis and
parts of Algeria in North Africa prior to the Christian era. The American Tunis evolved from
a number of importations of fat-tailed sheep from Africa and the Middle East that were
crossed with established European breeds to improve the breed's meat characteristics.

The earliest documented importation occurred in 1799, a gift to the U.S. from the ruler of
Tunisia and entrusted to the care of Judge Richard Peters of Pennsylvania. One of the
largest advocates of the Tunis breed was Thomas Jefferson, who owned a fairly large
flock. The breed could have been a major breed in this country if most of the southern
flocks had not been destroyed during the Civil War.

Tunis are a unique looking breed with an unusual color of reddish tan hair covering their
legs, faces and long pendulous ears and minor fat deposits over the dock area. The Tunis
is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Turki
Afghanistan is home to many of Central Asia's most unique breeds of sheep that are
particularly well-adapted to the local conditions and highly valuable commercially. The
most notable is the largest breed of fat-rumped sheep, the Turki.

The Turki has two distinct camel humps of fat on their behinds. They have a high growth
rate and are a good producer of mutton, but are not a good wool producer. They are
raised mostly in the northeastern parts of Afghanistan. Turki sheep accompany refugees
to neighboring Pakistan where the breed is recognized as Afghani sheep.

Breed categories: fat-tailed, carpet wool / Distribution: Central Asia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tyrol Mountain
This breed is found in Tyrol of Austria and Bolzano of Italy. It is a coarse wooled
breed, belonging to the Lop-eared Alpine group, which is kept for meat production.

The Tyrol Mountain is similar to the Carinthian but has better wool, a white face and
longer ears. The breed is also occasionally pied or black. Both sexes are polled. The
Tyrol Mountain originated from Bergamasca, Steinschaf, and Spiegel variety of
Carinthian.

Breed categories: meat, coarse wool / Distribution: Austria, Italy, Germany,


Switzerland

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ujumqin
The Ujumqin, a larger version of the Mongolian, is found in Inner Mongolia, China. It has a
fat tail 28 cm (11.2 in) long by 36 cm (14.4 in) wide in the male, and 22 cm long by 28 cm
(8.8 in) wide in the female. When dressed, the tail fat weighs 2 kg (4.4 lbs) or more. The
Ujumqin was developed due to the sharp seasonal contrast in plant growth in the pastoral
areas.

The sheep tend to deposit a large amount of fat in the body in order to meet nurtitional
demands during winter and spring. They are adapted to the unfavorable local
environmantal conditions of the North and Northwest Pastoral Grasslands. The Ujumqin
have the ability to deposit fat in the tail. Wool is coarse and production is low, with an
annual grease fleece weight of only about 1 kg (2.2 lbs).

Breed categories: fat-tail, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Valachian
The Valachian is a highly endangered landrace sheep. Presently, the only breeding done
in Germany is strictly for preservation and only animals that show malformations are not
bred on. The Valachian is dual-coated with coarse, mostly white wool that reaches the
ground; gray and black are rare.

Rams often have Roman noses and look imposing with their spiraling horns of up to one
meter, that stick out sideways. Ewes sometimes have corkscrew-like, fine horns.The
breed is extremely shy, high-spirited, alert, and loyal to its territory, nearly exhibiting the
character of a wild animal. It is remarkably hardy and frugal and can withstand extreme
cold, high precipitation, as well as drought.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Valais Blacknose
The Valais Blacknose is a coarsewooled (i.e. mattress, mixed or carpet) breed
from Switzerland, kept primarily for meat. In Germany, they call it the Walliser
Schwarznasenschaf

Breed categories: Carpet wool, meat

Distribution: Switzerland, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Van Rooy
In 1906, Senator J. C. van Rooy, of the farm Koppieskraal in the Bethulie district, started his
experiments to propagate a breed of sheep for slaughter lamb production: The requirements he
set for this breed, were threefold: 1) The breed had to be strong and hardy to cope with regular
droughts; 2) It had to be fertile in order to maintain a high percentage of production; It had to
have an excellent conformation.

With these aims in mind he made use of a white "Blinkhaar Afrikaner" ram and eighty
Rambouillet ewes. With the progeny of these the principle of inbreeding, coupled with severe
selection, was applied. Later on, a polled Wensleydale ram was introduced in an effort to
improve conformation. The present day Van Rooy sheep is still run mostly in the arid areas
where survival and reproduction on natural grazing are essential for the economic production of
meat.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: South Africa, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Vendéen
The Vendéen were developed near Vendée in western France. The breed was
developed using Southdown rams, imported during the late nineteenth century, on local
ewes. The breed is noted for the production of high quality lamb carcasses. Their face
and legs are covered with dark brown to gray hair. Both sexes are polled.

Comparisons in performance between the Vendéen and the Texel showed the
Vendéen having larger litter size, older at sexual maturity, and a longer lambing interval.
The two breeds are relatively equal in muscularity. The Vendéen exhibited a lower wool
yield, daily gain, carcass leanness, and milk yield.

Breed category: meat, medium wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Vlaams schaap
The Vlaams schaap originated in Belgium during the late middle ages. It is sometimes
confused with the Belgium Milk Sheep.

After the Second World War all native milk sheep were amalgamated to the Belgian milk
sheep and the Flemish sheep almost entirely disappeared. In the Netherlands, the
Flemish sheep was used in the development of the Swifter. They are a large breed, milky
and fertile. They can easily raise three lambs. Their white wool is long and curly at the
ends.

Breed category: multi-purpose, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Voskop
The Voskop (Fox Head) descends from ardense sheep which were brought to the
better Flemish meadows for fattening. They are a sheep of average size. Rams
weigh between 70 and 80 kg (154-176 lbs.); ewes between 55 and 70 kg (121-154
lbs.).

Ewes wean on average 1.7 lambs. Their wool is pale brown without spotting. They
are a hardy sheep, able to withstand both dryness and dampness and cold. They
produce meat of excellent quality and taste.

Breed category: meat, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Welsh Mountain
The Welsh Mountain breed has survived for centuries in the harsh environment of its
natural habitat, where high rainfall and freezing winter temperatures make it impossible for
anything other than the hardiest and fittest to survive. The breed was developed to survive
in such a harsh environment and breeders gave the highest priority to factors such as
hardiness, milkiness, mothering ability, and lamb survival.

Welsh lamb's pre-eminance for quality and taste was built upon lamb from the Welsh
Mountain breed. The inherent characteristics of the Welsh Mountain sheep are
transmitted to its crosses: Welsh Half-bred, Welsh Mules, and Welsh Bleus.

Breed category: hill, longwool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Welsh Mule
The Welsh Mule is the progeny of registered Bluefaced Leicester rams crossed with ewes
of one of three hardy hill breeds from Mid and North Wales -- the Welsh Mountain, Welsh
Hill Speckled Face and Bealah -- all having the reputation for being healthy, hardy, good
foragers with exceptional mothering qualities.

The Welsh Mule hybrid was developed inthe 1970's to satisfy the demand from prime
lamb producers for a prolific ewe with good growth potential, good milking capacity, and
when crossed with modern breeds of meat sires, the ability to produce prime quality, long
lean-finished lambs. Facial coloration varies from white to a dark mottled or speckeled,
depending upon breeding.

Breed category: half-breed / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wensleydale
The Wensleydale is a large longwool sheep with a distinctive deep blue head, ears and
legs. The breed originated in North Yorkshire, England during the 19th century and was
developed primarily to provide rams for crossing onto the hill ewe. The breed's greatest
attribute is the quality and quantity of curly wool each sheep produces.

Wool from the Wensleydale is acknowledged as the finest lustre long wool in the world.
The fleece from a purebred sheep is considered kemp free. The breed is widespread
throughout the United Kingdom, with some small flocks in Holland, France, and Denmark.
A "breeding up" program is developing in the USA, using Wensleydale ram sperm in
English Leicester, Lincoln, and Cotswold ewes and their female progeny.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

West African
The West African is found in Colombia, Venezuela, and the Caribbean. They are
usually brown, ranging in shade from tan to brown and cherry-red to dark red. They
are very similar to the Pelibüey in size and confirmation. The breed is polled and the
male is sometimes maned.

Breed categories: hair (meat)

Distribution: Caribbean, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Horned Heath


The White Horned Heath originated from the Grey Horned Heath Sheep and was first
developed as a separate breed at the beginning of the 20th century. Originally herds
consisted of both horned and polled animals. A few years later they were divided into
two breeds, the polled called White Polled Heath or Moorschnucke.

Since 1949, the White Horned Heath has been recognized as a new race. The origin is
in the heath areas in northern Germany. It is a small landrace breed which can be used
to preserve heath and moor areas. It's always pure white, both sexes are horned, the
meat is of very high quality and tastes like venison.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Mountain
The German Mountain breed is found in the Bavarian Alps and Pre-alps of
southern Germany. The breed was developed by grading local breeds to
Bergamasca and Tyrol Mountain. It is a coarse to medium wooled breed and is
polled.

Breed category: dual-purpose, coarse wool

Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Polled Heath


The origin of the hardy and frugal breed is northern German counties of Diepholz,
Nienburg, Rotenburg. The White Polled Heath is a white, dual-coated, graceful landrace
with a small frame. The slender head has small ears that stick out to the side. Both
sexes are hornless and have light-colored, hard hoofs. They mature slowly.

The decline of this heath-sheep breed started when it did not pay anymore to take the
flocks grazing on the moors. It took the involvement of nature protectors and breeders to
save the breed from extinction.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Suffolk
Beginning in 1977, Dr. Ewan Roberts of the University of New South Wales in Australia started
a breeding program to develop a terminal sire breed of sheep. His goals were to have a breed
with the confirmation, structure, and growth of the Suffolk, but with a white head and legs. The
initial cross was between Suffolk and Polled Dorset and separately Suffolk crossed with Border
Leicester. The F2 and subsequent generations were selected against black points and for
increased gain.

The White Suffolk has similar features to the Suffolk, however, instead of dark points the White
Suffolk has a white face and legs.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Whiteface Dartmoor
There have been Whitefaced Dartmoors on the Moor since they earliest records.
They are also found on parts of Exmoor. The ewes are renowned for crossing to
produce a halfbred ewe capable of producing a prime lamb when put to a terminal
sire ram.

The Whitefaced Dartmoor is very hardy and can thrive on the very poorest pasture.
They were always horned, but this feature has tended to disappear over the years.
The wool is white, of good staple, and with a fairly strong crimp.

Breed categories: coarse wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Whiteface Woodland
The Whitefaced Woodland originated in the South Pennines of England. It is also
known as Penistone after the Yorkshire town where sheep sales have been held
since 1699.

It is thought to be closely related to the Swaledale and the Lonk. One of the larger
of the English hill breeds, the breed has no wool free, white, face and legs. Both
sexes are horned and the horns in the males are heavily spiraled.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wiltipoll
The Wiltipoll is a new breed of sheep, recently developed in Australia from the Wiltshire
Horn. It is a polled sheep that is bred for the production of prime lamb only. Its short white
fleece is shed annually, from Spring to Summer, where it falls to the ground and is of no
commercial value.The absence of horns has been achieved by the infusion of blood from
the Border Leicester, Poll Dorset, and Polled Merino breeds.

Wiltipoll/Merino cross lambs, off grass at 10 months of age, regularly reach weights of 25
to 30 kgs dressed, without developing fat, as do other British Breed lambs.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wiltshire Horn
The Wiltshire Horn is an ancient British breed from the Chalk Downs region of England.
Reaching large numbers during the 17th and 18th centuries, they became almost extinct
by the beginning of the 20th. They are currently attracting attention for their lack of wool
and the need for shearing, as well as their ability to pass on their vitality and quality meat
in a cross-breeding program.

Both rams and ewes are horned. The Wiltshire Horn is classified as a "rare" breed by the
American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wrzosówka
The Wrzosówka belongs to the Northern type of short-tailed sheep which have been kept
for centuries in different regions of Europe, including Northeastern parts of Poland. It is
unique among Polish sheep breeds, since it is extremely adaptable to difficult conditions,
disease-resistant, and prolific. It is able to reproduce all year round.

The Wrzosówka is rather thin and small, proportionally built. The fleece is usually
consists of two layers: down and medulated hair. Its skins are usued for fur coat
production. Ewes are usually polled, while rams have widely set black horns. The
Wrzosówka is the only surviving primitive sheep breed in Poland. A conservation
program was started in 1981.

Breed categories: primitive, rare, short-tailed, fur / Distribution: Poland

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Xinjiang Fine Wool


The Xinjiang Finewool was among the first of the Chinese breeds and it has played a part
in the establishment of some other breeds. The original crosses were between Russian
Merino rams, probably of the Caucasian, Precoce, and Stravrapol types, with local breeds
of ewe. The most important of these breeds was the Kazakh, but some Mongolian ewes
were also used.

There followed a program of backcrossing to the Merino parent, with some interbreeding
and selection. Australian rams were used to a limited extend during the 1970s in the
development of the Xinjiang breed. The Xinjiang Finewool is a dual-purpose sheep with
emphasis placed on wool production and body weight.

Breed categories: fine-wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Zwartbles
Since the beginning of the last century, dairy farmers in the Freisland region of Holland have
kept Zwartbles Sheep, a strikingly handsome black sheep with a distinctive white blaze and 2 to
4 white "socks." Freisland lies in the North of Holland, and these beautiful and elegant sheep
serve as dual purpose animals - meat and milk. Due to changes in farming practices, numbers of
Zwartbles in Holland became severely reduced until the breed was adopted by the Dutch Rare
Breed Survival trust in the mid-1970s.

In the last few years, a small number of Zwartbles sheep have been imported by enthusiasts to
Great Britain. There are now 147 registered Zwartbles flocks (a total of about 3,500 sheep)
spread throughout the UK, and they are well able to cope with the lowland and mid-altitude
conditions in England, Wales, and Scotland.

Breed categories: rare, dual purpose (meat and milk) / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Black Hawaiian
There is some controversy on how the Black Hawaiian breed was started. Some say it is
a cross of Mouflon and black hair sheep from the Hawaiian islands. Others say they are
Barbados with a dilution of the red color gene making them black. They have a thick
black coat and are usually black all over, although some sport a white muzzle.

Like the other species of sheep of this type, the horns grow up, back, down, forward, up
again, and then tip out. The horns of the Black Hawaiian are jet black. Males can weigh
up to 140 to 150 pounds while females usually weigh about half that much. They are
raise primarily for trophy hunting.

Breed categories: hair, exotic

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Black Welsh Mountain


In the Middle Ages, the mutton of black-fleeced Welsh Mountain Sheep was prized for
its richness and excellence and much sought-after by merchants. During the mid-19th
century, some breeders began to select specifically for the black fleece color and the
result is the Black Welsh Mountain sheep.

The Black Welsh Mountain is a small, black sheep with no wool on the face or on the
legs below the knee and hock. It is the only completely black breed of sheep found in
the United Kingdom. Introduced into the U.S. in 1972, the fleece from the Black Welsh
Mountain has generated special interest among hand spinners and weavers.

Breed categories: primitive, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Blackheaded Persian
The Blackheaded Persian originated in the arid regions of east Africa in what is now
Somalia. It is one of the fat-rumped breeds and both sexes are polled. Blackheaded
Persians have a white body and black head and neck with the two colors sharply
distinguished.

The breed found its way to the tropics of the Caribbean region via South Africa many
years ago. The Caribbean population has adapted well to the humid tropics. The
Blackheaded Persian is one of the breeds that was used to develop the Dorper.

Breed categories: hair, fat-rumped

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bleu du Maine
The Blue du Maine originated in Western France in the region of Mayenne. The breed
was developed from crossing Leicester Longwool and Wensleydale which were imported
during a period from 1855 to 1880 with the now extinct Choletais breed. The Blue du
Maine is a large breed. The breed has no wool on its head or legs. The face is dark gray
or blue color. Both sexes are polled.

In comparing the Blue du Maine with the Texel breed, they show a higher litter size and
age of sexual maturity. Their average daily gain, carcass leanness, milk yield, and
lambing interval are similar to the Texel, but the Blue du Maine are lighter muscled.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Blue Texel
The Blue Texel is a color variant of the normal white Texel sheep. The Blue Texel came from
white Texels who carry the color factor "blue" with them. This factor is a recessive factor. From a
mating of two white Texels who both carry the factor for the blue colour, there is a 25 percent
chance blue lambs will be born while a mating between a Blue Texel and another Blue Texel
always gives blue lambs. Texel sheep evolved as a result of crossbreeding the Dutch polder
sheep with several English breeds, such as Leicester, Wensleydale, and Lincoln at the
beginning of the 20th century.

Today, as a result of efficient selection, the Texel breed has developed into a meat-type sheep
of outstanding lean meat quality that has become popular throughout the world as a sire of
crossbred slaughter lambs. When Texel lambs with a different color were orginally born, most
breeders were very ashamed of this. It was not until the late 70's that some breeders started with
the breeding of this rare colored sheep: the Blue Texel.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bluefaced Leicester
The Bluefaced Leicester evolved near Hexham in the county of Northumberland, England
during the early 1900's. They are descendants of Robert Bakewell’s improved Dishley
Leicester. The breed originated from Border Leicester individuals selected for the blue
face (white hairs on black skin) and finer fleeces. It was was developed as a sire of high
quality crossbred ewes.

The crossbred progeny of the Bluefaced Leicester is the Mule, the ewe famous throughout
the U.K. as the best commercial breeding ewe on the market. Bluefaced Leicesters were
imported to Canada in the 1970's where they eventually made their way to the United
States. Frozen semen from the United Kingdom is being used to expand the genetic base
of the breed in the U.S. and Canada.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Bond
Bonds evolved in Australia in 1909 as a dual-purpose breed, using Peppin Merinos and
imported Lincoln rams. Bonds are tall, long-bodied sheep, heavy in the bone and with
open faces and a robust constitution. They produce bulky, long-stapled, bright 22-28
micron wool. Lambs are long, lean, and fast growing. Bond rams weigh up to 150 kg
(330 lbs.).

Bond sheep are mainly found in the south east portion of Australia. They have the ability
to produce economic results in a wide range of climatic conditions of rainfall from 350-
1140 mm (14 to 45 inches).

Breed categories: dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Booroola Merino
The Booroola Merino was developed on the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales,
Australia. It differs from the normal Merino in two ways. First, its fertlity is as high as any breed
in the world. The number of lambs born per ewe lambing is 2.4, with a range of 1 to 6. Half-
Booroola ewes on average wean 20 percent more lambs than comparable Merinos under the
same conditions. Secondly, Booroolas have the ability to breed at most times of the year, thus
extending the breeding season.

The high prolifacy of the Booroola Merino is due to the action of a single gene. Booroola
actually refers to a gene called the B gene (also called F for fecundity). The B gene can be
transferred into any breed sheep and does not appear to be influenced by nutrition.

Breed categories: fine wool, prolific

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Border Cheviot
The Border Cheviot originated as a mountain breed, native to the Cheviot Hills between
Scotland and England, where the climate is harsh and the conditions are rugged. Cheviots are
extremely hardy and can withstand harsh winters and graze well over hilly pastures. They were
bred to look after themselves. Recognized as early as 1372, the breed is reported to have
developed from sheep that swam ashore from shipwrecked Spanish ships that fled northward
after the defeat of the Armada.

The Cheviot is a distinctive white-faced sheep, with a wool-free face and legs, pricked ears,
black muzzle and black feet. It is a very alert, active sheep, with a stylish, lively carriage.
Cheviot wool has a distinctive helical crimp, which gives it that highly desirable resilience.

Breed category: meat, hill

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Border Leicester
One of three distinct breeds of Leicester sheep, the Border Leicester was founded in 1767 by
George & Matthew Culley of Fenton, Northumberland, England. They were friends of Robert
Bakewell and had access to his improved Leicesters. Some feel that the Culley brothers
developed the Border Leicester by crossing Bakewell's improved Leicester rams with
Teeswater ewes. Others argue that Cheviot blood was introduced.

In any case, the breed was firmly established in England by 1850 and Border Leicesters have
now surpassed the old English Leicester in popularity in the British Isles and in other
countries. Border Leicesters are moderately prolific, good milkers, and mothers. They have
been used throughout the world to sire crossbred females. They yield a long-stapled, lustrous,
coarse wool that is much in demand by hand spinners.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Borderdale
The Borderdale was developed in New Zealand. It is the result of breeding the Border
Leicester and Corriedale breeds and interbreeding each generation until the F5 stage.
Borderdales are a medium-large, hardy, long-woolled breed, with a comparatively low
susceptibility to foot rot. They have a good growth rate.

Ewes are often used for crossbreeding with terminal sires from the meat breeds.
Borderdales are found mainly on the plains, dowlands, and foothills of Canterbury (New
Zealand).

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Boreray
The Boreray originated on the island of Boreray which is in the St. Kilda group. The
breed was developed during the late 19th century from Scottish Blackface and a
Hebridean type of Old Scottish Shortwool. The breed has been largely feral since 1930.
The Boreray is a small breed with no wool on face or lower legs. The extremities are
black or tan colored.

The fleece is white to light tan, but occasionally an individual animal will be darker. Both
sexes are horned. The ram's horns are large and spiraled. Adult ewes weigh about 28 kg
(62 lbs) and stand 55 cm (22 inches) at the withers.

Breed category: primitive, rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brecknock Hill Cheviot


The Brecknock Hill Cheviot was developed from the Scottish Cheviot that was
introduced to Wales in the 1850's. Purebred Brecknock sheep come in all colors
except spotted. They tend to be naturally small like their ancestors. However, their
nature is much more gentle than the other Cheviot sheep.

In Wales, Brecknock Hill Cheviots are not part of the three Cheviot sizes . They are a
Welsh hill breed of sheep. In the hills, they are kept in pure flocks for breeding
replacements.

Brecknock Hill Cheviot have small erect ears with white faces and legs. They do have
not wool on the face or below the knees or hock. Ewes and usualy rams are polled.
They breed is recognized for its longevity.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brillenschaf
The Brillenschaf from Carinthia is one of the endangered livestock breeds in Austria.
Since 1938, it has almost completely died out. It is named for the eyeglass marks
around its eyes, under the eyes, and on its ears. It is a cross between the old
Landschaf breed with the Bergamasca and Paduaner Schaf.

It is a member of the Alpine Mountain Sheep Breeds. The hardy, frugal Brillenschaf
can cope with high precipitation and is expert in climbing, therefore it is used for
grazing high alpine areas which are inaccessible to cows.

Breed category: meat, coarse wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

British Milk
British Milk Sheep are a composite breed whose exact make-up is in conflict. Breeds
that comprise the composite include the East Friesian, Bluefaced Leicester, Polled
Dorset, Lleyn, and perhaps other breeds. The breed was established and released in
1980. Animals of this breed are medium to large in size, polled, with white, woolless, face
and legs.

British Milksheep are the most prolific breed in the United Kingdom with yearling litter
size averaging 2.21, 2-year-olds at 2.63 and 3.07 in mature ewes. A milk yield of 650-
900 liters (173 to 238 gal) has been reported during a 300-day lactation. The milk solids
is also particularly high. British Milksheep produce a large, lean carcass.

Breed category: dairy / Distribution: United Kingdom, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brown Headed Meat


The Braunköpfiges Fleischschaf is one of the four predominant sheep breeds in
Switzerland. It is the heaviest breed. It was developed by crossing Oxfords from
England and German Blackheaded Mutton sheep onto landrace sheep.

The breed is seasonal, lambing once per year, usually in the winter, averaging 1.7
lambs.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Brown Mountain
The home of this breed is the alpine regions of Bavaria (Germany), Tyrol (Austria),
Southern Tyrol (Italy), and the Swiss Canton of Engadine. In recent years, the Brown
Mountain Sheep has gained popularity beyond its original borders. The Brown Mountain
Sheep descended from the Tyrolean Steinschaf (Stone Sheep), which can be of all
colors, one color per sheep, and is rarely white.

The Braunes Bergschaf is a medium-sized sheep with a slender, hornless head, and a
Roman nose profile. Its ears are long, broad, and hanging. It has strong legs with hard
hoofs. It is extremely hardy and shows no fear of heights. Non- seasonal breeding is
possible three times in two years, and twins are the norm.

Breed category: long wool

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

California Red
The California Red was developed in 1970. It is a cross between Barbados and Tunis
sheep. Considered medium-sized sheep, mature rams weigh 225 to 250 pounds and
ewes range from 130 to 150 pounds. Both sexes are naturally hornless. Lambs are born
a solid rust or cinnamon red color, a color that is retained as they mature.

At maturity, the fleeces turn a beige or oatmeal color. The legs and faces are free of
wool with long pendulous ears which emphasize the animal's appearance. The wool is
silky in texture and has found a specialty market with hand spinners and weavers. Year-
round breeding is another charactertistic of the breed.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

California Variegated Mutant


The Romeldale is a breed of sheep developed by A.T. Spencer, who felt the Romney breed
would increase the staple, length, and carcass quality of his Rambouillets. Through many years
of selection, the Romeldale breed was developed, with fleece properties of 60-64's, extremely
high yield, and uniformity including carcass cutability superior to the other whiteface breeds.
During the 1960's, Glen Eidman, a partner of J.K. Sexton, found in his purebred Romeldale flock
a multi-colored ewe lamb.

Two years later a ram lamb of the same barred pattern was born and when crossed with the
ewe, the resulting offspring were of the same color pattern. Through subsequent breeding and
further mutants from the Romeldale flock, the C.V.M. Breed was born. These sheep, christened
C.V.M.'s or California Variegated Mutants, were kept by Eidman who then placed emphasis on
spinability of the fleece, twinning, and lambing ease. The CVM is classified as a "critical" breed
by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: medium wool, rare

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cambridge
The Cambridge is a dark faced, medium sized sheep with an average quality white fleece. It
was founded in 1964 at Cambridge University. The female foundation stock consisted of very
prolific ewes selected within native breeds. Most ewes were from the Clun Forest breed, but
the Lleyn, Llanwenog and Kerry Hill breeds also contributed signficantly, and the Radnor,
Ryeland, Border Leicester, and Suffolk to a lesser extent.

These ewes were crossed with Finn rams and the resultant F1 males were backcrossed with
the foundation stock to reduce the Finn contribution to 20 percent. The particular value of the
Cambridge is for crossing with other breeds and crossbreeds to produce a superior halfbred
ewe. The breed has a very high prolificacy, most of which can be attributed to the presence of
a single gene which has a major effect on ovulation.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, prolific

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cameroon
The Cameroon sheep is a hair sheep from West Africa. Instead of wool, they carry
a hair coat that in the autumn forms an additional undercoat, which is shed after
winter. Cameroon sheep do not require shearing.

Cameroon sheep are very prolific and reach puberty very early. They are aseasonal
and can produce two lamb crops per year. They are a resistant, problem-free
sheep. Their most common color is brown with a black belly, head, and legs.

Breed categories: hair, landrace

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Castlemilk Morrit
During the early years of the 20th century, the late Sir Jock Buchanan-Jardine began a breeding
program on his Castlemilk Estate in Dumfriesshire. Using Manx Loghtan, moorit Shetland, and
wild Mouflon, he developed a breed to beautify his parkland and provide fine, kemp-free moorit
colored wool. On the death of Sir John Buchanan-Jardine the flock was dispersed in 1970, and
six ewes and a ram were bought by Joe Henson at the Cotswold Farm Park.

All of today’s Castlemilk Moorits are descended from these few sheep. The Castlemilk Moorit is
one of the larger primitive-type breeds, with mature ewes weighing in the region of 40 kgs. (85
lbs.) and rams 55 kgs. (120 lbs.) The ewes exhibit two uniform and wide spreading horns which
are much heavier and evenly spiralled in the rams. Light brown or moorit in color, they have
definite mouflon pattern markings to include white underparts around the eyes, lower jaw, belly,
knees and inside lower leg and tail together with a rump patch.

Breed categories: primitive, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Charmoise Hill
The Charmoise sheep originated in the hills of France and has been used in the production of
continental terminal breeds such as the Charollais and the Rouge. The Charmoise is a
genuine hill breed, the first to be imported to Britain from the Continent. The breed was formed
in France in the late 18th century by the introduction of Kent rams from England, which were
crossed on the indiginous hill and mountain breeds to give them a better shape.

The exceptional confirmation of the breed is the principal reason for the success of the
Charmoise ram in commercial crossbreeding schemes for the production of quality primestock
lamb. It is found in the rougher hill areas of France today where it is bred pure to produce a
high quality small lamb. In France it is the only top confirmation breed to be classified as "race
rustique" (hardy breed).

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Charollais
Charollais sheep are from the same region of France as Charolais cattle. They originated
in the early 1800's from a cross of the British Dishley Leicester with local landrace
breeds. The Charollais breed is a medium sized, heavy sheep, with a long loin and well
muscled hindquarters. Their clean head is pinkish grey. Their wool is fine to medium and
dense.

They are used primarily as a terminal sire to increase the muscling and growth rate of
lambs. They are the second most popular terminal sire breed in the United Kingdom.
Carcasses from Charollais lambs are lean and heavily muscled, especially in the loin and
hindquarters. Dressing percentage is above average.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Chios
Like many breeds, the exact origin of the Chios is unknown. Some sources suggest it is
the result of crossbreeding between local sheep of the island of Chios (Greece) and
breeds from Anatolia (Turkey). The Chios is typically white with black, occasionally
brown, spots around the eyes, and on the ears, nose, belly and legs. The entire head is
often black.

Female conformation is typically dairy. The breed is classified as semi-fat-tailed. Milk


production for the breed varies from 265 to 660 pounds (120-300 kg) of milk per lacation
depending on management and husbandry conditions. The highest production recorded
is 1,317 pounds (597.4 kg) during a 272 day lactation.

Breed cateogories: dairy, semi-fat-tailed / Distribution: Greece, Mediterranean

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Churra
The Churra sheep is an native breed raised in Castile and León in northwestern
Spain. It is a milk production breed of great hardiness, well suited to the continental
climate of Castile and León, with long, severe winters, very short springs, and hot dry
summers.

Zamorano cheese is a classic Spanish sheep’s milk cheese. It is made with full
cream milk, coming mainly from the Churra sheep. Navajo Churro sheep descend
from the Spanish Churra.

Breed categories: dairy, carpet wool / Distribution: Spain, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Clun Forest
The Clun Forest originated in the mountainous district of South West Shropshire in
England, adjoining the Welsh Border, and are the most numerous sheep of the Marshes
of Wales. They take their name from the ancient market town of Clun. Some authors
attribute the breed to a combination of Hill Radnor and Shropshire, with Kerry Hill
breeding also introduced in about 1865.

Cluns are considered a hardy, moderately prolific, easy care breed of medium size. They
are a relatively new breed in the United States, first imported in 1959. Clun Forests are
darkfaced with no wool on the head and legs. They produce a medium wool fleece and
are known for their longevity.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Coburg
In the 19th century this landrace sheep populated the European hilly ranges abundantly.
These red fox-colored sheep could be found under names that indicated their color or living
area, such as Golden Fox, Eisfelder Fox Sheep, Eifeler Sheep, Ardenais Solognotes, or
Rousse Tetes. In the beginning of the 20th century, 60% of the sheep in the German
Coburg area were of this landrace with the red fox-colored heads, but by World War II they
were nearly extinct.

It took Otto Stritzel, a breeder and weaver from Bavaria to publicize the favorable
characteristics of the Fuchsschaf, which laid the foundation for its continued existence. The
Coburger Fuchsschaf is frugal, hardy, and prolific. Longevity and non-fussiness of food
make it a perfect choice for keeping on rough hilly ranges. It is possible to breed them three
times in two years. The specialty of the Coburger Fuchsschaf is its long wool. Lambs are
born with a dark red-brown fleece that lightens at age 6-12 months

Breed categories: rare, long wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Columbia
The Columbia is truly an All-American breed, the first to originate in the United States.
Columbias were developed in 1912 from Lincoln and Rambouillet crosses. The object of
the cross was to create a breed that produced more pounds of wool and lamb and could
replace crossbreeding on the range.

Though originally bred for range conditions, the Columbia has found widespread
acceptance throughout the United States and is used increasingly to sire crossbred
market lambs. Columbias are one of the larger-sized breeds. Rams weigh between 225
and 300 lbs (100-135 kg) and females weigh between 150 and 225 lbs. (68-102 kg).

Columbia sheep produce a heavy, medium-wool fleece with good staple length and
hardy, fast-growing lambs.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Comisana
The Comisana is one of the most important breeds of Mediterranean sheep. The breed is
valued for its high milk yield, processed on site to produce a variety of home-made high quality
cheeses, following a tradition lasting thousands of years. The average production of Comisana
ewes is 200 liters per lactation.

In well managed flocks, many individuals are producing in excess of 2 liters of milk per day,
indicative of the breed's high potential. The Comisana sheep originated in the Southeast region
of Sicily from where it spread throughout Italy, mainly to Toscana, Lazio, Abruzzo, Basilicata,
Puglia and Calabria regions. The breed is well suited for the entire spectrum of production
systems, from extensive to intensive. The total population is about 700,000 sheep, of which
54% are found in Sicily.

Breed categories: dairy, coarse wool / Distribution: Italy, Mediterranean

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Coopworth
The Coopworth is a medium sized, dual-purpose, white faced sheep with an alert but
quiet disposition. It is one of the most dominant breeds in New Zealand. It originated in
New Zealand in the 1960's from Border Leicester and Romney crosses, and was first
imported into the United States during the late 1970's.

It is a highly productive sheep, intensively selected for easy care lambing, prolificacy,
and good mothering ability. Coopworth wool is relatively coarse and long and is popular
with hand spinners.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, North
America, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cormo
Cormo is a system of breeding in which selection is based on scientific measurement of
commercially desirable characteristics. Selection criteria include clean fleece weight,
fiber diameter, growth or body weight, and fertility. Originating in Tasmania, Australia, the
Cormo derives its name from its two parent breeds: Corriedale and Superfine Saxon
Merino.

Cormo sheep were first introduced into the United States in 1976. They are not being
promoted as a show sheep, but rather as one of economic value. Cormos sheep produce
a long stapled, high yielding fine-wool fleece with a high degree of fiber uniformity. They
cross well with American breeds.

Bred category: fine wool / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Corriedale
The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred wool breeds, a Merino-Lincoln
cross developed in Australia and New Zealand and first brought to the United
States in 1914. Corriedales are a dual-purpose sheep with good meat and wool.

Their dense fleece is medium-fine and high yielding, with good length and softness,
somewhat between medium wool and long wool. It is favored by hand spinners.
Corriedale lambs produce good quality carcasses and have a high pelt value.

Breed categories: medium wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Cotswold
The Cotswold is an ancient breed of sheep descended from sheep that grazed the
Cotswold Hills at the time of Caesar's conquest of Britain. In the Middle Ages, Cotswold
wool was a major export of England, contributing greatly to the wealth of the country as a
whole and particularly to the Cotswold region, where the wool churches and large houses
remain as evidence of its importance at that time.

Cotswolds are a large breed, noted for their long, coarse fleece of naturally wavy curls and
the tuft of wool on their foreheads. The earliest record of Cotswolds in the United States is
1832. The Cotswold is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds
Conservancy.

Breed category: long wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dalesbred
The Dalesbred is found in Upper Wharfdale and Central Pennines in England. The breed
originated from the Swaledale and Scottish Blackface breeds. The breed shows a black
face with a distinct white mark above and on each side of the muzzle. The legs are
similarly colored. They have have no wool on either the face or legs. Both sexes have a
round, low set of horns.

Dalesbred wool is of typical carpet quality. The fleece is curly on the outside with a dense
undercoat. Dalesbred sheep are very adaptable to climatic changes and can survive in
the harsh environmental conditions. Dalesbred ewes are often crossed with Teeswater
rams to produce the Masham which is one of the most famous of British crossbreeds.

Breed category: carpet wool, heritage / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Damara
The Damara originated from the Hamites of Eastern Asia and Egypt and moved down to the
present day Namibia and Angola. For many years, the sheep were in an isolated region of
Namibia and thus remained free of influence from other breeds. Damara sheep can survive in
a harsh environment and under poor nutritional conditions.

Research has indicated that up to 64% of the diet of the Damara sheep can consist of
browsing material. This places the Damara in the same feeding category as goats. Hair is
mostly short with a tendency to a fine layer of woolliness developing under the hair during
winter. The sheep has a wide range of colors which are all equally acceptable and desirable.
With the exception of the tail and the rear rump, there is no visible localized fat.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Debouillet
The Debouillet was developed in New Mexico in 1920 from Delaine Merino x
Rambouillet crosses.The breed is best adapted to the range conditions of the
southwestern United States. The Debouillet is a medium-sized sheep with white hair
on the face and legs.

They are hardy and gregarious and adaptable to unassisted pasture lambing. They
produce a fine wool fleece with a deep, close crimp.

Breed category: fine wool, rare / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Delaine Merino
Several strains of Merinos evolved in the United States. The type "A" Merino was developed in
Vermont through selection and inbreeding. This Merino carries a very heavy, wrinkly hide. In
form, the type A is angular and has little carcass value. It is not advocated for commercial
lamb and wool production. The "B" type Merino was developed principally in Ohio, a result of
breeders selecting for a heavy fleece on a sheep that has a fair mutton form.

Its body is fairly free of wrinkles, but it carries heavy neck folds and frequently wrinkles or
heavy folds behind the shoulders and on the thighs and rear flanks. The type B is larger and
better adapted to everyday conditions than the type A. The type "C" or Delaine Merino is the
most practical Merino and is especially adapted to range sheep production in the western and
southwestern parts of the U.S.

The Delaine Merino is of medium size. Mature ewes with full fleece average from 125 to 180
pounds. Rams are larger ranging in weight from 175 to 235 pounds. The Delaine has a
smooth body and is free of wrinkles. In the U.S., over 95 percent of Merinos are smooth or
nearly smooth.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Derbyshire Gritstone
One of the oldest British sheep breeds, the Derbyshire Gritstone was originally bred by
the farmers of the Peak District to survive in a harsh environment and to thrive on the poor
quality grazing found on the moors. They are concentrated today around Derbyshire,
Cheshire, Yorkshire, and Lancashire, but Gritstone rams have been used widely on
Welsh sheep to increase their size.

Gritstones are big, strong sheep with a good weatherproof fleece, the finest of all the
fleeces found in the hill breeds. Both sexes are polled (hornless). The face and legs are
black and white.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Devon and Cornwall Longwool


The Devon Longwoolled is a mutton and long-wool producing breed found in
northern Devon in England. The breed is similar to the South Devon but
smaller. Both sexes are polled.

They were developed from Leicester Longwool crossed with Southam Nott
and Bampton Nott. Their wool is very strong and is used mainly in the
manufacture of rugs and carpets.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Devon Closewool
The Devon Closewool is a medium sized, white faced, hornless sheep with a dense white
fleece of medium length and staple which contributes to its valued quality of hardiness.
The wool of the Devon Closewool is ideally suited to the home spinner and also modern
manufacturing processes. It should contain no black fiber, and therefore commands a
premium price.

The wool is close and fine with a wool count of 48-53. The fleece enables the Closewool
to withstand wind and rain. The breed is primarily a grassland sheep and is very hardy. A
well established breed the Devon Closewool's original home was Exmoor but it is now
spread throughout Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and parts of Wales.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dohne Merino
The Dohne Merino is a synthetic, dual-purpose Merino developed by the South African
Department of Agriculture using Peppin-style Merino ewes and German Mutton Merino
sires. The progeny were interbred and selected for high fertility, rapid lamb growth rate,
and fine Merino wool under commercial rangeland conditions.

The breeding program was initiated in 1939 and the Breed Society was formed in 1966.
Selection since 1970 has been done with the aid of performance and progeny testing and
comprehensive production records. All recorded animals are maintained in a
computerised flock recording scheme. The Dohne Merino is one of the leading woolled
breeds in South Africa.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, fine wool / Distribution: South Africa, Australia, New
Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dormer
The Dormer is a cross between Dorset Horn rams and German Merino ewes (presently
known as the South African Mutton Merino). It was a direct consequence of a series of
extensive slaughter lamb experiments carried out at the Elsenburg Research Station of
the Department of Agriculture since 1927 over a period of more than ten years. The name
Dormers is an abbreviation of the linkage Dorset-Merino.

The main object with the development of the Dormer was to breed a mutton breed which
could adapt to conditions in the winter rainfall area of South Africa (cold and wet) and from
which suitable rams could be produced for cross breeding purposes. The Dormer is well
known for its high fertility, excellent mothering abilities, long breeding season and easy
lambing.

Breed category: meat / Distribution: South Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorper
The Dorper breed is numerically the second largest breed in South Africa. Their popularity
has spread to many countries throughout the world, including the United States in 1995.
The Dorper was developed in South Africa in the 1930's, through crossing of the
Blackheaded Persian ewe (a native fat-tailed sheep) with the Dorset Horn (a mutton
breed).

The breed has a characteristic black head (Dorper) or can be all white (White Dorper).
Dorpers are a well-proportioned breed with heavy muscled hindquarters. Their skin
covering is a mixture of hair and wool and it will drop off without being sheared. The
Dorper has a thick skin which is highly prized and protects the sheep under harsh climatic
conditions. It is the most sought after sheepskin in the world.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorset Down
The Dorset Down originated in England around 1800 by mating Southdown rams with the
large Hampshire Down, Berkshire and Wiltshire ewes. The Dorset Down is a solid,
medium sized, dark-faced, polled sheep. It has a short, close white fleece with wool round
the cheeks, between the ears, on the forehead, and down the legs.

The wool is generally of high quality. The breed produces early maturing lambs and as
such is an ideal terminal sire. Ewes will take a ram in most months of the year, making the
breed ideal for the Christmas or early spring lamb market when prices are at a seasonal
high. Carcass conformation is good with fine bone and shoulder, being well fleshed with
delicately flavoured tender meat.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, terminal sire, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom,
Europe, New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Dorset
Dorsets are best known for their ability to produce a lamb crop any time during the year.
History tells us that centuries ago when Spain wished to conquer England, Merino sheep
were brought into southwest England and crossed with the Horned Sheep of Wales. The
result was a desirable, all-purpose sheep that spread over Dorset, Somerset, Devon and
most of Wales.

The first Horned Dorsets were brought to the United States in 1885. In 1948, a dominant
gene for polledness occurred resulting in Polled Dorsets which are now popular in the
farm flock states. Dorset ewes are prolific, heavy milkers that produce lambs with
moderate growth and maturity that yield heavy muscled carcasses.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Drysdale
The Drysdale is a dual-purpose breed whose wool is used mainly for carpet
manufacture. Drysdale sheep carry the dominant Nd gene, a mutant which occurred
in the Romney breed. The Nd gene causes a high abundance of coarse, very hairy
fibers, called halo-hairs.

The wool of the Drysdale is without crimp, highly medullated, with a fiber diameter of
40 microns. It is known for its whiteness and dyeing versatility. The Drysdale is found
in most environments throughout New Zealand. They are sheared twice a year.

Breed categories: carpet wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

East Friesian
(Friesian Milk Sheep, Ostfriesisches Milchschaf) The origin of the Friesian sheep breeds
is the region of Friesland extending along the North Sea coast westward from the Weser
River in the northeast of Germany along the north coast of the Netherlands and south to
the Schelde (Scheldt) River at the border of the Netherlands and Belgium.

The German East Friesian Milk Sheep is the best known and most important of the
Friesian breeds and is the breed known in the scientific literature as the "East Friesian."
The East Friesian is considered to be the world's highest producing dairy sheep. They are
highly specialized animals and do poorly under extensive and large flock husbandry
conditions. Friesian sheep cross well with local adapted breeds.

Breed categories: dairy, short-tailed / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Easy Care
The guiding principle behind Easy Care is straightforward. Centuries ago, sheep didn't naturally
have huge fleeces, merely a winter coat which was shed in springtime, as with most wild
animals. However, man began to breed sheep for wool because of its value. In recent times,
the value of wool has fallen so dramatically that its production is uneconomic. Meat production
without the overhead and extra shepherding required in wool production would be much more
profitable.

By using highly selective breeding to combine the rapid growth rate, lambing quality, and other
strengths of his naturally wool-less pedigree Wiltshire Horn flock with the smaller, hardy Welsh
Mountain and combining some of the strengths of other breeds, Iolo Owen has achieved his
aim: a breed of sheep with all the qualities sought after by the modern farmer with fewer of the
drawbacks.

As well as being woolless, Easy Care are extremely hardy, thrive on grass and inexpensive
feeds, have a superb lambing ratio (180% is the average), and produce excellent meat.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Est à Laine Merino


At the end of the 18th century, Merino blood was introduced into German sheep in the
borders with France, and gradually these large "meat" Merinos were kept in large
numbers in the Alsace Lorraine region of France. This strain became known as the Est
à Laine, which translated means East and Wool.

The Est à Laine Merino is an attractive, strong, large-framed sheep with very fine white
wool. The head is long, white in color, with long, drooping ears. The sheep is naturally
polled (no horns), unlike the original Merinos. The neck of the Est à Laine Merino has
no folds or dewlap, making it easier to shear.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Exmoor Horn
Though ancient in origin, the Exmoor Horn, which has existed since time immemorial
in the west of England, is well adapted to modern requirements. The Exmoor can be
described as a dual purpose breed to keep pure on the higher moorland; in fact, they
are classified as a hill breed.

The Exmoor Horn is an excellent crossing ewe. The Bluefaced Leicester cross
produces the Exmoor Mule which is docile and prolific in lowland areas. The Exmoor
is white faced, with horns, cherry colored skin, and a white fleece of medium length
and good quality.

Breed categories: hill, dual purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Faeroes
The origins of the Faeroes breed goes back to the Old Norwegian, Icelandic, and perhaps
Shetland breeds. They are not gregarious and tend to be territorial. The Faeroes will
forage in small groups, spreading to cover the entire area, behaving somewhat like the
Icelandic sheep. These sheep are small and well adapted to mountainous terrain. The
color varies from white, grey, light red, dark red, chestnut brown, to black.

However, due to the low price of wool, they are sheared primarily for the comfort of the
sheep. The lambs reach a slaughter weight of 20 to 45 pounds at 5 months of age. A good
ewe will weigh about 45 pounds at 6 to 7 years of age. Rams weigh from 45 to 90 pounds.
Bone structure is light, but strong. These animals are seasonal breeders, with singles
being most common.

Breed categories: short-tailed, primitive / Distribution: Denmark

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Finnsheep
Finnsheep or Finnish Landrace, as they are known in their native country of Finland
are considered to be several hundred years old, descending from the Mouflon that
live in the wild on Sardinia and Corsica and also said to be related to other
Scandinavian short-tailed sheep.

First imported to the United States in 1968, the primary use of Finnsheep was the
production of crossbred ewes. Finn ewes are hardy, will lamb on an accelerated
lambing program, have strong maternal instincts, and are highly prolific. Lambs are
noted for their high livability.

In the last 20 or so years, more research work and data has been compiled in the
United States involving Finnsheep and their crosses than any other breed of sheep. In
more recent years, Finnsheep have become valued for their soft fleeces of medium
wool.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gansu Alpine Finewool


The Gansu Alpine Finewool was one of a number of finewool breeds in China which made
use of Xinjiang Finewool, along with Russian Merino rams in its development. The Gansu
Alpine Finewool was initially based on Mongolian and Tibetan ewes and was developed
through backcrossing to Merino type, followed by selection.

The breed was developed in the Huangchen District of Gansu Province, China, which has
an altitude of 2,600 to 4,000 m (8,530-13,123 ft), an annual mean temperature of 0 to 3.8°C
(32-39°F), an annual precipitation of 257 to 461 mm, and an average humidity of 35 to 58
percent. The sheep are well adapted to this particular ecological condition. The average
weight of grease fleece in ewes is about 4.6 kg (10.1 lbs), and the wool quality is 60-64's
(20-25µm).

Breed categories: fine-wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Blackheaded Mutton


In 1850, blackheaded meat breeds, such as Leicester, Southdown, and Hampshire were
imported from England into Saxony to be crossed with local breeds. Thirty years later,
breeding of these sheep started more in Westfalia and Eastern Prussia than in Saxony.
The Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep) was prevalent in Saxony.

Westfalia, with its high precipitation was the perfect area for the Schwarzkopf
Fleischschaf, and it is still the main breeding area. German Blackheaded mutton sheep
are medium-sized, white sheep that are wide and long with dark-brown to black head,
ears, and legs. They grow crossbred wool with a tight and firm staple that protects them
in a wet climate.

Breed category: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Gray Heath


The German Gray Heath is the symbol of the Lueneburger Heide in Germany. Their
ancestors, the Mouflon were at home in Corsica. Single lambs are born in spring with a curly,
black fleece. After the sheep’s first yearly shearing, its wool turns silver gray with a black bib.
Head and legs are black and free of wool. Rams weigh up to 80 kg (176 lbs) and have
imposing horns that curl close to the face. Ewes weigh about 45 kg (100 lbs) and have short
horns.

Their meat tastes like venison. The dual-coated fleece of a ewe weighs 2.2 kg (4.4 lbs.), of a
ram 4 kg (8.8 lbs).. The coarse, straight outer coat is 25 cm (11.4 in.) long. The downy
underwool grows 6 cm (2.7 in) long and has a fiber diameter of 25-30 microns. The wool used
to be sent to Belgium and Turkey to be worked into carpets.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Merino
In the 18th century, Southern German Landsheep were crossed with French and Spanish
Merinos, which produced the Merinolandschaf. This sheep breed is the most wide-spread one
in Germany today, with 40% of the total German sheep population. The Merinolandschaf of
today started with the dual- coated Zaupelschaf, which already in 1539 was not liked because it
produced inferior wool. For that reason it was crossed with the Marschschaf from the Lower
Rhine.

This sheep was large, prolific, and could march, and its wool had a fiber diameter of 33 to 36
microns. Later, Merino wool sheep from Spain and France were used to improve the wool
quality. The Merinolandschaf has a large frame, a straight head with a small woolly tuft on top,
no horns, and rough, large ears that stick out to the side, with legs free of wool. It is in no way a
landrace, but a highly adaptable breed.

Breed category: fine-wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Mutton Merino


There are three German Merino breeds: Merinolandschaf (Merino landsheep),
Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep), and Merinolangwollschaf (Merino longwool
sheep). Although all three breeds produce Merino wool and are similar in meat yield, they
went through a different historical and genealogical development. The Merinofleischschaf is at
home east of the Elbe river, spreading all the way to the Ural Mountains.

It is suited for intense production in arid or in agricultural areas. It is highly resistant and easily
adapts to any climate and keeping conditions. It grows easily with good meat yield. Non-
seasonal breeding cycle (3 breedings in 2 years), high fecundity, and good mothering instincts
make the Merinofleischschaf a good choice for intense milk-lamb production.

Breed category: dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

German Whiteheaded Mutton


This breed was developed along the North Sea coast in the middle of the last century. English
Leicester, Cotswold, Hampshire, and Oxfordshire were imported and crossbred with the local
Wilstermarschschaf, a northern German marsh sheep. Breeders succeeded in retaining the
wanted qualities of the marsh sheep, such as high fecundity, fast development, and large size. In
the 1930’s, a new breed, the Deutsches Weißköpfiges Fleischschaf started to roam the grassy
areas next to the North Sea.

It is the perfect breed to withstand the rough, damp sea climate and suited for life on the dikes.
The sheep fatten on the lush dike grass, pound down the earth and encourage new grass
growth, thus helping to stabilize the North Sea dikes which makes them resistant against storm
floods. The sheep need to be rugged and to protect them against the weather, they have a long,
rough fleece with a fiber diameter of 37 to 41 microns. The white wool, also known as Eider
wool, has a good crimp which is unusual for such rough wool.

Breed category: dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gotland
Gotland sheep were first established on the large Baltic island of Gotland, off the east
coast of Sweden. The Vikings brought Karakul and Romanov sheep back from Russia
and crossed them with native landrace sheep, such as the Gute. Gotlands are polled.
They have short, hair-tipped tails and do not require crutching.

Lambs are born black and grow quickly, many turning to grey as they mature. Gotlands
produce a quick growing, lustrous, colored, curly fleece of medium micron. The Gotland
is found throughout Sweden where it is kept for its pelt and meat production. The breed
was recently established in the United States via artificial insemination.

Breed categories: fur, primitive / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, Australia, New
Zealand, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Greyface Dartmoor
The Greyface Dartmoor is also known as the Dartmoor or "Improved" Dartmoor. Descended
from the local breeds, which grazed the low ground in and around Dartmoor, they have
immense strength of constitution developed through withstanding the severe winters and
exposed conditions, which exist around the Moor. Improvements were carried out during the
19th century using the local Longwools (Notts) and the Leicester.

The Dartmoor fleece is classified as Lustre Longwool. They are a medium sized sheep
(approx. 60 kg/132 lbs), hornless, deep bodied, short legged, with well woolled head and legs.
The white face should be mottled or spotted with black or grey with matching feet.

Breed categories: long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Growmark
Development of the Gromark began in 1965 in northern New South Wales, Australia. The
Gromark is fixed at approximately 50 percent Corriedale and 50 percent Border Leicester.
It is a dual-purpose sheep which evolved from objective selection for high growth rate and
fertility with final selection being based on visual criteria: wool quality, frame, and carcass
attributes.

The Gromark is a large-framed breed (ewes average 80 kg/175 lb) producing large lean
lambs and good fleeces with wool fiber diameter being about 30 microns. Breed
categories: dual-purpose

Breed categories: dual-purpose / Distribution: Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gulf Coast Native


Spanish sheep first arrived in Florida in the 1500's. Later importations of Spanish and
other breeds of sheep mixed with the earlier population, all evolving under the strong
natural selection of the native range conditions of Florida and the other Gulf Coast
states. Today a remnant of this population survives and is known as the Gulf Coast.

Gulf Coasts are best known for their resistance to internal parasites. The Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station in Gainesville has a flock which has been maintained
without the use of anthelmintics since 1962. The Gulf Coast Native is classified as a
"critical" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Gute
Gute sheep are the most primitive breed in the collection of breeds that make up the
Swedish Landrace breed group. These breeds belong to the North European Short Tailed
Breeds and are related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, Spelsau, Shetland,
Faroe, Orkney, and Icelandic sheep.

Both rams and ewes have two well-developed, slightly turned, converging or diverging,
symmetrical horns which are strongly curved and deeply ringed. The rams' horns are large
and strong; the ewes' are thinner. Gute wool is coarse and may be straight or wavy. It is a
mixture of fine wool, long coarser hair, and kemp fibers. Most sheep shed their fleece
partly or entirely in the beginning of the summer.

Breed categories: Swedish landrace, primitive, short-tail, coarse wool / Distribution:


Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hampshire
The Hampshire sheep acquired its name from the agricultural county of Hampshire in
southern England where it was developed from Old Hampshire, Southdown, Wiltshire
Horn, and Berkshire Knot crosses. Hampshires were first brought to the United States in
1860, but all of the flocks were either destroyed or scattered during the Civil War.

Importations in large numbers did not resume until the 1880's. Hampshires are a large
breed, with black faces and legs and wool on the legs and head. Their fast growth rate
and superior carcass merit make them a popular choice to sire crossbred market lambs.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool, down / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Han
The Han is a type of Mongolian sheep. It was developed in the semi-humid agricultural areas of
China (Henan, Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces). There are two types of Han
which in 1982, were claimed as two different breeds: Large-tail Han and Small-tail Han. The
Large-tail Han are polled and are characterized by a long, broad, fat tail, with a thin twisted end
turing upwards between two lobes, and broadest at the base. Maximum weight being 25 kg.

Since the tail is too heavy for the sheep to move around easily during grazing, this type (or
breed) is only adaptable to the plains. Han sheep are precocious and highly prolific, their
fecundity levels being 163% for the Large-tail Han and 229% for the Small-tail Han. Recent
reports have given even even higher figures of 192 percent for the Large-tail Han and 270
percent for the Small-tail.

Breed categories: fat-tail / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hebridean
The Hebridean, a sheep breed now classified as rare, originated in the islands off the
western coast of Scotland. They are classified as one of the Northern Short-tailed breeds.
Over the centuries, Hebridean ewes have been selected by natural systems for hardiness
in all weathers, ease of lambing, milkiness and good mothering instincts.

Because Hebrideans have not been modified by artificial selection they remain a small,
economically efficient breeding ewe with a surprising ability to produce quality cross-bred
lambs. Both sexes are usually horned with either two or four horns, four horns being the
most common. They have shown a greater tendency to browse than other sheep breeds
which has made them useful in ecological projects where the control of brush and weeds
was needed.

Breed categories: Rare, Northern European short-tail / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Heidschnucke
The Heidschnucke are a fairly small sheep, initially originating from Niedersachsen in
Germany. There are several varieties of Heidschnucke sheep: the grey horned
Heidschnucke, the white horned Heidschnucke, and the moorschnucke (marsh sheep). At
one time, the Heidschnucke were the most important sheep in northern Germany, but
their numbers have declined substantially.

Lambs are black at birth, but their fleece discolors their first year of life, until it gets its
characteristic grey color. Both rams and ewes have beautiful horns. Lambing percentage
is usually low, only about 100 percent.

Breed categories: rare, primitive / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Herdwick
They name Herwick is derived from an old Norse word that means sheep pasture. It
is believed that the ancestors of Herdwick sheep were introduced by early Norse
settlers. Herdwick sheep are considered the most hardy of British hill sheep.

They are raised mostly in the central and western dales of the Lake District and are
noted for their foraging ability in rough terrain. They produce a good crossbred lamb,
but their wool is considered to be of low quality and low value. The produce a coarse,
grey wool, a carpet wool.

Breed categories: rare, heritage / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hill Radnor
The Hill Radnor is a hardy hill sheep with a long history attached to the central marshes
of Wales.

The Hill Radnor has a light brown face and legs, free from wool. The rams are horned,
with horns of varying size; ewes are naturally polled. Compared to some other hill
breeds, the fleece is white and dense, with a fine staple, and is popular with local hand-
spinners and weavers. Like many hill breeds they are thrifty and good foragers

Breed categories hill, medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hog Island
About 200 years ago, a flock of sheep was established on Hog Island, one of Virginia's barrier
islands located off its Eastern Shore. The sheep were already native to the area and are
believed to have had a substantial amount of Merino blood in them. There were occasional
subsequent introductions to the population, the last being in 1953, when a Hampshire ram was
taken to the island. In 1974, the island was sold to The Nature Conservancy, which decided to
remove all the sheep and cattle.

Gunston Hall Plantation in Fairfax County, Virginia, eventually became the owner of the greater
number of these sheep and exhibited them as part of their replication of 18th century plantation
life. Hog Island sheep evolved and survived for over 200 years in an extremely harsh
environment on a limited diet and no medical attention. It is estimated that there are
approximately 200 Hog Island breeding ewes, mostly in Virginia.

Breed categories: medium wool, rare, heritage / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Hu
Hu sheep originated from Mongolian sheep. They are distributed in the Zhejiang Jiangsu
provinces of China and the suburbs of Shanghai. Hu sheep are well recognized for their
beautiful wavy lambskins, early sexual maturity, aseasonal breeding, prolificacy, and the
adaptability to a hot and humid climate. Hu sheep are raised indoors all year round. The
lambskins taken from lambs slaughtered within the day of birth have distinctive wave-like
stripes which are still retained after processing.

Hu sheep lambskins are traditional export item of Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. The first
estruses in ewes occur at the age of 4-5 months. Rams are capable of mating at the age of 4
months. Ewes cycle all year round. The average ovulation rate is 2.38 with higher ovulation
rate of 2.60 in autumn and lower rate of 2.2 in spring. Under normal conditions, ewes lamb
twice a year with litter size 2-3 lambs in most cases, and 7-8 lambs occasionally.

Breed categories: fur, meat / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Icelandic
The modern Icelandic Sheep is a direct descendant of the sheep brought to Iceland by the
early Viking settlers in the ninth and tenth century. They are of the North European Short
Tailed type, related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, and Shetland. A major
gene controlling prolificacy has been identified in the Icelandic breed. This gene exhibits
action similar to the gene found in the Booroola Merino.

The fleece from Icelandic sheep has an inner and outer coat typical of the more primitive
breeds, and it is the wool for which Iceland is known. It is illegal to import any sheep into
Iceland.

Breed categories: double-coated, short-tailed / Distribution: North America, Iceland,


United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ile de France
The Ile de France is the result of crossing the English Leicester and the
Rambouillet. The breed was originally known as the Dishley Merino.

The breed is widespread in France and was introduced to Great Britain in the
1970's. The breed is wide and thick set. Both sexes are polled. The Ile de France is
widely used throughout the world as a terminal sire for quality lamb production.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Imroz
The Imrov is among the smallest sheep breeds in Turkey. They are raised for meat,
milk, and wool. Animals are predominantly white, with black marks around the mouth,
nose and eyes, on the ears and rarely on the tip of the legs.

The tail is thin and long, usually reaching below the hocks. Rams have strong spiral
horns extending sideways; ewes are usually polled, but up to 30% of the ewes may
have small scurs. The head is narrow and its profile is straight. The wool is very coarse
and long, and it covers the top of the head

Breed categories: dual-purpose, carpet wool / Distribution: Turkey

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

INRA 401
The creation of the INRA 401 sheep bloodline began in France in 1970, after a series of
experiments crossing the Berrichon du Cher x Romanov which began in 1963 with the
Romanov breed.

Matings were carried out for several successive generations, between breeding stock of
the same generation chosen in priority to maintain the origins represented in the
foundation generation. The INRA 401 is a highly productive ewe, with a 200 percent
prolificacy, excellent out-of-season fertility, good milk production, and outstanding
mothering ability.

Breed categories: meat, medium wool / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Jacob
The Jacob is a unique breed. Their most striking features are their four horns, two vertical
center horns and two side horns curling along side of the head, and their spotted black and
white fleece which is prized by hand spinners and weavers. The Jacob is an old, unimproved
breed whose origins are obscure to say the least. Some say they are the result of the earliest
recorded selective breeding as referenced in the Bible.

Others claim they descend from Moorish sheep brought from Spain or Africa or from Norse
sheep from Scandinavia and the northern Scottish islands. Jacobs came to Britain via the
Iberian Peninsula and have been raised there for over 350 years. Until recent times, Jacobs
were kept at only a few large estates in England and thought to be in danger of extinction, but
they are making a comeback. The Jacob is classified as a "rare" breed by the American
Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Jezersko-Solcava
Jezerskosolflorinavska sheep resulted from the crossbreeding of native white sheep with the
Bergamasca sheep and with the Padova sheep. It resembles the Austrian Bergschaf that has
a similar origin. The breed got its name after the breeding centers of Jezersko and
Solflorinava. Its head has a convex profile and hanging ears. Its legs are long and strong. This
breed is very convenient for lamb production in the Alpine and Pre-Alpine region.

Since 1980, Jezersko-Solflorinavska sheep has been crossed by Romanovska sheep, hence
number of pure breed animals has been decreased quickly. Therefore, a special program on
preservation the pure breed has been started in 1991. An ewe has 1.42 lambs per lambing.
Ewes are non-seasonal breeders and pregnancy usually occurs during the lactation period.

Breed categories: meat / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kamieniec
Kamieniec are a Polish breed. They were created in the years 1954-1965 in the
Kamieniec farm of the Breeding Center in Susz, near Olsztyn. The starting point was a
flock of primitive ewes of the Pomeranian type, from individual farms in the regions of
Gdansk and Koszalin or brought from settlers from the East. They were initially crossed
with Leine and Texel rams, and then mated to Romney Marsh rams.

After selection, the progeny was interbred in order to obtain genetic consolidation of the
required traits and a more uniform type. Sheep of this strain have rather large, deep, and
broad bodies. Their wool covering much of the body is uniform in quality, with long staples
and hgh clean yield. This variety is also highly resistant to diseases, especially foot rot.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: Eastern Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Karakul
The Karakul may be the oldest breed of domesticated sheep. Archeological evidence indicates
the existence of the Persian lambskin as early as 1400 B.C. and carvings of a distinct Karakul
type have been found on ancient Babylonian temples. Native to the plains of Central Asia,
Karakuls differ radically in conformation from most other American breeds. They are of the fat
broad tailed type of sheep. In their large tail is stored fat, a source of nourishment, similar in
function to the camel's hump.

In Central Asia and South Africa , large flocks of Karakuls are still raised for pelt production from
very young lambs. The skins of baby lambs with their tightly curled wool are used in the "Persian
lamb" fur trade. Karakuls were introduced to the United States between 1908 and 1929. They
are a specialty breed in the U.S. Their fleeces, long and colorful, are prized by hand spinners.
Karakul wool is the wool upon which the art of felting evolved. The Karakul classified as a "rare"
breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: double-coated, fat-tailed, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Katahdin
The Katahdin is an improved breed of hair sheep, the first hair breed to meet North American
industry standards for carcass quality. The Katahdin is a cross between British meat breeds,
notably the Suffolk, African Hair sheep, specifically the St. Croix, and later the Wiltshire Horn.
They were developed in the 1950's by amateur geneticist Michael Piel and take their name
from Mt. Katahdin in Maine where the Piel farm was located.

The Katahdin is an easy-care, low-maintenance meat-type sheep that is naturally tolerent of


climateic extremes and capable of high performance in a variety of environments. One of the
most outstanding characteristics of the Katahdin is its natural resistance to internal parasites.
The Katahdin is one of the most popular breeds of registered sheep in the U.S.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: North America, Caribbean, Asia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kelso
The Kelso is one of several composite breeds developed in New Zealand. Unlike
traditional breeds, which are bred for appearance as well as productivity, composites are
bred for productive traits alone. The Kelso is continually being upgraded and modified to
meet changing market needs.

Kelso uses the best tools available to ensure genetic progress. Kelso is a sheep genetics
company which has developed two large scale breeding programmes over the last 50
years. The Kelso (Maternal Sire) and Ranger (Terminal Sire) breeding flocks are run on
five farms from Gisborne to Southland all genetically linked. Breed categories: composite

Breed catetories: meat, composite / Distribution: New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kerry Hill
The Kerry Hill breed is from Powys, on the English/Welsh borders, and it derives its
name from the village of Kerry, near Newtown. There are records of this distinctive breed
in this area dating back to 1809, and the first Flock Book was published in 1899.
Registered Kerry Hill Sheep can be found throughout the British Isles, Ireland, and
Holland.

It is a handsome sheep, with a black nose and sharply defined black and white markings
on the head and legs. The fleece handles well and is amongst the softest of British
wools. The breed crosses well with Hill and Long wool breeds to make crossbred ewes.

Breed categories: hill, dual-purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Kivircik
The Kivircik is found in northwestern Turkey, where it is kept for milk and meat
production. Their fleece is of carpet-wool type, but the wool is of better quality than
the wool of all other indigenous breeds in Turkey.

They are white with white or spotted faces, similar to the Karnobat and the Tsigai.
Black and brown varieties are also found. Rams have horizontal spiral horns
extending sideways; ewes are usually polled. Tails are long and thin, usually
reaching the hocks.

Breed categories: multi-purpose, carpet wool / Distribution: Turkey

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lacaune
The Lacaune is the most numerous sheep breed in France. It has been selected in
France for increased milk production under a sophisticated selection program
incorporating artificial insemination, milk recording, and progeny testing of sires for
longer than any other dairy sheep breed in the world.

Annual genetic improvement for milk yield in the French Lacaune is estimated at 2.4%
or 5.7 kg (12.5 lbs). Lacaune ewes produce milk with higher total solids than the East
Friesians, but in slightly less volume.The sheep of the Lacaune breed produce the milk
which is responsible for the famous Roquefort cheese.

Breed categories: dairy / Distribution: Europe, North America, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Landschaf
This member of the heath-sheep landrace is a cross between German and Dutch heath
sheep and a marsh sheep. Since 1934, it has been bred in the northern German Emsland
area, especially in the county of Bentheim. The highly endangered, frugal Bentheimer
Landschaf is used for landscape preservation. It is the largest of the German heath and
moor sheep with long legs and hard hoofs.

A slender, long head, Roman nose, small ears, no horns, long and woolly tail, describe
the sheep. The sheep is white, but dark pigmentation is permitted around the eyes, on the
ears and on its legs. Fleece weight is 3-4 kg (6.6-8.8 lbs), with a fiber diameter of 34-40
microns.

Breed categories: landrace, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Leicester Longwool
The Leicester Longwool was important to the development of other long wool breeds and
has made a large contribution to the sheep industries in Australia and New Zealand. The
breed originated in the Leicester region of England and although it is a very old breed,
Robert Bakewell, a pioneer in the field of animal genetics, is given credit for improving it
during the 18th century.

Leicesters are a big sheep with a heavy fleece of curly, lustrous wool that is even in length
and fiber diameter. The breed was first imported into the United States during the time of
the American Revolution, and it is believed that George Washington used Leicester sheep
to improve his flock at Mt. Vernon. The Leicester Longwool is classified as a "rare" breed
by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Leine
The Leine breed comes from the region of Nordheim (Hannover), in particular from the Leine
river valley (hence the name).

It was created through crossbreeding of local breeds with Friesian, Merino, and Berrichon du
Cher rams as well as rams of the English Leicester, and Cotswold breeds. In effect, a white
hornless sheep of the dual purpose type was obtained. Medium-early maturing with uniform
medium coarse wool, it is a hardy and healthy breed, well adapted to difficult conditions and to
walking over long distances. In Germany, the breed is nearly extinct.

Breed categories: dual purpose, coarse wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Limousine
Limousine sheep orginated in the region of France which gave them their name.

The Limousine sheep breed has great hardiness and excellent adaptability in very
varied regions, notably on non-chalky, acid soils. It is a breed notable for its female
qualities: early sexual maturity, a sure aptitude for off-season breeding, maternal
instinct, and milk value.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lincoln
The Lincoln is one of the world's largest breeds of sheep. Its fleece is the heaviest,
longest-stapled and most lustrous of any breed in the world.

Lincolns originated in a fertile area on the East Coast of England, bordering the North
Sea and the county of Lincolnshire. They were first brought to the United States in
1825, where they contributed to the development of several commercially-important
American breeds including the Columbia and Targhee.

Breed categories: long wool, rare / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lleyn
Lleyn sheep originate from the Lleyn peninsula in Wales and until recently were a
relatively unfamiliar breed of sheep in the UK. Over the past 10 years the Lleyn breed has
caught the eye of many farmers, and now Lleyn sheep can be found almost all over the
Country.The Lleyn ewe is renowned for her tremendous mothering ability, ease of
lambing, longevity, and prolificacy.

Lleyn rams are an ideal way to inject maternal traits, fertility, and hybrid vigour back into
breeding ewes. They are also becoming popular for crossing onto hill and lowland ewes
to produce a quality prime lamb or to produce a Lleyn cross female replacement that
carries the qualities of the Lleyn ewe.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Lonk
The Lonk has been bred on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Pennines from time
immemoria. It is an aristocrat by virtue of origins as ancient as the hills on which it roams.
It is one of the largest native hill breeds in England. The face is pure black and white,
and the legs are speckled black and white. Both sexes are horned.

Lonk ewes are prolific and good mothers. They are often crossed with Down and
Continental tups (rams) to produce a long lean lamb suitable for the modern consumer.
Lonk tups are often put to ewes of other hill breeds such as Swaledale, Dalesbred,
Scottish Blackface, and Welsh ewes to produce bigger lamb carcasses and improve
wool quality.

Breed categories: carpet wool, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Manchega
The Manchega sheep comes from the Entrefino breed and has a double production use:
milk and sheepmeat. Among this breed, there are two accepted varieties: black and white.
The latter one makes up more than 90% of the animals. The average milk production is
100 liters (26.4 gallons) per animal a year, being markedly seasonal during the months of
April, May and June.

Manchego cheese is the most important and well-known sheep’s milk cheese in Spain.
True Manchega cheese is made only from whole milk of the Manchega sheep raised in
the "La Mancha" region. This region is a vast high plateau, more than 600 meters (1,969
ft) above sea level.

Breed categories: dual purpose (dairy and meat) / Distribution: Spain, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Manx Loaghtan
The Manx Loaghtan is found on the Isle of Man off the coast of Great Britain. It is
member of the Northern Short-tailed group, similar to the Hebridean, but slightly larger.
It's wool is chocolate brown with paler tips. The Manx Loaghtan is descended from the
primitive sheep once found throughout Scotland and the coastal islands of Britain.

Manx Loaghtan are horned with four horns being preferred. In England, the majority is
two-horned. Individuals are also found with six horns. The horns are small on the ewes,
but are larger and stronger on the males. They sometimes shed their natural colored
wool in the spring. The meat is appreciated as a delicatesse and is protected by EU law.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tail / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Masham
Masham sheep have been bred for over a centry on the hill farms in the Northern
Counties of England. They are produced by crossing a Teeswater ram onto either a
Dalesbred or Swaledale ewe, both hardy hill breeds.

It is from these parent breeds that the Masham gains its hardiness, longevity, heavy
milking qualities, strong moterhing insticts and high prolificacy. The Masham ewe is
medium sized and hornless. Her fleece is long staples, 8-10 inches on a yearling and 6
to 7 inches on a ewe, with a good degree of lustre.

Breed categories: half-breed, dual purpose, long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Meatlinc
The Meatlinc is a British breed, in the Terminal Sire category, developed from a breeding
program originated by Henry Fell in the early 1960’s.Originally a mixture of chosen
individuals from five breeds, two British and three French, the Meatlinc evolved as a result
of many years of rigorous and disciplined selection based on performance recording
carried out under strictly commercial conditions.

The breed was closed to any further use of outside genetic material in 1975. It is thus a
genuine pure breed with recognizable uniformity. It is amongst the biggest of the British
breeds, a mature ram weighing 140 kg (over 300 lbs).

Breed categories: meat, terminal sire / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Meatmaster
In the early 1990's, determined to utilize the advantages of the indigenous fat-tailed hair
breeds and realizing the huge gap between the fat-tailed breeds and the well-muscled
British and European breeds and the need for a truly good pure hair breed with good meat
qualities, a group of South African farmers decided to develop a composite breed.

Various fat-tailed breeds were thus crossed with well-muscled breeds and the dream of
the Meatmaster emerged. Meatmaster sheep are selected solely for economic factors
under natural conditions. They have been exported to Namibia, Australia, and Canada.
The Meatmaster must just have a percentage of Damara blood in it. The rest can be that
of any other sheep breed.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Africa, Australia, Canada

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Miniature Cheviot
Cheviot sheep originated in the Cheviot Hills between England and Scotland. They were
introduced to the U.S. in 1838. Border Cheviots are small, hardy sheep that spend their lives on
the moors. In the U.S., they have become larger than their ancestors from the UK, so the
Brecknock Hill Miniature Cheviot registry was formed to preserve the original size. The registry
recently dropped "Brecknock Hill" from its name to differentiate American Miniature Cheviots
from the Brecknock Hill Cheviots that originated in Wales and are slightly different.

Miniature Cheviots are usually white, with small heads and erect little pointed ears. Their fleeces
provide a medium wool with a distinctive helical crimp and a long staple, perfect for
handspinning. Maximum height at two years of age is 23 inches at the top of the shoulder when
sheared. Mature ewes weigh 45 lbs to 85 lbs; mature rams 55 lbs to 100 lbs.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, miniature / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Mirror
The Mirror Sheep has a characteristic head design. Besides its otherwise white color,
it has black eye marks, black ear points, and a black nostril. A medium-sized sheep,
Mirror Sheep are undemanding compared to other sheep.

They descend from old Bündner sheep races like the Prättigauer sheep and probably
have influences of the silk sheep and the Luzeiner sheep. Austrian races might have
participated like the Montafoner and the eyeglass sheep in the emergence of the
Mirror Sheep.

Breed categories: meat / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Montadale
The Montadale was developed in the United States from Cheviot and Columbia crosses. E.H.
Mattingly, a well-known commercial lamb buyer is given credit for developing the breed. His
idea was to bring together the qualities of big western-white faced sheep and the popular
mutton characteristics of Midwestern sheep. His result was a good meat type, dual- purpose
animal with the head and legs free of wool and with the stylish appearance and agile body of
the Cheviot.

For fifteen years, many of these Montadale lambs were carcass tested for characteristics which
are now the standard in the industry, but which at that time were yet to become widely
accepted as the ideal. The Montadale breed is considered a dual-purpose breed noted for
producing both high-quality carcasses as well excellent wool.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Morada Nova
The Morada Nova comes from northeast Brazil and is probably of African origin. It
may also be related to a Portugal breed called Bordaleiro. The breed originated from
selection of individuals of the Brazilian Woolless. Both sexes are polled.

The rams do not have a throat ruff. It has been reported that they have a litter size of
1.32 to 1.76. The predominant color is red to cream, but white animals are also found.
The breed is small with mature lamb and ewe weights of about 40 (88 lbs) and 30 kg
(66 lbs), respectively.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Mouflon
The Mouflon is thought to be one of the two ancestors for all modern sheep
breeds. It is red-brown with a dark back-stripe, light colored saddle patch and
underparts. The males are horned and the females are horned or polled.

It is now rare, but has been successfully introduced into central Europe, including
Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovak Republics, and Romania.

Breed categories: native (wild) / Distribution: Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Navajo Churro
The Navajo-Churro was the first domesticated sheep introduced into North America.
Brought from Southern Spain in 1514, Churro sheep became the mainstay of Spanish
ranches and villages along the Rio Grande.

Native Indians acquired flocks of Churro for food and clothing through raids and trading
and eventually incorporated them into their lifestyle. After nearly becoming extinct
through a government sheep "improvement" program in the mid-1900's, the breed is
now recovering and becoming more popular, though still considered a "rare" breed.

They are a small breed, hardy, and disease resistant. Rams may carry four horns. The
Churro fleece is long, fine, and coarse. It has two layers and is low in oil. Native Navajo
tribes still use the Churro fleece to weave their famous rugs and blankets. The Navajo
Churro is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

New Mexico Dahl


New Mexico Dahl Sheep are an almost extinct Spanish Colonial heritage hair sheep breed
under development at Terra Patre Wildlife Preserve & Teaching Farm in Colorado and New
Mexico. The goal in developing these unique sheep is to produce a truly multi-marketable, low-
maintenance product. These hardy, no-shear sheep are beautiful and majestic with the rams
supporting magnificent horns. They are also very excellent sources of lean, less muttony tasting
meat.

The NM Dahl is taking this one step further and wanting to increase the meat marketability
along with increasing the growth of the horns not only on rams but also on the ewes for even
better future horn genetics. With this in mind, New Mexico Dahl Sheep are hybrids of the best
horned and meat hair sheep.

Beginning with the descendents of hair sheep brought to the USA in 1598 by the Onate
Spanish Colonists, and not being limited to breeding within the Corsican Sheep family (Texas
Dall, Black Hawaiian, and Painted Desert Mouflon crosses), breeding is based solely on a
focus of easy care, big horns and heavy meat carcasses, as well as maintaining the shedding
ability in these wonderful hybrids.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

New Zealand Halfbred


The New Zealand Halfbred is a registered breed of sheep, originally developed in
the 19th century by crossing one of the English longwool breeds such as Lincoln,
English Leicester, or Romney, with the Merino.

New Zealand Halfbreds are mainly farmed in the foothills of the South Island high
country. Their wool has a fiber diameter of 25-31 microns, intermediate between
Corriedale and Polwarth. Staple length is 3 to 4 inches.

Breed categories: half-bred, medium-wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New


Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Nolana
The breeding aim of the Nolana sheep is to combine the advantages of hair sheep with
the advantages of native wool sheep. Nolana sheep are hair sheep. They don’t produce
wool, but carry a smooth coat during summer and a 4-5 cm (1.6-1.8 in) thick pelt during
winter which they shed naturally in spring. Therefore, they don’t need to be shorn.

Two types of sheep have evolved during the development of the Nolana sheep: a meat-
type (fleischscafe) and a landrace-type (landscafe) for more extensive settings and
landscape management. The meat-type is mostly white, while the landrace-type is more
variable in color and type.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Norfolk Horn
The Norfolk Horn originated in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridge, England. It is one of
the ancient "Heath" breeds now being revived in small numbers. The Norfolk Horn
was used along with Southdown in the development of the Suffolk breed.

It is a medium-sized breed with a long body and legs. The face and legs are black or
dark brown and free of wool. The fleece is white with new born lambs being mottled.
Both sexes are horned and the horn pattern is an open spiral. The feet are black.

Breed categories: landrace, rare, medium-wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North Country Cheviot


North Country Cheviots are a "hill breed" of sheep. They evolved on the rugged Scotch
highlands and of necessity had to thrive unattended by man and search for food on wild
unimproved land. In these conditions the ewes usually lambed alone, and the newborn
lambs survived by their near-miraculous ability to get-up, nurse, and run just minutes
after their birth.

North Country Cheviot sheep are intelligent, self-reliant, resourceful, and among the
healthiest and most long-lived breeds. The North Country is an tough sheep that
produces both a superior lamb crop and a fleece that delights handspinners. It has
outstanding crossbreeding ability and can be used as either the sire or the dam breed.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North of England Mule


This medium- sized crossbred sheep, sired by the Bluefaced Leicester, has a Swaledale or
Northumberland type Blackface dam. The latter two breeds are born and reared on the Northern
fells and moors and noted for their qualities of hardiness, thriftiness, and longevity. The Mule
ewe has the ability to produce and rear prolific crops of lambs under any system.

Lambs from the Mule by a Down or continental type breed of sire give a first class carcass, at 17
to 22 kg (37-48 lbs), ideal for both the UK and continental markets. The fleece of the Mule has a
staple length of 10-25 cm (4-10 in) and a Bradford Count of 46's-54's. It is mainly used for the
manufacture of knitwear and carpets. The Mule is hornless with a brown/black face, clera of
wool, with a tendency towards a "Roman" nose. Ears and legs are white with brown markings. It
is the most popular crossbred ewe in the UK.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

North Ronaldsay
The North Ronaldsay is a small rare breed of sheep of the Northern short-tailed group of
breeds. They have remained virtually unchanged. Their most unique feature is their diet,
which consists mostly of seaweed. Mature ewes rarely exceed 25 kg (55 lbs); rams about
30 to 35 kg (66-77 lbs.). The animals are primitive and fine-boned and have evolved in a
specialized seashore environment on their native island.

They adapt well to mainland management including conservation grazing. Rams are
horned, but ewes can be horned, polled, or scurred. Virtually any color of wool is possible.
Wool is fairy fine, with some kemp. Rams develop a mane and beard of coarse hair.
There are about 3,700 of these sheep still on the island of North Ronaldsay.

Breed categories: rare, primitive, short-tailed / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Old Norwegian
The Old Norwegian Sheep is a small primitive type of sheep which inhabited Norway and the
rest of Scandinavia as well, including Iceland and Faeroes. Probably only the feral Soay Sheep
of St. Kilda are more primitive. The sheep are small framed, with good legs and a fleece varying
in colour from almost white to greyish, dark brown, badger-faced, muflon pattern and black.

Adult males weigh on average 43 kg (95 lbs) and females 32 kg (70 lbs). The fleece is
remarkably fine and in contrast to the mouflon, the inner fleece is highly developed. The outer
coat has long fibers, up to 30 cm (11.8 in) around the neck on the males. Normally, the sheep
shed their fleece naturally in early July. All the males of this breed are horned with approximately
10 % of the ewes also being horned. This breed of sheep has a unique pattern of flight (escaping
an enemy), which makes it suitable for use in grazing areas with predators.

Breed categories: primitive, rare, Northern European short-tailed, double-coated / Distribution:


Norway

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ossimi
The Ossimi breed originated in the Ossim village in the Giza Governorate of Egypt and
is the most popular among the Nile and Delta sheep breeds. It is thought to be
expanding its range at the expense of other breeds.

The breed is adapted to variable conditions and is usually raised under intensive
cropping conditions. They are a medium sized sheep, narrow, with a shallow body and
long legs. They are multi-colored, usually white with a brown head, neck, and legs. They
produce coarse/carpet wool and have a fat tail. Rams are horned.

Breed categories: fat-tailed, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: Middle East, Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ouessant
The Ouessant is one of the smallest sheep breeds in the world. They originated on Ile
d'Ouessant, a small island off the coast of Brittany, France.

Most animals are black in coloration with a few white individuals also occurring. The
average thickness of their wool is 27 to 28 microns. It is suitable for suitable for fine
knitting yarns and soft weaving yarns. Ushants are a dwarf breed with the males being
horned and the females polled (naturally hornless). The breed is rare.

Breed categories: rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Oxford
The Oxford or "Oxford Down," originated in Oxford County, England. The breed was the
result of crossing Cotswolds and Hampshires. It has been contented that very early in the
development of the Oxford breed, a small amount of Southdown blood was introduced.
The breed has never become prominent outside of its own native area in England.
Oxfords have been exported to many major sheep countries.

The Oxford is one of the largest breeds of sheep . It produces the heaviest fleece of any of
the Down breeds. In the U.K., it is a specialist breed to cross with commerical crossbred
ewes for meat production. The first Oxfords were imported to the United States in 1846.
They are a relatively minor breed in the U.S.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, down / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Painted Desert
The Painted Desert Sheep is a spotted hair sheep that received most of its influence from the
Mouflon. Before being established as a separate breed, it was considered by many to be a
parti-colored Corsican. Other early influence came from Merino and Rambouillet, and a few
four-horned individuals stem from Jacob or Churro ancestry. Long desired by hunters because
of the large horns and aesthetic, flashy looks, the Painted Desert is now popular among exotic
and alternative livestock fanciers.

These sheep shed their short winter wool naturally each spring, leaving a glossy, slick coat.
Colors can be very wild with mixes of up to four or five colors. They breed out of season and
lamb twice a year, with twins and even triplets occurring often. They produce a carcass of lean
meat without a muttony taste. Rams must show Mouflon influence by sporting a luxurious
mane in addition to large, heavy horns of homonymous, supracervical or polycerate types.
Some ewes may be horned.

Breed category: hair, exotic / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Panama
The Panama breed of sheep is one of only two recognized breeds of sheep which were
developed in the United States by private sheep breeders. Originating in Idaho in the early
1900's, the Panama began as a cross between Rambouillet rams and Lincoln ewes.
Following approximately five years of crossbreeding, rams and ewes were mated among
themselves to establish the breed.

The Panama is a hardy breed that is highly adapted to range areas with ample feed
conditions. They are polled, resemble the Columbia breed, but are more intermediate in
size, and produce a heavy, dense medium-grade fleece with a long staple length.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pelibüey
The Pelibüey is a hair sheep, probably closely related to the West African, Red African,
African or Africana breed of Columbia and Venezuela. It is descended from the West
African Dwarf and is found in Cuba, coastal areas of Mexico, and other locales in the
Caribbean. It comprises 75 percent of sheep population in Cuba.

Hair color ranges from beige, brown, dark brown, red, white, black, and roan, with both
solid and a combination of colors found. Males do carry a throat ruff, but usually do not
have horns.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: Caribbean, Mexico, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Perendale
The Perendale was developed in New Zealand during the 1950's at Massey University
to meet the needs of hill country farmers on developing country. It is still a very popular
breed in New Zealand. Developed from the Cheviot and Romney, the Perendale is a
dual-purpose sheep producing a 28-32 micron wool with a 125 mm (5 in) staple length.

The Perendale is characteristically a high fertility animal, and has great potential to
produce a prime lamb dam when crossed with the Merino. As a purebred, its hardiness
makes it ideally suited to colder, high rainfall areas. The Perendale is easy to care for;
the ewes have little trouble lambing and are good mothers.

Breed category: dual purpose, long wool / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pitt Island
The Chatham Islands, inhabited by about 50 people, lie about 750 kilometers (469 miles) east
of the Mainland of New Zealand. In 1841, Saxony Merino sheep were introduced to the Island.
They have been untended for about 80 years. Natural selection has resulted in self-shedding
fleeces and natural parasite resistance. Originally, they were all white. Half were black by
1950.

Since 1997, 90 percent of flock has been pigmented, most being solid black and about 5%
moorit. Almost 97 percent of the rams have horns. The horns can be massive, forming
complete spirals up to 95 cm (38 in) around the curve. In 1981, 305 of these feral sheep were
placed in a specially created scientific reserve on Pitt Island. Some have been exported to the
mainland of New Zealand where they are maintained by rare breeds enthusiasts.

Breed category: feral, rare / Distribution: New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polish Merino
The first Merino sheep were introduced to Poland from Spain in 1786. In the early 19th
centural, Electoral Merinos were imported. After 1860, Merinos of the Rambouillet and
Precoce types were brought to Poland, and work towards a dual-purpose type of sheep was
begun. In the period between 1918 and 1939, the breed was improved for meat traits using
such breeds as the Mele and Ile de France, created on the basis of English Longwool sheep.

After 1945, Fleischmerinos and Landmerinos were introduced into some of the Merno flocks
which survived the war. The Polish Merino flocks are located mostly in western Poland. The
Polish Merino shows both meat and wool traits.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polish Mountain
Polish Mountain Sheep evolved from the old Carpathian Cakiel, and especially one of its
varieties - the primative Podhale sheep. The breed can be found in the whole Polish part
of the Carpathian mountains; however, it is most frequently found in the Podhale region
near the town of Nowy Sacz, where the breed traditionally originates. It has a light build,
thin but strong legs and narrow rump.

Polish Mountain sheep are milked. The milk yield is 50 to 100 liters per lacation and 40 to
80 liters in a milking period of 150 days with a fat content of 7 to 8%. Meat production is
rather poor. The wool is white and coarse, suitable for carpet manufacture. The thatch-like
coat consists of loose locks, with a characteristic parting line along wthe back.

Breed category: carpet wool, dairy / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polwarth
The Polwarth is a dual-purpose sheep, developed in Victoria, Australia, in 1880. It is 75
percent Merino and 25 percent Lincoln. Polwarths are well suited to areas with improved
pastures and are mainly found in the higher rainfall districts of southern Australia. The
breed has been successfully exported to many countries, particularly South America
where they are know as "Ideals".

The Polwarth breed contains both polled and horned sheep with the polled types
predominating. It is large framed, robust, and produces a high-yielding, soft-handling
fleece of 22-25 micron fiber diameter. Much of the emphasis within the breed has been
directed towards developing and improving the wool aspects.

Breed category: dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia, South
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Polypay
The Polypay is a synthetic breed, developed in the 1970's at the U.S. Sheep
Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho, and Nicholas Farms at Sonoma, California.
Targhee x Dorset and Rambouillet x Finnsheep crosses were mated to form a 4-breed
composite that could produce two lamb crops and one wool crop per year.

Polypays are a medium-sized, prolific breed with an extended breeding season. Good
mothers and milkers, they produce lambs with acceptable growth and carcass quality.
The name Polypay comes from "poly" for many or much and "pay" to indicate a return
on investment and labor.

Breed category: medium wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Pomeranian Coarsewool
The Pomeranian Coarsewool is a landrace sheep that used to be kept in small flocks along
the Baltic Sea in Pomeranian (Pomerania) and Mecklenburg for its wool, meat, and milk. The
Pomeranian are highly resistant against parasites. They are not fussy eaters, thrive on sandy,
as well as moory ground and can be kept alone or in small flocks. They attach themselves to
people, are hardy and not demanding.

They lamb easily by themselves on the pasture and can be bred three times in two years. It is
a dual-coated breed, with an outer coat of 14-22 cm long wool and a fine downy undercoat.
The Pomeranian turn lighter as they age, therefore a silver-gray lamb will turn white and
should be culled. Handspinners love the wool with its interesting shades of gray, and they turn
the yarn into rugged, indestructible sweaters and jackets.

Breed category: landrace, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Portland
The Portland, once common in Dorset, is now one of England's rarest breeds. It is most
likely that the Portland is all that is left of the Western Tanfaced horn, common in the
Southwest during the Middle Ages.The Portland was one of the breeds used in the
development of the Dorset breed. Portlands are small. They are free of wool on the face
and lower legs, which are tan.

The lambs are born fox red in color and lighten to either white or gray during the first few
months of life. Both sexes are horned, with the ram's horns having a heavy spiral. This
breed will sometimes breed out of season. In fact, it was the first breed of sheep in Britain
able to have lambs at any time of the year.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Priangan
In the Priangan residency of West Java which includes the five districts of Bandung, Garut,
Sumedang, Ciamis and Tasikmalaya, there is a breed of sheep which has been developed
primarily for ram fighting (Ketangkasan Seni Domba). The rams are selected for size, horn size,
and for fighting ability. The champion rams are highly priced and may fetch up to 300,000 rupiah
(US$ 1 = 415 rupiah). However, they are not used for breeding during their fighting career as it is
feared that mating would deprive them of their taste for fighting.

The Priangan is a variety of the Javanese Thin-tailed. Some indications are that Africander and
Merino breeding were introduced in the 19th century. They are usually black or pied,
occasionally individuals will be gray or tan. Males are horned and females are polled. Individuals
often lack external ears.

Breed category: meat / Distribution: Indonesia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rabo Largo
Rabo Largo, meaning broad tail, are found in northeastern Brazil. They
originated from fat-tailed hair breeds which were brought from Africa and
crossed with the native Crioulo.

They are white, pied, or white, with a colored head. Both sexes are horned.
Individuals within the breed vary between hair and carpet wool. The breed is
one of the long fat-tailed breeds.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Racka
The Racka is a unique breed with both ewes and rams possessing long spiral shaped
horns. The breed is of the Zackel type and originated in Hungary. The breed is used for
milk, wool and meat production. Mature males may have horns as long as two feet or
more. The minimum standard length is given as 50 cm (20 inches) for rams and 30 cm
(12-15 inches) for ewes.

The cork-screw horns protrude almost straight upward from the top of the head. The
Racka has been described as a hardy animal and is often used in crossbreeding due to
its ability to pass this survivability to its offspring. The breeds unique appearance and
quiet disposition would make it a desirable animal for hobby situations.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rahmani
The Rahmani originated in northern Syria and northern Turkey and was introduced
into Egypt in the 9th century. The original stock is the Red Karman from Turkey. The
breed is named after Rahmania, a village in the Beheira Governorate in the North of
the Delta.

This breed is believed to have some resistance to internal parasites. The animals
breed all year round. The twinning rate is relatively high. They are the largest of the
Egyptian sheep breeds. They produce coarse/carpet wool and have a fat-tail. Their
color is brown, which fades with age.

Breed category: fat-tailed / Distribution: Middle East

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rambouillet
The Rambouillet is the "backbone" of the American Sheep Industry, forming the foundation of
most western range flocks and raised throughout the United States. The Rambouillet
descends entirely from the Spanish Merino. In fact, it is the French version of the Merino
developed when Louis XVI imported 386 Spanish Merinos in 1786 for his estate at
Rambouillet.

Though named for the town in France, the breed owes much of its development to Germany
and the United States. The Rambouillet is a dual purpose sheep, producing a desirable
carcass and good fine wool. Rambouillets are large sized, rugged and long-lived with a strong
flocking instinct. Rambouillet ewes possess many desirable traits which have resulted in their
inclusion in crossbreeding programs to improve lamb production.

Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Red Engadine
Red Engadine sheep orginated in Switzerland in Lower Engadin and in the bordering
Tirolian and Bavarian valleys. They originate from local varieties, from the Stone Sheep
and the Bergamask sheep. They are medium to large framed and are distinguished by
their ram nose and their long, hanging ears.

They have a dark-brown body and a red-brown, medium to coarse wool which with
increasing age becomes lighter. They are an easy-care sheep, well suited to extensive
production situations. In the 1980's, the breed was almost extinct in Switzerland, but
conservation efforts reversed the trend and in 1992, the Swiss Engadine Sheep Breeders
Club was formed.

Breed category: rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Red Masai
Red Masai are an East African fat-tailed type of hair sheep used for meat
production. They are found in northern Tanzania, south central Kenya, and
Uganda.

Masai are red-brown, occasionally pied. Males are horned or polled.


Females are usually polled. Red Masai are known for being resistant to
internal parasites.

Breed category: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: Africa, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rhoen
One of the oldest landraces in Germany was mentioned in 1844 in the files of the convent of
Fulda: “The common sheep of the Rhoen farmer is a normal German sheep with peculiar
characteristics, which even in foreign countries is known as Rhöenschaf. It is yellow-white with
a black hornless head and is clothed in coarse, non-elastic wool, with little crimp. Its body is
large, the bones are strong, and it lends itself to fattening.”

Pictures from 1873 show that the Rhöenschaf then was similar to the one of today, despite
crossbreeding attempts with Cotswold, Oxfordshire, and Merino rams. Even today it is a
medium to large-sized sheep with long legs and no horns. It is the only breed with white legs
and black head that is free of wool.

This extremely hardy and frugal landrace is well suited for the wet climates of rough highlands,
where it is useful in landscape preservation. In the higher regions, the sheep feed on rough
grasses and tree sprouts; in lower areas, they groom the meadows that are dotted with fruit
trees.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rideau
Rideau sheep are one of three Canadian breeds. Their development began in 1968 at
Agriculture Canada's Animal Research Centre in Ottawa when the Centre's Suffolk,
Shropshire, and Dorset sheep were combined with imported breeds: Finnish Landrace
and East Friesian. In 1974, the Rideau was closed to the introduction of new genetic
material.

From 1974 to 1977, the numbers within the breed were multipled with minimal culling to
broaden the genetic base. From 1977 to 1986, selection emphasis was on high fertility
and the potential for yearround lambing and to a lesser extent retail cut yield. In 1988
and 1989, the breed was released to nucleus flockowners.

Since 1989, the breed's popularity has grown rapidly. Rideau sheep should be used in
commercial flocks to improve the maternal traits within that flock. Approximately 50% of
Rideau ewes carry three lambs or more during pregnancy and another 40% carry twins.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Romanov
The Romanov sheep breed originated in the Volga Valley, northeast of Moscow. The name
“Romanov” comes from the old royal family of Russia. These sheep were first noticed in the
18th century, and were later imported into Germany and then France. In 1980, the Canadian
government brought in 14 Romanov ewes and 4 rams for testing and put them into quarantine
for 5 years. After that, some were brought to the United States

Romanov ewes tend to lamb by the litter. Most other sheep give birth to singles and twins,
while the Romanov average about 2-5 lambs per lambing. When the lambs are born they are
pure black but when they get older they turn gray. Romanov wool (a mixture of gray wool and
black guard hair) is used for rugs, mats, and wall hangings.

Breed category: meat, prolific, short-tailed / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Romney
The Romney is truly a versatile breed, as demonstrated by its ability to produce quality meat
and wool under diverse climate conditions and management systems. It is so-named for the
Romney Marsh region in Kent, England where it was developed as a dual purpose sheep.
Due to the extreme geographic and climatic conditions of the region, Romney sheep
developed some specific breed characteristics which include hooves which are resistant to
footrot and fleeces which remain heavy in harsh weather.

Due to similar land topography, Romneys made an easy transition to the Southern Island of
New Zealand and the Falkland Islands where they quickly established themselves as the
most predominant breed. The first Romneys came to the United States in 1904. Their long,
lustrous fleeces are sought by hand spinners.

Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rouge de l'Ouest
The Rouge is a medium sized breed of excellent conformation without excessive bone. As its
name suggests, its head, which is hornless, can vary from pink to deep red and is covered with
fine hair. The breed is strong and deep through the chest with good length in back and loin, but
it is the exceptional hind quarters and muscling that are immediately recognized as the
powerhouse of the Rouge.

The Rouge de l'Ouest is of the same origin as the Bleu du Maine, but with a distinctive pink
face and legs. It is used primarily for market lamb production, though was originally kept as a
dairy sheep to produce Camembert cheese. However; French breeders concentrated on
breeding their animals for superior conformation, whilst retaining prolificacy and milkiness. The
name Rouge de l'Ouest (usually shorted to Rouge) translates as Red of the West, describing
both the color and origin of the breed.

Breed category: meat, medium wool Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Rough Fell
The Rough Fell is an exceptionally docile sheep that excels in hardiness and has no
equal in its power to exist under adverse conditions.

It is well fitted to endure the hardships of the mountains and valleys of Northern England
including the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. Drafted to lower ground, the Rough
Fell is a dual purpose breed and is found in many counties of the United Kingdom. They
are ideal for crossing. The breed has a horned black head with a definite white patch on
the nose.

Breed category: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Roussin
Roussin Sheep were developed from, the Brittany Heath Sheep. Dishley Leicester and the
Southdown. In the 1960's the breed was improved using Suffolk and Avranchin. In 1977, the
breed was closed and the characteristics established. The main areas in France the Roussin are
the Cherbourg peninsular, Normandy, and Brittany. The French sheep breeds tend to stay in
their local areas. However Roussin Rams have been taken down to the Carmangue to be used
on the feral sheep to produce fat lambs off the salt marsh.

Roussin sheep are now found throughout Europe and the UK, able to adapt to any soil or
climatic conditions. Roussin are hardy and prolific, capable of achieving with 200% lambing
average. Ewes have plenty of milk and lamb growth rates are averaging 340 grams (0.75 lbs.)
per day upto 100 days. Lambs finish at 18 to 21 kg (40-46 lbs.) dead weight. The carcasses are
noted for their exceptional meat to bone ratio.

Breed category: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Royal White
The Royal White® is a new breed of hair sheep privately funded and developed by
William Hoag, of Dorpcroix Sheep Farm in Hermeleigh, Texas. The breed is a cross
between the Dorper and St. Croix.

They are pure white. They grow a longer hair in the winter that is shed off naturally in
the spring. Ewes and rams are naturally hornless. Texas Tech and Texas A & M
University are currently doing research with the breed with regards to meat production
and scrapie resistance.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ryeland
Ryelands are a white-faced, polled (no horns), small to medium sized, down-type breed
whose antecedents were developed by monks at Leominster in the rye growing district of
Herefordshire, England, in the 15th Century. It was one of the breeds used to introduce
the poll gene to the Dorset breed in the development of the Poll Dorset. The Ryeland
breed first came to New Zealand in 1903 and later to Australia.

Initially a dual purpose sheep, the breed was, in latter years, used mainly as a terminal
sire. There has been a recent upsurge in interest in the Ryeland as a breed ideally suited
for small farmers who want the truly all-purpose type of sheep; not too big to handle
safely, docile, fertile, thrifty, and capable of providing both fine wool for hand-spinning and
high quality meat for the table.

Breed category: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Australia, New
Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Saeftinger
The Saeftinger breed originated around 1986 by crossing a Romanov ram onto
Suffolk ewes. The breed takes its name from the salt meadows where it grazes.

The meat from the Saeftinger is a culinary specialty. Mature ewes average 2.2
lambs per lambing; ewe lambs, 2.0. Three lamb crops in two years is common.
Ewes and rams are both hornless.

Breed categories: meat, short-tailed / Distribution: Belgium, Netherlands

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Santa Cruz
There is considerable uncertainty as to the exact origin of the sheep of Santa Cruz Island, even
to the century in which sheep were placed there. Speculation is that Merino, Rambouillet, and
perhaps some Churro figure in the Santa Cruz sheep's background, and it is certain that the
sheep have been feral for the last 70 years. The Nature Conservancy acquired 88% of the
island (located off the coast of southern California) during the 1970's and began an eradication
program in 1980.

In 1988, twelve lambs were brought off the island by a team of Nature Conservancy and ALBC
volunteers and were placed with five California breeders to begin a population rebuilding effort.
The Santa Cruz Island sheep breed is an important genetic resource. Its historic background,
long period of isolation, and adaptation to a challenging environment have given the breed an
array of characteristics not found among commercial breeds.

Breed categories: feral, rare, heritage / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Santa Inês
The Santa Inês is a breed of hair sheep found in Brazil. It is generally thought to be a
cross of Morada Nova, the course-wooled Italian breed, Bergamasca, and the native
coarse-wooled Crioula, followed by a period of selection or evolution for absence of
fleece. Colors range from red, black and white and can be spotted or solid. They have
large bodies, are long-legged and have large pendulous ears and are polled.

Rams do not have a throat ruff. They have a low litter size of 1.25. Mature weights of the
ewes in the field fall between 40 and 50 kg. (88 to 110 lbs.), and if well fed, the rams can
weigh as much as 100 kg (220 lbs).

Breed categories: hair (meat), skin / Distribution: South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Sardinian
The Sardinian breed originated from the local lowland breed which were large,
polled, and had white wool. Merino and Barbary breeding were also used in
developing the breed. The males are occasionally horned and the females are polled
(hornless).

Sardinian sheep are primarily keep for milk production. Pecorino sarda cheese is
made only from Sardinian sheep milk coming from the island of Sardinia off the
coast of Italy. In Sardinia, there are more sheep than people.

Breed categories: dairy, carpet wool / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scotch Mule
The Scotch Mule is an intentionally produced crossbred sheep out of Scottish Blackface ewes
and sired by Bluefaced Leicester rams. The term "mule" (when it refers to sheep) is used for an
intentionally produced crossbred sheep that is sired by a Bluefaced Leicester ram. In the United
Kingdom, Mule ewes are the backbone of the commercial sheep industry. The various types of
Mules are the most popular commercial ewes in the UK, and the Bluefaced Leicester is the
number one crossing sire there.

The advantages of the Mule as a commercial ewe are many, and the Bluefaced Leicester
imparts many highly desirable qualities in his crossbred daughters. The Mule ewe will have
improved maternal qualities such as early maturity, increased prolificacy, improved milk
production, more capacity, in addition to hybrid vigor.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scottish Blackface
The Scottish Blackface is by far the most important blackface sheep in all of Great Britain.
They are primarily used for crossing, usually with the Border or Bluefaced Leicester. They
originated as a mountain sheep in Scotland, and there is a tradition that they came from a
Spanish ship wrecked during the northward flight of Armada in 1588. The Scottish Blackface
has a light weight fleece of long, coarse wool. Both sexes have horns.

In addition to an attractive and stylish fleece, their roman nose and unusual black and white
face markings set them apart in appearance. The Scottish Blackface is found in the Highlands
and Borders of Scotland, Pennines, Dartmoor and Northern Ireland. They have also been
exported to the United States, Italy and Argentina.

Breed categories: carpet wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North America, South
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Scottish Greyface
By using the Border Leicester ram with the Scottish Blackface ewe, the Scottish
Greyface is produced.

The Scottish Greyface ewe has the same purpose as other Halfbred and Mule
ewes,namely to produce quality prime lamb when put to a terminal sire. As the name
suggests, she has a speckled face, gray in color. The body is long, well-sprung, and
evenly fleshed. The Scottish Greyface can be found in all parts of the British Isles.

Breed categories: half-breed, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shetland
The Shetland's roots go back over a thousand years, probably to sheep brought to the
Shetland Islands by Viking settlers. They belong to the Northern European short-tailed group
of sheep, which also includes Finn sheep, Icelandic sheep, and Romanovs. The Shetland is a
primitive, unimproved breed noted for its natural hardiness, lambing ease, longevity, and ability
to survive under harsh conditions. It is one of the smallest breeds of sheep.

Shetlands are known primarily for their production of colorful wool upon which the Shetland
woolen industry is based. Shetland comes in one of the widest ranges of colors of any breed.
There are 11 main colors as well as 30 markings, many still bearing their Shetland dialect
names. Shetlands naturally shed their wool during late spring/early summer.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tailed / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shetland-Cheviot
From the turn of the 20th century, North Country Cheviot rams have been bred with the
Shetland ewe to produce what has become locally as the Shetland-Cheviot. The hybrid
vigor prdouced from the crossing the two pure breeds ensures that the Shetland-Cheviot
retains the features of both. She is a hardy, thrifty, and milky with her sire's excellent
conformation.

Following the realization that a small ewe crossed with a large, fast growing sire could
produce prime lamb very efficiently, producers outside Shetland turned to the breed,
which has spread into the Orkneys, Caithness and down through Scotland. The
Shetland-Cheviot's main purpose is to produce quality lamb when put to a suitable ram,
usually a terminal sire.

Breed categories: half-breed, medium wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Shropshire
Shropshires are a good, middle-of-the-road sheep, medium to large in size, with dark
faces and wool on the legs. They originated in central western England in the counties of
Shropshire and Stafford from native stock, Southdown, Leicester, and Cotswold crosses.
First imported into the United States in 1855, until the 1930's, the Shropshire was the
most popular and influential breed in the country.

Called the "Ideal Farm Sheep," Shropshires were boasted to have "wool from the tip of
the nose to the tip of the toes." Over the last few decades, Shropshires have evolved into
a very modern and productive breed, perfect for families with youth projects.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Skudde
The Skudde is a nordic, short-tailed heather sheep. Its original homeland was East Prussia and
the Baltic States. Today a few small herds can be found in these areas. The most noticeable
feature of the Skudde ram is the imposing snail horn. The ewes are hornless or carry horn
stumps. In individual cases, it occurs that ewes carry chamois-like “hornlets.” The animals are
slender, the weight of the rams lies between 35 and 50 kg (77-110 lbs), that of the ewes from
25 to 40 kg (55-88 lbs).

The wool mixture typical of this breed consists of fine wool fibers, dispersed with short hairs and
course cover hair. The colors are white, brown, black, and gray. White Skuddes have small
pigment spots on the head. Lambs have a rust-colored marking in the nape of the neck and on
the legs. This coloring disappears in adults.

Skuddes are not kept for their meat. They are suited for pasturing more barren areas. The meat
is held to be a delicacy in circles of connoisseures. Skuddes come into heat aseasonally.
Lambs are born at any time of the year. As a rule three lambings are possible in two years.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Soay
The Soay has been called the only living example of the small, primitive sheep
which inhabited the British Isles before the coming of the Norsemen and Romans.

Their name is derived from the island of Soay off the coast of Scotland. Soays were
originally imported to North America in 1974. They are a small framed sheep with a
fleece that varies from light to dark brown in color and is shed naturally in the
summer.

Breed categories: primitive, short-tail, double-coated / Distribution: United Kingdom,


Europe, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Solognote
The Solognote is an old breed that derives its name from Sologne, France, where
it was developed in the 15th century.

The breed was very widespread in the 1850's. It has been exported to Germany,
Belgium, the Netherlands, and Morocco. The Solognote is a very rustic breed that
is able to tolerate diseases and poor feeding conditions.

Breed category: medium wool, rare / Distribution: Europe, Africa

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Somali
The Somali is a hair sheep native to Somali in Africa where they are reared primarily for
meat production.

They are white with a black head. Both sexes are polled and the breed belongs to the
fat-rumped type. Somali sheep are the immediate ancestor of the Blackheaded Persian
which was developed in South Africa in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and that
has been widely used for crossbreeding in many parts of Africa and elsewhere in the
tropics.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-rumped / Distribution: Africa, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South African Meat Merino


SAMMs were imported into South Africa by the Department of Agriculture from 1936 to 1974
from Germany where the Deutsche Fliesch Merino is a common meat sheep of Germany,
Austria, and Poland. In South Africa, the name was translated as Duits Vleis Merinoand then
into English as German Mutton Merino. In 1974, the South African Breed Society changed the
name to the South African Mutton Merino.

When imported into Australia in 1996, Western Australian SAMM breeders registered the name
Prime SAMM, as the Australian usage of the word "'Mutton" relates to a description of
extremely old and inedible sheepmeat. The translation used in Australia is "South African Meat
Merino." The SAMM is bred specifically to produce a slaughter lamb at an early age (35 kg/77
lbs. at 100 days of age), while still being able to produce good volumes (4 kg/8.8 lbs) of medium
to strong wool.

Breed categories: Merino, dual-purpose / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South Suffolk
The South Suffolk is a fixed cross between the Suffolk and Southdown breeds. It is a
large, comparatively heavy meat breed of sheep.

Rams are for use as terminal sires, used in cross breeding for early prime lamb
production. South Suffolks can be found in most states of Australia and in New
Zealand, where the breed originated. The wool is of the fine Downs type and measures
24 to 26 micron in fiber diameter. Fertility levels are high.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

South Wales Mountain


South Welsh Mountain sheep have been reared on the harsh hill pastures of South Wales
for centuries. Their ability to thrive where lesser breeds have failed has ensured their
predominance in the area. They are a dual purpose breed. They are similar in appearance
to other Welsh Mountain breeds, and rams are frequently used to improve the size and
conformation of the other Welsh Mountain breeds.

When crossed with a Suffolk ram, the South Wales Mountain ewe produces ewe lambs
that are much sought after as lowland breeding ewes, being hardy, prolific and good
milkers with strong conformation. Their fleece is dense with an even mixture of white
kempy fiber.

Breed categories: dual-purpose, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Southdown
The Southdown takes its name from the Chalk Hills of Sussex County in extreme
southeastern England where they are said to have roamed from time immemorial. They are
one of the oldest sheep breeds, having contributed to the foundation stock of all other
down breeds: Suffolk, Hampshire, and Oxford.

Historians are not agreed as to when the first Southdowns were imported to America, but it
is known that they were introduced very early in the history of the country. Governor
Winthrop, early Connecticut governor is said to have acquired a flock of Southdown ewes
in 1648. Southdowns adapt well to intensive management, pass their superb conformation
onto their offspring, and can thrive and maintain flesh where many other breeds would
virtually starve.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Spael
The Norwegian Spael sheep is named after the short, nearly wool-less tail (spælen). It
originates from the old Norwegian landrace of sheep. In 1912, two breeding stations were
established to prevent extinction of the breed. Icelandic sheep were crossed onto the Spael
sheep through semen import in the 1960's and 1970's. Finnsheep and Faeroe Island sheep
were also used in the breeding of Spael sheep.

The sheep are most commonly white, but there are also black, brown, grey and blue-grey
animals and various forms of piebald are found. Most animals are polled, with about 10%
occurrence of horned in both sexes. The wool is double coated, with mean fibre diameter 31.5
micron of underwool and 57.1 micron of outer hair.wool is used for many different products
and woolskins and nappa leather are made out of the pelts.

Breed categories: Swedish landrace, short-tailed, double-coated / Distribution: Northern


Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Spanish Merino
A number of sheep breeding nations, including Phoenicia, Italy, and Spain, are believed to
have played a part in the development of the Merino sheep. However, it is generally agreed
upon that the Moors, who dominated Spain through the eighth to thirteenth centuries, were
primarily responsible for selectively breeding the animals to such an extent that the wool they
produced became superior to that of all other sheep.

Indeed, the word Merino may be of Moorish origin, possibly evolving from their word for a
judge that settled disagreements about flocks between shepherds. By the eighteenth century,
Merino wool was considered so luxurious and valuable only the sovereign of Spain was
permitted to send Merino sheep out of the country, which he occasionally conveyed as gifts.

The Merino fleece sits at the top of the grading charts for fineness; it is the standard against
which all others are measured. Merino sheep are also noted for their hardiness and their
herding instincts and have been used as parents of several other breeds, notably the
Rambouillet of France.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

St. Croix
The St. Croix is a hair sheep that originated in the Virgin Islands, where it is called the
"Virgin Island White." The breed is believed to have descended from the hair sheep of
West Africa, but some feel it is a cross of the Wiltshire Horn and the native Criollo. Most
of these sheep are white with some solid tan, brown, black or white with brown or black
spots.

Both sexes are polled, and rams have a large throat ruff. Exceptional parasite resistance
compared to British sheep breeds has been documented in studies at several
universities. The St. Croix is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock
Breeds Conservancy.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Caribbean, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Steinschaf
The Steinschaf is a direct descendent of the now extinct Zaupelschaf. It had developed
characteristics that made it perfect for life in the high mountains in the Eastern Alpine regions.
In the beginning of the 20th century the Steinschaf still roamed the meadows of Bavaria,
Germany, especially the areas around Berchtesgaden, Traunstein, and Rosenheim. In
Austria, its range was mainly in the Salzburg area

.The original Steinschaf used to be a dual-coated, small, and wiry high mountain sheep,
weighing 28- 30 kg (62-66 lbs). It was bred twice a year and it had 20-70 % twins. The modern
Steinschaf is a robust, small to medium-sized sheep with a coarse, dual-coated fleece, that
can be of all colors and markings. It would benefit the breed if it could be kept exclusively on
high alpine meadows, in order to retain its excellent characteristics.

Breed categories: double-coated / Distribution: Germany, Austria, Italy

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Suffolk
Suffolks are found throughout the world's sheep producing countries. In the United States,
they are by far the most popular pure breed of sheep, accounting for more than fifty percent
of purebred sheep registrations. In the British Isles, they are the leading terminal sire breed.
The Suffolk breed originated almost 200 years ago on the rugged southeastern coast of
England, the result of crossing Southdown rams and Norfolk Horn ewes. Originally, they
were called Southdown Norfolks or just "Black faces."

The first Suffolks were brought to the United States in 1888, but it wasn't until after the
second World War when the sheep industry moved towards a larger, meatier, open faced
sheep that Suffolks gained in prominence. They are a large breed with a distinctive all-black
head and legs that are free of wool. Suffolk lambs grow faster than any other breed and yield
heavy, high cutability carcasses of the type demanded by today's health conscience
consumers.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swaledale
The breed's origin almost cerainly emerged from the genetic group of horned sheep from
which also came the Blackface, the Rough Fell, and other localized types.

Slowly over time a "Swaledale" breed type emerged from within these horned sheep.The
Swaledale can now be found in both the hills and lowlands of Britain, producing both pure
bred and the well-known North of England Mule (a Blue Faced Leicester cross). The
Swaledale has proven itself to be a bold hardy sheep, well-fitted to endure the hardships
of exposed and high lying situations. Wool is medium.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swifter
The Swifter is a new, highly productive sheep breed, which was developed in the 1970's
by the Agricultural University in Wageningen, the Netherlands, to increase the productivity
of the Dutch sheep stock. Swifters are used as dams for slaughter lambs.

The Swifter is a product of a cross between the Texel and Flemish breeds. To obtain
excellent, fast-growing lambs for slaughter, the Swifter ewe is tupped by a ram for
slaughter lamb production: the Charollais, the Suffolk, or the Texel. Pedigree Swifters
produce 2.5 lambs per lambing on average. 80% of ewes give birth to two or more lambs
in their first year. Births are virtually always without problems.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swiss Black-Brown Mountain


The Swiss Black-Brown Mountain originates from the ancient Swiss breeds Jura, Simmentaler,
Saanen, Frutiger, Roux de Bagnes and Freiburger. It is a polled, medium-sized sheep, deep,
and broad. The coat color is either black, chestnut colored, or light brown. Head and legs are
clear of wool, covered with short black or brown hairs. The fleece of the Swiss Black-Brown
Mountain is of single-color, thick, and close-cropped.

Due to the Merino ancestry, the wool is fine and strong and is remarkable for its strength and
elasticity. No kemp or white fibers are allowed. The ewes lamb quite often twice a year and
have 1.7 lambs on average, thus making them an ideal mother race for crossings with meat
producing rams. Swiss Black-Brown Mountain lambs, both purebred or crossbred, kill out
significantly better than the Tyrol Mountain. Their bone is light, with a commendable meat to
bone ratio.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Swiss White Alpine


The Swiss White Alpine is a short-wooled breed kept primarily for meat. The
breed originated in Switzerland in 1936 from a cross between the Swiss White
Mountain and 50 to 75% Ile-de-France.

Breed category: meat, medium wool

Distribution: Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tan
Tan sheep are famous for their fur with long curled hair. The wool of Tan sheep is
soft, light and puffy, with long and even fiber, suitable for making high-grade
blankets, shawls and scarves. Tan sheep are raised in the desert and semi-desert
regions of China.

Breed categories: fur, meat

Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Targhee
The Targhee is one of America's youngest breeds. It was developed in 1926 at the U.S.
Sheep Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho, from Rambouillet, Columbia and Corriedale
crosses. The Targhee derives its name from the Targhee National Forest on which the
experiment station's flock grazes in the summer. The forest was named for a chief of the
Bannock Indians who had lived in the area in the 1860's.

The Targhee is a dual-purpose sheep with good meat type and a heavy fleece of high
quality wool. They are especially popular in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota, where
their ¾ fine wool and ¼ long wool breeding is favored by western ranchers.

Breed categories: crossbred wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Teeswater
Teeswater, a longwool sheep from Teesdale in the County of Durham, located in
Northern England, have for almost 200 years been bred by farmers in that area of the
north. Until the 1920's, the breed was comparatively rare, but now they are to be
found in almost every part of the U.K.

Their wool should be fine long-stapled lustre wool with each lock hanging free and
with no tendancy to mattiness. There should be no dark fibers in the fleece, which
should be uniform in texture over the whole body. The Teeswater produces a kemp
free fleece, a characteristic it passes on.

Breed category: long wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, North America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Texas Dall
The Texas Dall has no relation to the Alaskan Dall. It is a hybrid, a cross between
domestic sheep (Rambouillet and Barbados Blackbelly) and the European Mouflon.

Although most are white, they can range in color from white to blond or pale
champagne. Some even have spotted markings, usualy fawn in color. Their horns
are large and spectacular. They are raised primarily for trophy hunting.

Breed categories: hair, exotic / Distribution: United States

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Texel
The Texel originated on the Isle of Texel off the coast of the Netherlands early in the
nineteenth century. They became available to U.S. sheep producers in 1990 when they
were released from quarantine at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center,
Nebraska, where they were evaluated for their potential in crossbred lamb production.

The most outstanding characteristics of the Texel are its remarkable muscle
development and leanness. Texel-sired lambs show an advantage of one full leg score in
breed comparisons and less total carcass fat—especially seam fat. The Texel has
become the dominant terminal-sire breed in Europe and is gaining popularity as a sire
breed in the United States.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tong
Tong sheep originate from Mongolian sheep. They are able to withstand unfavorable
environmental conditions and are found in the high plains of the northern Shaaxi
Province of China, where the average temperature is 13°C and annual precipitation is
520 to 600 mm (20-24 in). Their wool is carpet wool. Wool production is low.

Tong sheep have the ability to deposit fat in the tail. Tong lambs have beautiful curls
that look like pearls. Coats made from the pelts provide warmth with light weight.

Breed categories: fat-tail, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tsigai
Tsigai sheep originated in Southeast Europe, where they are raised for
meat and milk. There are many variations of the breed.

Some Tisigai populations have been improved by Merino and British meat
breeds. Tsigai sheep have long tails. They are good meat and milk
producers.

Breed categories:dual-purpose, medium wool / Distribution: Eastern and


Central Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tukidale
Technically, the Tukidale is a not a new breed of sheep, but rather a Romney sheep carrying
the T gene for hair. The breed originated on M.W. Coop's property in New Zealand from a
ram born November 26, 1966. The ram possesed the T gene, which is dominant. The T gene
is responsible not only for producing the specialty carpet-type fleece, but also the formation of
horns in the in the male and, to a lesser extent in females.

Tukidale sheep are easy care sheep of good conformation and high fertility, with carcass
accepability. High fleece weight with a diameter in the range of 35-45 microns, with a high
percentage of medulated fibers. They have an extremely fast rate of wool growth, resulting in
two wool clips per year at a premium price.

Breed category: carpet wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: New Zealand, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tunis
The Tunis is one of the oldest sheep breeds, said to have roamed the hills of Tunis and
parts of Algeria in North Africa prior to the Christian era. The American Tunis evolved from
a number of importations of fat-tailed sheep from Africa and the Middle East that were
crossed with established European breeds to improve the breed's meat characteristics.

The earliest documented importation occurred in 1799, a gift to the U.S. from the ruler of
Tunisia and entrusted to the care of Judge Richard Peters of Pennsylvania. One of the
largest advocates of the Tunis breed was Thomas Jefferson, who owned a fairly large
flock. The breed could have been a major breed in this country if most of the southern
flocks had not been destroyed during the Civil War.

Tunis are a unique looking breed with an unusual color of reddish tan hair covering their
legs, faces and long pendulous ears and minor fat deposits over the dock area. The Tunis
is classified as a "rare" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Turki
Afghanistan is home to many of Central Asia's most unique breeds of sheep that are
particularly well-adapted to the local conditions and highly valuable commercially. The
most notable is the largest breed of fat-rumped sheep, the Turki.

The Turki has two distinct camel humps of fat on their behinds. They have a high growth
rate and are a good producer of mutton, but are not a good wool producer. They are
raised mostly in the northeastern parts of Afghanistan. Turki sheep accompany refugees
to neighboring Pakistan where the breed is recognized as Afghani sheep.

Breed categories: fat-tailed, carpet wool / Distribution: Central Asia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Tyrol Mountain
This breed is found in Tyrol of Austria and Bolzano of Italy. It is a coarse wooled
breed, belonging to the Lop-eared Alpine group, which is kept for meat production.

The Tyrol Mountain is similar to the Carinthian but has better wool, a white face and
longer ears. The breed is also occasionally pied or black. Both sexes are polled. The
Tyrol Mountain originated from Bergamasca, Steinschaf, and Spiegel variety of
Carinthian.

Breed categories: meat, coarse wool / Distribution: Austria, Italy, Germany,


Switzerland

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Ujumqin
The Ujumqin, a larger version of the Mongolian, is found in Inner Mongolia, China. It has a
fat tail 28 cm (11.2 in) long by 36 cm (14.4 in) wide in the male, and 22 cm long by 28 cm
(8.8 in) wide in the female. When dressed, the tail fat weighs 2 kg (4.4 lbs) or more. The
Ujumqin was developed due to the sharp seasonal contrast in plant growth in the pastoral
areas.

The sheep tend to deposit a large amount of fat in the body in order to meet nurtitional
demands during winter and spring. They are adapted to the unfavorable local
environmantal conditions of the North and Northwest Pastoral Grasslands. The Ujumqin
have the ability to deposit fat in the tail. Wool is coarse and production is low, with an
annual grease fleece weight of only about 1 kg (2.2 lbs).

Breed categories: fat-tail, meat, carpet wool / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Valachian
The Valachian is a highly endangered landrace sheep. Presently, the only breeding done
in Germany is strictly for preservation and only animals that show malformations are not
bred on. The Valachian is dual-coated with coarse, mostly white wool that reaches the
ground; gray and black are rare.

Rams often have Roman noses and look imposing with their spiraling horns of up to one
meter, that stick out sideways. Ewes sometimes have corkscrew-like, fine horns.The
breed is extremely shy, high-spirited, alert, and loyal to its territory, nearly exhibiting the
character of a wild animal. It is remarkably hardy and frugal and can withstand extreme
cold, high precipitation, as well as drought.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Valais Blacknose
The Valais Blacknose is a coarsewooled (i.e. mattress, mixed or carpet) breed
from Switzerland, kept primarily for meat. In Germany, they call it the Walliser
Schwarznasenschaf

Breed categories: Carpet wool, meat

Distribution: Switzerland, Germany

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Van Rooy
In 1906, Senator J. C. van Rooy, of the farm Koppieskraal in the Bethulie district, started his
experiments to propagate a breed of sheep for slaughter lamb production: The requirements he
set for this breed, were threefold: 1) The breed had to be strong and hardy to cope with regular
droughts; 2) It had to be fertile in order to maintain a high percentage of production; It had to
have an excellent conformation.

With these aims in mind he made use of a white "Blinkhaar Afrikaner" ram and eighty
Rambouillet ewes. With the progeny of these the principle of inbreeding, coupled with severe
selection, was applied. Later on, a polled Wensleydale ram was introduced in an effort to
improve conformation. The present day Van Rooy sheep is still run mostly in the arid areas
where survival and reproduction on natural grazing are essential for the economic production of
meat.

Breed categories: hair (meat), fat-tailed / Distribution: South Africa, Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Vendéen
The Vendéen were developed near Vendée in western France. The breed was
developed using Southdown rams, imported during the late nineteenth century, on local
ewes. The breed is noted for the production of high quality lamb carcasses. Their face
and legs are covered with dark brown to gray hair. Both sexes are polled.

Comparisons in performance between the Vendéen and the Texel showed the
Vendéen having larger litter size, older at sexual maturity, and a longer lambing interval.
The two breeds are relatively equal in muscularity. The Vendéen exhibited a lower wool
yield, daily gain, carcass leanness, and milk yield.

Breed category: meat, medium wool / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Vlaams schaap
The Vlaams schaap originated in Belgium during the late middle ages. It is sometimes
confused with the Belgium Milk Sheep.

After the Second World War all native milk sheep were amalgamated to the Belgian milk
sheep and the Flemish sheep almost entirely disappeared. In the Netherlands, the
Flemish sheep was used in the development of the Swifter. They are a large breed, milky
and fertile. They can easily raise three lambs. Their white wool is long and curly at the
ends.

Breed category: multi-purpose, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Voskop
The Voskop (Fox Head) descends from ardense sheep which were brought to the
better Flemish meadows for fattening. They are a sheep of average size. Rams
weigh between 70 and 80 kg (154-176 lbs.); ewes between 55 and 70 kg (121-154
lbs.).

Ewes wean on average 1.7 lambs. Their wool is pale brown without spotting. They
are a hardy sheep, able to withstand both dryness and dampness and cold. They
produce meat of excellent quality and taste.

Breed category: meat, rare / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Welsh Mountain
The Welsh Mountain breed has survived for centuries in the harsh environment of its
natural habitat, where high rainfall and freezing winter temperatures make it impossible for
anything other than the hardiest and fittest to survive. The breed was developed to survive
in such a harsh environment and breeders gave the highest priority to factors such as
hardiness, milkiness, mothering ability, and lamb survival.

Welsh lamb's pre-eminance for quality and taste was built upon lamb from the Welsh
Mountain breed. The inherent characteristics of the Welsh Mountain sheep are
transmitted to its crosses: Welsh Half-bred, Welsh Mules, and Welsh Bleus.

Breed category: hill, longwool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Welsh Mule
The Welsh Mule is the progeny of registered Bluefaced Leicester rams crossed with ewes
of one of three hardy hill breeds from Mid and North Wales -- the Welsh Mountain, Welsh
Hill Speckled Face and Bealah -- all having the reputation for being healthy, hardy, good
foragers with exceptional mothering qualities.

The Welsh Mule hybrid was developed inthe 1970's to satisfy the demand from prime
lamb producers for a prolific ewe with good growth potential, good milking capacity, and
when crossed with modern breeds of meat sires, the ability to produce prime quality, long
lean-finished lambs. Facial coloration varies from white to a dark mottled or speckeled,
depending upon breeding.

Breed category: half-breed / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wensleydale
The Wensleydale is a large longwool sheep with a distinctive deep blue head, ears and
legs. The breed originated in North Yorkshire, England during the 19th century and was
developed primarily to provide rams for crossing onto the hill ewe. The breed's greatest
attribute is the quality and quantity of curly wool each sheep produces.

Wool from the Wensleydale is acknowledged as the finest lustre long wool in the world.
The fleece from a purebred sheep is considered kemp free. The breed is widespread
throughout the United Kingdom, with some small flocks in Holland, France, and Denmark.
A "breeding up" program is developing in the USA, using Wensleydale ram sperm in
English Leicester, Lincoln, and Cotswold ewes and their female progeny.

Breed categories: long wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe, North
America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

West African
The West African is found in Colombia, Venezuela, and the Caribbean. They are
usually brown, ranging in shade from tan to brown and cherry-red to dark red. They
are very similar to the Pelibüey in size and confirmation. The breed is polled and the
male is sometimes maned.

Breed categories: hair (meat)

Distribution: Caribbean, South America

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Horned Heath


The White Horned Heath originated from the Grey Horned Heath Sheep and was first
developed as a separate breed at the beginning of the 20th century. Originally herds
consisted of both horned and polled animals. A few years later they were divided into
two breeds, the polled called White Polled Heath or Moorschnucke.

Since 1949, the White Horned Heath has been recognized as a new race. The origin is
in the heath areas in northern Germany. It is a small landrace breed which can be used
to preserve heath and moor areas. It's always pure white, both sexes are horned, the
meat is of very high quality and tastes like venison.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Mountain
The German Mountain breed is found in the Bavarian Alps and Pre-alps of
southern Germany. The breed was developed by grading local breeds to
Bergamasca and Tyrol Mountain. It is a coarse to medium wooled breed and is
polled.

Breed category: dual-purpose, coarse wool

Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Polled Heath


The origin of the hardy and frugal breed is northern German counties of Diepholz,
Nienburg, Rotenburg. The White Polled Heath is a white, dual-coated, graceful landrace
with a small frame. The slender head has small ears that stick out to the side. Both
sexes are hornless and have light-colored, hard hoofs. They mature slowly.

The decline of this heath-sheep breed started when it did not pay anymore to take the
flocks grazing on the moors. It took the involvement of nature protectors and breeders to
save the breed from extinction.

Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated / Distribution: Europe

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

White Suffolk
Beginning in 1977, Dr. Ewan Roberts of the University of New South Wales in Australia started
a breeding program to develop a terminal sire breed of sheep. His goals were to have a breed
with the confirmation, structure, and growth of the Suffolk, but with a white head and legs. The
initial cross was between Suffolk and Polled Dorset and separately Suffolk crossed with Border
Leicester. The F2 and subsequent generations were selected against black points and for
increased gain.

The White Suffolk has similar features to the Suffolk, however, instead of dark points the White
Suffolk has a white face and legs.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat / Distribution: Australia, New Zealand

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Whiteface Dartmoor
There have been Whitefaced Dartmoors on the Moor since they earliest records.
They are also found on parts of Exmoor. The ewes are renowned for crossing to
produce a halfbred ewe capable of producing a prime lamb when put to a terminal
sire ram.

The Whitefaced Dartmoor is very hardy and can thrive on the very poorest pasture.
They were always horned, but this feature has tended to disappear over the years.
The wool is white, of good staple, and with a fairly strong crimp.

Breed categories: coarse wool / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Whiteface Woodland
The Whitefaced Woodland originated in the South Pennines of England. It is also
known as Penistone after the Yorkshire town where sheep sales have been held
since 1699.

It is thought to be closely related to the Swaledale and the Lonk. One of the larger
of the English hill breeds, the breed has no wool free, white, face and legs. Both
sexes are horned and the horns in the males are heavily spiraled.

Breed categories: medium wool, meat, hill / Distribution: United Kingdom

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wiltipoll
The Wiltipoll is a new breed of sheep, recently developed in Australia from the Wiltshire
Horn. It is a polled sheep that is bred for the production of prime lamb only. Its short white
fleece is shed annually, from Spring to Summer, where it falls to the ground and is of no
commercial value.The absence of horns has been achieved by the infusion of blood from
the Border Leicester, Poll Dorset, and Polled Merino breeds.

Wiltipoll/Merino cross lambs, off grass at 10 months of age, regularly reach weights of 25
to 30 kgs dressed, without developing fat, as do other British Breed lambs.

Breed categories: hair (meat) / Distribution: Australia

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wiltshire Horn
The Wiltshire Horn is an ancient British breed from the Chalk Downs region of England.
Reaching large numbers during the 17th and 18th centuries, they became almost extinct
by the beginning of the 20th. They are currently attracting attention for their lack of wool
and the need for shearing, as well as their ability to pass on their vitality and quality meat
in a cross-breeding program.

Both rams and ewes are horned. The Wiltshire Horn is classified as a "rare" breed by the
American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

Breed category: hair (meat) / Distribution: Worldwide

1/1
WOLDRAGERS
Wereldwijd zijn er honderden schapenrassen: van oerdegelijke landrassen tot excentrieke exoten. Dragers van stoere langharige vachten, maar ook van hele mooie zachte vezels om te spin-
nen. De ene wolsoort is de andere niet en elk ras heeft zo z’n specifieke kenmerken op het gebied van kleur, structuur, vezellengte en vezeldikte. De honderdtwintig meest bekende wol-
dragers van West-Europa worden op deze pagina getoond en beschreven op basis van het rasgemiddelde. Geen ingewikkelde complexe verhandelingen maar gewoon handige basisken-
nis voor en door liefhebbers van wol. De kudde van Purewol herbergt meer dan dertig van deze mooie schapenrassen, waarvan de wol de webwinkel (https://www.purewol.nl) te vinden is.
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Wrzosówka
The Wrzosówka belongs to the Northern type of short-tailed sheep which have been kept
for centuries in different regions of Europe, including Northeastern parts of Poland. It is
unique among Polish sheep breeds, since it is extremely adaptable to difficult conditions,
disease-resistant, and prolific. It is able to reproduce all year round.

The Wrzosówka is rather thin and small, proportionally built. The fleece is usually
consists of two layers: down and medulated hair. Its skins are usued for fur coat
production. Ewes are usually polled, while rams have widely set black horns. The
Wrzosówka is the only surviving primitive sheep breed in Poland. A conservation
program was started in 1981.

Breed categories: primitive, rare, short-tailed, fur / Distribution: Poland

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Xinjiang Fine Wool


The Xinjiang Finewool was among the first of the Chinese breeds and it has played a part
in the establishment of some other breeds. The original crosses were between Russian
Merino rams, probably of the Caucasian, Precoce, and Stravrapol types, with local breeds
of ewe. The most important of these breeds was the Kazakh, but some Mongolian ewes
were also used.

There followed a program of backcrossing to the Merino parent, with some interbreeding
and selection. Australian rams were used to a limited extend during the 1970s in the
development of the Xinjiang breed. The Xinjiang Finewool is a dual-purpose sheep with
emphasis placed on wool production and body weight.

Breed categories: fine-wool, dual-purpose / Distribution: China

1/1
bib.ge/sheep/open.php

Zwartbles
Since the beginning of the last century, dairy farmers in the Freisland region of Holland have
kept Zwartbles Sheep, a strikingly handsome black sheep with a distinctive white blaze and 2 to
4 white "socks." Freisland lies in the North of Holland, and these beautiful and elegant sheep
serve as dual purpose animals - meat and milk. Due to changes in farming practices, numbers of
Zwartbles in Holland became severely reduced until the breed was adopted by the Dutch Rare
Breed Survival trust in the mid-1970s.

In the last few years, a small number of Zwartbles sheep have been imported by enthusiasts to
Great Britain. There are now 147 registered Zwartbles flocks (a total of about 3,500 sheep)
spread throughout the UK, and they are well able to cope with the lowland and mid-altitude
conditions in England, Wales, and Scotland.

Breed categories: rare, dual purpose (meat and milk) / Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe

1/1