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The Internet and the World Wide


Web.
END-USER LICENCE AGREEMENT FOR MICROSOFT LICENSED CONTENT:
DIGITAL LITERACY CURRICULUM

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY: These licence terms (the “Licence Terms”) are an agreement between you (an individual or
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© 2006 Microsoft Corporation, All rights reserved.
1.13. “Use” means the non-commercial use of the Licensed Content by a) Students solely to conduct Self-
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WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, COPYING OR REPRODUCTION OF THE LICENSED CONTENT TO ANY
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© 2006 Microsoft Corporation, All rights reserved.
4. DESCRIPTION OF OTHER RIGHTS AND LICENCE LIMITATIONS

4.1 Errors; Changes; Fictitious Names.


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Provided you comply with these Licence Terms, you may print and/or reproduce a print version of (i) any
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Form of Notice:
© 2006 Reprinted with permission by Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Permission is granted to reproduce materials contained herein on the condition that such
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Microsoft and Windows are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft


Corporation in the US and/or other countries. Other product and company names
mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.”
4.3 Use of Media Elements. You may not modify the Media Elements.

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© 2006 Microsoft Corporation, All rights reserved.
4.4 Use of Components in Instructor Content. Solely in conjunction with providing an Authorised Training
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4.5 Modifications. Subject to these Licence Terms, Instructors or Students may copy and modify the
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4.6 Permitted Modifications. If You make any modifications under these Licence Terms, you agree: (a) that
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If You are an Instructor, in addition to the foregoing, You also agree: (a) that such modifications will not be used
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© 2006 Microsoft Corporation, All rights reserved.
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© 2006 Microsoft Corporation, All rights reserved.
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change without notice.
Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organisations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people,
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Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights or other intellectual property rights covering subject
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document does not give you any licence to these patents, trademarks, copyrights or other intellectual property.

© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Encarta, FrontPage, Hotmail, MSN, Outlook, Windows Media and Windows are either registered trademarks or
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

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Table of Contents

Course Overview

Course Information

Module 1: The Internet and the World Wide Web.

The Internet
The World Wide Web
Communicating on the Internet
Module Summary

Glossary

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Course Overview

The Internet provides an easy and a quick method to search for any type of information. With the help of
the World Wide Web, a popular service on the Internet, you can access information from a vast pool of
resources at any time. You can search information for job vacancies, current news, train schedules or
holiday destinations.
The Internet has also transformed the way people communicate with each other. It takes days,
sometimes weeks, for a postal letter to reach a friend on the other side of the globe. However, with the
communication tools that the Internet provides, you can communicate with friends living in different parts
of the world in just a few seconds. You can also conduct your business over the Internet and access your
bank accounts from any where in the world.
This course provides all the basic information that you need to use the Internet and the World Wide Web.

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Course Information

This course explains the basic computer terminology associated with the Internet and the World Wide
Web. It describes the various communication tools that the Internet provides and the methods for
accessing information on the World Wide Web. This course also explains the concept of e-commerce.

Course Details Description

Audience This course is intended for anyone who wants to acquire digital literacy skills.
Description

Prerequisites Students should have basic reading comprehension skills at the level required to
read a local newspaper.
Students should have taken the first course on Computer Basics or have equivalent
computer skills.

Course After completing this course, you will be able to understand basic Internet and
Objectives World Wide Web terminology, browse the World Wide Web for information and
perform transactions over the Internet.

For More For more information, see the Microsoft Learning Web site
Information (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=34834) .

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Lesson 1
The Internet

Lesson Contents

About the Internet

Connecting to the Internet

Types of Internet Connections

About Bandwidth

Self Test

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Lesson Introduction
Imagine that you have many friends and you want to send them birthday
greetings every year. If you use the postal service to send your greetings,
your friends may not always receive the greetings on time. Instead, if you
use the Internet, your friends will receive your greetings in a few seconds.
The Internet also provides you with the advantage of sending music and
pictures along with your greetings.
This lesson will help you identify different uses of the Internet, such as
searching for information, sending letters and cards, playing games,
reading the latest news or even buying and selling products. You will also
learn about the components required for connecting to the Internet and the
different types of Internet connections. In addition, you will learn about the
term bandwidth and the bandwidth provided by the different types of
Internet connections.

Lesson Objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
• Define the Internet and elaborate on its uses.
• Identify the different components required to connect to the
Internet.
• Identify the features of different types of Internet connections.
• Explain the term bandwidth in relation to the different types of
Internet connections.

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Topic: About the Internet

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

Imagine a scenario where you want to communicate by using a computer on your network with a
computer on another network. For this, both the networks need to be connected. The Internet is a
collection of networks that are connected together for exchange of information.
When the computer is connected to the Internet, it is said to be online.
You can use the Internet to communicate with people all around the world instantaneously. When you
send messages over the Internet, it can reach any part of the world in just a few seconds.
The Internet also helps you to get the latest information on a current event. Many leading news channels
use the Internet as the medium to provide updated news.
You can use the Internet to search for information on any specific topic, such as history of computers.
You can also take any course of your choice and register for online certification exams over the Internet.
The Internet can also be used as a source of entertainment. You can listen to music, play games, watch
movies, or share family pictures.
In addition, you can buy and sell products, such as books and electronic goods, over the Internet. You
can also pay for these goods online by specifying your credit card details.
You can also use the Internet to perform banking transactions, such as viewing details of your bank
account and transferring money from one account to another.
Therefore, the Internet provides various advantages to its users.

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Topic: Connecting to the Internet

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

To connect to the Internet, you need a computing device, a connection device and an Internet Service
Provider (ISP).
The computing device can be a personal computer, a portable computer or even a mobile device, such
as a mobile phone or a handheld device.
You need a connection device, such as a modem, to connect your computer to the Internet. A modem
converts digital information into analogue information and transmits it over a phone line. A modem can
either be built-in your computer, or externally attached to it.
An ISP is a company that provides Internet connectivity to individuals, businesses and organisations. It
may also provide additional services such as the storage space to share your personal content.
There are different methods by which you can connect to the Internet. When you connect to the Internet
by using cables, the connection is called a physical connection.
You can also connect to the Internet by using wireless technology. A computing device that supports
wireless technology has a Wireless Fidelity or the Wi-Fi card that provides wireless communication
between the computing device and the network. A Wi-Fi card is not physically connected to an ISP.
Another device you need for wireless connectivity is an access point (AP). An AP is used to connect a
wireless computing device to a wired network. This wired network may belong to an ISP. You can then
connect to the Internet through this ISP.

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Topic: Types of Internet Connections

There are two different types of Internet connections, dedicated Internet connections and dial-up Internet
connections. You can choose the type of connection depending on your requirement and budget.
The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

Dedicated Internet connection

Karen Archer works as a broker at the stock exchange. She uses the Internet to constantly monitor
share prices at every hour of the day. She uses a dedicated Internet connection because she wants
the computer to be connected to the Internet all the time.
In a dedicated Internet connection, you do not need to request your ISP for a connection every time
you want to connect to the Internet. Many large organisations and universities use dedicated Internet
connections because these organisations and universities need to use the Internet extensively.

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

Dial-up Internet connection

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Denise Smith is a full-time worker and uses the Internet to send e-mail messages to the company's
clients and greetings to her friends and family. As Denise wants to be connected to the Internet for
only a short time, she uses a dial-up Internet connection.
In a dial-up connection, you need to connect to the ISP every time you want to connect to the Internet.
You can disconnect from the Internet after completing your work.
A dial-up Internet connection is usually less expensive and has a slower data transfer rate compared
to a dedicated Internet connection.

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Topic: About Bandwidth

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

Bandwidth is the amount of data that can be transmitted over a network in a certain amount of time.
Bandwidth is measured in Mbps (or megabits per second), Kbps (or kilobits per second) or bps (or bits
per second).
If the bandwidth of a network is 1 Mbps, it means that 1 megabit of data can be transmitted over that
network in 1 second. The actual rate of transfer of the data will vary depending on the ISP’s equipment,
the type of Internet connection, and the number of people using the same connection at once.
The bandwidth of a network depends on the technology you use to connect to the Internet. For example,
you can connect to the Internet by using a dial-up connection. Most dial-up connections offered today
allow data transfer rates up to 56.6 kilobits per second.
Digital Subscriber Line (or DSL) is another technology that you can use to connect to the Internet. If you
use a DSL connection, you do not need to connect to the ISP every time you want to use the Internet. By
using a DSL connection, you can upload data at speeds of up to 128 kilobits per second and download
data at around 512 kilobits per second.
You can also use a cable modem to connect to the Internet. If you have a cable TV connection, you can
get a high speed Internet connection from the cable TV provider. You can achieve data transfer rates of
up to 36 megabits per second by using a cable modem.
In addition, you can connect to the Internet by using wireless technology. With this technology, you can
achieve data transfer rates of up to 30 megabits per second.
More recently, high-speed internet, also known as broadband, has become very popular among users
who require a much faster connection to upload or download data over the internet. Generally, high-
speed internet connections provide data transfer rates of 256 kilobits per second or higher for data
upload.

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Topic: Self Test for Lesson: The Internet

Sort the items into their associated categories by writing the statement number in its corresponding option
box.

Statement

1 Computing Device

2 Wireless

3 Internet Service Provider (ISP)

4 Dial-up

5 Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)

6 Modem

Option 1 Option 2

Internet Components Internet Connections

Note: The correct answers are shown on the next page.

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Option 1 Option 2

Internet Components Internet Connections

6, 3, 1 5, 4, 2

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Lesson 2
The World Wide Web

Lesson Contents

Introducing the World Wide Web

Web Addresses

Working with Internet Explorer

Evaluating a Web Site

Introducing E-Commerce

Self Test

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Lesson Introduction
Imagine that you and your family have decided to go on a holiday to
Cyprus and you would like more information about the place. You will
probably speak to your friends who have already visited Cyprus or search
for books that will provide the information you want. As a result, you spend
a lot of time in gathering this information.
By using the World Wide Web (WWW), you can quickly get information
such as the hotel details or the places to visit in Cyprus.
In this lesson, you will learn the basic components of the WWW, which is
often referred to as the Web. You will also learn to use a search engine to
find information on the Web. In addition, you will learn to navigate Web
sites for information and perform online transactions.

Lesson Objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
• Define WWW and its relation to the Internet.
• Explain how Web addresses work.
• Explore Web sites by using a search engine.
• Identify the guidelines used to evaluate a Web site.
• Explain how to perform transactions over the Web.
• Define browser plug-ins and explain their uses.

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Topic: Introducing the World Wide Web

The World Wide Web (WWW or simply, the Web) refers to the collection of information that is accessible
on the Internet. The information is in the form of text, pictures and sound, which are arranged logically
and stored on computers known as Web servers. The Web is a very popular service on the Internet.
Many people use the terms the Web and the Internet synonymously, but they are technically two different
terms. The Internet connects multiple computers and forms a network on which a computer can
communicate with another computer. However, the Web is a way of accessing and sharing information
over the Internet by using Web browsers.
The image above shows various components associated with the Web. Some Web sites may contain
content in the form of animation, video or audio files. To view these files, you need additional
programmes known as add-ons. An add-on is a software programme that adds features to your browser
and enhances your Internet experience. Add-ons provide added functions by allowing the Web browser to
access and run files that are included in Web pages. For example, Microsoft Silverlight is a browser add-
on that is required to view high-quality videos by using Web browsers.
• Web browser: A Web browser is a software programme that enables you to view and interact
with various resources on the Web. An example of a widely used Web browser is Microsoft®
Internet Explorer that displays both text and graphics.
• Web page: A Web page is a document on the Web. It is a formatted text document that a Web
browser can display. Most Web pages on the Internet allow you to move quickly to another Web
page. You can do this by clicking a hyperlink, commonly called a link. Clicking a link opens the
new Web page in your Web browser. You can access existing Web pages or even create and
publish new Web pages on the Web. You can create Web pages by using a software language
known as Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). Web browsers use HTML to display Web pages.

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• Web site: A Web site is one or more Web pages that reside on a single server. This server is
known as a Web server and is connected to the Internet. The first Web page that is displayed
when you access a Web site is known as the home page. Every Web site has a unique home
page.

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Topic: Web Addresses

Every Web site on the Web is stored on a computer that is part of a vast network. To access a Web site,
you need to access the computer on which the Web site is stored. Just as every house has a unique
address, each computer on the Web is identified by a unique address, known as the Internet Protocol (IP)
address. The IP address is a numeric address that specifies the exact location of a computer on the Web.
You can access a computer on the Web by using an IP address, such as 192.168.0.1.
The IP address is linked to a corresponding domain name because it is easier to remember names than a
string of numbers. For example, the corresponding domain name for the IP address 127.0.0.1 can be
proseware.com. Web browsers can use either the domain name or the IP address to locate and display a
Web page.
A Web site for a domain is accessed with the help of a unique alphanumeric address known as the Web
address. The Web address is also known as the Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which specifies the
protocol to be used and the exact location of the Web site. A protocol is a standard method of transferring
data between different computers. In the example http://www.microsoft.com/learning/default.asp, http
indicates what protocol to use and microsoft.com/learning/default.asp specifies the exact location of the
Web page. The following table lists the components of a URL.
Element Description

http:// Indicates the protocol to be used to access a file.

www Indicates that the Web site is on the World Wide Web.

microsoft Indicates the name of the Web site.

.com Indicates the type of domain.

/learning/default.asp Indicates the path of the document.

A URL also includes a domain name suffix that indicates the type of organisation to which the Web site
belongs. For example, in the domain name microsoft.com, the domain name suffix is .com. The following
table lists some examples of domain name suffixes.
Suffix Description

.com Indicates that the Web site is for a commercial organisation.

.edu Indicates that the Web site is for educational institutions, such as schools, colleges and
universities.

.net Indicates that the Web site is for a network-oriented organisation or for an ISP.

.org Indicates that the Web site is for a nonprofit organisation.

.info Indicates that the Web site is informative in nature.

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.museum Indicates that the Web site is used for a museum or for an individual of the museum
profession.

Note:
There are country-level domains that are specifically used by a country or an independent territory.
Some examples of country-level domains include .ke for Kenya, .in for India and .jp for Japan.

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Topic: Working with Internet Explorer

The Internet offers a range of services, such as file transfer between Internet users, electronic mail for
sending e-mail messages or Web sites for viewing news. You can use the Internet and its services to
search and apply for jobs, send messages to other Internet users, watch films and buy and sell products.
In this exercise, you are new to the Internet and want to learn how to use a Web browser, such as
Internet Explorer, to search for information on current affairs. In addition, you want to learn how to save
and print the information that you find over the Internet.
The following table contains the steps of an online simulation.

Step 1
To open Internet Explorer, click Start, and then click Internet Explorer.
Step 2
To open a Web site, click in the Address bar, press SPACEBAR to have the Web site address typed for
you and then click Go.
Step 3
To view the News Web page, in the left column of the MSN home page, click News.
Step 4
To view the World News Web page, click World News.
Step 5
To update the Web page content, click the View menu, and then click Refresh.
Step 6
To search for news related to politics, click in the Search box, press SPACEBAR to have the text typed
for you, and then click Search.
Step 7
To open a Web site, click in the Address bar, press SPACEBAR to have the Web site address typed for
you, and then click Go.

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Step 8
To go back to the previous Web page, click the Back button.
Step 9
To save the Web page, click the File menu, and then click Save As.
Step 10
Click in the File name box, press SPACEBAR to have the file name typed for you, and then click Save.
Step 11
To add a Web page to your Favourites list, click the Favourites menu, click Add to Favourites, and then
click OK.
Step 12
To print a Web page with the default printer settings, click the File menu, and then click Print. Next in the
Print dialogue box, click Print.
Step 13
To view a Web site visited previously, click the View menu, point to Explorer bar, and then click History.
Step 14
To close Internet Explorer, in the Web browser window, click the Close button.

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Topic: Evaluating a Web Site

With multiple Web sites on the Web, it is possible that the information provided by a Web site is not
authentic. For example, you are a broker and you need to track the price variations in the market. The
information that you get from the Web sites must be accurate to ensure a correct analysis of the price
variation.
There are various guidelines that will help you evaluate a Web site.
Guideline Description

Include reliable A good Web site should state the various sources, such as other Web sites,
content books or names of experts, for the content that is displayed on the Web site.

Answer your The Web site should answer your questions by giving you valid and specific
questions information.

Include content by The people who have written the content that is displayed on the Web site
authors with should preferably be writers with reliable credentials.
credentials

Include current The Web site should be well organised to help you easily navigate within the
content Web site. All the links in the Web site should be working and the content on
the Web site should be regularly updated.

To search for information on a specific topic, you use a search engine. After you specify a keyword in a
search engine, it displays a list of Web sites that contain information related to that keyword. An example
of a search engine is MSN® Search provided by Microsoft, which helps you to quickly find Web sites that
contain information relevant to your search.
You can also search information with the help of portals, which are Web sites that offer information
related to a specific topic in the form of a directory. The information on a portal is usually arranged in a
specific order. A portal acts as a starting point to a number of resources on the Web. For example, in
msn.com, various Web pages are linked together to form the complete Web site. These Web pages act
as gateways to a host of information on the Web. From the MSN Web site, you can access your e-mail,
perform a keyword or a directory search, participate in online discussions, find the location of a cinema,
join Web communities and get the latest news.
In this demonstration, you will learn how to perform a directory and a keyword search in a search engine.
The following table contains the steps and transcript of an online demonstration.

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Step List

1 Demonstration: Evaluating a Web site

2 Click Start, and then click Internet Explorer.

3 Type http://www.msn.comin the Address bar, and then click Go.

4 Click Encarta.

5 Type history of computers, and then click Go.

On the MSN Search home page, type history of computers in the Search the Web text box, and
6
then click Search.

Transcript

To search for information on the Internet, open Internet Explorer. Open a search engine, such as MSN
Search.
In a search engine, you can search for specific information. You can either perform a keyword search or
directory search to find information on a specific topic.

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By using directory search, you can access a list of directories that the search engine provides based on
the search.

For example, you can search for information on the history of computers. The results page displays a list
of links to the resources within the directory. These resources provide information on the history of
computers.

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With the keyword search, you can get results for a specific topic from various Web sites. For example, if
you search for history of computers, the results page displays links from all the Web sites on the World
Wide Web that have information related to your search.

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Topic: Introducing E-Commerce

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

E-commerce refers to the business transactions made over the Internet, such as buying and selling
items online. For example, you can purchase online tickets to visit a museum. To do this, you first need
to access the museum's Web site and create a new account.
While creating a new account, you need to provide details such as a user name, a password and your
address in a registration form. You will then receive an authentication to make an online transaction on
the Web site.
To purchase online tickets, you need to select the date and the number of tickets you want to purchase.
You can also compare the prices of the tickets available. Before you complete the process of purchasing
the tickets, you need to provide your credit card details along with the delivery address.
After you submit these details, a Web page is displayed indicating that your online transaction is
complete. It also provides you a transaction code that you can use for any further queries related to this
purchase.
The online purchase requires you to provide your credit card details. To ensure a secure transaction, you
must provide your credit card details only to reputed Web sites.
In addition to making online transactions, e-commerce includes online stock trading that gives you an
opportunity to buy and sell shares in the stock market. You can also check your bank account status or
insurance details online.

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Topic: Self Test for Lesson: The World Wide Web

Each pair of statements contains a true statement and a false statement. For each pair of statements,
indicate which statement is true by placing a mark in the True column to the right.

Statement True False


1 World Wide Web IS a part of the Internet.

2 World Wide Web IS NOT a part of the Internet.

3 You CANNOT create new Web pages.

4 You CAN create new Web pages.

5 Internet Explorer is a Web SERVER.

6 Internet Explorer is a Web BROWSER.

7 WEB address is also known as Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

8 IP address is also known as Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

9 You can open ONLY A SINGLE Web browser window.

10 You can open MULTIPLE Web browser windows.

11 You CANNOT download files from the Web.

12 You CAN download files from the Web.

13 A portal IS a Web site.

14 A portal IS NOT a Web site.

15 A reliable Web site must have authors WITH credentials.

16 A reliable Web site must have authors WITH NO credentials.

17 Search engines are Web SITES with special technology.

18 Search engines are Web BROWSERS with special technology.

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Note: The correct answers are shown on the next page.

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Statement True False

1 World Wide Web IS a part of the Internet.

2 World Wide Web IS NOT a part of the Internet.

3 You CANNOT create new Web pages.

4 You CAN create new Web pages.

5 Internet Explorer is a Web SERVER.

6 Internet Explorer is a Web BROWSER.

7 WEB address is also known as Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

8 IP address is also known as Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

9 You can open ONLY A SINGLE Web browser window.

10 You can open MULTIPLE Web browser windows.

11 You CANNOT download files from the Web.

12 You CAN download files from the Web.

13 A portal IS a Web site.

14 A portal IS NOT a Web site.

15 A reliable Web site must have authors WITH credentials.

16 A reliable Web site must have authors WITH NO credentials.

17 Search engines are Web SITES with special technology.

18 Search engines are Web BROWSERS with special technology.

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Lesson 3
Communicating on the Internet

Lesson Contents

Opening an E-Mail Account

Writing and Sending E-Mail Messages

Managing E-Mail Messages

About Online Communities

Understanding Instant Messaging

Publishing on the Web

Self Test

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Lesson Introduction
Imagine that you work at an organisation where the employees are located
all over the world and you need to talk to them frequently. You might also
have friends and relatives located in different parts of the world. In either
case, you will get a huge phone bill if you talk to them frequently.
The Internet provides a quick, easy and cost-effective method to exchange
messages with other computer users in any part of the world. You can use
e-mail messages, online communities or instant messaging, to
communicate over the Internet.

Lesson Objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
• Explain how e-mail works.
• Write and send e-mail messages.
• Manage e-mail messages.
• Identify the features of online communities.
• Explain how instant messaging works.
• Explain how the Web authoring software is used to create and
publish Web pages.

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Topic: Opening an E-Mail Account

Electronic mail (e-mail) is an electronic form of the traditional letter. Instead


of using a pen and paper to write a letter, you use a software programme to
create e-mail messages. This software programme is known as an e-mail
client. After you create the message, a network server acts like a postman
to deliver your message to the recipient. A network server is a computer
that manages all other computers on a network. Unlike postal mail, which
can take several days to reach the recipient, an e-mail message can reach
the recipient's e-mail account within a few seconds. You can also send
pictures, data files, audio and even video clips with your e-mail messages.
For example, you can send a family photograph or a small home video to
your friends with your e-mail messages.
To exchange e-mail messages with other people, you need to have an e-
mail address for yourself. You can obtain an e-mail address by opening an
account with an e-mail service provider. Then, you need to know the e-mail
address of the person to whom you want to send the e-mail message.
An e-mail address has two parts separated by the@symbol. The following
table explains the different parts of the e-mail address,
someone@example.com.
Information Description

someone This is the name you use to create your e-mail


address. People recognise the e-mail address with the
help of the user name. When you open an account
with an e-mail service provider, you can specify your
user name. The user name that you specify should be
unique. The e-mail service provider checks if the user
name you provide already exists. If it exists, you need
to provide another user name.

@ The @ symbol separates the user name from the


remaining part of the e-mail address.

example.com This represents the domain name of the mail server,


where all your e-mail messages are stored.

In addition to having an e-mail address, you need to ensure that your


computer is connected to the Internet. You also need to have an e-mail
client on your computer to send and receive the e-mail messages. When
you create and send an e-mail message, the e-mail client first connects to a
mail server. The message then travels from your mail server to the
destination mail server over the Internet. This mail server then sends the e-
mail message to the recipient's e-mail account.
There are two types of e-mail clients, local and Web-based. Local e-mail
clients are installed on your computer and you can use them to save e-mail
messages to your hard disk. Microsoft Outlook® Express is an example of

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a local e-mail client. You connect to Web-based e-mail clients by using a
Web browser. You can send and open e-mail messages by using the Web-
based e-mail client, but unless you specifically download a message to
your local computer, all messages remain on the service provider's system.
MSN Hotmail® is an example of a Web-based e-mail client.

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Topic: Writing and Sending E-Mail Messages

You can create e-mail messages and send them to multiple people in different parts of the world by using
your e-mail account and e-mail client.
Each e-mail message is made up of two parts, the header and the body. The header is similar to the
envelope of a postal letter. It includes information such as the e-mail address of the sender and recipient
and the subject of the e-mail. The body is similar to the letter inside an envelope. It includes the text
message and any attachments.
In this exercise, Craig M. Combel is working as a marketing assistant with Trey Research. He has
recently opened an e-mail account on Hotmail. He now wants to communicate with his other team
members about a trade show.
The following table contains the steps of an online simulation.

Scenario
The Hotmail Web site is opened and the e-mail account has been signed in.

Step 1
The e-mail programme has been opened and the e-mail account has been signed into for you. To begin a
new message, click New Message.
Step 2
To specify the e-mail address of the recipient, click in the To box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the
text typed for you. If you need to send the message to multiple people, you can include their e-mail
addresses. Each e-mail address must be separated by a comma (,). Include additional e-mail addresses
in the boxes next to Cc (carbon copy) or Bcc (blind carbon copy). If you do not want to directly address
the message to that person, but would like to send the message for informational purposes only, include
the e-mail address in the Cc box. If you do not want the other recipients to know that you have sent a
message to that recipient, include an e-mail address in the Bcc box. You must type the correct e-mail
address, or the e-mail message will not reach the intended recipient and will be returned to you
undelivered.

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Step 3
To specify the subject of your e-mail, click in the Subject box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the
text typed for you.
Step 4
To type your message, click in the message box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the text typed for
you.
Step 5
To attach files to your message, click Attach.
Step 6
The list shows you the types of files you can attach: Pictures, Files or Contact Information. To attach a
file to your message, click File.
Step 7
To select the relevant file from your computer, click Browse. For this exercise, click Web Site Insertion
Order, and then click Open.
Step 8
To return to your message, click OK.
Step 9
Just as you end a letter by signing your name, in an e-mail message you can add personal signature
information. You can add your name, your company's name and any other contact information. To have
the text typed for you, click in the message box, and then press SPACEBAR.
Step 10
To send your message, click Send.
Step 11
Your message is sent to the intended recipients. To view all the messages that you have received, click
Mail.
Step 12
All the unread messages are highlighted. To open one of the messages, click on it. For this exercise,
select the message from Michael Allen.
Step 13
To reply to the message, click Reply.
Step 14
The recipient's e-mail address is typed in the To box. The subject is the same as the mail you received
and is prefixed with RE: to indicate that you are replying to the message. You can type your message in
the message box. Click in the message box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the text typed for you.
Click Send to send your message. Your message is sent to the intended recipient.

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Topic: Managing E-Mail Messages

Imagine that you receive about 30 e-mail messages everyday from different people all over the world.
They may be your friends, relatives or business colleagues. Suppose, you have to take some action this
week on an e-mail message you received last week. If you have not organised your e-mail messages,
you will likely spend time searching for that particular e-mail message. Just like you organise all your
important papers in separate files or folders and discard unwanted papers, you need to organise your e-
mail messages. It is always a good practice to read your e-mail messages every day, delete unnecessary
ones and organise the useful e-mail messages in separate folders according to their content.
Most e-mail programmes provide various options to manage your e-mail messages. Outlook Express is a
local e-mail client that comes with the Windows operating system and it has a number of tools that help
you organise your messages.
In this exercise, you will explore how to manage your e-mail messages.
The following table contains the steps of an online simulation.

Scenario
The Outlook Express application is open and the Inbox has some e-mail messages.

Step 1
To create a new e-mail folder in Outlook Express, click the File menu, point to New and then click Folder.
Step 2
To specify the name of the new folder, in the Create Folder dialogue box, click in the Folder name box,
and then press SPACEBAR to have the folder name typed for you.
Step 3
To create the new folder as a top-level folder, rather than as a subfolder of the Inbox, in the Create
Folder dialogue box, click Local Folders, and then click OK.
Step 4
To move the selected New Training Idea e-mail message from the Inbox, click the Edit menu, and then
click Move to Folder.

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Step 5
In the Move dialogue box, click Orientation Ideas, and then click OK.
Step 6
To verify that the message is moved, in the Folders list, click Orientation Ideas.
Step 7
To open the message in its own window, double-click the New Training Idea message.
Step 8
To print a message, click the File menu, and then click Print.
Step 9
You can mark messages that require a response or other action by attaching a follow-up flag. To add a
follow-up flag to an e-mail message, click Message and then click Flag Message.
Step 10
To close the message window, click the Close button for the message.
Step 11
To delete a message that you no longer need, in the Folders list, click Inbox, click the Tuesday's
Meeting Cancelled message, and then click Delete.
Step 12
To verify that the message is deleted, in the Folders list, click Deleted Items.
Step 13
To organise e-mail messages in alphabetical order by sender, click Inbox, and then click From.
Step 14
To organise e-mail messages by date, with your most recent messages appearing at the top of the list,
click Received.
Step 15
You can create an address list so that you do not have to remember the e-mail addresses. To create an
address list, click Tools, and then click Address Book.
Step 16
To add a contact, click File, and then click New Contact.
Step 17
To specify the first name of the contact, click in the First box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the first
name of the contact typed for you.
Step 18
To specify the last name of the contact, click in the Last box, and then press SPACEBAR to have the last
name of the contact typed for you.
Step 19
To add the e-mail address to your address list, click in the E-Mail Addresses box, press SPACEBAR to
have the e-mail address of the contact typed for you, and then click OK.

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Topic: About Online Communities

Online communities are formed by groups of computer users who have common interests and purpose to
communicate with each other over the Internet. Some Web sites provide tools that allow you to exchange
ideas and information in an open interactive forum. You can participate and interact with other users who
are online. Some Web sites allow you to add your responses or views to an ongoing conversation when
other users are not online. Some online communities provide a facility for sending e-mail messages about
the details of discussions.
There are different types of online communities, some of which are listed in the following table.

Type of online
Description
community

Newsgroups Newsgroups are online discussion forums dedicated to


specific topics. There are newsgroups available for all
kinds of topics such as computers, literature, social
issues, current affairs and more. These newsgroups are
called Usenet.
Newsgroups are like bulletin boards. They include
articles on different areas of a topic, other people's
views on that topic and announcements of various
events or job openings. If you have questions for which
you need answers, you can post them to the
newsgroup. People will read your questions and reply
with their answers or opinions.
You can search for a newsgroup related to your topic of
interest and subscribe to it. Then, similar to sending e-
mail messages, you can log on to the newsgroup and
post your messages. The only difference is that
everyone who logs on to the newsgroup can read your
messages.
All discussions related to a particular topic are grouped
and linked by a single thread of discussion. So, over a
period of time, you can continue a discussion on a
particular subject with other people.

Chat Chat groups or rooms are Web sites that you can use to
groups/rooms communicate instantly with other people who have
logged on to the same Web site. When you chat with
someone, it means that you type a line of text and then
press the ENTER key. The words that you typed appear
on the screens of the other participants, who can then
respond in kind. You can even use audio and video
media while chatting so that you can talk and see the
person you are chatting with. You can also transfer files
to other participants.
There are many chat rooms available that cater to
different topic areas. Depending on your topic of

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interest, you can sign in to a chat room. You need to
sign in to the chat room so that other people in the chat
room can know that you are online.

Blogs Blogs are online diaries or journals. You can post


articles, daily events or your thoughts on any subject.
Blogs are like personal diaries, where you can restrict
access to people who can view and comment on your
postings. You can either post your articles on specific
Web sites that allow you to post blogs or you can create
your own Web site.

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Topic: Understanding Instant Messaging

The following table contains the transcript of an online animation.

Instant messaging allows you to communicate with other computer users over the Internet. However,
unlike e-mail messages, you can send and receive messages immediately.
Instant messaging is similar to a telephone conversation; the only difference is that you are typing your
conversation.
Instant messaging works just like a chat room, but it allows only your friends and colleagues to see if you
are online and start a conversation.
To use instant messaging, you also need instant messaging software along with an Internet connection.
You can download the messaging software from the Internet and install it on your computer. For this
topic, Windows Messenger is used. Most instant messaging software works in a similar way.
After you install the software, you need to create an account. You need to provide a user name and
password. You may also be asked to provide your personal details, but this is optional.
After you have created your account, you can log on and add the user names of your friends and
colleagues who use the same instant messaging application. When you log on, the people in your list will
know that you are online and can send messages to you.
To send a message to someone who is online, you need to double-click the person's name on the list. A
window will open, and you can type your message in that window. Most instant messaging applications
provide a number of emoticons that allow you to express your emotions through icons.
Most instant messaging applications allow you to change your status, such as Online, Busy, Away, or
Out To Lunch, to indicate whether you are available for chatting or not.
In case you do not want the people in your list to see that you are online, but you would like to send
messages to some of them, you can set your status as Appear Offline. Depending on the application you
use for instant messaging, there can be many more options.

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Topic: Publishing on the Web

Web pages are files saved on a network server and made available on the World Wide Web. The process
of making Web pages available to other computer users is called publishing. You can create your own
Web page and publish it. For example, you can create a Web page that contains information about your
interests, hobbies, family and your work. You can also include pictures, audio and even video on your
Web page.
Expert users can create a Web page by using a simple text editor, such as Notepad. Anyone can produce
refined pages using specialised Web authoring software, such as Microsoft Office FrontPage® 2003,
which makes it easy to publish your Web pages on the WWW.
In this demonstration, you will see how to create and publish your Web page by using FrontPage.
Click to launch the demonstration.
The following table contains the steps and transcript of an online demonstration.

Step List

1 Demonstration: Publishing on the Web

To begin creating a one-page Web site by using a template, in the New task pane, under New Web
2
site, click the One page Web site link.
In the Web Site Templates dialogue box, on the General tab, click Personal Web Site, and then
3
click OK.
To open the Web site's home page in Page view, in the Folder List pane, double-click the
4
index.htm file.
To change the style of the heading, select the heading text, click the Style list arrow, and then click
5
Heading 2. The font size of the heading increases to 18 pt.
To change the heading and description for the Web page, in the Page view editing window, select
6
the text and start typing.
To format the text as a bulleted list, click at the beginning of the first line, drag to select the entire
7
list, and then on the Formatting toolbar, click the Bullets button.
To add a hyperlink to the text, click Insert, click Hyperlink, click the file to be linked, and then click
8
OK.

9 To add clip art to a Web page, click Insert, point to Picture, and then click Clip Art.

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To search for a clip art image, in the Clip Art task pane, click in the Search For box, type leaves,
10
and then click Go.
To insert a clip art image into the page, click the arrow on the right side of the image, and then click
11
Insert.
To save your Web site, click File, and then click Save. To save all the files you included in your Web
12
site, click OK in the Save Embedded Files dialogue box.
To preview a Web site in the Preview pane, at the bottom of the Page view editing window, click the
13
Preview button.
To publish your Web site, click File, and then click Publish Site. A number of options are available.
14 You can click FTP to publish your Web site on a Web server that supports File Transfer Protocol
(FTP).

Transcript

You can use one of the FrontPage templates to create your Web page. The template provides a layout
with placeholders for the different types of content you want to include.

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FrontPage provides a number of templates. Depending on your purpose for designing the Web page, you
can select one of the templates.

Depending on the template you select, a number of files are generated. Index.htm is the home page of
your Web site.

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The Index.htm page contains placeholders for information about you and links to your favourite Web
sites. The first line of the home page usually has a heading. To change the style of the heading, you can
click one of the styles in the Style box.

You can include your text by selecting the relevant text to be replaced, and then typing your own text.

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You can present information in the form of a bulleted list or a numbered list to help visitors to your Web
site to grasp information quickly.

You can add hyperlinks to your Web site to provide extra information to your visitors. Select the words to
be hyperlinked, and link them to the relevant files.

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You can add clip art and photographs to make your Web site more interesting.

There are a number of clip art images available. You can search for a clip art image of your choice by
typing the relevant category.

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After you have selected the image or the photograph you want to include in your Web site, click the arrow
on the right side of the clip art, and then click Insert.

After you have included all the text, pictures and links in your Web site, you need to save all the
information. All the files that you included, such as the additional clip art images or linked files, will also be
saved.
After you add some information to your Web site, you need to preview the contents of your Web site
before making more changes or finalising it.

After you have finished developing your Web site, you need to publish it locally to test its functionality,

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and then publish it to a Web server so that others can access it. In this demonstration, you learned about
creating and publishing your Web page.

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Topic: Self Test for Lesson: Communicating on the Internet

Sort the types of features into their associated categories by writing the statement number in its
corresponding option box.

Statement

1 Remains on server till it is downloaded

2 Send and receive responses immediately

3 Exchange messages with mobile devices

4 Includes recipient information in header

5 Read job announcements

6 Create personal online diary

7 Send icons to express emotions

8 Join discussion groups

Option 1 Option 2 Option 3

E-mail Messages Online Communities Instant Messaging

Note: The correct answers are shown on the next page.

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Option 1 Option 2 Option 3

E-mail Messages Online Communities Instant Messaging

4, 1 8, 6, 5 7, 3, 2

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Module Summary

Lessons

The Internet The Internet is a group of networks that provides


various useful services. The components required to
connect to the internet are a computing device, a
connecting device and an ISP. There are two
methods of connecting to the Internet, namely
physical and wireless. The amount of data that can
be transmitted over a network in a certain amount of
time is known as the bandwidth. The bandwidth of a
network depends upon the technology you use to
connect to the Internet.

The World Wide WWW is a popular service provided on the Internet. It


Web acts as a storehouse of interlinked documents.
Documents on the Web are identified with the help of
IP addresses, domain names and URLs. You can use
Web browsers to look for information on the Web.
You can also make business transactions on the
Web.

Communicating The Internet offers a quick, easy and cost-effective


on the Internet method to exchange personal and professional
messages with other Internet users around the world.
You can use various methods, such as e-mail
messages, online communities or instant messaging,
for communication over the Internet.
• E-mail is one of the most popular ways of
communicating on the Internet. You can write
new messages and also manage your e-mail
messages.
• Online communities are formed by groups of
computer users who have common interests
and reasons to communicate with each other
over the Internet.
• You can use instant messaging to
communicate with other computer users over
the Internet.
• You can create your own Web page that lists

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your interests and hobbies and publish it on
the Internet.

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Glossary

Access point
An access point is a wireless connection device. It is used to connect a wireless computing device to a
wired network.

E-commerce
E-commerce refers to the business transactions made over the Internet, such as buying and selling items
online.

E-mail
An electronic mail (e-mail) is an electronic form of the traditional postal mail that allows you to exchange
messages and files over a network.

Internet
The Internet is a worldwide collection of public networks that are linked to each other for information
exchange.

IP address
An Internet Protocol (IP) address is a numeric address that specifies the exact location of a computer on
the Web.

ISP
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is a company that provides Internet connectivity to individuals,
businesses and organisations.

Modem
A modem is a connection device that allows you to connect your computer to the Internet. It converts
digital information into analogue information and transmits it over a phone line.

Network
A network is a group of computers that are connected to share resources and exchange information.

Online
When a computer is connected to the Internet, it is said to be online.

Online communities
Online communities are formed by groups of computer users who have common interests and purpose to
communicate with each other over the Internet.

Plug-ins
Plug-ins are programmes that help you view files, such as animation, audio or video, which are included
in Web pages.
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Portal
A portal is a Web site that offers information related to a specific topic in the form of a directory. A portal
acts as a starting point to a number of resources on the Web.

Protocol
A protocol is a standard method of transferring data between different computers.

Search engine
A search engine is a programme that allows you to search and retrieve information over the Internet.

The Web
The Web, also known as the World Wide Web (WWW), is a collection of information that is accessible on
the Internet. This information is arranged logically and stored on computers known as Web servers.

Web address
A Web address specifies the protocol to be used for transferring data between different computers and
the exact location of the Web site. A Web address is also known as the Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

Web browser
A Web browser is a programme that enables you to view and interact with various resources on the Web.

Web page
A Web page is a formatted text document on the Web.

Web site
A Web site is a collection of one or more Web pages that are linked together and made available through
a Web server.

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