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May 2017

Day 1: Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5


Intro: Dystopias o Due: Reading; Book o Due: o Due: o Due Reading; Book
o Movie Trailers: The Write 1 Reading; Reading Connection 1
Hunger Games, The o Literary Approaches Book Write o Journal 3 o Discuss Book
Giver, Ready Player o Journal 2 2 o Debate 1 Connection 1
One o Think-Pair-Share o Group o Book o Jam Comics
o Student Selection + o HW: Reading’ Book Share Book Connection o HW: Reading; Book
Journal 1 Write 2 Write 2 1 Write 3
o Recommended Reading o Blackout o HW:
Guide Poems Reading;
o HW: Reading; Book o Reflection Finish Book
Write 1 o HW: Connection
Reading 1
Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10
o Due: Reading; Book o Due: Reading o Due: o Due: 3- o Due: Select Media
Write 3 o RT Strategies Reading; Lit Column o Group Check-In
o Concentric Circles o Fanfiction Circle Prep Reading o Book Connection 2
o Silent Discussion o Lit Circles o Lit Circle Logs o Work on Visual
o Character Trading o HW: Reading; Lit o Reflection o Journal 4 Presentations
Cards Circle Prep o 3-Column o Debate 2 o HW: Finish Visual
o HW: Reading Reading o Intro: Visual Presentations
Logs Storytelling
o HW: Finish o HW: Select
3-Column Media
Reading
Logs
Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15
o Due: Visual o Due: Book Reviews o Due: Read o Due: Battle o Due: Battle of the
Presentations o Numbered Heads Article + of the Books Books
o Visual Presentations o Research/Reflection Respond (1/3) o Project Check-In +
Prep o Read Article + o Socratic o Check-In for Presentations
o Presentations Respond Seminar 1/3 o Movie Survey
o Discuss Book o HW: Finish Reading o Battle of o Battle of the o Letter to the Author
Connection 2 Article + Respond the Books Books o HW: Finish Letter
o HW: Book Reviews o Groups + Workday
Proposal o Journal 5
o HW: Battle o HW: Finish
of the Battle of the
Books (1/3) Books

Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20


o Due: Letter o Due: Rough Draft o Due: Final o Due: Bring o Journal 7
o Finish Presentations o Prep for Writer’s Draft Book o Movie (cont.)
o Relic Bags Workshop o Journal 6 o Book Party o Commentary (cont.)
o Intro: Paper o Writer’s Workshop o Dystopian Prep
o HW: Rough Draft o Self-Reflection Connections o Book Party
o HW: Final Draft (Sticky (Activity)
Notes) o Begin Movie
o Unit of Choice
Reflection o Commentary
o HW: Bring
Book for
Book Party
Connections to Standards:
 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with
others, including linking to and citing sources. (7.W.6)
 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. a. Use punctuation
(comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break. b. Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission. c. Spell correctly. (8.L.2)
 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other
characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. (9‐10.RL.3)
 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
(Grade‐specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above. (9‐10.W.4)
o a. Produce clear and coherent functional writing (e.g., formal letters, experiments, notes/messages, labels, timelines, graphs/tables,
procedures, invitations, envelopes, maps, captions, diagrams) in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience. (AZ. 9‐10.W.4)
 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or
two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. (11‐12.W.10)
 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance
understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. (11‐12.SL.5)
https://cms.azed.gov/home/GetDocumentFile?id=550c579daadebe15d072a99e

https://cms.azed.gov/home/GetDocumentFile?id=550c579eaadebe15d072a9a9

Differentiating Instruction:
For this unit in general, my plans for differentiating instruction include using such techniques as tiered instruction, menus, cubing, Socratic seminars,
layered curriculum, and incorporation of technology.

 ELLs – I will differentiate instruction ELLs by doing the following: collaborating with ESL teacher(s), using vocabulary and visual/audio
supplements, providing group work opportunities, allowing some scaffolding with the native language, differentiating assignments based on
language abilities while maintaining high expectations, and more.
 Gifted – I will differentiate instruction for gifted students by doing the following: offering learning contracts for independent study, setting up
interest centers, having gifted students help struggling students in class, adding extension activities, and more.
 Special Education – I will differentiate instruction for special education students by doing the following: providing group work opportunities,
using assistive technology, handing out graphic organizers, modeling explicitly, and incorporating a multi-sensory approach.
http://education.ky.gov/educational/diff/documents/strategiesthatdifferentiateinstruction4.12.pdf
Day 1 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Obtain class copies of The Giver by Lois Lowry, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, and Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
from the school bookstore.
2) Bring a book cart loaded with these books to the classroom. Cover with a sheet. These books will be unveiled after going over
the Dystopias: Definition and Characteristics handout with students.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Pass out copies of the Dystopias: Definition and Characteristics handout to each student. Using your own copy of the
handout, go through each point in the handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed during this unit
introduction.
 Tips: To keep students’ attention, employ techniques such as popcorn reading or popsicle stick reading (note: jar of
popsicle sticks with students’ names written on them are on teacher’s desk).
3) Unveil the three dystopia YA books for this unit. Briefly talk about each book (i.e. plot summary, number of pages).
4) Using the computer, play the movie trailers with the links provided so that students may get a better idea of what each story is
about.
5) After watching the trailers, have students go up by row by row to select the book of their choice. When they return to their desks,
write the prompt for Journal 1 on the board and have students begin to answer on a piece of paper.
6) As students are writing, pass out the Book Write 1 homework assignment and the Recommended Reading Guide.
7) Have students turn in their finished journal assignment on the front desk on their way out. This assignment must be submitted by
the end of class for credit.
http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson926/DefinitionCharacteristics.pdf
Movie Trailers:
Instructions: Show the clips below so that students may get an idea of what each story is about.

 The Giver: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvp6FnYWRZU


 The Hunger Games: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S9a5V9ODuY
 *Ready Player One: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSp1dM2Vj48

Student Selection + Journal 1:


Instructions: Have students select a copy of one of The Giver, The Hunger Games, or Ready Player One. After making their
selections, they will respond to the following prompt on a piece of paper. They will turn it in at the end of class.

(Prompt: I want to read ________ because/I chose this book because _______)

Book Write 1 (HW):


1. Quote 5 Fantastic Sentences.
2. Explain why you like them. (You might focus on the sentences that are written especially well, those you think are vital to a
moment in the book, or both.)

Recommended Reading Guide:


Instructions: As this unit is a full one, I would like you to finish reading your book within the first week or so. Doing so will allow you to
focus more on tackling the upcoming assignments/activities; having all of the book’s information at your disposal will be a useful tool in
crafting more thoughtful, solid responses. Below is a recommended reading guide that breaks the three books down into manageable,
daily homework readings. Of course, this guide is just a recommendation— read at your own pace each day! However, it is still highly
suggested that you finish the book as quickly as possible.
 Day 1: HG 1-4, Giver 1-4, RPO 0-5
 Day 2: HG 5-8, Giver 5-7, RPO 6-11
 Day 3: HG 9-12, Giver 8-11, RPO 12-17
 Day 4: HG 13-16, Giver 12-14, RPO 18-23
 Day 5: HG 17-20, Giver 15-17, RPO 24-29
 Day 6: HG 21-24, Giver 18-20, RPO 30-35
 Day 7: HG 25-27, Giver 21-23, RPO 36-39
Day 2 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Pass out copies of the Literary Approaches handout to each student. Using your own copy of the handout, go through each
approach in the handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed.
 Tips: Focus mainly on the Application/Possible Questions to Pursue portions.
3) Write the prompt for Journal 2 on the board. Have students begin to answer on a piece of paper.
4) As students finish their journal assignment, have them form pairs and do think-pair-share. They will first discuss their journal
assignment, then their homework (Book Write 1).
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on pairs to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note
of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
5) At the end of class, have students line up at the front desk. They will exchange their classwork and homework for the Book Write
2 homework assignment. Make a note next to students’ names if they are missing an assignment. Remind these students to
bring their missing assignment(s) to class the next class day for half credit, if ever.
Journal 2:
Instructions: After going over literary approaches, have students respond to the following prompt on a separate sheet of paper.

(Prompt: Examine what you have read so far in your book using at least three different literary approaches in a
format of your choice (e.g. mini paragraphs, bullet points).)

Think-Pair-Share:
Instructions: Have students think about which analyses they would like to share with their partner (at least two). They will pair off and
discuss their findings. Students do not need to be reading the same book for this activity. After talking about lit approaches, have
them share what they wrote for Book Write 1, as well. Collect both sheets at the end of class.

Book Write 2 (HW):


1. List 20 Words from your book.
2. Use at least 10 of them in a Poem.
Day 3 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Gather art supplies and page printouts for the Blackout Poems activity. They may be found in the supply closet behind the
teacher’s desk.
2) Arrange materials neatly on the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their Book Write 2 homework assignment. They will share what they wrote in groups of 4-6.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a
note of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
3) After discussion, collect the Book Write 2 homework assignment, as well as any late assignments. Remind students to bring their
missing assignment(s) to class the next class day for half credit, if ever.
4) Using the computer, pull up examples of Blackout Poems to introduce the next activity.
 Tips: The provided links are a good place to start.
5) Have students go up row by row to get the page printout corresponding to the book they read, as well as any art supplies they
may need.
6) Allow students to work on their poems. When finished, they may volunteer to share.
7) On the back of their poems, have students respond to the reflection prompt that you will read aloud. This reflection is their ticket
out the door.
8) Put away art supplies and any extra papers.
Group Share:
Instructions: Have students make groups of 4-6 and share what they wrote for Book Write 2. Collect the homework after discussion.

Blackout Poems:
Instructions: Pull up examples of blackout poems to explain on the computer (tip: Google and Pinterest work well). Have students take
the sheet that goes along with the book they are reading. Provide art supplies for students to use as they create their blackout poems.
Students may volunteer to share at the end of the activity.

Reflection/Ticket Out the Door:


Instructions: Have students respond to the following on the back of their blackout poems. They will turn this sheet in before leaving
class.

Respond in the format of your choice (i.e. paragraphs, bullet points):


 What did you like about the activity? Dislike?
 Was there a common theme/style in the poems in the poems that were shared? If not, explain what you
thought about one poem (i.e. talk about structure, tone, etc.).
 Explain the role of omission in your book or in dystopias, in general. What do you think about omitting
information to create new meaning?
http://www.kkoworld.com/kitablar/suzanna-kollinz-acliq-oyunlari-1-hisse-eng.pdf
http://io9.gizmodo.com/5831527/read-the-first-two-chapters-of-ernest-clines-dystopian-gamer-novel-ready-player-one
http://schools.smcps.org/lms/images/6thgrade/thegiver.pdf
Day 4 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Obtain a laptop cart from the school tech center
2) Bring this laptop cart to the classroom. Leave it behind the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Write the prompt for Journal 3 on the board and have students begin to answer on a piece of paper.
3) After they finish writing, have the students number off by one’s and two’s. These teams will each claim a side of the classroom.
 Tips: Have students bring their Journal 3 responses with them when they move around. What they wrote may be helpful
for the upcoming debate.
4) Introduce the debate activity. Reveal the topics up for argument and assign viewpoints (e.g. one’s are for each point, two’s are
against each point).
5) Allow students to prep for a few minutes.
 Tip 1: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a
note of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
 Tip 2: If worried about participation, you may split each group into four smaller sub-groups (they will still sit as an entire
group). Therefore, the four debate points can be addressed by both sides with a better chance for everyone’s
participation.
6) Begin the debate. Monitor it with attention to validity of arguments, participation, and time. Transition through topics as necessary
so each will get covered.
7) After the debate, have students place their Journal 3 assignment on the front desk and grab a Book Connection 1
classwork/homework assignment and laptop from the cart on the way back to their regular seats.
8) Allow students to work on their Book Connection 1 assignment until the end of class. Whatever they do not finish will be
homework. Address questions/comments as needed.
9) Have students put back their laptops on their way out. Return the laptop cart to the school tech center.
Journal 3:
Instructions: Have students respond to the following prompt on a piece of paper. Their response may be used to help with the
debate.

(Prompt: What are some dystopian characteristics that stand out to you in the book you chose? In what ways
does the protagonist of your book conform to/rebel against societal control?)

Debate 1:
Instructions: Divide the class into two teams. Show each team the following topics and assign viewpoints (for or against). Monitor the
debate with attention to validity of arguments, participation, and time.
Topics:
 Social control is a good thing.
 One person/protagonist cannot make much of a difference in the game of social control.
 There is nothing wrong with the way society is set-up.
 People in power are only in power because we allow them to be.

Book Connection 1 (CW/HW):


Instructions: Students will do outside research and find an article that connects to their book. They will write a one paragraph reflection
that demonstrates their understanding of both their book and article. If students do not finish in class, it is homework.
(Idea Examples: Linking an article on video game addiction to Ready Player One (comparing technology in society); linking an article on
world hunger to the issue of hunger in The Hunger Games; linking an article on job culture to The Giver.)
Findings will be discussed at the beginning of class the next day before being collected.
Day 5 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Gather art supplies from the supply closet.
2) Arrange materials neatly on the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their Book Connection 1 assignment. As a class, discuss findings.
 Tip 1: Make a note next to students’ names if they are missing an assignment. Remind these students to bring their
missing assignment(s) to class the next class day for half credit, if ever. Encourage these students to do their best to
participate in the discussion as to not lose participation points, as well.
 Tip 2: Allow students to volunteer to share before calling on them. Call on students if the conversation is lagging. Allow to
students to also ask their peers for clarification and such, if needed.
3) After discussion, collect the Book Connection 1 homework assignment and have students form groups based on the books they
are reading. Make sure that groups that are too big get split up.
4) Introduce the Jam Comics activity. Give groups time to plan their comics/storyboard before getting art supplies.
5) Have each group go up to the front desk for art supplies. Using the art supplies provided, students will create comics for The
Hunger Games, The Giver, and Ready Player One for the duration of the class.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a
note of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
6) As groups finish their comics, have them double-check that each member’s name is written down before they put away supplies.
Help groups put up their finished comics around the classroom.
7) Stand by the door and hand out the Book Write 3 homework assignment on students’ way out.
8) Put away art supplies and any extra papers.
Jam Comics (Prep):
Instructions: Divide students into groups based on the book they are reading. Split groups if they are too large. Allow students plan out
their comics (i.e. Will the comic have words? Will students be conveying a specific scene in their comics, or will they freeform?)

Jam Comics:
Instructions: Using the art supplies provided, students will create comics for The Hunger Games, The Giver, and Ready Player One for
the duration of the class. When finished, all group members will write their names and turn it in. Their work will be posted around the
classroom.

Book Write 3 (HW):


Describe your Favorite Moment in the book so far. Be sure to explain why you like it!
Day 6 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*\
Before Class:
1) Write Silent Discussion questions on the boards around the room.
2) Gather art supplies from the supply closet.
3) Arrange materials neatly on the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their Book Write 3 homework assignment. They will then move to the center of the classroom and divide
as evenly as possible to form an inner and outer circle for the Concentric Circles activity. Students will share their responses to
Book Write 3 with their partners as they rotate.
 Tip 1: Have just the outer circle move for better management.
 Tip 2: Walk around and listen in on pairs to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note
of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
3) After students have gone full circle and shared, collect Book Write 3, as well as any late assignments.
4) After students have returned to their seats and picked up a writing utensil, have them break into groups of 4-6.
5) Introduce the Silent Discussion activity. Hand out a sticky-note pad to each group and assign them to their starting board.
Groups will rotate and answer each question until all have been answered.
 Tips: Keep an eye on time and groups’ progress. Students have four minutes max to answer each question, but speed up
the rotation if groups are finishing earlier than expected.
6) Have students return to their seats. Address any questions/comments concerning the Silent Discussion as you begin to hand out
index cards.
7) Introduce the Character Trading Card activity as a fun, but still thought-provoking, closing activity. Allow students to gather art
supplies and converse quietly as they wish while working on their cards.
8) Students must show you a finished product to get credit for the activity. It is also their ticket out the door.
9) Put away any art supplies. Collect sticky-notes.
Concentric Circles:
Instructions: Have half the class be the inner circle and the other half be the outer circle. Have students take turns sharing their favorite
parts (Book Write 3) with their corresponding pairs. After a minute, have the outer circle move counterclockwise to a new partner.
Repeat until they have gone full circle. Collect homework.

Silent Discussion:
Instructions: Have students make groups of 4-6. They will respond to the following questions written on the boards around the room
using a rotation system. They will have four minutes to answer each question on a sticky-note before rotating; they will sign the sticky-
note with their name and answer all questions.
 Companionship plays a key role in The Giver, The Hunger Games, and Ready Player One. Does it serve as a blessing or a
curse? Explain your reasoning.
 The protagonists of The Giver, The Hunger Games, and Ready Player One are all adolescents. Do you think the stories would
interest you more if the protagonists were older/younger? Why or why not?
 Knowledge is power. In what ways do some of the characters in your book use knowledge to manipulate their circumstances?
 In a dystopian society, individuality and dissent are viewed as ‘bad.’ Examine your protagonist’s individuality through the eyes of
the antagonist. How might individuality threaten you?
Character Trading Cards/Ticket Out the Door:
Instructions: Hand out index cards and provide art supplies. For the last few minutes of class, have students design trading cards by
drawing a picture of whatever character they want and listing important qualities of that person. They may talk amongst themselves
while working, but each card should be done individually. Students will show their cards on the way out for credit.
Sample Template: Name:

(Character image)

Stats:

Abilities:
Day 7 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
During Class:
1) Attendance
8) Pass out copies of the RT (Reciprocal Teaching) Strategies handout to each student. Using your own copy of the handout, go
through each point in the handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed.
2) On a separate piece of paper, have students apply the RT Strategies to the book they are reading.
3) As students complete their RT Strategies, using the computer, pull up examples of fanfiction to introduce the next activity.
 Tips: The provided links are a good place to start.
4) Navigate the fanfiction websites to give students a better understanding of how they work. Next, have students try their own
hand at writing fanfiction based on the book they are reading.
 Tips: As writing fanfiction can be a rather personal activity, tell students in advance that they do not have to share, but
may do so if they wish. Credit for the activity is just based on the written submission.
9) Allow students to write their fanfictions on a separate piece of paper or on the back of their RT Strategies. When finished, they
may volunteer to share.
5) Introduce the Lit Circle activity by passing out copies of the Literature Circle Roles handout to each student. Using your own
copy of the handout, go through each point in the handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed.
6) Before they leave, have students create small groups based on the books they are reading and assign roles among themselves.
Confirm groups by making a note. Prepping for the actual lit circle will be their homework.
7) Collect/have students turn in their two written assignments (RT Strategies/Fanfiction) at the end of class for credit.
Fanfiction:
Instructions: Pull up examples of fanfiction to explain on the computer (AO3 and ff.net work well). On a sheet of paper or on the back of
their RT Strategies, have students try their hand at writing their own fanfiction based on the book they are reading. They may volunteer
to share at the end of the activity. Their writings will be collected at the end of class.

Literature Circle Roles

Discussion Director - writes questions to guide thoughtful group discussion and keeps group on task

Connection Maker - writes own and group members' connections (Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World)

Summarizer - writes a Beginning-Middle-End summary, revises with group input and creates book final summary

Word Wizard - searches for unusual word choice or description or defines words the group may not know

Passage Picker - selects and rereads important passages or descriptive imagery sections to the group and discusses author's style.

These roles are taken from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/training-students-literature-circles (and the person who wrote this lesson
recommends doing a practice literature circle with picture books or other shorter texts to give students some experience with literature circles before
using them with a novel).

Dystopian YA Book:
______________________________________________________________________

Our Assigned Roles:

Discussion Director -

Connection Maker -

Summarizer -

Word Wizard -

Passage Picker -
Day 8 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Allow students to form their lit circles and discuss their books.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a
note of students who are noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
3) As students discuss, write the reflection prompt on the board.
4) As students finish their discussions, have them respond to the reflection prompt on the back of their Lit Circle handout or on a
separate piece of paper.
5) Introduce the reading log activity by passing out copies of the 3-Column Reading Log handout to each student. Using your own
copy of the handout, go through each point in the handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed.
6) Have students work on their reading logs for the duration of the class. Whatever they do not finish will be homework. Address
questions/comments as needed.
7) Have students turn in their Lit Circle reflections on their way out.
Reflection:
Instructions: On a separate sheet of paper, have students respond to the following. They will turn in this sheet at the end of class.

Respond in the format of your choice (i.e. paragraphs, bullet points):


 What did you like about the activity? Dislike?
 Describe at least two topics addressed during your group’s lit circle that stood out at you. Why did these topics
interest you?
 Write any last-minute thoughts/questions you were not able to address during your discussion.
 Briefly explain the importance of roles/designated jobs/expectations in your story.

3-Column Reading Log


 Divide your paper into 3 equal columns. As you find an interesting or important sentence in a text, record it in the middle column. Then, label it to the
left and comment on it to the right. Number each entry in the label column, and separate completed entries with a line. The number of entries required
for each log for this assignment will be at least 8 entries.

Label Quote Comment

Write the term only. Quote whole sentences. Respond with at least a couple of
sentences.

Number these. Put the text in quotation marks


and include the page number. Commentaries should be
insightful and well-written.
Examples: Examples:

Literary term (name it): Use a reading strategy:

Simile, Metaphor, Predict, question, clarify,


summarize, visualize, connect, or
Synecdoche, evaluate.
Personification, Alliteration,
Hyperbole,
For new vocabulary:
Understatement, Oxymoron,
Paradox, Define the word and comment.

Repetition, Rhyme, Epiphany,


Pun, Imagery, Symbol, Apply a critical perspective:
Allusion, Antithesis, Conflict,
Climax, Setting, Mood, Irony, Archetypal, Feminist, Marxist,
Flashback, Foreshadowing, Psychoanalytical, New Historicism,
Point-of-view, etc. Reader-response,

Structuralist, Moral,
Character’s name
Biographical, Formalist, or
(write the name) Deconstructionist.

New vocabulary

Historical detail

Cultural detail
Day 9 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Write prompt for Journal 4 on the board.
2) Obtain a laptop cart from the school tech center.
3) Bring this laptop cart to the classroom. Leave it behind the front desk.
4) Confirm that you can log in to the teacher’s online classroom using the password left for you.
Online access is necessary for the Intro: Visual Storytelling aspect of today’s lesson.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their reading log assignment. On the back of that or on a separate
piece of paper, have them do their Journal 4 assignment as an opening activity. If students do
not have their reading log assignment for some reason, remind them to bring it to class the
next day for half credit, if ever.
3) After they finish writing, have the students number off by one’s and two’s. These teams will
each claim a side of the classroom.
 Tips: Have students bring their Journal 4 responses with them when they move around.
What they wrote may be helpful for the upcoming debate.
4) Introduce the debate activity. Reveal the topics up for argument and assign viewpoints (e.g.
one’s are for each point, two’s are against each point).
5) Allow students to prep for a few minutes.
 Tip 1: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
 Tip 2: If worried about participation, you may split each group into four smaller sub-
groups (they will still sit as an entire group). Therefore, the four debate points can be
addressed by both sides with a better chance for everyone’s participation.
6) Begin the debate. Monitor it with attention to validity of arguments, participation, and time.
Transition through topics as necessary so each will get covered.
7) After the debate, have students place their 3-Column Reading Log and Journal 4 assignments
on the front desk and grab a laptop from the cart on the way back to their regular seats.
8) Using the computer, have students follow your example on their laptops as you log in to the
teacher’s online classroom. Introduce the Visual Storytelling project and advise them to
explore the different links provided in Assignments > Intro: Visual Storytelling.
 Tips: Remind students that they are not limited to the teacher’s suggestions.
8) As students are exploring online, pass out and go over the Visual Presentation assignment.
Address questions/comments as needed.
9) Before they leave, have students create small groups based on the books they read. Confirm
these presentation groups by making a note. Selecting their choice of media/prepping for their
visual presentations is their homework.
10) Have students put back their laptops on their way out. Return the laptop cart to the school
tech center.
Journal 4/Debate Prep:
Instructions: On a separate sheet of paper or on the back of their 3 -Column Reading Logs, have
students respond to the following.

(Prompt: Describe your thoughts on the lessons/themes and ending of your book. Do
you agree with the author’s message? Explain.)

Debate 2:
Instructions: Divide the class into two teams. Show each team the following topics and assign
viewpoints (for or against). Monitor the debate with attention to validity of arguments, participation,
and time.
Topics:
 Social control is an easy thing to get rid of.
 Greed is the source of all evil.
 Adolescents possess more wisdom than children/adults.
 Not just anyone can bring about a rebellion.

Intro: Visual Storytelling


Students, I have listed some examples of some visual presentation software/applications below. Remember, you are NOT
limited to these! 

 PowerPoint: 8 Tips to Create an Epic Presentation


 How To: Prezi
 How To: Google Slides
 How To: Illuminated Texts
(See Appendix A and examples)
 Overview: Glogster
(Free 7 Day Trials Available)
 How To: Windows Movie Maker
 How To: TechSmith
(Includes Jing, Screencast, Snagit, and Camtasia)
 How To: Storyboard That
(Free 14 Day Trials Available)
 How To: Haiku Deck
(Free Access Available)
 How To: Canva
(Free Access Available)

Visual Presentation:
Instructions: Have students make groups of 4-6 based on the book they read. For this assignment,
they will use the media of their choice to create a visual presentation on either The Hunger Games,
The Giver, or Ready Player One that: a) Provides an accurate representation of the novel’s contents,
b) Is at least 5 minutes in length, and c) Is engaging and creative.
Students will be given lab time— one full class period as a work day and half a period to prep before
presenting. As this project is a major one, organization is expected early on. Points will be deducted if
groups do not have an idea by the time they enter the lab/if they are seen changing their ideas or not
working cooperatively (i.e. group mates working on separate presentations, not all group mates
actively working) during lab time.
As it is also a group project, equal effort is expected of each group member during the time of the
presentation.
http://mbf.blogs.com/files/visual-presentation-rubric.pdf

*Note: Group members’ participation grade will be added separately by teacher.


Day 10 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Organize a computer lab day.
2) Notify students in advance that they will be meeting in the computer lab instead of the
classroom.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Introduce the Book Connection 2 opening activity.
3) As students finish their Book Connection 2 assignment, have them move to sit with their group
mates if they are not already.
4) Go around and check that each group has selected the form of media they will use for their
visual presentations. Points will be deducted if they do not have an idea/if they change their
idea during lab time due to factors like poor preparation. Make notes as necessary.
5) Have students work on their visual presentations for the rest of class. Address
questions/comments as needed.
 Tip 1: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating.
 Tip 2: Confirm that groups are working honestly on what the projects they checked in
(lit. “Are they actually using the media they said they would?”). Groups that are deficient
in any aspects will lose credit based on the teacher’s judgment.
 Tip 3: Remind students that this will be the only full work day provided. It is their
responsibility to finish the project on their own time.
Book Connection 2:
Instructions: Students will do outside research and find an article that connects to their book. In an
email to the teacher, students will attach the link to their article and include a 2-3 sentence
explanation as to how it relates to their book.

Group Check-In:
Instructions: Go around and check that each group has selected the form of media they will use for
their visual presentations (e.g. PowerPoint, Prezi, poster). Points will be deducted if they do not have
an idea/if they change their idea during lab time due to factors like poor preparation.
Day 11 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Organize a computer lab day.
2) Notify students in advance that they will be meeting in the computer lab instead of the
classroom.
3) Look over the Book Connection 2 assignments and select some of interest (at least one per
book).
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Allow students to prep for their visual presentations for 5-10 minutes. During this time, also
allow groups to decide the order they will be presenting in.
3) Begin visual presentations.
 Tips: Sit at the back of the room. Along with evaluating visual presentations, also keep
an eye out for students who are not being good audience members (i.e. working on their
own presentations, texting). They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
4) After all presentations are over, return to the front of the room and reintroduce the Book
Connection 2 assignment from the previous class day. Engage the class in discussion about
an interesting selection of submissions.
5) At the end of class, pass out the Book Reviews homework assignment.
Book Connection 2 (Class Discussion):
Instructions: Briefly go over a selection of Book Connection 2 submissions from the previous day. Be
sure to keep them anonymous and pose at least one question per book.
Questions:
 What do you think about the message of this article in relation to the book?
 How might this article relate to any other dystopian works you have previously encountered?
 Do you think the author had issues like the one in this article in mind when writing his/her
book? Why or why not?

Book Reviews (HW):


Instructions: Write a 1-2 paragraph long review on the book you read. Give it a rating based on 1-5
stars. This review may be done online through the media of your choice (i.e. Amazon, Goodreads,
Facebook).
Day 12 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Organize a computer lab day.
2) Notify students in advance that they will be meeting in the computer lab instead of the
classroom.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students open their online book reviews.
3) Number students off 1-5. Students of the same number will form groups and discuss their book
reviews.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
4) After discussing reviews, have students use their lab computer to look up reviews written
online about their books for a few minutes.
5) Have students discuss their findings. This discussion will count as the reflection portion of their
research/reflection activity.
6) Introduce writing activity. Using the computer, model how to access the article to be used for
this assignment for students. On the board, write the instructions for this assignment.
7) Allow students to read their articles and craft their responses for the duration of the class.
Whatever they do not finish will be homework.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on students to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
Numbered Heads:
Instructions: Number students off 1-5. Students of the same number will form groups and discuss
their book reviews.

Research/Reflection:
Instructions: After discussing reviews, have students use their lab computer to look up reviews written
online about their books. Reflection will be done orally.
Questions:
 What kind of ratings did you find on your book online? Do you agree with those ratings? Why
or why not?
 Based on the reviews, what are the highlights of your book?
 Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Article + Response:
Instructions: Have students read the following article (http://finance.yahoo.com/news/trump-era-
begins-readers-flock-dystopian-fiction-143150817.html). They will write a 2-paragraph response on it
as prep for Socratic seminar, as well 3 questions.

Dystopian fiction is selling like there's no


tomorrow

COLLIN BINKLEY
Associated Press March 10, 2017

View
photos
Books are
displayed
under a
sign at the
Harvard
Book
Store,
Thursday,
March 9,
2017, in

Cambridge, Mass. Readers have been flocking to classic works of dystopian fiction in the first months of Donald Trump's
presidency. Novels depicting dysfunctional societies have shot to the top of best-seller lists in recent months, including
George Orwell's "1984" and Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale." Publishers credit Trump's election for sparking
demand. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

BOSTON (AP) — Save the light reading for later. In 2017, dystopian fiction is all the rage.

Gloomy classics depicting societies gone terribly wrong have shot to the top of best-seller lists like
Amazon's in recent months, including George Orwell's "1984" and Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's
Tale," prompting publishers to ramp up production decades after the books were first released. Others
have followed close behind, such as Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World," Sinclair Lewis' "It Can't Happen
Here" and Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451."

Some nonfiction works in the same vein have seen similar resurgences, including Hannah Arendt's 1951
"Origins of Totalitarianism."

Longtime staples in English literature courses, dystopian works are attracting new attention from casual
readers and social book clubs. Local theater groups are adapting versions for the stage. College courses
on dystopian classics are suddenly drawing long wait lists.

Much of the renewed interest has followed the November election of President Donald Trump, which
publishers and scholars say is no coincidence.

"Definitely the election had an effect," said LuAnn Walther," editorial director of the paperback division at
Knopf. "There's fear out there about what is going to happen, and I think these predictive books are
helpful to people who are looking for the dangers the future might hold."

One edition of "1984" has seen sales jump by 10,000 percent since January, when Trump adviser
Kellyanne Conway defended incorrect claims as "alternative facts" in a TV interview. It instantly drew
comparisons to the type of government manipulation Orwell wrote about nearly 70 years ago.
"That was so perfectly Orwellian, that truth is variable and can be changed, and that there's a fact and
then there's a counter-fact," said Peter Stansky, an Orwell biographer and a professor emeritus of history
at Stanford University. "The current Trump situation has just caused a vast upsurge in interest."

Other critics have said Trump's views on immigration and the news media, while not unique, would fit
neatly into the plot of a dystopian tale. In college classes on dystopian works, students have been eager
to draw their own parallels. Dozens of U.S. movie theaters are screening a film version of "1984" in April
as a protestagainst many of Trump's policies.

"Orwell's portrait of a government that manufactures their own facts, demands total obedience and
demonizes foreign enemies has never been timelier," the group United State of Cinema, which is
organizing the protest, wrote in a statement.

Those types of barbs are far from new in American politics. Critics of former President Barack Obama
compared him to the watchful Big Brother in "1984" after a vast government surveillance program was
detailed in 2013 leaks. Sales of the novel surged then, too.

In the case of Trump, some scholars say the comparisons are largely unjustified.

"On the face of it, there are absolutely no parallels," said Robert Colls, a professor of cultural history at
Britain's De Montfort University who wrote a 2013 book on Orwell. "Trump was elected, and as far as I
know he hasn't purged anyone or killed anyone."

Quentin Kopp, a leader of the nonprofit Orwell Society, said that there may be some similarities but that
"it's easy to overstate these parallels or dig too hard." His group seeks to promote Orwell's life and works
but takes no political stance.

Some experts say readers often return to dystopian works during periods of great change, hoping to find
out how they can avoid the nightmarish worlds the works depict. Beyond the U.S. election, readers might
be jarred by events like the global refugee crisis, some say.

"There's a factor of activism that you can take away from reading dystopian fiction, reading it as a defense
against who we might become," said Therese Cox, a doctoral candidate teaching a course on dystopian
fiction at Columbia University. "It speaks to impulses and fears that we've had for a very long time."

Others say new adaptations of classic works have fueled renewed interest. Hulu is releasing a TV version
of "The Handmaid's Tale" in April, telling the story of a woman in New England after an oppressive
religious regime takes over. In June, a British stage production of "1984" is headed to Broadway.

John Morillo, who teaches a course on dystopias at North Carolina State University, said readers have
long enjoyed dystopian fiction because it lets them experience the thrill of something horrific without the
threat of real danger. But now he sees another benefit — it can offer readers a comforting reminder about
the world today.

"Now maybe it's a sense that, well, it's still not that bad," he said. "They can close this book and say, 'Now
there's hope for the future.'"
Day 13 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Arrange desks in a circle for Socratic seminar.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their printed article responses. If students do not have their
assignment, remind them to bring it to class the next day for half credit, if ever. However, they
will still be required to participate in the discussion. Encourage these students to do their best
to participate in the discussion as to not lose participation points, as well.
3) Begin Socratic seminar. Monitor discussion for participation, validity of arguments, and time.
The questions will be based off those written by students.
 Tips: Set up a hot seat and/or jump in with your own questions/comments— keep the
conversation going.
4) After the Socratic seminar, introduce the next project: Battle of the Books. Pass out copies of
the handout to each student. Using your own copy of the handout, go through each point in the
handout with the students. Address questions/comments as needed.
5) Allow students to make their own groups of 4-6 based on the books they read. As groups, they
will write come up with their project proposals.
6) Have students show you their proposal. You must approve it before they may leave. While at
your desk, have them turn in their article responses, as well.
7) Remind students that 1/3 of their project is due the next day at the beginning of class as they
leave.
8) Rearrange the desks properly.
Socratic Seminar:
Instructions: Arrange desks for Socratic seminars. Monitor discussion for participation, validity of
arguments, and time. The questions will be based off those written by students.

Battle of the Books:


Instructions: In groups of 4-6, students will use three different types of media to show their audience
why The Giver, Ready Player One, or The Hunger Games is the best and why others should read it.
Students are not limited to this list of media examples and may choose whatever mode suits their
purposes. Refer to the Intro: Visual Storytelling section on the online classroom if necessary.
Examples of Possible Media:
 Illuminated texts
 Skits
 Book/movie trailers (self-produced)
 Posters
 Comics
 Social media
 Songs/Dance
Because students made visual presentations for their last project, it is understandable that they would
like to reuse some of their presentations. I have decided that no more than one old presentation can
be reused per group as part of the Battle of the Books project. Major points will be deducted if groups
fail to abide by this guideline.
As it is also a group project, equal effort is expected of each group member during the time of the
presentation.
http://mbf.blogs.com/files/visual-presentation-rubric.pdf

*Note: Group members’ participation grade will be added separately by teacher.


Groups + Proposal:
Instructions: Have students form groups of 4-6 and decide which three forms of media they will use.
Their proposals must be approved by the teacher before leaving and moving forward with the project.
Day 14 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Obtain a laptop cart from the school tech center.
2) Bring this laptop cart to the classroom. Leave it behind the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students get in their project groups and get laptops from the cart if needed.
3) Go around and check that each group has 1/3 of their project ready for check-in. Make a note
next to students’ names if they do not have this portion complete. Point deduction will be
calculated later by the teacher.
4) Have the students work on their Battle of the Books assignment for an extended period.
Address questions/comments as needed.
 Tip 1: Walk around and listen in on groups to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating.
 Tip 2: Remind students that this will be the only work day provided. It is their
responsibility to finish the project on their own time.
5) While students are working on their projects, write the prompt for Journal 5 on the board.
6) Shortly before the end of class, have students start putting their project materials and laptops
away. When they return to their seats, have them take out a piece of paper and respond to the
journal prompt.
7) Collect journal assignments at the end of class. Remind students to finish the rest of their
projects and return the laptop cart to the school tech center.
Journal 5:
Instructions: Have students respond to the following prompt on a sheet of paper.

(Prompt: What role does the media have in your story? Why is the media important in
dystopian societies?)
Day 15 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Obtain a laptop cart from the school tech center.
2) Bring this laptop cart to the classroom. Leave it behind the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students get in their project groups and get laptops from the cart if needed. Allow them to
prep for 5-10 minutes. During this time, also allow groups to decide the order they will be
presenting in.
3) Go around and check that each group has 3/3 of their project ready for check-in. Make a note
next to students’ names if they do not have this portion complete. Point deduction will be
calculated later by the teacher.
4) Start Battle of the Books presentations. Address questions/comments as needed.
 Tip 1: Aim to get through at least half of the presentations today.
 Tip 2: Sit at the back of the room. Along with evaluating the presentations, also keep an
eye out for students who are not being good audience members (i.e. working on their
own presentations, texting). They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
5) Shortly before the end of class, have students start putting their project materials and laptops
away. When they return to their seats, have them take out a scrap piece of paper.
6) Have students quickly vote on which movie they would like to see at the end of this dystopian
YA unit. Using the computer, revisit the movie trailer links provided in Day 1’s lesson plan if
you find it necessary.
9) Collect votes and introduce Letter to the Author activity by passing out copies of the handout to
each student. Using your own copy of the handout, go through the sample with the students.
Address questions/comments as needed.
7) Allow students to start working on their letters until the end of class. Whatever they do not
finish will be homework. Remind them on their way out that the groups that did not present
today will go the next class day, too.
8) Return the laptop cart to the school tech center.
Movie Survey:
Instructions: On a scrap of paper, have students anonymously write down the name of the movie they
want to see. Reference movie trailers if necessary.

Letter to the Author:


Instructions: Students will look up the mailing address of the author of the book they read and write
him/her a friendly 1-2-page letter, keeping in mind tone, formality, syntax, mechanics, etc. An
example of a letter to the author may be found below (http://cojowa.blogspot.com/2006/03/letter-to-
author-example.html). The letter does not have to be sent to the author.

Eastside High School


10245 Eagle Drive
Covington, GA 30015
May 16, 2002

Barbara O’Connor
Double Day Press
1234 Main St.
Duxbury, Massachussetts
98765

Dear Mrs. O’Connor:

On Monday May 13, I finished your novel Me and Rupert Goody, your novel about a young girl
struggling to come to terms with a new “sibling” in her “family.” I wanted to let you know how much I
enjoyed reading the novel.

As a girl from the South, I considered your portrayal of Jennalee and her problems to be very
accurate and realistic. Jennalee’s descriptions of her family made me laugh but also made me feel
very sad for her. I also have a large family and sometimes it does seem as though there is “a ton of
hell” going on in my house. I especially liked the part where Jennalee got her sister in trouble with
their mom; it happens like that at my house, too. I know why Jennalee was so jealous of Rupert. Until
Rupert arrived, Uncle Beau’s was Jennalee’s sanctuary; she had Uncle Beau’s undivided attention.
He made her feel important and valuable. She didn’t want to share that with Rupert.

I especially liked the language in the novel. Jennalee’s grammar wasn’t perfect so she sounded like a
real person. I also liked that she wasn’t perfect; she was jealous and sometimes mean. She also
worked hard. Eventually, she did the right thing and accepted Rupert as a member of her family. In
spite of her sometimes bad actions, Uncle Beau and her family still loved her.

At first, I was wondering why you made Rupert a black man. I thought that was going to be the major
conflict. I like that his race was really not the issue to Jennalee. I thought that sent a valuable
message without being really obvious. He was also a very forgiving and loving character; he didn’t try
to be mean to Jennalee even when she was being mean to him.
In your letter, you talked about things that you took from your own life and included in your books. Do
you keep a notebook of possible ideas or do you just rely on your memory? Do you ever use people
you know in your books?

Is it hard to make the characters in a book sound like real people? Jennalee and her family sound just
like my family. How much time do you spend writing a book? Does anyone help you?

I really enjoyed Me and Rupert Goody and I am looking forward to reading the book you have set in
Freedom, Georgia. Thank you for taking the time to respond to letters from my class.

Sincerely,

Melanie Hundley
Day 16 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Obtain a laptop cart from the school tech center.
2) Bring this laptop cart to the classroom. Leave it behind the front desk.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their letters and share if they wish. Collect them. Make a note next to
students’ names if they are missing an assignment. Remind these students to bring their
missing assignment(s) to class the next class day for half credit, if ever.
3) Have students get in their project groups and get laptops from the cart if needed. Allow them to
prep for 5-10 minutes.
4) Finish Battle of the Books presentations. Address questions/comments as needed.
 Tip 1: The rest of the presentations must be done today, so keep an eye on time.
 Tip 2: Sit at the back of the room. Along with evaluating the presentations, also keep an
eye out for students who are not being good audience members (i.e. working on their
own presentations, texting). They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
5) After presentations are finished, introduce the Relic Bags activity by passing out copies of the
handout to each student. Using your own copy of the handout, go through it with the students.
Address questions/comments as needed.
6) Have students work on their relic bags and share with each other and the class when ready.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on students to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
7) Before the end of class, pass out copies of the final project paper assignment to each student.
Using your own copy of the handout, go through it with the students. Address
questions/comments as needed.
8) Inform students that their rough draft is due the next class day and is necessary to participate
in the Writers’ Workshop for full credit.
9) Have students return their laptops and turn in their Relic Bags assignment at the front desk.
Return the laptop cart to the school tech center.
Relic Bags:
Instructions: Using the following template, students will list ten objects that represent their book. After
completing their lists, students will share with their neighbors, providing an explanation as to why
these chose each object. This sheet will be turned in at the end of class.

Final Paper:
Instructions: In a 3 page, MLA style paper, students will respond to the prompt that ties in with the
book they read. Papers must have a thought-out claim/thesis, use solid evidence (analysis of detail),
and demonstrate mastery over style and mechanics.

Prompts:
 The Giver: Explain the significance of isolation during Jonas’s training as The Receiver of
Memory.
 The Hunger Games: What is the role of spectatorship in The Hunger Games?
 Ready Player One: What does the control OASIS has over the real world say about society in
Ready Player One?

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/1b/73/a9/1b73a94b175327bc34cfcaccadf8767c.jpg
Day 17 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their rough drafts. Make a note next to students’ names if they are
missing it. Remind these students to bring their missing assignment(s) to class the next class
day for half credit, if ever.
3) Have students get in groups of 3 and begin Writers’ Workshop. They will do this activity for an
extended period. Address questions/comments as needed.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on students to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
4) Before the end of class, have students respond to the reflection prompt that you will read aloud
somewhere on their rough drafts.
5) Remind students that both their rough and final drafts are due the next class day.
Writer’s Workshop (Prep + Activity):
Instructions: Check that each student has a rough draft. Divide students into groups of 3. They will
peer edit their rough drafts to prepare for the final ones. Both the rough and final drafts will be turned
in at the beginning of class the next day.

Self-Reflection:
Instructions: Somewhere on their rough drafts, students will list three things they did well and three
things they need to improve on based on their peers’ editing.
Day 18 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students take out their rough and final drafts. Make a note next to students’ names if they
are missing assignment(s). Remind these students to bring their missing assignment(s) to
class the next class day for half credit, if ever. Collect the assignments.
3) Write the prompt for Journal 6 on the board. Have students respond on a piece of paper.
4) As students finish their journal assignment, have them bring it to the front desk. When all
students are finished, introduce the Dystopian Connections activity by passing out copies of
the handout to each student. Using your own copy of the handout, read the directions with the
students. Address questions/comments as needed.
5) Assign each section of the room a board and hand out sticky-note pads as needed. Without
using the handout on dystopias they received on the first day of the unit, have students fill up
their boards as much as possible using sticky-notes to convey their knowledge.
 Tip 1: Walk around and listen in on students to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment.
 Tip 2: Examine the sticky-notes on each board. Consider the similarities and differences
between students’ answers.
6) Discuss the Dystopia Connections activity as a class. This discussion will serve as the Unit
Reflection.
7) Discuss the upcoming Book Party at the end of class. Allow students to sign up to bring snacks
and such. Remind students to bring their books to class, as well
Journal 6:
Instructions: Have students respond to the following prompt on a sheet of paper.

(Prompt: Based on the book you read, why do you think the dystopian fiction genre is
so popular?)

Dystopian Connections:
Instructions: Assign each section of the room a board. Without using their handout on dystopian
characteristics, have students fill up their boards as much as possible using sticky-notes. The sticky-
notes should provide examples of general dystopian qualities and specific dystopian qualities in the
books read. They should also include the students’ initials as to track participation.

Unit Reflection (Class Discussion):


Instructions: Using the questions below, allow students to share their thoughts on the dystopian unit.
Questions:
 What did you like about this unit? Dislike?
 What do dystopias tell us about real life?
 To what extent is independence important?
 How does the social control in these books mirror the constraints of our society?
 Do you think dystopias are real? Why or why not?
Name Snack/Drink
Day 19 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Buy treats for the Book Party (optional).
2) Bring book cart to the classroom.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Double-check if any students have late assignments they would like to turn in. Today is the last
day they will be accepted.
3) Allow students time to take out their books, get snacks, and make themselves comfortable
around the room.
4) For the first half of the period, allow students to talk about, exchange, and preview books
amongst themselves.
 Tips: Walk around and listen in on students to check if they are on track. Issue
warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are noticeably off-
task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the teacher’s
judgment. Students will also lose participation credit if they forgot to bring their books
back today.
5) Before starting the movie students voted on in the previous week in the latter half of the period,
introduce the Commentary activity. Then get through as much of the movie as possible.
6) At the end of class, have the students help clean up the classroom and put their books back on
the book cart before leaving. Remind the students who did not bring their books that they are
responsible for returning them to the bookstore on their own time now.
7) Return book cart to the bookstore.
Book Party (Prep + Activity); Movie:
Instructions: Allow students time to take out their books, get snacks, and make themselves
comfortable around the room. For the first half of the period, allow students to talk about, exchange,
and preview books amongst themselves. Start the movie students voted on in the previous week in
the latter half of the period.
Commentary:
Instructions: On a piece of paper, have students list comments/questions they have about the movie
as they watch. Collect at the end of the movie.
Sample Comments/Questions:
 This scene interests me because…
 This scene differs from the scene in the book because…
 The setting reminds me of…
 If I were that character, I would…
Day 20 Plan for Teacher:
*Related handouts and lesson instructions attached behind*
Before Class:
1) Write the prompt for Journal 7 on the board.
During Class:
1) Attendance
2) Have students do Journal 7 on a piece of paper as an opening activity.
3) Using the computer, prepare to resume the movie.
4) Have students resume the Commentary activity.
5) Resume movie (*if students cannot finish it today, adjust the next class day’s schedule to make
room for it*)
 Tips: Walk around and check that students are working on their Commentary
assignment. Issue warnings/corrections as needed. Make a note of students who are
noticeably off-task/not participating. They will lose participation credit based on the
teacher’s judgment.
6) At the end of class and the movie, collect the Journal 7 and Commentary assignments.
Journal 7:
Instructions: On a sheet of paper, have students respond to the following prompt.

(Prompt: What is your opinion of the movie so far? Is it how you imagined it would be?
Why or why not?)

Commentary (cont.):
Instructions: On a piece of paper, have students list comments/questions they have about the movie
as they watch. Collect at the end of the movie.
Sample Comments/Questions:
 This scene interests me because…
 This scene differs from the scene in the book because…
 The setting reminds me of…
 If I were that character, I would…