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Reading Unit Lesson Plans

Subject: Reading Dates: October 2 – November 13

Unit Name: Global Read Aloud – A Boy Called Bat

Summary of Unit: In this unit, we read a book called A Boy Called Bat and have

discussions about each of the chapters. At the end of the unit, we did a character trait

project. Our focus was reflecting on the overall theme of empathy. This book is about a

young boy who is on the autism spectrum who experiences many challenges at school

with friends and teachers, and at home with his sister and divorced parents. One day,

Bat’s mom brings home a baby skunk, which Bat falls in love with right away and will not

let anything come in the way of taking care of the baby skunk.

Notes: During this unit, we did not read A Boy Called Bat every day, thus the reason it

took us over a month to complete. When we first began reading this book, we did read it

uninterruptedly. However, towards the middle/end of the book, we only took a few days

out of the week to read it, so we could have a chance to read other short books to focus

on learning about theme and character traits.

Reading Lesson Plan 1 – 10/2/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will go directly to the text to find the answer for the questions asked.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Write these questions in the “GO” portion of the stop light.


1. Who…?

2. What…?

3. When…?

4. Where…?

5. How…?

Have a discussion on the “GO” portion of the stop light. Explain that they will directly go

to the text to find the answers for the questions asked (refer to the picture below).

Activity:

1. Introduce the book by watching a trailer video. Next, watch a video that

the author made to talk more about the book. Since the book is about a boy with autism,

be ready to discuss what autism is because there may be questions asked (I do not

have the links to the trailer video or the author video).

2. As a pre-discussion, ask the kids these questions: In your own words, how

would you define the word friend? What makes a good friend? How do you be a good

friend? How do you react to someone who is different from you? Discuss and move on.

3. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

4. Read chapter 1 and ask them questions as you go along.

5. After you finish reading the book ask them these four questions:
a. Who are the characters that we have met? (When a student

answers, have them show you where in the text they found that answer. Do this

for all questions asked).

b. What is Bat’s real name?

c. How do you know that Bat likes vanilla yogurt?

d. When does Janie watch Bat when their mom is gone?

6. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Who do

you think is right? Bat, when he says, “You don’t have to say please to get someone to

do their job.” or Janie, when she replies, “You do if you want them to do it well.” Why do

you think what you do?

7. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

8. Walk around and help if needed.

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)
Reflection:

Today’s lesson was focused on introducing the book and giving direction on how

we are going to go through this chapter book within the next few weeks of school. While

we were having our discussion, we picked students randomly to answer the questions,

by drawing sticks with their names on it. We had not done this for a while so some of

the kids were not prepared to answer the questions. It showed Mrs. Brown and I what

students listened and those that did not. The discussion was great and went very well. I

enjoyed the book, as well as the class.

Reading Lesson Plan 2 – 10/3/18

Standards:
RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will go directly to the text to find the answer for the questions

asked.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board
 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by having a discussion on the “GO” portion of the stop light. Remind

the class that they will directly go to the text to find the answers for the questions asked.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 2 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these five questions:

a. Who wrote the sign “Please Knock” on Bat’s door?

b. What were some of the items in Bat’s room that made him feel

better?

c. When did Bat look through his animal encyclopedia?

d. Where was Bat’s favorite place?

e. How did Bat organize his drawers?

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Now that

you have spent some time with Bat, what can you tell about him? What are some

character traits that describe him? Do you have anything in common with him?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.


6. Walk around and help if needed.

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.

Reflection:

I thought today was another GREAT lesson. The students were engaged in the

book and discussion questions and worked hard on their responses. The book is getting

more intriguing which is fun for the students to have something to look forward to the

following day. I also loved the discussion question that asked if they had anything in

common with Bat. It was interesting to see what they came up with. As a whole, I was

happy with how today went.

Reading Lesson Plan 3 – 10/4/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will stop and think about what they know from the text before

answering the questions.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:


Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by having a discussion on the “STOP” portion of the stop light.

Explain that the questions are not directly from the text. They will have to stop and think

about what they know to help them answer the questions.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 3 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:

a. I wonder why Janie said, “If you had any friends to play with you

could hang out with them on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of being a pain in

my neck.”

b. What would happen if Bat’s mom was late?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Why do

you supposed Bat gets so anxious about his mom coming home late, and angry that

she didn’t bring home more vanilla yogurt? What might be going on inside him to cause

all of these strong feelings? What things cause strong feelings and upset you?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed.


Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

When I finished reading, the kids sighed and got ecstatic about the big

cliffhanger in the book. It made me so happy to see them get excited about a book. With

the reader’s response question, they struggled a little bit with understanding the

questions, so at the end of the reading period, her and I tag teamed and answered the

questions together in front of the class. Overall, the days keep getting more exciting

because the kids are excited to learn and read.

Reading Lesson Plan 4 – 10/5/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.


RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions

as the book is read.

 Students will stop and think about what they know from the text before

answering the questions.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by having a discussion on the “STOP” portion of the stop light.
Remind them that the questions are not directly from the text. They will have to stop and

think about what they know to help them answer the questions.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 4 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:

a. Why would Bat have a lot of rules when it came to Janie?

b. Why do you think Bat would want Janie to know that he knew about

the animal first?

c. I wonder why Bat’s mom switched the subject of the conversation

and asked about Janie’s math test.

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Why does

the author, Ms. Arnold, write an entire chapter without letting us know what kind of

animal Bat’s mom brought home? How does it make the book more exciting? Or does

it?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed.


Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

Today’s lesson was not much different than the others. It has been pretty

consistent with how the kids respond and answer the questions. However, I have

noticed they are giving more detail with their answers in their journals, which is showing

a growth mindset. It has been going well!

Reading Lesson Plan 5 – 10/8/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.


RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will slow down and look in more than one place in the text to help

them find the answer.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by having a discussion on the “SLOW DOWN” portion of the stop
light. Let them know that when answering questions, they will need to slow down and

look in more than one place in the text to help them find the answer.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 5 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these three questions:

a. How are Bat and Janie different?

b. What caused their mom to bring the baby skunk home?

c. What are some examples of Bat being misunderstood?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Bat thinks it

is not worth it to explain his thinking to his sister because she will not understand him.

He thinks most people misunderstand him. Why does this seem to be the case?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed.

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.
(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

The kids seemed very intrigued with today’s chapter. It finally revealed the

animal that Bat’s mom brought home, which the students were “dying” to figure out! We

had a good conversation afterwards which I was happy about as well.

Reading Lesson Plan 6 – 10/9/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.


 Students will slow down and look in more than one place in the text to help

them find the answer.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by having a discussion on the “SLOW DOWN” portion of the stop

light. Remind them that when answering questions, they will need to slow down and

look in more than one place in the text to help them find the answer.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 6 and ask them questions as you go along.


a. Point out the word crooning and ask them what they think it means.

Explain.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:

a. How are Bat and his mom similar?

b. What are some examples of Bat being a good caregiver for the

skunk (kit)?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Bat says he

loves the skunk kit, but he’s only just met it. Is this possible? Could he really love it

already? It’s a SKUNK! Why does he blurt this out?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed.

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,
recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

Today was another good lesson. The kids did well with going back into the text

to find the answers to the questions I asked. This was not very different than our other

lessons – it went well.

Reading Lesson Plan 7 – 10/10/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will STOP and think about what they know to help them answer

questions.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.
Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by explaining that they will guess which type of question we will be

referring to today. Let them know that they should be listening to the key words in the

questions asked to help them figure out if we are asking STOP, SLOW DOWN, or GO

questions.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 7 and ask them questions as you go along.

a. Ask them what “deep as space” means.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:
a. What if Laurence took the skunk kit home in the evenings? How

could that effect Bat?

b. I wonder why Bat makes his mom reset the trip meter in the car?

c. Why would the author go into such great detail about Bat and his

mom going to school and being dropped off?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Bat explains

that every-other-Fridays make him uncomfortable because they break a pattern. But if

it’s every-other Friday, isn’t that a pattern? Doesn’t Bat love his dad and want to see

him? What things make you uncomfortable, anxious, or nervous and why?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,
recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

During our discussion today, there were several kids who were not listening

when I pulled their stick. It makes me a little frustrated because after 10 minutes of

reading, they should still be engaged in the lesson, especially if I am randomly picking

sticks. When I was younger, if I knew I had the chance of getting called on, I always

listened. I just do not think they care as much as the other students in the class. They

are good kids, however, some of their attention spans are not where they should be in

3rd grade. I think pulling sticks is a great tool to use during a read aloud. It was another

good lesson.

Reading Lesson Plan 8 – 10/11/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:
 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will GO directly to the text to find the answer.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 Chart Paper w/ Stop Light

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the chart paper with the stop light up at the front of the classroom so the

kids can see. Begin by explaining that they will guess which type of question we will be

referring to today. Let them know that they should be listening to the key words in the

questions asked to help them figure out if we are asking STOP, SLOW DOWN, or GO

questions.

Activity:
1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 8 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these four questions:

a. How did Bat get a weird feeling in his stomach when talking with

the boys throwing the ball?

b. Who got upset at Bat?

c. What are eyelets?

d. Where in this chapter does Bat feel uncomfortable?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: What

happened with Lucca, Israel, and Bat? Why did Lucca rush off to the bathroom crying?

What doesn’t Bat understand?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.
(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

The students did a good job of answering my discussion questions today. The

question that I asked about Bat being uncomfortable took them awhile to think of

several answers, but after hinting at a few details in the story, they answered it correctly.

Overall, they did a good job.

Reading Lesson Plan 9 – 10/15/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:
 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the students look at the title of the book and guess what this chapter will be

about. Discuss and then move on to reading.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 9 and ask them questions as you go along.

a. What does reluctantly mean?

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these three questions:
a. How would you rephrase the meaning of “unspoken rules?”

b. How would you interpret Bat’s love for Baby Cakes?

c. Give me some examples of why Mr. Grayson was the best teacher.

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: What do

you know about Bat that could explain why he visits Baby Cakes more than anyone else

in his class?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)
Reflection:

The students were very squirrely today but were engaged with the chapter. They

laughed at the picture of Baby Cakes and wanted to keep reading, which was a great

sign of them liking the book. They did a good job of talking about the book and

responding to the questions. However, they have not shown much depth in their

answers. They hit the surface, but not much deeper than that.

Reading Lesson Plan 10 – 10/16/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:
 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the students look at the title of the book and guess what this chapter will be

about. Discuss and then move on to reading.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 10 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these three questions:

a. Can you recall two things Bat did not like in this chapter?

b. What facts or ideas show that Bat is a very detailed person?

c. Can you predict how Bat’s weekend is going to go after his long

day?
 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: What is

happening as Bat works with his group on the volcano project that is making it difficult

for everyone? Do you ever have difficulties when working with a group? How do you

work past them? Can you offer Bat and his group some advice?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:
Today, it felt like the students were more engaged with the reading. I made

everyone sit on the carpet, not at tables, which made it seem like they were paying

more attention. The students did well with answering each question and mentioned one

idea that I had not thought of. I was happy to hear their answer, especially coming from

the student that it did.

Reading Lesson Plan 11 – 10/17/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as

the book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils
 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have the students look at the title of the book and guess what this chapter will be

about. Discuss and then move on to reading.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 11 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:

a. What ideas justify that Bat notices a lot about people?

b. Do you notice anything different with Bat’s senses?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing sticks

with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: At the end

of the chapter, Bat predicts it is going to be a long weekend. Why is he so pessimistic

and unenthusiastic?
5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

The discussion questions we had today made the students think a little more

because of the words used in the questions. None of them understood what “justify”

meant. I had to explain the question in a different way to help them understand better.

Also, we had a few minutes of discussion with the question about the senses. Overall, it

was a challenging discussion for the students.

Reading Lesson Plan 12 – 10/18/18

Standards:
RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer
Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Talk about the chapter from yesterday to remind them of what happened in the

story. Move on to reading the chapter.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 12 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these three questions:

a. Turn to a neighbor and share your thinking about Mr. Grayson.

b. Why is the title of this chapter appropriate?

c. Let’s read the last sentence of the last paragraph together… talk to me

about this.

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing

sticks with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: What

conclusions have you drawn about Mr. Grayson? How would you

describe him? Compare him to your teacher. How are they the same?

What is different about them?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to

them that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.


6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending

on how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

Today’s discussion was great. We talked a lot about Mr. Grayson and what we

thought about him. The turn and talk to your neighbor was a great decision for the

beginning of the discussion. It was a little different from what we have been doing so it

was a nice change up.

Reading Lesson Plan 13 – 10/22/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:


Talk about the chapter from yesterday to remind them of what happened in the

story. Move on to reading the chapter.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 13 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these three questions:

a. Will you interpret in your own words what this statement means? “If

the T-shirts still have my scent, then maybe the kit will bond with

me.”

b. How would you describe Bat and Janie’s relationship?

c. Why did Janie want to name the kit “Thor?”

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing

sticks with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Describe

the relationship that Bat has with his sister, Janie and how he feels about

her. How does she feel about Bat? What clues from the book led you to

draw these conclusions?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).


Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

We had a good discussion today because I connected some personal stories to

the book which seemed to interest the kids. They remembered what happened in the

last chapter which I was impressed by because we had a longer weekend than usual.

However, I did get frustrated because I had to keep reminding several students to stop

talking and pay attention. Next time, I need to come up with a better classroom

management tool. I gave them around 3-4 warnings, so next time I will need to find a

different way to discipline them. Overall, it was a good discussion today!

Reading Lesson Plan 14 – 10/23/18

Standards:
RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer
Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Talk about the chapter from yesterday to remind them of what happened in the

story. Move on to reading the chapter.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 14 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you finish reading the book ask them these two questions:

a. Do you agree with Bat’s mom not letting him sleep with Thor?

b. In the last paragraph Mom says, “You drive a hard bargain.” What

does that mean?

 Have multiple students answer each question by drawing

sticks with their names on it.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Bat is

trying his best to get his way, but his mom is the boss and gets to make

decisions. What strategies did Bat use to try to get his way? What

strategies do you use at home to try to get your way?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).


Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

Today’s discussion was shorter than the ones we have had in the past. I was

pleased with how they answered the second question. I wasn’t sure if they understood

what “driving a hard bargain” meant, but many of them gave wonderful answers. There

were a few students who were not listening to me, which made me feel frustrated. It has

been the same students acting up, so I need to talk with Mrs. Brown and figure out how

to handle them. Other than that, the discussion went well.

Reading Lesson Plan 15 – 10/24/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.


RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called BatT by Elana K. Arnold

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Talk about the chapter from yesterday to remind them of what happened in the

story. Move on to reading the chapter.

Activity:
1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 15 and 16 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you are finished reading, explain that we will answer the canvas

question together. Up on the white board, write down some thoughts as

bullet points. Have a whole class discussion and then have them answer

in full sentences on Canvas.

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: Bat sneaks

out of bed when he should be sleeping to read about skunks. What

naughty things do you do that you really shouldn’t? Bat is confused by

Israel when he doesn’t leave. If you were there with him, what would you

tell him or explain to him?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,
recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

Before I taught my lesson, Mrs. Brown read a book about kids who have Autism.

We decided we wanted the kids to understand Autism on a deeper level and have a

connection to our global read aloud, A Boy Called Bat. It was a perfect transition into

our read aloud time. I read two chapters today and the kids loved reading more than just

one short chapter. They gave some funny examples for the “being naughty” question

and other good ideas for their canvas question. I enjoyed switching the lesson up and

doing something a little bit different.

Reading Lesson Plan 16 – 10/30/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:
 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

 Airplay w/ Smart Board

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Talk about the last chapter to remind them of what happened in the story. Move

on to reading the chapter.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapter 17 and 18 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you are finished reading, have a discussion with these three questions.

a. What caused Jeff to get loose and Laurence to fall down?


b. What are some examples of Bat and Janie not getting along?

c. What connections can you make with Bat and your own life?

4. For their readers responses, have them answer this question: 1) Bat is

normally bothered by too many sounds and doesn’t like people rumpling his

hair, but at his mom’s vet office the noises and flickering light don’t bother

him, nor does Laurence rumpling his hair. Why is he so much more relaxed

and tolerant at the vet than anywhere else? 2) This chapter is all about Bat

not understanding the effect his words have on Janie. If you were him, what

would you say to Bat to help him understand? Is there anything you would

say to Janie?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them

that they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)
Reflection:

When I was reading today, I got a really bad scratch in my throat and I could

barely talk. Mrs. Brown had to take over the rest of the reading and then I came back for

the discussion questions. It was not the best discussion today but it still went well. I do

not think the students were 100% focused on what we were talking about. They love the

book, however, discussing it at the end is not their favorite.

Reading Lesson Plan 17 – 11/1/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold


 Airplay w/ Smart Board

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Talk about the last chapter to remind them of what happened in the story. Move

on to reading the chapter.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapters 19-21 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you are finished reading, have a discussion with questions regarding

theme. Talk about the theme of each chapter that you read today. Then bring up

the word “empathy” and talk about the theme of the entire book, empathy for

others (Bat).

4. For their readers responses, have them answer these questions: 1) Janie didn’t

like Bat’s thank you surprise at all. What do you think of his surprise? If you had

been able to help Bat with the surprise what would you have suggested? 2) Bat

is so focused on Thor that he can’t concentrate on his math. Have you ever had
a time when it was hard for you to concentrate in school because your focus was

on something else? If so, explain. 3) Janie explains to their dad that Bat doesn’t

have any friends. Is this true? If so, why? If not, who are his friends?

5. Have them get their reading response journals and communicate to them that

they need to answer the statement/question in detail.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on how

much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

When finished, have them put their journals at their desks with it open to their

response. Walk around and check their work. Next, have them make a reading choice.

(The students can decide when they do their reading responses. Set the time for an

hour and give them their reading workshop choices. As long as they have their

responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start with another choice. However,

recommend that they start with the response, so they do not have to worry about not

getting it done.)

Reflection:

My throat got another scratch in it to where I could barely talk, so Mrs. Brown

finished the reading and the discussion. I did begin the reading however, and had some

trouble with a certain student. He was being disrespectful and not listening to me, which

I had a hard time with. However, it got worked out. Mrs. Brown brought up the theme of

each chapter and the theme of the book as a whole. It was a wonderful and long

reading lesson.
Reading Lesson Plan 18 – 11/7/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

 Airplay w/ Smart Board

 App “Explain Everything”

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 iPads
 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Begin by talking about character traits and refreshing the students on what that

means. Tell the class they should be thinking of Bat’s character traits as we read the

two chapters.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapters 22 and 23 and ask them questions as you go along.

3. After you are finished reading, explain that they have two options today for

a reader’s response. They can either answer the questions on canvas or

create an explain everything that shows Bat’s character traits.

4. If they choose to do the canvas questions, have them answer these

questions: 1) Bat finally has a nice time with his sister. What is different

about how they interact in this chapter? Can you find examples to support

your ideas? 2) Bat and his mom have a long conversation about eyes. But

what does his mom mean when she says, “You can tell a lot about a

person by looking into their eyes.” What have you learned by looking into

someone’s eyes?

5. Have them get started.


6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

Have them make a reading choice. (The students can decide when they do their

reading responses. Set the time for an hour and give them their reading workshop

choices. As long as they have their responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start

with another choice. However, recommend that they start with the response, so they do

not have to worry about not getting it done.)

Reflection:

Today’s lesson was another great lesson. I thought the kids did a good job at

staying engaged during the reading and understanding what was happening in the

story. Not everyone completed the reader’s response which confused Mrs. Brown and I.

Those that did the responses did a lovely job at listing Bat’s traits. No one answered the

canvas question, and instead chose to do the explain everything. Overall, I enjoyed

today and how reading went.

Reading Lesson Plan 19 – 11/9/18

Standards:

RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring

explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.


RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Objectives:

 Students will listen to the story and participate in answering questions as the

book is read.

 Students will write in their reading response journals about the story.

Materials:

 Book – A Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

 Airplay w/ Smart Board

 Reading Response Journals

 Pencils

 iPads

 Smart Board

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Begin by talking about the past chapters and what happened in them.

Activity:

1. Have the book up on the screen for the kids to see as you read.

2. Read chapters 24, 25 and 26 and ask them questions as you go along.
3. After you are finished reading, discuss the book and what they loved

about it and if anything surprised them at the end.

4. For their canvas questions, have them answer these questions: 1) Israel

keeps talking to Bat and asks if he can go to Bat’s house. Is Mr. Grayson

right? Does Israel want to be Bat’s friend? How can you tell? 2) Bat’s

mom says that instead of passing Thor on to the animal rescue people

the next week that Bat might be able to raise him until it is time for him to

be released. Do you think this is a good idea? Why or why not? 3) It

says, “Israel’s hands told Bat that Thor would be safe.” How could he

know this from looking at Israel’s hands?

5. Have them get started.

6. Walk around and help if needed. Set the timer for an hour (depending on

how much reading time you have).

Conclusion/Assessment:

Have them make a reading choice. (The students can decide when they do their

reading responses. Set the time for an hour and give them their reading workshop

choices. As long as they have their responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start

with another choice. However, recommend that they start with the response, so they do

not have to worry about not getting it done.)

Reflection:
Today’s lesson was bittersweet because it was the end of our global read aloud.

The kids were so sad to finish it, but it was time to move on since it has taken a little

over a month. I absolutely loved this book and what it taught the kids and I. Overall, it

was an amazing book and will be one that I keep in mind for the future.

Reading Lesson Plan 20 – 11/12/18

Standards:

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

Objectives:

 Students will draw/color an illustration of Bat and write two character traits about

him.

 Students will explain why Bat is “_______” (whatever inside character trait they

chose).

Materials:

 Index Cards (2 for each student)

 White Paper

 Colored Pencils/Markers/Crayons

 Pencils

 iPads
 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Begin by telling the class that we will be doing a project since we finished reading

“A Boy Called Bat.” Explain that it needs to be their best work and it will take a couple

days to finish.

Activity:

1. Explain that they will be drawing Bat on white paper (whole body or

face).

2. Once they have Bat drawn, they will get two index cards.

a. If they need help to draw Bat, they can google a picture of him to

look off of.

3. On those index cards they will write one inside character trait on each

one. Underneath the trait, they will give a specific example from the

book of why Bat is that trait. We just need to see proof of that character

trait.

4. After they give their best hand writing and best effort on their picture

and index cards, they write their names on the back of each paper and

turn it into you.

Conclusion/Assessment:

Then, have them make a reading choice. (The students can decide when they do

their reading responses. Set the time for an hour and give them their reading workshop
choices. As long as they have their responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start

with another choice. However, recommend that they start with the response, so they do

not have to worry about not getting it done.)

Reflection:

Mrs. Brown and I were extremely impressed with how hard they were working on

this project. It was a great switch up! The classroom was so quiet from them working

hard and staying focused. They drew some amazing illustrations and came up with

creative character traits. We are continuing our project tomorrow which will be

enjoyable.

Reading Lesson Plan 21 – 11/13/18

Standards:

RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

Objectives:

 Students will write opinion pieces about empathy.

 Students will draw a picture about their opinion writing.

 Students will piece their entire project together to finish.

Materials:

 Writing Paper with Box (at the top)


 Colored Pencils/Markers/Crayons

 Pencils

 Glue

 Big Construction Paper

 White Board

 Dry Erase Marker

 iPads

 Timer

Prior Content Knowledge/Pre-Assessment:

Have everyone come to the carpet. Begin by telling the class that we will be

finishing our character trait project today. Explain to them they will be doing an opinion

writing piece to tie the project together.

Activity:

1. On the white board, write this question - “How would you apply what

you learned about the theme of empathy in your life?”

2. Explain that you want them to find a specific example of Bat being

shown empathy or being empathetic towards someone. Once they

write an example from the book, have them relate it to their own lives.

When they are finished writing, they can draw a picture in the box at

the top of the paper to describe their writing.


3. Ask if there are any questions and hand out the writing paper.

4. Check each writing piece to make sure it is their best work.

5. When they are completely done, have them glue their writing, two

index cards from yesterday and their picture from yesterday all on one

big piece of construction paper.

6. Hang it up outside in the hallway to show off their work. 😊

Conclusion/Assessment:

Then, have them make a reading choice. (The students can decide when they do

their reading responses. Set the time for an hour and give them their reading workshop

choices. As long as they have their responses done by the time is up, it is okay to start

with another choice. However, recommend that they start with the response, so they do

not have to worry about not getting it done.)

Reflection:

Mrs. Brown and I were extremely proud of how these projects turned out. The

class did such a fantastic job with their illustrations and opinion writing. They took their

time on each portion of the project and were very engaged in what they were doing. We

hung up their projects on the wall outside our room and got several comments on their

work. This is a project I would do every year. It was a wonderful project to close out “A

Boy Called Bat.”