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MA-59812-100 Revision 1.

1
V10 January 2013

Kidde Fire Protection High Pressure

Carbon Dioxide Fire Suppression

System

PRODUCT MANUAL

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FOREWARD

This Kidde Fire Protection High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Product Manual (MA-59812-100) is to
be used by qualified and trained personnel, with knowledge of the applicable standard as
dictated by the authority having jurisdiction, such as BS 5306 or NFPA 12 together with any other
applicable standards in effect.
This manual is intended to clearly and accurately reflect the Kidde Fire Protection High Pressure
Carbon Dioxide Fire Suppression System. This publication describes the design, operation,
installation and maintenance of the High Pressure Carbon Dioxide (CO2) System.
Kidde Fire Protection assumes no responsibility for the application of any systems other than
those addressed in this manual. The technical data contained herein is limited strictly for
informational purposes only. Kidde Fire Protection believes this data to be accurate, but it is
published and presented without any guarantee or warranty whatsoever. Kidde Fire Protection
disclaims any liability for any use that may be made of the data and information contained herein
by any and all other parties.
Any questions concerning the information presented in this manual should be addressed to:

Kidde Fire Protection


Thame Park Road
Thame
Oxfordshire OX9 3RT
Tel: +44 (0) 1844 265003

SAFETY SUMMARY

Kidde Engineered Systems use pressurised equipment; therefore personnel responsible for fire
suppression systems must be aware of the risks associated with the improper handling,
installation or maintenance of this equipment. Fire suppression system service personnel shall
be thoroughly trained in the proper handling, installation and service of Kidde Fire Protection
High Pressure CO2 Fire Suppression System equipment and follow the instructions used in this
manual.

Kidde Fire Protection has provided warnings and cautions at appropriate locations throughout the
text of this manual. These warnings and cautions are to be adhered to at all times. Failure to do
so may result in serious injury or fatality to personnel.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. REVISION CONTROL LOG ........................................................................... 10


2. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................ 11
3. SPECIFICATION FOR KIDDE CO2 FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM ............ 12
3.1 General Description ............................................................................................................... 12
3.2 Plans and Specifications ........................................................................................................ 12
3.3 Standards, Approvals and Quality Assurance ....................................................................... 12
3.4 Proposals and Submittals ...................................................................................................... 12
3.5 General Requirements ........................................................................................................... 13
3.6 System Components.............................................................................................................. 14
3.7 System Design ....................................................................................................................... 15
3.8 Equipment Manufacturer........................................................................................................ 16
4. GENERAL ...................................................................................................... 17
4.1 Characteristics of Carbon Dioxide ......................................................................................... 17
4.2 Hazards to Personnel ............................................................................................................ 17
5. SYSTEM COMPONENTS .............................................................................. 18
5.1 CO2 Cylinders ........................................................................................................................ 18
5.2 Klem Cylinder Valve (K24509) ............................................................................................... 19
5.3 Cylinder Valve Pressure/Lever Actuator (K62341) ................................................................ 20
5.4 Racking .................................................................................................................................. 21
5.4.1 Single Cylinder Strap...................................................................................................... 21
5.4.2 Single Row Cylinders ..................................................................................................... 22
5.4.3 Double Row Cylinders .................................................................................................... 23
5.5 CO2 Manifold Options ............................................................................................................ 24
5.5.1 Single Row Manifold Bracket ......................................................................................... 25
5.5.2 Double Row Manifold Bracket ........................................................................................ 25
5.6 Flexible Discharge Hose (K97112) ........................................................................................ 26
5.7 Control Head Actuating Devices ............................................................................................ 27
5.8 System Actuator Assembly .................................................................................................... 28
5.9 Nitrogen Pilot Gas Cylinder and Valve .................................................................................. 29
5.9.1 Optional Pressure Monitoring Switch ............................................................................. 30
5.10 Control Head and Accessories .............................................................................................. 31
5.10.1 Control Head (K62303) .................................................................................................. 31
5.10.2 Control Head with Switches (K62304) ........................................................................... 32
5.10.3 Safety and Reset Pin (K62401) ...................................................................................... 33
5.10.4 Manual Push-to-Fire Button (K62412) ........................................................................... 33
5.11 Control Head Mounting Bracket (K62487) ............................................................................. 35

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5.12 Control Head Mounting Bracket (K62932) ............................................................................. 36


5.13 Solenoid Actuators ................................................................................................................. 37
5.13.1 Standard 24v DC Solenoid (K62422B) .......................................................................... 37
5.13.2 Flameproof ATEX 24v DC Solenoid (K93206/AX) ......................................................... 37
5.14 Pull Box (K1114) .................................................................................................................... 38
5.15 Corner Pulley (K1122) ........................................................................................................... 39
5.15.1 Cable Release Assembly (K62478) ............................................................................... 39
5.16 Pilot Gas Flexible Hoses (K93433 and K93434) ................................................................... 40
5.16.1 Pilot Gas Vent (K24051)................................................................................................. 40
5.17 Pilot Gas Rigid Tubing and Fittings ....................................................................................... 41
5.18 Typical 2 Cylinder Configuration with Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder Actuation ............................... 42
5.19 Assembled Time Delay Kit (E6000-001/002)......................................................................... 42
5.20 CO2 Operated Pressure Switch (K60218) ............................................................................. 45
5.21 CO2 Operated Pressure Trip (K17554) .................................................................................. 47
5.22 Pressure Operated Direction Valves ..................................................................................... 48
5.22.1 ¾” to 2” Pod Valves ........................................................................................................ 48
5.22.2 3” & 4” Pod Valves ......................................................................................................... 49
5.22.3 3” & 4” Companion Flange, Bolts and Gasket ............................................................... 50
5.22.4 Pressure Operation for POD valves ¾” to 4” ................................................................. 50
5.22.5 Manual Operation ........................................................................................................... 50
5.22.6 Valve Open Indicator Switch .......................................................................................... 51
5.23 Safety Relief Device (K921) ................................................................................................... 51
5.24 Lock Out Valves with Limit Switches (10611106_112) .......................................................... 52
5.25 CO2 Discharge Nozzles ......................................................................................................... 56
5.25.1 Multi-jet Nozzles ............................................................................................................. 56
5.25.2 Flanged Multi-jet Nozzle (K5814 N4-N8) ....................................................................... 57
5.25.3 Duct Nozzle (K13045 N3-N4) ......................................................................................... 57
5.26 CO2 Operated Siren (981574) ............................................................................................... 58
5.27 Odouriser Assembly (K4135) ................................................................................................. 59
5.28 CO2 Warning Labels .............................................................................................................. 60
5.28.1 Entrance Door Warning Label (K93681) ........................................................................ 60
5.28.2 Manual Control Point Label (K9368) .............................................................................. 61
5.29 Weight Monitoring Device (E8731-402) ................................................................................. 62
5.29.1 Operation ........................................................................................................................ 62
5.30 Beam Scale (K62685) ............................................................................................................ 64
5.31 Direct Acting Solenoid (E7772-004-02) ................................................................................. 65
5.31.1 Direct Acting Solenoids – Maximum 6 x 45kg CO2 Cylinders ........................................ 66
6. SYSTEM DESIGN .......................................................................................... 67
6.1 Total Flooding Systems ......................................................................................................... 67

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6.1.1 Examples of Hazards ..................................................................................................... 67


6.1.2 Type of Fires .................................................................................................................. 67
6.1.3 Where CO2 is NOT Effective .......................................................................................... 67
6.2 CO2 Requirements for Surface Fires ..................................................................................... 68
6.2.1 Basic Quantity ................................................................................................................ 68
6.2.2 Uncloseable Openings ................................................................................................... 68
6.2.3 Limits of Uncloseable Openings ..................................................................................... 69
6.2.4 Compensation ................................................................................................................ 69
6.2.5 Material Conversion Factor (MCF) ................................................................................. 69
6.2.6 Temperature Correction ................................................................................................. 71
6.2.7 Forced Ventilation .......................................................................................................... 71
6.2.8 Interconnected Volumes................................................................................................. 72
6.2.9 Venting for Surface Fire Systems .................................................................................. 72
6.3 CO2 Requirements for Deep Seated Fires ............................................................................ 72
6.3.1 Basic Quantity ................................................................................................................ 72
6.3.2 Openings ........................................................................................................................ 73
6.3.3 Forced Ventilation .......................................................................................................... 73
6.3.4 Interconnected Volumes................................................................................................. 73
6.3.5 Extended Discharge ....................................................................................................... 74
6.3.6 Venting for Deep Seated Fire Systems .......................................................................... 75
6.4 Discharge Rates for Total Flooding Systems ........................................................................ 77
6.4.1 Surface Fires .................................................................................................................. 77
6.4.2 Deep Seated Fires ......................................................................................................... 77
6.5 Nozzle Distribution ................................................................................................................. 78
6.6 Local Application Systems ..................................................................................................... 78
6.6.1 Examples of Hazards ..................................................................................................... 78
6.6.2 General ........................................................................................................................... 78
6.6.3 CO2 Quantities................................................................................................................ 79
6.6.4 Duration of Discharge..................................................................................................... 79
6.6.5 Material Conversion Factor ............................................................................................ 79
6.7 Rate by Area Method ............................................................................................................. 80
6.7.1 CO2 Quantity.................................................................................................................. 80
6.7.2 Horn Dispositions ........................................................................................................... 81
6.8 Rate by Volume Method ........................................................................................................ 84
6.8.1 Assumed Enclosure ....................................................................................................... 84
6.8.2 CO2 Quantity .................................................................................................................. 84
6.8.3 Horn Dispositions ........................................................................................................... 85
6.9 Pipe Selection ........................................................................................................................ 86
6.9.1 Rate of Application ......................................................................................................... 86
6.9.2 Pipe Size Estimates ....................................................................................................... 86

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6.9.3 Nozzle Sizes ................................................................................................................... 87


6.10 CO2 Storage Container Location ............................................................................................ 87
6.11 Distribution Valves ................................................................................................................. 88
6.12 Automatic Operation .............................................................................................................. 88
6.13 Manual Control ....................................................................................................................... 89
6.13.1 Manual Release ............................................................................................................. 89
6.14 Alarms .................................................................................................................................... 89
6.15 Electrostatic Discharge .......................................................................................................... 90
6.16 Detection ................................................................................................................................ 90
6.17 Safety Requirements ............................................................................................................. 90
6.17.1 Total Flooding Systems .................................................................................................. 91
6.17.2 Local Application Systems ............................................................................................. 91
6.18 FM Approved Systems........................................................................................................... 91
7. HYDRAULIC FLOW CALCULATION PROGRAM ......................................... 92
7.1 Hydraulic Flow Calculation Program (KFP CO2 – version 2.0.9 January 2010) .................... 92
7.1.1 Commands Available ..................................................................................................... 92
7.1.2 System Information ........................................................................................................ 93
7.1.3 Project Data .................................................................................................................... 94
7.1.4 Revision .......................................................................................................................... 94
7.1.5 Cylinder Data .................................................................................................................. 94
7.1.6 Configuration Variables .................................................................................................. 95
7.1.7 Hazard Information ......................................................................................................... 95
7.1.8 Hazard Data ................................................................................................................... 96
7.1.9 Extended Discharge ....................................................................................................... 97
7.1.10 Area .............................................................................................................................. 100
7.1.11 Area Nozzle List ........................................................................................................... 100
7.2 Piping Model Data ................................................................................................................ 100
7.2.1 System Design Considerations for Sectioning of Pipe ................................................. 101
7.2.2 Column Headings and Descriptions ............................................................................. 102
7.3 Calculate and Display Results ............................................................................................. 107
7.3.1 Calc Results ................................................................................................................. 108
7.3.2 Nozzle BOM ................................................................................................................. 109
7.3.3 Nozzle Summary .......................................................................................................... 110
7.3.4 Discharge Information .................................................................................................. 110
7.4 Output/Print Data and Results ............................................................................................. 111
7.4.1 Items to Print ................................................................................................................ 111
7.4.2 Output Units ................................................................................................................. 111
7.4.3 Configure Printer .......................................................................................................... 112
7.4.4 Print .............................................................................................................................. 112

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8. FLOW CALCULATION SOFTWARE ........................................................... 113


8.1 Equivalent Length ................................................................................................................ 113
8.2 CO2 Calculation Example .................................................................................................... 113
8.3 Software Hot Keys Reference List ....................................................................................... 117
9. INSTALLATION ........................................................................................... 118
9.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................ 118
9.2 Personnel Safety.................................................................................................................. 118
9.2.1 UTC Fire & Security Cardinal Rules and General Rules ............................................. 118
9.3 Safety Precautions: Hazards to Personnel .......................................................................... 120
9.4 Handling and Storage of CO2 Cylinders .............................................................................. 120
9.5 Re-Entry into a Flooded Area .............................................................................................. 121
9.6 Dismantling and Modifications ............................................................................................. 121
9.7 Preliminary Checks .............................................................................................................. 121
9.8 CO2 Cylinders ...................................................................................................................... 122
9.8.1 Klem Cylinder Valve K24509........................................................................................ 122
9.8.2 Single Cylinder Installation ........................................................................................... 122
9.8.3 Single Row Cylinder Installation ................................................................................... 123
9.8.4 Double Row Cylinder Installation ................................................................................. 124
9.9 CO2 Manifold Pipe................................................................................................................ 125
9.10 Distribution Piping ................................................................................................................ 126
9.10.1 Piping............................................................................................................................ 126
9.11 Flushing of Pipe Work .......................................................................................................... 130
9.12 Pressure Testing of Pipe Work ............................................................................................ 130
9.12.1 Pressure Testing Using Water ..................................................................................... 130
9.12.2 Pressure Testing Using Gas ........................................................................................ 131
9.12.3 Precautions .................................................................................................................. 131
9.14 Electrical Clearances ........................................................................................................... 133
9.15 Installation of Pipework ........................................................................................................ 133
9.16 Pressure Operated Direction Valves ................................................................................... 134
9.16.1 Installation of Pressure Operated Directional Valves (POD Valves) ........................... 134
9.16.2 Installation of Flexible Discharge Hose ........................................................................ 135
9.17 Control Head Actuating Devices .......................................................................................... 136
9.18 System Actuator Assembly .................................................................................................. 136
9.19 Safety and Reset Pin ........................................................................................................... 136
9.19.1 Installation of Control Head Actuating Devices ............................................................ 137
9.19.2 Manual Push-To-Fire Button ........................................................................................ 138
9.19.3 Solenoid Installation ..................................................................................................... 138
9.19.4 Installation of Standard Solenoid (K62422B) ............................................................... 138
9.19.5 Installation of Flameproof Solenoid (K93206/AX) ........................................................ 139

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9.19.6 Operation Check .......................................................................................................... 139


9.19.7 Control Head and Solenoid Wiring ............................................................................... 140
9.19.8 Special Instructions to comply with 94/9/EC (ATEX) ................................................... 141
9.20 Cable Release Assembly ..................................................................................................... 142
9.20.1 Installation of Cable Release Assembly ....................................................................... 142
9.21 Pull Box (K1114) .................................................................................................................. 144
9.21.1 Installation of Emergency Pull Box ............................................................................... 144
9.22 Cylinder Valve Pressure/Lever Actuator (K62341) .............................................................. 145
9.22.1 Installation of Cylinder Valve Actuator ......................................................................... 145
9.23 Pilot Gas Rigid Tubing and Fittings ..................................................................................... 145
9.23.1 Assembly ...................................................................................................................... 145
9.23.2 Hose Installation ........................................................................................................... 146
9.24 Pneumatic Time Delay Unit ................................................................................................. 148
9.24.1 Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder Installation ............................................................................... 148
9.24.2 Installation of Pressure Operated Control Head .......................................................... 149
9.24.3 Time Delay ................................................................................................................... 149
9.24.4 Lever Operated Control Head ...................................................................................... 150
9.25 Lockout Valves ..................................................................................................................... 150
9.25.1 Stem Seal Adjustment .................................................................................................. 150
9.26 Wiring Diagram .................................................................................................................... 151
9.27 CO2 Operated Pressure Switch (K60218) Installation ........................................................ 152
9.28 CO2 Operated Pressure Trip (K17554) Installation ............................................................. 153
9.29 Weight Monitoring Device .................................................................................................... 154
9.29.1 Special Instructions for Compliance with 94/9/EC ....................................................... 158
9.30 CO2 Discharge Nozzles ....................................................................................................... 159
9.30.1 Multi-Jet Nozzle (K61792 & K61793) ........................................................................... 159
9.30.2 Flanged Multi-Jet Nozzle (K5814) ................................................................................ 160
9.30.3 Flanged Nozzle Duct Adaptors K61420A-D ................................................................. 160
9.30.4 Duct Nozzle (K13045) .................................................................................................. 161
9.31 Pneumatic Capillary Tube, Conduit and Fittings ................................................................. 162
9.32 CO2 Operated Siren (981574) ............................................................................................. 163
9.33 Odouriser Assembly (K4135) ............................................................................................... 163
9.34 CO2 Warning Labels ............................................................................................................ 164
10. COMMISSIONING ........................................................................................ 165
10.1 Visual Checks ...................................................................................................................... 165
10.2 Mechanical Function ............................................................................................................ 166
10.2.1 General ......................................................................................................................... 166
10.2.2 Manual Push-to Fire ..................................................................................................... 166
10.2.3 Pull Box ........................................................................................................................ 166

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10.2.4 Pressure/Lever Actuator and POD Valves ................................................................... 166


10.2.5 Pressure Trip ................................................................................................................ 167
10.2.6 Pressure Switch ........................................................................................................... 168
11. MAINTENANCE ........................................................................................... 169
11.1 Preliminary Checks .............................................................................................................. 169
11.2 Component Function Tests .................................................................................................. 170
11.2.1 General ......................................................................................................................... 170
11.2.2 Control Head ................................................................................................................ 170
11.2.3 Pressure/Manual Release Heads and POD Valves ..................................................... 171
11.2.4 Pressure Trip ................................................................................................................ 172
11.2.5 Pressure Switch ........................................................................................................... 173
11.3 Instructions for Commissioning the System after its Operation ........................................... 173
11.4 Every Six Months ................................................................................................................. 173
11.5 Every Twelve Months........................................................................................................... 173
11.6 Weight Monitoring Device – Testing Procedure .................................................................. 173
11.7 Beam Scale – Testing .......................................................................................................... 175
12. APPENDICES .............................................................................................. 176
12.1 CO2 Components – FM Approved list. ................................................................................. 176

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1. REVISION CONTROL LOG


Revision
Page Description Date Approved
Number

1.0 All Comprehensive Re-write of Version 6 24.10.12 R. J. Lade

Part number change for the cylinder and valve


1.1 23.01.13 C. Jones
assemblies – 22.6kg and 6.8kg cylinder sizes

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2. INTRODUCTION
This manual describes the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance to be used on all
Kidde Fire Protection (KFP) High Pressure Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Systems.

General requirements and design criteria are based on British Standard (BS) 5306 part 4, but on
some occasions National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 12 may be used as the base document.
Detailed information on components is given in the individual CO2 Engineering Data Sheets.

The importance of proper design cannot be over stressed as design concentrations and application
rates are critical for successful extinguishing. The recommendations given in this document represent
the best known technical data, but while the aim has been to anticipate all considerations, the
recommendations should be applied in practical situations with discretion and due regard to local
circumstances.

Full requirements for the design of CO2 fire fighting systems are given in BS5306 part 4.

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3. SPECIFICATION FOR KIDDE CO2 FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM

3.1 General Description


This specification defines the requirements for a Kidde Fire Protection CO2 Fire Suppression System.
It shall be used as a standard for equipment, installation and acceptance testing.

3.2 Plans and Specifications


To ensure system effectiveness, the contractor shall design, install and test the equipment in
accordance with NFPA 12 or BS 5306 part 4.
In addition to this specification, drawings shall be provided showing the general arrangement of
equipment within the protected areas. The contractor shall also provide a hazard analysis of the
individual risk areas to be included.

3.3 Standards, Approvals and Quality Assurance


The CO2 system shall be designed, installed and tested in accordance with BS 5306 part 4 or NFPA
12, as defined by the client or their insurers. All equipment shall be procured from a single
manufacturer operating to ISO 9001.
In order to be able to claim an FM Approved System – only those components listed within this
Manual maybe used. Some components within this Manual are not part of the FM Approved System
and are explicitly stated as such (see Appendix 1).

3.4 Proposals and Submittals


The contractor shall supply manufacturers’ sales literature, data sheets and technical information for
each major component of the system.
The contractor shall submit the following with their proposal:
• Evidence of their qualifications (e.g. LPS 1204) to design, install, test, service and recharge the
manufacturers’ equipment as approved by Kidde Fire Protection.
• A complete bill of materials and description of the proposed installation including the
manufacturers’ part number for each major item of equipment.
• Evidence of their ability to supply spare parts to maintain the system.

Upon award of a contract the contractor shall supply the following:


• Detailed scaled plans/drawings of the proposed system showing all items of equipment, routing of
all pipes and cables. Flow calculations shall be shown detailing pipe size, nozzle size flow rate
and terminal pressure.
• This information shall be generated by a suitable software package from the equipment
manufacturer.

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• Care should be taken in locating the extinguishing agent containers as close as possible to the
hazard to minimise the time for the agent to reach the fire.
• Electrical system schematics in accordance with the relevant standard showing safety interlocks
and a description of the sequence of operation.
• Full sets of drawings and technical submittals, as required, shall be submitted to the client and the
consultant for approval prior to installation.

3.5 General Requirements


The carbon dioxide system shall be designed, engineered and installed for the proper protection of
the hazard area(s). All major components shall be supplied by Kidde Fire Protection.
The design, installation and testing shall be in accordance with BS 5306 part 4, NFPA 12 or FM
Global Datasheets as appropriate.
In addition, the detection and alarm system shall be designed and installed to the appropriate
standard.
Release of the carbon dioxide system shall be possible by electrical solenoid attached to a system
control head operating together to release a pilot nitrogen supply or where FM Approval is not
required using the direct acting solenoid. The nitrogen pilot gas shall be capable of operating a
maximum of 36 Klem valve actuators.
The control head shall also have facilities for manual release locally and remotely by mechanical pull
cable. As an option the control head shall have integral switches to indicate:
• Operated - Control head fired.
• Isolated - Control head isolating pin inserted.
The system discharge time shall be designed in accordance with the design code selected for the
project. Particular attention shall be given to determining the classification of the hazard and
protection method employed.
The carbon dioxide storage cylinders and valves shall be:
• π marked in accordance with European TPED Legislation 99/36/EC.
• Each cylinder shall be fitted with a Kidde Klem servo assisted valve.
• The valves shall be fitted with a safety burst disc designed to operate at 190bar. The cylinder
shall be painted red.
Where multiple cylinders are required for one or more hazard areas, a common manifold shall be
used, with each cylinder being of common size and fill. An approved check valve shall be fitted to
each cylinder to prevent the loss of gas or accidental discharge.
Where more than one risk is protected from a bank of cylinders, consideration shall be given to
supplying a reserve supply of gas suitable to protect the largest risk.
System piping shall be in accordance with the requirements of BS 5306 part 4 (NFPA 12, if
applicable).
Discharge nozzles shall be selected from the range of KFP designs and shall be suitably sized for the
flow rates required.

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System design shall be verified using the Kidde Fire Protection CO2 calculation program. A full print
out shall be submitted for approval.

3.6 System Components


1. Cylinders – These are filled with 45 kg of carbon dioxide and fitted with the Kidde Klem valve.
Valves are proof and leak tested as part of the manufacturing process. Smaller cylinder sizes
6.8kg and 22.6kg are available.
2. Valve Actuator (K62341) - This is the valve operating device and is attached to the valve by a 'U'
shaped securing pin. The actuators can be removed for system testing without operating the
cylinder valve with the associated risks of losing gas. The actuator is operated by pilot gas
pressure or manually by a lever.
3. Flexible Hose (K97112) - A flexible connection between the Klem valve and manifold check valve.
For single cylinder system this discharge loop is to be used with pipe adaptor (K62755) to connect
to the distribution pipework.
4. Pilot Hose (K93433 and K93434) - High pressure flexible tube used to connect between the pilot
gas supply and cylinder valve actuators. Pilot Hoses shall be tested to 210 bar (3000 PSI).
5. Pilot Vent (K24051) - This device is a safety feature designed to slowly relieve pilot gas pressure
following the main CO2 discharge.
6. Manifolds – These are manufactured from schedule 80 pipe, galvanised and tested to 120 bar
(2000 PSI). Manifolds are available in the following sizes for 2, 3, 4 and 5 cylinders 1" nominal
bore or 1¼" nominal bore schedule 80 pipe.
7. Cylinder Racking – This is formed from steel components designed specifically for supporting
CO2 cylinders during storage and discharge. Where double rows of cylinders are used a wooden
central spacer shall be used. Racking shall be supplied in modules of 2 or 3 cylinder sets. Two
sets of racking shall be used for each bank of cylinders.
8. Control Heads (K62303 and K62304) – These provide the electro/mechanical interface between
the detection control panel and CO2 extinguishing hardware. The control head together with the
pilot cylinder (K62462 and K62959FM), solenoid (K62422B) and wall mount (K62487/K62932FM)
form the system actuator which provides the pilot gas supply to operate the main cylinder bank.
Operation of the control head may be achieved electrically, pneumatically or mechanically by
remote pull cable.
9. Push to Fire Button (K62412) - Provides direct manual control to operate the CO2 cylinder bank
from the systems actuator.
10. Safety Pin (K62401) - This fits into the control head to reset the device following operation. It also
provides an isolation facility when left in position. Remote indication of the isolated condition is
available via contacts within the control head. A blanking plug shall be used to prevent ingress of
dirt into the control head when the safety pin is not in situ.
11. Manual Release Interface (K62478) - Allows remote release of the control head by means of a
pull box K1114 and phosphor bronze pre - stretched cable K9002. To allow easy change of

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direction corner pulleys K1122 shall be used. The cable shall be run in ½" O.D. galvanised
conduit for mechanical protection.
12. Pressure Operated Direction Valves (various sizes available) – These are used to control the flow
of CO2 to a specific hazard in a system designed to protect multiple risks from a common bank of
cylinders. The valve shall be capable of opening under full CO2 pressure. A manual lever shall be
supplied for emergency control. An optional switch can be fitted to the valve which indicates
whether the valve is open or closed. POD valves can be supplied in the following sizes: ¾", 1",
1¼", 1½", 2", 3", and 4" with or without the switch.
13. Safety Relief Device (K921) - Shall be used where gas may be trapped between two closed
valves to prevent a dangerous rupture of the pipework e.g. when directional valves or isolating
valves are used.
14. Pressure Switch (K60218) - Shall be used to provide electrical contacts rated at 10amp providing
the following facilities:
• Plant shut down
• Remote alarm signalling
• Discharged indication
• Gas in manifold - should direction valve not open.

The pressure switch shall be FM Approved where required.


15. Pressure Trip (K17554) - Shall be used to automatically release weight operated dampers, fuel
valves etc upon CO2 discharge.
16. CO2 Siren (981574) - This device can be fitted into the main CO2 feed pipe to provide an audible
alarm for the duration of the CO2 discharge.
17. CO2 Discharge Time Delay Assembled Kit (E6000-001_2) - Used in conjunction with the siren to
give a 30/60 second pre-alarm to allow safe evacuation of a CO2 protected space.
18. Odouriser Assembly (K4135) - Shall be used to introduce a pungent lemon smell into a protected
hazard area upon operation of the CO2 extinguishing system.
19. Continuous Weight Monitoring Unit (E8731-402) – This shall be used to monitor the CO2 cylinders
for weight loss. Should a cylinder lose 5% - 10 % of its weight then this device shall automatically
signal a fault condition to the system control panel via a micro switch. The weight monitoring
device is also available without the switch (E8731-403).

3.7 System Design


For total flooding applications care shall be taken to ensure that the room is reasonably gas tight with
all ventilation shut down. Failing this, adequate provision shall be made for leakage compensation in
accordance with the design standard.
All doors or windows which may be open shall be arranged to close automatically upon CO2
discharge to prevent undue loss of gas.

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The CO2 fire suppression system shall be designed based upon accurate drawings of the hazard or in
the absence of drawings a detailed site survey. The hazard analysis shall define the design
concentration used and temperature applicable.

NOTE: Warning signs shall be fitted to all appropriate doors into the hazard area and any areas
where CO2 may build up and form a hazardous concentration.

All equipment shall be installed to the manufacturer's manuals and due consideration for service and
maintenance of the system shall be given.
The system shall meet the requirements of BS 5306 part 4 or NFPA 12 as determined by the
client/consultant or their insurers.
System temperature ranges:
• Total flooding systems: Minimum -18 Maximum 55°C.
• Local Application flooding Systems: Minimum 0°C Ma ximum 46°C.

3.8 Equipment Manufacturer


The CO2 system components shall be manufactured by:
Kidde Fire Protection, Station Road, High Bentham, Near Lancaster, LA2 7NA, UK.
The product manual, data sheets and hydraulic flow calculation software shall be provided by:
Kidde Fire Protection Head Office, Thame Park Road, Thame, Oxfordshire OX9 3RT.

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4. GENERAL

4.1 Characteristics of Carbon Dioxide


Carbon Dioxide (CO2) at atmospheric pressure is a colourless, odourless and electrically non-
conducting inert gas which is almost 1.5 times denser as air.
CO2 extinguishes fire by removing heat from the flame sheath and reducing the oxygen content of the
atmosphere.

4.2 Hazards to Personnel


Exposure to atmospheres containing about 5% CO2 leads to shortness of breath and slight headache.
At the 10% level, headache, visual disturbance, ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and tremor are followed
by loss of consciousness.
The exposure of personnel to carbon dioxide at fire extinguishing concentrations (typically in excess
of 30vol %) creates serious hazards, through toxic and asphyxiation effects, that will be lethal.
Carbon dioxide is also denser than air and will drift and accumulate in low spaces, such as cellars,
pits and floor voids, which may be difficult to ventilate effectively. Furthermore CO2 and can migrate
into adjacent spaces outside the protected area and pose a hazard there too.
The rapid expansion of large quantities of CO2 results in a substantial localised cooling of the
installation and of the air surrounding the point of discharge. This can present a frost burn hazard.

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5. SYSTEM COMPONENTS

5.1 CO2 Cylinders


CO2 is stored in solid drawn steel cylinders containing gas in liquid form equal to two thirds of its water
capacity. The pressure within the cylinder varies with changes in ambient temperature, increasing
with rising temperature. At 21°C the pressure is 58 .6 bar.
The cylinder assembly comprises of a cylinder, cylinder valve and rigid syphon tube. The assembly
must ALWAYS be installed in an upright position (Figure 5-1).

Figure 5-1 CO2 Cylinder Assembly

Water Dimension (mm)


Fill Weight Total Weight
Part No Capacity ‘A’ ‘B'
(kg) (kg)
(Litres) ±10mm

E7194-004 67.5 45 120 approx. 267 1531

E7194-006 34.0 22.6 81 approx. 229 1102

E7194-005* 10.2 6.8 15 approx. 140 865


* note that E7194-005 is not listed for use with an FM Approved System
Table 5-1 CO2 Cylinder Specification.
Specification
Body Material: Steel
Test Pressure: 250 bar
Fill Ratio: 0.661kg/litre
Standard Point Finish: Red
Specification: 1999/36/EC (TPED)

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5.2 Klem Cylinder Valve (K24509)


The Klem cylinder valve is a compact, horizontal servo-assisted valve which can be operated by
pressure or by use of the manual lever on the valve actuator K62341.
The valve is opened by depressing the actuator rod and applying a force of between 23 and 27kg.

WARNING: The valve will close immediately once the force is removed from the actuator rod.

Each cylinder valve incorporates a safety disc designed to rupture and discharge the CO2 cylinder
contents when the ambient temperature reaches approximately 60°C (Figure 5-2).

Figure 5-2 Klem Cylinder Valves

Specification
Body Material: Brass
Seals: Silicone Rubber Shore 70° - 90°
Actuator Rod: St. Steel
Safety Burst Disc: Ruptures at 179 to 196 bar

K24509 - DIN 477 (25E) Klem valve is used with all cylinder sizes.

Refer to data sheet DS K24509 for further information on Klem cylinder valve such as
dimension/thread details.

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5.3 Cylinder Valve Pressure/Lever Actuator (K62341)


The release head is a piston device which is fitted to the cylinder valve by means of a “U” pin and can
be operated by means of independent nitrogen gas pressure and/or by use of the manual lever
(Figure 5-3). Two gas pressure ports provide the means of interconnecting a series of release heads
by using flexible pilot gas hoses. (K93433 & K93434)
All pilot lines must include a pilot vent (K24051) as part of the assembly.

WARNING: This device is NOT self-resetting. After operation the piston MUST be manually
reset by pushing the piston back onto its seating.

NOTE: If manually operated the lever must be returned to its original position and secured
before re-setting.

Figure 5-3 Cylinder Valve Pressure/Lever Actuator

Specification
Body Material: Brass
Seals: Nitrile
Lever: Plated Steel
Securing Pin: Stainless Steel
Safety Pin: Stainless Steel
Weight: 0.4kg

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5.4 Racking
CO2 cylinders should be located as near as possible to the hazard they protect, but should not be
exposed to the fire in a manner that is likely to impair performance. They should not be exposed to
weather conditions or put in a location where they can be subjected to chemical or other damage.
Suitable guards or enclosures should be provided when necessary.

5.4.1 Single Cylinder Strap

Figure 5-4 Single Cylinder Strap

Part No Cyl. Size Dim ‘A’

K16896 6.8 175

K4881 22.6 292

K62943 45.0 320

Table 5-2 Single Cylinder Strap Details

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5.4.2 Single Row Cylinders

Figure 5-5 Single Row Cylinder Racking Detail

Weight
Part No Material Finish
(kg)
Steel Back
2 Cylinder K17238 MS Angle Paint Black 1.8
Racks

3 Cylinder K17235 MS Angle Paint Black 2.7

Steel Front
2 Cylinder K13744 MS Strap 2.7
Straps Nylon Dipped
Black
3 Cylinder K13745 MS Strap 4.5

Single Row Rack Bolt


Assembly K62752 MS Rod Paint Black 0.4

Table 5-3 Single Row Cylinder Racking Details

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5.4.3 Double Row Cylinders

Figure 5-6 Double Row Cylinder Racking Detail

Part No Weight (kg)

Cylinder Centre 2 Cylinder K24334 1.4


Racks 3 Cylinder K24335 2.0

Two Row Rack Bolt K62753 1.1

Two Rack Special Rack Bolt K17327 0.7

Table 5-4 Double Row Cylinder Racking Details (45kg)

Part No Weight (kg)

Cylinder Centre 2 Cylinder K22654 1.1

Racks 3 Cylinder K22655 1.8

Two Row Rack Bolt K17245 1.0

Two Rack Special Rack Bolt K17327 0.7

Table 5-5 Double Row Cylinder Racking Details (22.6kg)

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5.5 CO2 Manifold Options


On multiple cylinder systems manifold pipes are supplied as a complete assembly including factory
installed check valves (Figure 5-7).

Figure 5-7 CO2 Manifold Pipe

NOTE: Pipe Socket to be ordered separately

1” Pipe Socket K20277 1 ¼” Pipe Socket K20133


Assembly Number of Weight Assembly Number of Weight
Part No. Cylinders (kg) Part No. Cylinders (kg)
K21207 2 2.7 K21215 2 3

K21209 3 3.9 K21217 3 4.5

K21211 4 5.0 K21219 4 5.9

K21213 5 6.3 K21221 5 7.3

Table 5-6 1” NB (25mm) Manifold Details Table 5-7 1¼” NB (32mm) Manifold Details

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5.5.1 Single Row Manifold Bracket

Figure 5-8 Single Row Manifold Bracket


Dimension (mm)
Part No Pipe Size Material - Finish Weight (kg)
‘A’ ‘B’
K24267D 1” Mild Steel
101.6 174.5 2.0
K24267E 1¼” Painted Black

Table 5-8 Single Row Manifold Details

5.5.2 Double Row Manifold Bracket

Figure 5-9 Double Row Manifold Bracket

Part No Pipe Size Dimension (mm) Material - Finish Weight (kg)


‘A’ ‘B’
K24268D 1” Mild Steel
101.6 479.4 2.5
K24268E 1¼” Painted Black

Table 5-9 Double Row Manifold Details

NOTE: Manifold pipe clips and manifold pipe clip bolts are supplied with the brackets.

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5.6 Flexible Discharge Hose (K97112)


The flexible discharge hose is used when in-situ weighing of the cylinders is required (Figure 5-10). It
is also recommended for use on single cylinder systems for ease of connection to rigid discharge
piping. When used for this purpose a hose to pipe adaptor (K62755) is required.

Figure 5-10 Flexible Discharge Hose

Specification
Hose Material: Reinforced Rubber
Connectors: Mild Steel Zinc Plate and Chromate Passivated
Coupling Nuts: Mild Steel Zinc Plate and Chromate Passivated
Test Pressure: 210 bar
Weight: 0.5kg
Adaptor K62755: Brass

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5.7 Control Head Actuating Devices

There are various options available for automatically or manually operating the control head as
illustrated in Figure 5-11.

1. Manual Push-to-Fire Button K62412


2. Pneumatic Diaphragm K62459*
3. 24Vdc Solenoid K62422B
4. 24Vdc Flameproof Solenoid K93206/AX*
5. Remote Cable Release Assembly K62489
* K62459 and K93206/AX are not listed for use
with an FM Approved System

Figure 5-11 Control Head Actuating Devices

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5.8 System Actuator Assembly


The system actuator assembly incorporates the source of pilot nitrogen gas supply and the
mechanism to release it, either automatically or manually (Figure 5-12).

Figure 5-12 System Actuator Assembly

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5.9 Nitrogen Pilot Gas Cylinder and Valve

Figure 5-13 Nitrogen Pilot Gas Cylinder and Valve

Specification
Water Capacity: 0.4 Litres CF-CD01 Issue 2
Body Material: Steel
Test Pressure: 250 bar
Valve: Brass
Charge: Dry nitrogen to 65 bar at 20 (Recharge required at 55 bar)
Weight: 1.7kg
Finish: Grey Paint

• K62462* N2 Pilot Cylinder


• K62462A* N2 Pilot Cylinder with Pressure Switch
• K62959 N2 Pilot Cylinder
• K62969A N2 Pilot Cylinder with Pressure Switch

* K62462 and K62462A are not listed for use with an FM Approved System.

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5.9.1 Optional Pressure Monitoring Switch


The optional pressure monitoring switch provides means of signalling low-pressure within the nitrogen
pilot cylinder, see Figure 5-14.

WARNING: Pressure Head - DO NOT attempt to remove from cylinder.

Figure 5-14 Pressure Monitoring Switch

Specification
Sensor Capacity: Max System Pressure 207 bar
Proof Pressure 621 bar
Electrical Rating: 28vDC 5 Amp resistive
3 Amp inductive
Connections: Common Earth
Open under pressure - 1
Closed under pressure - 2
Temperature Range: -54 to +107°C
Construction: ST.ST Housing, Black Nylon Cap
Operating Pressure: Factory set at 50 bar – decreasing

NOTE: Pressure Switch is factory fitted; it cannot be ordered separately

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5.10 Control Head and Accessories

5.10.1 Control Head (K62303)


The control head is mounted directly onto the nitrogen pilot gas cylinder valve and is secured by a
coupling nut (Figure 5-15). When the control head is operated the firing pin extends by approximately
3mm.

Figure 5-15 Control Head

Specification
Body Material: Brass
Weight: 2.35kg
Rating: IP55

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5.10.2 Control Head with Switches (K62304)


The control head is available with switches to provide remote indication that the safety and reset pin
has been inserted and a second switch indicates the condition of the control head (Figure 5-16).

Figure 5-16 Control Head with Switches

Safety/Reset Pin Switch


Orange - Common
Red - N.O
Black - N.C

Control Head Condition Switch


Grey - Common
White - N.O
Yellow - N.C

Electrical Rating
250v AC 7A Resistive, 7A Inductive
30v DC 4A Resistive, 3A Inductive
50v DC 1A Resistive, 0.25A Inductive
125v DC 0.4A Resistive, 0.3A Inductive

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5.10.3 Safety and Reset Pin (K62401)


The Safety and Reset Pin device, supplied with the control head, when screwed fully home will reset
the control head causing the firing pin to retract to its normal position, see Figure 5-17. Unscrew to
release and make the control head active again (retain reset pin in safe location for future use).

WARNING: DO NOT attempt to reset whilst still electrically or pneumatically energised.

Figure 5-17 Safety and Reset Pin

Specification
Body Material: Steel
Weight: 0.1kg

5.10.4 Manual Push-to-Fire Button (K62412)


To manually operate the control head, pull safety pin and operate ‘push to fire’ button (Figure 5-18).

Figure 5-18 Manual Push-to-Fire Button

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Unscrew the port plug on the control head and screw the button fully home (Figure 5-19).

Port Plug

Figure 5-19 Control Head Showing Port Plug and Safety/Reset Pin

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5.11 Control Head Mounting Bracket (K62487)

Figure 5-20 Standard Control Head Mounting Bracket

Specification
Material: Mild Steel
Finish: Painted Black

NOTE: Not FM Approved

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5.12 Control Head Mounting Bracket (K62932)

Figure 5-21 Control Head Mounting Bracket (FM Approved)

Specification
Material: Black Mild Steel
Finish: Nylon Dipped Black

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5.13 Solenoid Actuators

5.13.1 Standard 24v DC Solenoid (K62422B)

Figure 5-22 Standard 24v DC Solenoid

5.13.2 Flameproof ATEX 24v DC Solenoid (K93206/AX)


Designed in accordance with ATEX directive classification (ATEX 94/9/EC) for potentially explosive
atmospheres flameproof enclosure EX II 2 G EEx d II C T6 to T4 and II 2 D IP65, T85°C to T135ºC.
K93206/AX is NOT listed for use with an FM Approved System.

Figure 5-23 Flameproof ATEX approved 24v DC Solenoid

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5.14 Pull Box (K1114)


The pull box is used where remote emergency manual operation of a system is required. The handle
is connected to the gas release device by flexible phosphor bronze cable run in mild steel conduit for
protection (Figure 5-24). Abrupt changes in direction to the routing of the manual pull line are affected
by means of enclosed brass pulleys (Part No K1122).

Pulley can be mounted in 90º increments.

Figure 5-24 Pull Box

Specification
Box: Box-Steel painted signal red BS 381C/537
Front Cover: Plastic
Weight: 1.65kg
Rating: IP40

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5.15 Corner Pulley (K1122)

Figure 5-25 Corner Pulley

Specification
Materials: Brass (natural)
Weight: 0.5kg

5.15.1 Cable Release Assembly (K62478)


The cable release assembly (Figure 5-26) is used in conjunction with a remote pull box and cable
system to manually operate the control head.

Figure 5-26 Cable Release Assembly

Specification
Material: Mild Steel Box Painted Black

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5.16 Pilot Gas Flexible Hoses (K93433 and K93434)


The short 374mm pilot hose (K93433) is used to interconnect the pressure/lever actuator (K62341)
pressure inlet ports on multiple cylinder systems.

The long 527mm pilot loop (K93434) is used to interconnect the release head where the cylinders are
installed in a double row. It is also used to convey the pilot nitrogen gas from a system actuator to the
inlet port of the first release head.

Figure 5-27 Pilot Gas Flexible Hose

Specification
Hose Material: Polyamide inner tube, synthetic branding/polyamide cover
End Fittings: Brass - Natural Finish
Minimum Bend Radius: 50mm
Test Pressure: 207 bar
Weight: 50 grams

5.16.1 Pilot Gas Vent (K24051)


The pilot gas vent is fitted in the last unused pressure inlet port of the release head K62341 allowing
the pilot gas pressure to slowly vent (bleed) to atmosphere. The rate at which the pilot gas is vented is
slow enough to maintain adequate operation pressure in the pilot gas line far in excess of the duration
of the main CO2 discharge for normal flooding systems. The bleed valve is factory calibrated to vent at
0.8 litres/min at 51.7 bar / 750psi.

Specification
Body Material: Brass
Weight: 0.02kg

Figure 5-28 Pilot Gas Vent

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5.17 Pilot Gas Rigid Tubing and Fittings


On systems where either the system actuator is remote from the CO2 cylinders or when the system
incorporates directional valves the pilot gas line consists of steel bundy tubing and compression
fittings (Figure 5-29).

Figure 5-29 Pilot Gas Rigid Tubing and Fittings

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5.18 Typical 2 Cylinder Configuration with Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder


Actuation

Figure 5-30 Typical 2 Cylinder Configuration with Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder Actuation

5.19 Assembled Time Delay Kit (E6000-001/002)


The time delay unit kit consists of a pneumatic time delay device which utilizes nitrogen pressure from
1.77L pilot cylinder to provide a pneumatic (automatic mechanical) means to delay the CO2 discharge
for a pre-determined time period. The pneumatic time delay consists of a metering tube, a cylinder,
and a differential pressure operated valve with a control port for the connection of a lever-operated
control head. This assembly kit is installed in the pilot line, prior to the CO2 cylinder bank to allow
alarms to sound, and equipment and ventilation to shut down prior to carbon-dioxide discharge. One
time delay assembly is available with non-adjustable, factory pre-set delay period of 30 or 60
seconds. The delay period can be bypassed by operation of the manual lever control head which is
connected to the time delay's control port. This lever operated control head installed on the time
delay is to provide this bypass feature.

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Items that make up the assembled time delay kit:

Figure 5-31 1.77L Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder

Gas pressure from the nitrogen cylinder drives the pneumatic time delay.
Specification
Cylinder Capacity: 1.77L
Safety relief device Burst Range: 183 bar to 207 bar at 21°C
Cylinder Contents: nitrogen BB-n-411b, Grade A, Type 1 124 bar

The pressure operated control head (Figure 5-32) allows for pneumatic actuation of nitrogen pilot
cylinder and is mounted directly on top of the nitrogen pilot cylinder valve. The pressure operated
control head is self-venting to prevent accidental system discharge in the event of a slow build up
of pressure in the pilot line.

Figure 5-32 Pressure Operated Control Head

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The lever operated control head (Figure 5-33) is installed on the 30 or 60 second time delay unit
(Figure 5-34) and will act as an emergency override should the time delay period need to be
bypassed. It is equipped with an operating lever secured in the closed position by a safety pull pin
and seal wire. The lever can be rotated to the open position by removing the safety pin.

Figure 5-33 Lever Operated Control Head

Figure 5-34 Time Delay Unit

NOTE: The time delay unit is factory pre-set to 30 or 60 seconds.

WARNING: DO NOT ADJUST - Tampering with this unit could cause failure.

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Figure 5-35 Time Delay Assembled Kit

• P/N E6000-001 - 30 seconds time delay assembled kit


• P/N E6000-002 - 60 seconds time delay assembled kit

5.20 CO2 Operated Pressure Switch (K60218)


The universal pressure switch is a gas pressure operated device which is connected to the
distribution piping or manifold. A gas pressure of 4 - 110bar is required to operate the piston which
makes or breaks electrical contacts.
When the system is activated, gas pressure forces the piston against the operating rod which moves
across the housing, operating the switch. The switch completes an electrical circuit and illuminates
the system discharged lamp on the indicating lamp panel or operates the alarm etc. The rod extends
into the transparent cover to indicate the switch has operated.

To reset pressure Switch:


• Unscrew re-setting cap (transport cover) from box
• Reverse cap and screw onto the operating rod.
• Press until switch clicks home.
• Remove resetting cap from rod, reverse and screw back into box.

NOTE: Refer to Datasheet K60218

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¾ ” BS PT
Figure 5-36 CO2 Operated pressure Switch

Specification
Housing: Cast Aluminium
Finish: Red Enamel
Testing: 2KV tested

Inductive Rating

Power Factor 250 Volts 440 Volts 600 Volts

1 30 Amps 25 Amps 20 Amps

0.74 25 Amps 20 Amps 16 Amps

0.50 17.5 Amps 14 Amps 11.5 Amps

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DC Rating

Resistance 220 Volts 500 Volts

Loadings 30 Amps 15 Amps

5.21 CO2 Operated Pressure Trip (K17554)


The pressure trip is fitted into the CO2 distribution piping and is used to automatically release
ventilation shutters, fire curtains, ducting dampers, fuel valves, etc. A CO2 pressure of approximately
2bar is sufficient to operate the piston and unlatch the catch mechanism.

Figure 5-37 Pressure Trip

Specification
Body Materials: Gunmetal
Finish: Nickel Plate

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5.22 Pressure Operated Direction Valves


When two or more areas are to be protected using a central bank of CO2 cylinders, a Pressure
Operated Directional (POD) valve is installed in each of the CO2 main feed pipes leading to the
designated areas (Figure 5-38).

Figure 5-38 POD Valve System

5.22.1 ¾” to 2” Pod Valves

Figure 5-39 ¾” to 2” POD Valves

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Part Size With Dimension (mm) Dimension (mm) Weight


Number (inch) Switch ‘A’ ‘B’ (kg)
K24004 ¾ NO 171 117 3.4

K24628 ¾ YES 216 117 3.5

K24005 1 NO 171 100 3.2

K24629 1 YES 216 100 3.3

K24175 1¼ NO 210 156 5.7

K24630 1¼ YES 255 156 5.8

K24176 1½ NO 210 137 5.4

K24631 1½ YES 255 137 5.5

K24177 2 NO 295 191 17.0

K24632 2 YES 340 191 17.1

Table 5-10 ¾” to 2” POD Valve Details

5.22.2 3” & 4” Pod Valves

Part Size With Dimension (mm) Flange Weight


Number inch Switch ‘A’ ‘B’ ‘C’ Fixing Holes (kg)
8-EQUI spaced 21mm
K24775 3” YES 330 292 203 43.3
Dia. on 165mm PCD
8-EQUI spaced 25 mm
K24777 4” YES 406 340 241 69.5
Dia. on 197mm PCD

Figure 5-40 3” & 4” POD Valves

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5.22.3 3” & 4” Companion Flange, Bolts and Gasket

Part Size Dimension (mm) Bolt Part Weight


Number inch ‘A’ ‘B’ ‘C’ Number (kg)
K60103 3 203 165 32 K60101 7

K60104 4 241 197 35 K60102 8.5

Figure 5-41 3” & 4” Companion Flange, Bolts and Gasket

NOTE: Use 3” gasket (K60105) or 4” gasket (K60106)

5.22.4 Pressure Operation for POD valves ¾” to 4”


Application of nitrogen pilot gas to the pilot gas inlet port depresses the valve piston. When the valve
piston is at the bottom of its stroke a pilot gas outlet port is uncovered thus allowing the pilot gas to be
conveyed, by the pilot gas line, to the CO2 cylinder pressure release heads.

NOTE: The valve remains open until the pilot gas pressure is vented from the pilot gas line.

5.22.5 Manual Operation


Remove the safety pin and operate lever fully.

NOTE: The valve can be opened while subjected to CO2 pressure.

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5.22.6 Valve Open Indicator Switch


The indicator switch provides means for operating audible/visual alarms to give warning of a partial or
fully open valve.

Figure 5-42 Valve Open Indicator Switch

5.23 Safety Relief Device (K921)


On systems employing normally closed directional/stop valves there is a possibility of CO2 entrapment
in pipework between the CO2 cylinders and the valves therefore a safety relief device must always be
fitted. The indicator sleeve is “blown-off” when the disc ruptures giving a visual indication of operation.

WARNING: These devices should be fitted so that the discharge in the event of operation will
not injure or endanger personnel. If necessary the discharge should be vented to an area
where it will not become a hazard to personnel (as per the requirements of BS 5306 part 4).

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Figure 5-43 Safety Relief Device

Specification
Burst/Opening Pressure: 150 bar ± 5%
Material: Brass
Finish: Natural
Weight: 0.35 kg

5.24 Lock Out Valves with Limit Switches (10611106_112)


A lockout valve is a manually operated valve installed between the carbon dioxide manifold and the
distribution pipe work to the protected area (Figure 5-44). The lockout valve can be locked in the
closed position to prevent carbon dioxide from discharging into the protected area. The lockout valve
shall be installed at the end of the carbon dioxide manifold or, if a common manifold protects multiple
hazards, after each directional (stop) valve. This is a required safety precaution to prevent an
accidental discharge from an automatic CO2 system into a protected enclosure when it is occupied
(This includes any period of occupancy or maintenance).

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.
Figure 5-44 Lock Out Valve

Lever Operated stainless steel ball valve with 2-SPDT limit switches W/BY Beacon, NEMA 4, 4X with
Lock Open/Close Feature.

The lockout valve consists of a stainless steel ball valve with union ends. The ball valve has a 2,500
PSIG pressure rating. A NEMA4 enclosure, housing two SPDT limit switches with a 15A rating, sits at
the top of the valve. Limit switch No.2 shall be wired in series with the electric control head in the
releasing circuit. Limit switch No.1 may be wired to provide positive indication that the valve is fully
closed.

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Figure 5-45 Lock Out Valve Detail

Valve Size Part Number Dim ‘A’ (mm) Dim ‘B’ (mm) Dim ‘C’ (mm)

¼” 10611106 40 70 235

½” 10611107 40 70 235

¾” 10611108 50 89 243

1” 10611109 50 92 243

1 ¼” 10611110 54 100 251

1 ½” 10611111 63 116 256

2” 10611112 68 126 261

Table 5-11 Lock Out Valve Details

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Figure 5-46 All CO2 Cylinders Discharging to Either Space Incorporating the Assembled Time
Delay Unit Kit

Figure 5-47 Two Spaces Requiring Differing CO2 Cylinders Space Incorporating the
Assembled Time Delay Unit Kit

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5.25 CO2 Discharge Nozzles


There are various nozzles suitable for total flooding or local application systems (local application
systems are not currently FM Approved). In all cases it is essential that they are installed in their
correct locations as defined by the code number stamped on the nozzle body in reference to the
design drawing.

5.25.1 Multi-jet Nozzles


The multi-jet nozzle is the standard carbon dioxide discharge nozzle (Figure 5-48). The horn has been
developed to prevent the scattering of burning material that can take place with a high velocity
discharge.

Figure 5-48 Multi Jet Nozzle Detail

Specification
Environment: Industrial/Offshore/Marine
Material: Horn - mild steel
Nozzle - brass
Finish: Horn - black paint.
Nozzle - Natural
Weight: K61792 N13 - N18:- 0.8kg approx.
K61793 N3 - N12:- 0.6kg approx.

K61793 N3-N12 Small Multi Jet Nozzles

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K61792 N13-N18 Large Multi jet Nozzles

5.25.2 Flanged Multi-jet Nozzle (K5814 N4-N8)


The stainless steel flanged carbon dioxide horn (Figure 5-49) is designed for use in those areas
where the nozzle may become blocked or dirty by the process being protected. The force of the
discharge automatically blows the frangible PFTE disc clear.

Figure 5-49 Flanged Multi Jet Nozzle

Specification
Material: Horn: Stainless Steel Nozzle: Stainless Steel
Finish: Body: Natural Nozzle: Natural
Weight: 0.9 kg approx.

5.25.3 Duct Nozzle (K13045 N3-N4)


The CO2 nozzle and duct adaptor is used to protect ductwork in areas where space is limited (Figure
5-50).

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Figure 5-50 Duct Nozzle Detail

Specification
Mounting Plate Material: mild steel
Mounting Plate Finish: Zinc plated and passivated.
Nozzle Material: brass
Nozzle Finish: natural
Weight: 0.4kg approx.

5.26 CO2 Operated Siren (981574)


The CO2 operated siren can be fitted into the main CO2 feed pipe to provide an audible alarm for the
duration of the CO2 discharge (Figure 5-51).

Figure 5-51 CO2 Operated Siren

Specification
Body Material: Bronze
Rotor: Brass
Hood: Steel
Nozzle & Filter: Monel

Nominal Flow at 21.1°C - Carbon Dioxide 9.25kg/min

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5.27 Odouriser Assembly (K4135)


At normal atmospheric pressures and temperatures, the extinguishing CO2 gas is colourless and
odourless. To enable CO2 to be detected during and following a discharge an odouriser shall be
fitted. The unit must be fitted within the main pipe run so that the pressure of the gas passing through
the pipe bursts a seal in the unit and releases a liquid odorant into the gas system. Burst pressure
range 3 Bar +/- 10%.

Each unit contains 10cc of odorant which is sufficient to produce a positive and identifiable lemon
smell in a protected space. One odourising device will be sufficient for 1000 Kg/ CO2 max.

Figure 5-52 Odouriser Assembly Detail

Specification
Body Material: Brass

NOTE: This unit MUST be installed downstream and MUST NOT be installed in the inverted
position (see section 9.33). If odouriser is removed, the opening is to be plugged off
IMMEDIATELY.

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5.28 CO2 Warning Labels

5.28.1 Entrance Door Warning Label (K93681)

Figure 5-53 Entrance Door Warning Label Details

Specification
Material: 22 SWG Aluminium

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5.28.2 Manual Control Point Label (K9368)

Figure 5-54 Manual Control Point Label

Specification
Material: 22 SWG Aluminium

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5.29 Weight Monitoring Device (E8731-402)


The weight monitoring device is used to automatically monitor the contents of a fixed fire CO2
cylinder. When the contents of the cylinder fall by a pre-determined amount, typically 10%, the weight
decreases causing a micro-switch to trip and send a signal to a signal panel.

The components of the weight indicator mechanism with a cylinder hanging are shown in Figure 5-55.
The device is supplied in a kit form, for assembly onto the mounting frame, and comprises: the body,
two hanger rods, neck collar, weight, four off M10 nuts and washers, and one off M12 nut and
washer.

The mounting frame will be supplied by others. Figure 5-55 shows the dimensions of the weight
monitoring device.

Figure 5-55 The Dimensions (mm) of the Weight Monitoring Device

5.29.1 Operation
When the weight indicator mechanism is set up, the downward force of the cylinder is greater than the
leverage provided by the weight on the weight rod.

As the contents of the cylinder drops through a pre-determined amount, the downward force of the
cylinder becomes less than the leverage of the weight, therefore the weight rod drops and trips the
microswitch sending a signal to a control panel.

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Microswitch Specification
Type: Single-pole, volt-free, change-over
Rating: Maximum current 3A at 125v or 250v AC
Sealing: Rated at IP67 to BS 5490
Connections: RED - common
BLUE - normally open (N/O)
YELLOW - normally closed (N/C)

NOTE: All screws and steel fittings are zinc plated.

The customer is to provide protective flexible conduit (rated at IP65 minimum), wire and insulated
crimp pin or blade terminal connectors.

Figure 5-56 Weight Monitoring Device

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The weight monitoring device is available without the switch E8731-403 which has been designed and
certified as non-electric equipment for compliance to the following hazardous area classification:
Group II category 3 GD c T6 X

NOTE: NOT FM Approved

5.30 Beam Scale (K62685)


The beam scale is an alternative mechanism to the weight monitoring devices to weight the contents
of a CO2 cylinder.

Figure 5-57 Beam Scale Including Bracket

NOTE: NOT FM Approved

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5.31 Direct Acting Solenoid (E7772-004-02)

Figure 5-58 Direct Acting Solenoid

NOTE: NOT FM Approved

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5.31.1 Direct Acting Solenoids – Maximum 6 x 45kg CO2 Cylinders

Figure 5-59 Typical 2 Cylinder System Configuration with Direct Acting Solenoid

Specification
Environmental Protection: BS EN 60529 1991 IP6
Nominal Coil Resistance: 53.2 ohms
Minimum Firing Pulse: 60ms
Maximum Firing Pulse: unlimited
Electrical Connection: DIN Plug type DIN 43650A
Storage Temperature Range: -30°C to +55°C
Operating Temperature Range: -20°C to +55°C
Maximum Working Pressure: 152.5 bar G

Power Supply Requirements


Voltage Range: 18v DC to 28v DC
Current at 18v DC: 338mA
Current at 28v DC: 526mA

NOTE: The master cylinder can actuate maximum 5 slave cylinders in any one system.

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6. SYSTEM DESIGN

6.1 Total Flooding Systems


CO2 total flooding systems are based on creating an extinguishing concentration of CO2 within an
enclosed space containing the combustible materials. The quantity of CO2 is determined by applying
an appropriate flooding factor to the volume being protected.
The efficiency of a total flooding system depends upon maintaining the concentration for as long as
possible, so before total flooding can be considered as a method of extinguishing, the protected
space must be reasonably well enclosed. It is always advisable for an integrity test to be conducted to
verify the rate of leakage.
A fixed supply of CO2 is permanently connected to pipe distribution network and discharge nozzles
are arranged to discharge CO2 into the protected space.

6.1.1 Examples of Hazards


Rooms, vaults, enclosed machines, ovens, dust collectors, floor and ceiling voids and fume extraction
ducts.

6.1.2 Type of Fires


Fires that can be extinguished by total flooding methods are:
a) Surface fires that can be extinguished quickly, such as those involving flammable liquids and
vapours.
b) Deep seated fires that require cooling time in order to be extinguished, e.g. fires involving bulk
paper and other solids.

6.1.3 Where CO2 is NOT Effective


a) Materials that contain their own oxygen supply and liberate oxygen when burning, e.g.
cellulose nitrate.
b) Reactive metals e.g. sodium, potassium, magnesium, titanium, zirconium, uranium and
plutonium.
c) Metal hydrides.
While CO2 may not extinguish these fires, it will not react dangerously or increase the burning rate.
CO2 will protect adjacent combustibles and will also extinguish fires of other materials in which the
reactive metals are often stored.
Example:
a) Sodium stored or used under Kerosene.
b) Cellulose nitrate in a solvent.
c) Magnesium chips covered with heavy oil.

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6.2 CO2 Requirements for Surface Fires

6.2.1 Basic Quantity


Multiply the volume to be protected (cubic metres) by the appropriate volume factor given in
Table 6-1 to give the mass of CO2 required in kilograms. This will protect an enclosure containing
materials requiring a design concentration of up to 34%.
The volume to be used is the gross volume of the enclosure but it is permitted to deduct permanent,
impermeable elements of the building structure i.e. beams, stanchions, solid stairways and
foundations.
Volume of Space Volume Factor Calculated Minimum
(m³) (kg CO2/m3) (kg)
<4 1.15

>4 <14 1.07 4.5

>14 <45 1.01 16.0

>45 <126 0.90 45.0

>126 <1400 0.80 110.0

>1400 0.74 1100.0

Table 6-1 Volume Factors

NOTE:
Table 6-1 Volume Factors MUST ONLY be used for surface fires. For deep seated fires refer to
section 6.3

Example
Room: 6m x 9m x 3m = 162m3
162m3 x 0.80kg/m3 = 129.6kg

6.2.2 Uncloseable Openings


Openings shall be arranged to close automatically before or simultaneously with the start of the CO2
discharge. This can be done by self-closing door devices, fire curtains or steel shutters.
If it is not possible to seal the opening it is permissible for small openings to remain open provided
they do not exceed the limits shown below, and are compensated by addition of extra carbon dioxide.

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6.2.3 Limits of Uncloseable Openings


The maximum area permitted is the smaller result of the following calculations:
a) An area in square metres, which is numerically equivalent to 10% of the volume in cubic
metres.
b) 10% of the total area of all sides, top and bottom in square metres.
When uncloseable openings exceed this limitation, the system should be designed by a local
application method.

6.2.4 Compensation
Additional CO2 needs to be applied at 5kg/m2 of the opening. Where necessary this quantity should
be multiplied by the appropriate Material Conversion Factor (refer to Section 6.2.5).
The additional quantity should be discharged through the regular pipework system and the flow rate
increased accordingly so that the additional quantity is discharged within the time specified in BS
5306 Part 4.

6.2.5 Material Conversion Factor (MCF)


For materials requiring a design concentration over 34%, the basic quantity of carbon dioxide
calculated, i.e. the result of using
Table 6-1, plus the addition for losses through limited openings, shall be increased by multiplying this
quantity by the appropriate conversion factor in
Table 6-2.
The most hazardous material in the enclosure must be selected no matter what the quantity of that
material.
For materials not listed consult Kidde Fire Protection as the design concentration may have to be
determined by test.

Example
Room: 6m x 9m x 3m high = 162m3
162m3 x 0.80kg/m3 = 129.6kg
Uncloseable opening = 1.0m2 = 5.0kg
Basic quantity = 134.6kg
If room contains butadiene as the most hazardous material: MCF = 1.3
134.6kg x 1.3 = 175kg

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Combustible Minimum CO2 Material Conversion


Design Factor (MCF)
Acetaldehyde Concentration
34 (%) 1
Acetylene 66 2.5
Amyl Acetate 34 1
Acetone 34 1
Amyl Alcohol 34 1
Benzol, Benzene 37 1.1
Butadiene 41 1.3
Butane 34 1
Butyl Acetate 34 1
Butyl Alcohol 34 1
Carbon Disulphide 66 2.5
Carbon Monoxide 64 2.4
Coal Gas or Natural Gas 37 1.1
Cyclopropane 37 1.1
Diesel Fuel 34 1
Dowtherm 46 1.5
Ethane 40 1.2
Ethyl Ether 46 1.5
Ethyl Alcohol 43 1.3
Ethylene 49 1.6
Ethylene Dichloride 25 1
Ethylene Oxide 53 1.75
Hexane 35 1.1
Hydrogen 74 3.2
Isobutane 36 1.1
Kerosene 34 1
Lube oils 34 1
Methane 34 1
Methyl Alcohol 40 1.2
Paint 34 1
Pentane 35 1.1
Petroleum Spirit 34 1
Propane 36 1.1
Propylene 36 1.1
Quench, Lube Oils 34 1
Tar 34 1
Toluol 34 1
Turpentine 34 1
Transformer Oil 34 1

Table 6-2 Minimum Carbon Dioxide Design Concentration and Material Conversion Factors

NOTE: For materials not listed please contact Kidde Fire Protection.

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6.2.6 Temperature Correction


Additional quantities of CO2 are needed to compensate for the effects of abnormal temperature.
Hazards which operate at temperatures above 100°C m ay be more likely to re-ignite; add 2% carbon
dioxide for each 5°C above 100°C. The additional q uantity of carbon dioxide shall not be discharged
within the design discharge period.

Example
Oven: 3m x 1.5m x1.8m = 8.1m³
If the normal working temperature is 204°C:
204-100 = 104/5 = 20.8
20.8 x 2% = 41.6%
8.1m3 x 1.07 kg/m3 = 8.66 (basic quantity) x 1.416 (temp correction) = 12.26kg

Where the normal temperature of the enclosure is below -20°C, add 2% of CO2 for each 1°C below
-20°C. CO2 has a lower expansion ratio at lower tem peratures so it will be denser and leakage would
be greater than normal therefore the additional quantity of carbon dioxide shall be discharged within
the design discharge period.

Example
Refrigerated Space: 3m x 6m x 3m = 54m3 with a normal operating temperature of -23°C
23°C - 20°C = 3°C x 2% = 6%
54m3 x 0.90kg/m3 = 48.6kg (basic quantity) x 1.06 (temp correction) = 51 .5kg

If an addition has been made to the basic CO2 quantity to compensate for openings or application of
an MCF, the total quantity should be used in place of the basic quantity in the above examples.

6.2.7 Forced Ventilation


When forced air ventilation systems are used, they shall, if possible, be shutdown before or
simultaneously with the start of the CO2 discharge. If this cannot be done additional CO2 must be
applied.
If there is a short run down time but the quantity of air removed is significant, additional CO2 must be
applied. The additional CO2 must be discharged within the time specified in BS 5306 Part 4.
For calculation purposes the volume of air removed in one minute will be replaced with CO2 at the
design concentration being used.

Example
Starting with the example in Section 6.2.5, assume the room has 30m3 of air removed by the
ventilation system in one minute.

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30m3 x 0.80kg/m3 = 24kg x 1.3 (MCF) = 31.2kg + 175kg (original) = 206.2kg

Services such as heating, fuel supplies, paint spraying, conveyors etc. must also be shutdown before
or simultaneously, with the CO2 discharge.

6.2.8 Interconnected Volumes


In two or more interconnected volumes where free flow of CO2 can occur, the CO2 quantity shall be
the sum of the quantities calculated for each volume, using its respective volume factor. If one volume
requires greater than normal concentration, the higher concentration shall be used for all
interconnected volumes.

6.2.9 Venting for Surface Fire Systems


Leakage around doors and windows often provides sufficient pressure relief without special venting
arrangements being required. It is possible to calculate the area of free venting needed for very tight
enclosures but it is recommended that the customer is provided with the formula and CO2 flow rate so
that his architect can take the responsibility.
Q
  29.3 
√P
Where:
X is the free venting area (in mm2).
Q is the calculated carbon dioxide flow rate (in kg/min).
P is the permissible strength (internal pressure) of enclosure (in bar).

6.3 CO2 Requirements for Deep Seated Fires

6.3.1 Basic Quantity


Multiply the volume to be protected (cubic meters) by the flooding factor given in Table 6-3 (Hazard
Factors).

Example
Paper documents storage room: 6m x 6m x 3m high = 108m3
108m3 x 2 kg/m3 CO2 = 216kg

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6.3.2 Openings
Total flooding systems protecting solid materials cannot tolerate the degree of openings permitted for
surface fire protection.
The design concentration must be maintainable over a long period; low level openings are not
practicable. Small openings at or near the ceiling are ideal because:
a) Compensation for losses involves only reasonable quantities of additional CO2.
b) They allow the escape of hot gases.
c) They prevent pressure increases that can stress the enclosure structure.
Any openings that cannot be closed shall be compensated for by the addition of CO2 equal in volume
to the expected loss during the extinguishing and holding time.

6.3.3 Forced Ventilation


When forced air ventilation systems are used, they shall, if possible, be shutdown before, or
simultaneously, with the start of the CO2 discharge. If this cannot be done, additional CO2 must be
applied.
If there is a short run down time but the quantity of air removed is significant, additional CO2 must be
applied. The additional CO2 must be discharged within the time specified in BS 5306 part 4.
For calculation purposes the volume of air removed in one minute will be replaced with CO2 at the
design concentration being used.

Example
Assume the room has 30m3 of air removed by the ventilation system in one minute:
30m3 x 2kg/m3 = 60kg + 216kg (original) = 276kg

Services such as heating, fuel supplies, paint spraying, conveyors etc. must also be shutdown before
or simultaneously, with the CO2 discharge.

6.3.4 Interconnected Volumes


In two or more interconnected volumes where free flow of CO2 can occur, the CO2 quantity shall be
the sum of the quantities calculated for each volume, using its respective volume factor. If one volume
requires greater than normal concentration, the higher concentration shall be used for all
interconnected volumes.

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Hazard Design Flooding Concentration (%) Factors (kg/m3)


Electrical equipment.
Enclosed rotating equipment
50 1.35
Dry electrical wiring
Electrical insulating materials
Computer installations *
Central processing areas and 53 1.50
equipment
Data processing
Tape controlled machinery 68 2.25
and tape storage
Service Voids 68 2.25
Stores
Record stores and archives for
65 2.00
paper documents
Ducts and covered trenches
Fur storage vaults
75 2.70
Dust collectors
General
Cocoa
Leather 63 1.78
Silk
Wool
Coal
Coffee
Cork
Cotton
75 2.70
Peanuts
Rubber
Soybean
Sugar

Based on an expansion ratio of 0.52m3/kg at a temperature of 10°C


* See also BS 6266
Table 6-3 Hazard Factors BS 5306 Part 4

NOTE: Flooding factors for other deep seated fires should be agreed with Kidde Fire
Protection.
Table 6-1 (Volume Factors) is NOT applicable for deep seated fires and must not be used.

6.3.5 Extended Discharge


In some instances it may be necessary to have an extended discharge for leakage compensation with
a rate of flow that is considerably slower than that required for initial fire extinguishing. A typical
example is the protection of rotating electrical machinery, i.e. alternators and generators, where an
initial concentration has to be achieved in a short time and a minimum concentration of 30% during a
specified deceleration period, which should be held for 20 minutes.

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Two separate banks of CO2 containers and distribution piping are used in this case, the ‘initial’ bank
discharging at a fast rate and the ‘extended’ bank discharging at a slow rate.

Table 6-4 is used to determine the quantity of CO2 to maintain minimum concentration.
The quantities are based on the nett internal volume of the machine and the deceleration time
assuming average leakage.
For non re-circulating machines with relief vents add 35% to the quantities shown in
Table 6-4.

6.3.6 Venting for Deep Seated Fire Systems


Leakage around doors and windows often provides sufficient pressure relief without special
arrangements being required. It is possible to calculate the area of free venting needed for very tight
enclosures but it is recommended that the customer is provided with the formula and CO2 flow rate so
that his architect can take the responsibility.
Q
  29.3 
√P
Where:
X is the free venting area (mm²).
Q is the calculated carbon dioxide flow rate (kg/min).
P is the permissible strength (internal pressure) of enclosure (bar).

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CO2 Required 5 min 10 min 15 min 20 min 30 min 40 min 50 min 60 min
kg lb m3 ft3 m3 ft3 m3 ft3 m3 ft3 m3 ft3 m3 ft3 m3 ft3 ft3
45 100 34 1 200 28 1 000 23 800 17 600 14 500 11 400 9 300 6 200
68 150 51 1 800 43 1 500 34 1 200 28 1 000 21 750 17 600 14 500 11 400
91 200 68 2 400 55 1 950 45 1 600 37 1 300 28 1 000 24 850 18 650 14 500
113 250 93 3 300 69 2 450 57 2 000 47 1 650 37 1 300 30 1 050 23 800 17 600
136 300 130 4 600 88 3 100 68 2 400 57 2 000 47 1 650 37 1 300 28 1 000 20 700
159 350 173 6 100 116 4 100 85 3 000 71 2 500 57 2 000 47 1 650 34 1 200 26 900
181 400 218 7 700 153 5 400 108 3 800 89 3 150 71 2 500 57 2 000 45 1 600 34 1 200
204 450 262 9 250 193 6 800 139 4 900 113 4 000 88 3 100 74 2 600 60 2 100 45 1 600
227 500 306 10 800 229 8 100 173 6 100 142 5 000 110 3 900 93 3 300 79 2 800 62 2 200
250 550 348 12 300 269 9 500 210 7 400 173 6 100 139 4 900 119 4 200 102 3 600 88 3 100
272 600 394 13 900 309 10 900 244 8 600 204 7 200 170 6 000 147 5 200 127 4 500 110 3 900
295 650 436 15 400 348 12 300 279 9 850 235 8 300 200 7 050 176 6 200 156 5 500 136 4 800
319 700 479 16 900 385 13 600 314 11 100 266 9 400 230 8 100 204 7 200 181 6 400 159 5 600
340 750 524 18 500 425 15 000 350 12 350 297 10 500 259 9 150 232 8 200 207 7 300 184 6 500
363 800 566 20 000 464 16 400 385 13 600 329 11 600 289 10 200 261 9 200 232 8 200 207 7 300
386 850 609 21 500 503 17 750 421 14 850 360 12 700 320 11 300 289 10 200 258 9 100 229 8 100
408 900 651 23 000 541 19 100 456 16 100 391 13 800 350 12 350 317 11 200 285 10 050 255 9 000
431 950 697 24 600 581 20 500 491 17 350 422 14 900 379 13 400 346 12 200 312 11 000 278 9 800
454 1 000 739 26 100 620 21 900 527 18 600 453 16 000 411 14 500 374 13 200 337 11 900 303 10 700
476 1 050 782 27 600 666 23 300 564 19 900 484 17 100 442 15 600 402 14 200 364 12 850 326 11 500
499 1 100 824 29 100 697 24 600 596 21 050 515 18 200 470 16 600 430 15 200 389 13 750 351 12 400
522 1 150 867 30 600 736 26 000 632 22 300 547 19 300 501 17 700 459 16 200 416 14 700 374 13 200
544 1 200 912 32 200 773 27 300 667 23 550 578 20 400 532 18 800 487 17 200 442 15 600 399 14 100
567 1 250 954 33 700 813 28 700 702 24 800 609 21 500 562 19 850 515 18 200 467 16 500 422 14 900
590 1 300 1 000 35 300 852 30 100 738 26 050 641 22 650 592 20 900 544 19 200 494 17 450 447 15 800
612 1 350 1 042 36 800 889 31 400 773 27 300 673 23 750 623 22 000 572 20 200 521 18 400 472 16 650
635 1 400 1 087 38 400 929 32 800 809 28 550 705 24 900 654 23 100 600 21 200 548 19 350 496 17 500
658 1 450 1 130 39 900 968 34 200 844 29 800 736 26 000 685 24 200 629 22 200 575 20 300 520 18 350
680 1 500 1 172 41 400 1 008 35 600 879 31 050 767 27 100 715 25 250 657 23 200 600 21 200 544 19 200

Table 6-4 Extended Discharge Gas Quantities for Enclosure Circulation - Rotating Electrical Machines

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6.4 Discharge Rates for Total Flooding Systems


The importance of the following calculations is that pipe and nozzle sizes are based on the desired
flow rate (refer to Section 6.9).
0.52m³/kg @ 10°C
0.54m³/kg @ 20°C
0.56m³/kg @ 30°C

6.4.1 Surface Fires


For surface fires the design concentration will be achieved in one minute.

Example
A Room requires 1,000kg of CO2.

This would be the basic quantity calculated, plus all additions but not including any special addition for
cooling purposes (refer to Section 6.4)
1000kg of CO2 ÷ by one minute
Flow rate = 1000kg/min

6.4.2 Deep Seated Fires


For deep seated fires the design concentration will be achieved within seven minutes but the rate will
not be less than that required to develop a concentration of 30% in two minutes.
This would be the basic quantity calculated, plus all additions but not including an extended
discharge.

Example
Paper documents storage room:
6m x 6m x 3m high = 108m3
108m3 x 2kg/m3 of CO2 = 216kg
30% vol = 32.4m3
32.4 in3 ÷ 0.56m3/kg (expansion 30°C) = 57.85kg ÷ 2
Flow rate = 29kg/min
Flow time = 216 ÷ 29 = 7.45 minutes
To ensure a flow time of 7 minutes
Use 216 ÷ 7 = 31kg per minute

Most calculations produce a flow time of between four and seven minutes, the last step shows
what to do if seven minutes is exceeded.

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6.5 Nozzle Distribution


For flooding rooms use discharge horn nozzles part number K61793 N3-N12 or K61792 N13-N18;
nozzle diameter and orifice size depends upon flow rate required.
Nozzles should be spaced approximately 6m apart for standard systems. For FM Approved systems
the maximum space is up to 4.9m.
For rooms up to 5m high, install nozzles at a height of 2.5m and angle of 45°. Average throw for
standard systems is approximately 4m.
For rooms between 5m and 10m high, install at 2/3 height up from floor.
For rooms with high stacking or rooms over 10m high, it may be necessary to install at 1/3 and 2/3
levels.
Obstructions - If obstructions interfere with efficient distribution it may be necessary to use more
nozzles than specified above, or even locate nozzles at ceiling level.
To protect the nozzle in dirty conditions use the flanged horn version part number K5814 N4-N8.
To inject CO2 into ducts use duct nozzle part number K13045 N3-N4.

6.6 Local Application Systems


Local application systems are used for extinguishing surface fires in flammable liquids, vapours and
shallow solids, where the hazard is not enclosed or where the degree of enclosure does not conform
to the requirements for total flooding. Local application systems are not currently FM Approved.
In carbon dioxide local application systems, CO2 is discharged directly into the fire. The efficiency of
the system depends on the CO2 contacting the burning surface at the required rate of flow. Correct
discharge horn nozzle positioning is critical.

NOTE: Quantities of CO2 must NOT be determined by using


Table 6-1.

6.6.1 Examples of Hazards


Dip tanks, quench tanks, printing presses, textile machinery, coating machinery, spray booths, kitchen
ranges and hoods etc.

6.6.2 General
The important point is that the hazard shall be isolated from other hazards and the entire hazard
protected simultaneously, so that fire is prevented from spreading to unprotected areas and a re-flash
from unprotected areas is not possible.
For example, in a six stand printing press simultaneous protection would be given to all printing
stands, the drying boxes, the ink supply containers, and the flammable vapour extract duct. Similarly
in an industrial food processing environment, simultaneous protection is given to the cooking oil
surfaces, the burner compartment, the fume hood and extraction duct.

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Any service likely to affect the efficiency of the CO2 discharge must be interlocked with the system so
as to automatically shut down. This would include ventilating fans, conveyors, flammable liquid
pumps, mixers, heaters, dryers, sprayers etc.

6.6.3 CO2 Quantities


The quantity of CO2 to be used in a local application system can be determined by either of two
methods depending upon the hazard construction, but there are various factors that are common to
both.
The amount of CO2 required is computed by multiplying the total nozzle discharge rate by the time the
discharge is required to be maintained.
For high pressure systems, the computed quantity of CO2 is increased by 40% to compensate for the
fact that only 70% of the cylinder content is discharged as a liquid and considered effective.
If a combination of total flooding and local application protection is being given, this increase is not
needed for the total flooding portion. The discharge rate for the total flooding portion can be calculated
by dividing the quantity required for total flooding by the factor 1.4 and by the time of the local
application discharge in minutes.

6.6.4 Duration of Discharge


The minimum, effective liquid discharge time is 30 seconds. This is increased if hot surfaces or
materials require a longer time to assist in cooling and to prevent re-ignition.
The standard does not specify the prolonged discharge time so this must be decided by the designer
taking into account the temperature involved and local site considerations, but somewhere between 1
to 3 minutes is usually adequate.
The minimum discharge time for Carbon Dioxide being applied to liquids that have an auto-ignition
temperature that is lower than their boiling temperature shall be 3 min.
For example when protecting a kitchen range a prolonged discharge of 3 minutes is given to the
cooking oil surface but only 30 seconds to other associated areas.

6.6.5 Material Conversion Factor


A MCF is applied when appropriate (as specified in Section 6.2.5). The increased quantity of CO2 has
to be discharged during the 30 second minimum period.

Example
Local application portion:
Flow rate (kg/min) x discharge time (min) x 1.4 x MCF = kg of CO2 required.
E.g. 100kg/min x 0.5 x 1.4 x 1.5 (Ethyl Ether) = 100 x 0.7x 1.5 = 105kg

Plus 150kg for a 90 second discharge for cooling = 315kg in total and discharged at a rate of
150kg/min.

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Total flooding portion:


Quantity of CO2 required is determined by the total flooding method
Flow rate = (quantity of CO2) / (1.4 x discharge time)

e.g. 14kg of CO2 is for a total flooding portion of a combined local application minus total flooding
system (discharge time 0.5min)
Flow rate = 14kg / (1.4 x0.5) = 20kg/min

NOTE: Only liquid discharge is effective in a local application system.

6.7 Rate by Area Method


The area method of system design is used where the fire hazard consists of flat surfaces or low-level
objects associated with flat horizontal surfaces.
When flammable liquid fires are to be extinguished, a minimum freeboard of 150mm is necessary.

6.7.1 CO2 Quantity


The maximum area protected by each discharge horn and the amount of CO2 required varies with the
distance of the horn from the surface being protected. The greater the distance, the larger the area
covered and quantity of CO2 required.
The portion of a hazard surface protected by each horn is based on its ‘side of square’ coverage.
Nozzle sizes are selected for their area coverage and flow rate so as to minimise the amount of CO2
required.

See Table 6-5 for details of horn height, area coverage and CO2 quantity combinations.

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Coated Surface (m) Discharge Horn Liquid Surface (m)


Area Side of Height Rate Area Side of
(m2) Square (m) (kg/min) (m2) Square
1.17 1.08 0.60 14.0 0.84 0.91
1.23 1.11 0.68 15.7 0.88 0.94
1.30 1.14 0.76 17.3 0.93 0.96
1.36 1.17 0.84 19.3 0.98 0.99
1.43 1.19 0.91 20.5 1.02. 1.01
1.50 1.22 0.99 21.6 1.07 1.03
1.56 1.25 1.07 23.6 1.11 1.05
1.62 1.27 1.14 25.2 1.16 1.08
1.69 1.30 1.22 26.8 1.20 1.09
1.76 1.33 1.30 28.4 1.25 1.12
1.82 1.35 1.37 30.0 1.30 1.14
1.86 1.37 1.45 31.6 1.35 1.16
1.95 1.40 1.52 33.2 1.39 1.18
2.01 1.42 1.60 34.8 1.44 1.20
2.08 1.44 1.67 36.4 1.49 1.22
2.15 1.46 1.75 38.0 1.53 1.23
2.21 1.48 1.83 39.5 1.58 1.26
2.28 1.50 1.90 41.1 1.62 1.27
2.34 1.53 1.98 42.7 1.67 1.29
2.41 1.55 2.06 44.3 1.72 1.31
2.47 1.57 2.13 46.0 1.76 1.33
2.54 1.59 2.21 47.5 1.81 1.34
2.60 1.61 2.29 49.1 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.36 50.7 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.44 52.3 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.51 53.9 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.59 55.5 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.67 57.0 1.86 1.36
2.60 1.61 2.74 58.6 1.86 1.36
Part Numbers K5814 up to N8 Part Numbers. K61793 up to N12 and K61792 up to N18
Table 6-5 Horn Selection and CO2 Quantity (Interpolations are not permitted)

6.7.2 Horn Dispositions


Hazard conditions often restrict the positioning of discharge horns but to use Table 6-5 accurately,
horns must be installed perpendicular to the hazard and centred over the area to be protected. They
may also be installed at angles between 45 and 90° to the plane of the hazard. The ‘height’ used in
determining the necessary flow rate and area coverage is the distance from the aiming point on the
protected surface to the face of the horn measured along the axis of the horn.
See Figure 6-1 for a typical example.

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Figure 6-1 Aiming Position for Angled Discharge Horns

The aiming point is measured from the near side of the area protected and is located by multiplying
the fractional aiming factor in Table 6-6 by the width of the area protected by the horn.

Discharge Angle (see note 1) Aiming Factor (see note 2)


45 to 60° 1/4
60 to 75° 1/4 to 3/8
75 to 90° 3/8 to 1/2
90° (perpendicular) 1/2 (centre)
Table 6-6 Aiming Factors for Nozzles Installed at an Angle (based on 150 mm freeboard)

NOTE: Degrees from plane of hazard surface.


Fractional amount of nozzle coverage area.

It is important that horns are located so that the discharge is not obstructed and their alignment is not
easily disturbed.

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Discharge horns must be located so as to develop an extinguishing concentration over coated stock
that may be extending over a protected surface, e.g. freshly dipped items hanging on a conveyor line.
In these circumstances additional horns may be required for this specific purpose, particularly if stock
extends more than 600mm above a protected surface.

Note the increase in area coverage that is given in Table 6-5 for coated surfaces compared with
liquid surfaces.

The effects of severe air currents and draughts shall be compensated for by adjusting horn locations
or by providing additional horns to suit the expected conditions.

Example
Hazard: Quench Tank
Material: Quench Lube Oil
MCF: 1
Surface dimensions: 0.92 m x 2.13m

Horn Location: The site survey has shown that discharge horns can be positioned anywhere from
0.92m to 1.83m above the liquid surface without interfering with plant operations.

Design Aim: To select a combination of horn height, area coverage and flow rate to adequately cover
the area with the minimum CO2 quantity.

Procedure: Consider the size to be protected. What is the minimum number of horns that could be
used to cover a length of 2.13m of liquid surface?

Answer: Two horns with a side of square each of 1.08m. This selection also satisfies a width of 0.92m
since it is less than 1.08m, and also an area of 1.95m² since it is less than can be protected by the
two horns selected.

Horns required: Two located centrally above the liquid surface pointing down from a height of 1.14m.

Flow rate: 2 x 25.2kg per minute = 50.4kg/min

CO2 required. 50.4 x (1.4/2) (liquid flow for 0.5 min) = 50.4 x 0.7 = 35.3kg

This provides the basic CO2 quantity for the minimum permitted length of time but the discharge time
at the calculated flow rate could be increased for cooling to prevent re-ignition.

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6.8 Rate by Volume Method


The assumed volume method of system design is used where the fire hazard consists of three
dimensional irregular objects that cannot easily be reduced to equivalent surface areas, or where the
degree of enclosure does not conform to the requirements for total flooding.

6.8.1 Assumed Enclosure


The total discharge rate of the system is based on the volume of hypothetical enclosure surrounding
the hazard.
The assumed enclosure must have a closed floor.
The assumed walls and ceiling of the ‘enclosure’ shall be at least 0.6m from the main hazard unless
actual walls are involved, and they must enclose all areas of possible leakage, splashing or spillage.
No deduction from the assumed volume shall be made for solid objects within this volume. A
minimum dimension of 1.2m shall be used in calculating the assumed volume.

6.8.2 CO2 Quantity


The total discharge rate for the basic system with no sides shall be 16kg/min per m³ of assumed
volume.
If the assumed enclosure is partly defined by permanent continuous walls extending at least 0.6m
above the hazard, the discharge rate may be proportionately reduced to not less than 4kg/min per m³
for the actual walls completely surrounding the hazard. See Figure 6-2 for quickly deciding the
appropriate discharge rate.

Figure 6-2 Discharge Rate, per kg per min per m3

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6.8.3 Horn Dispositions


A sufficient number of horns must be used to adequately cover the entire hazard volume and they
must be located and directed so as to retain the CO2 in the hazard volume by suitable co-operation
between horns and objects making up the hazard volume.
If forced draughts or air currents are anticipated they must be compensated for by a suitable
disposition of the discharge horns.
To ensure that discharge horns are not located too remotely from the risk as to be ineffective, and not
so close to liquids as to cause splashing; a check can be made by using Table 6-6.

Examples
If horn P/N K61792, with a flow rate of 52.3 kg/min, was selected it should be located approximately
2.44 m from the surface it is protecting.

Example 1
Hazard: Paint Spray Booth (ignoring extract duct for this calculation)
Actual dimensions: 2.44m wide (open front) x 2.13m high x 1.83m deep
Assumed volume: 2.44m x 2.13m x 2.43m (1.83m deep + 0.6m) = 12.63m3
Percent Perimeter enclosed =
(2.44 + 1.83 + 1.83) / (2.44 + 2.44 + 1.83 + 1.83) = (6.1/ 8.54) = 71%
Discharge rate for 71% enclosure: from Figure 6-2= 7.5kg/min m3
Discharge rate: 12.63m3 x 7.5 kg/min m3 = 94.73kg/min
CO2 required: 94.73kg/min x 0.7 = 66.3kg x MCF (1.0)

Example 2
Hazard: Printer with 4 sides and top open (no continuous solid walls and ignoring extract duct for this
calculation).
Actual dimensions:
1.22m wide x 1.52m long x 1.22m high (this is the maximum hazard outline)
Assumed volume:
2.42m (1.22 + 0.6 + 0.6) x 2.72m (1.52 + 0.6 + 0.6) x 1.82m (1.22 + 0.6) = 11.98m3
Percent perimeter enclosed: Zero
Discharge rate for 0% enclosure: 16kg/min m3
Discharge rate: 11.98m3 x 16 kg/min m3 = 191.7kg/min
CO2 required: 191.7kg/min x 0.7 = 134.2kg x MCF (1.0)

NOTE: The assumed volume method of system design always needs more gas than the rate
by area method, so to be competitive it is always worth considering if the risk can be protected
by the area method. Example 2 can, but Example 1 cannot.

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6.9 Pipe Selection


The selection of the various grades of pipe and fittings in order to meet the duties imposed by
operating pressures arid temperatures is made by complying with BS 5306 part 4 or NFP A 12 as
appropriate.

6.9.1 Rate of Application


Also refer to Section 6.4.
Where advancement of flame is potentially rapid, as in surface fires, the CO2 discharge must be
comparably fast to minimise damage.
Where the spread of fire is potentially slow, such as deep seated fires in solid materials, more
emphasis is placed on maintaining a fire suppression concentration for a lengthy period of time to
allow time for cooling.
Where the spread of fire may be faster than normal for the type of fire expected, or where high values,
or vital machinery or equipment are involved, higher rates than the stated minimums may be used.
Where a hazard contains materials that will produce both surface, and deep seated fires, the rate of
application should be at least the minimum required for surface fires.

6.9.2 Pipe Size Estimates


Hydraulic pipe size calculations are accurately determined by using the Kidde Fire Protection CO2
Computer Calculation Program. However, for estimating for a quotation, only a reasonably accurate
result is needed and this can be achieved by using Table 6-7.

Metric Imperial

Estimated Pipe Size


Flow Rate Estimated Pipe Size Flow Rate Nominal bore
(kg/min) Nominal bore (mm) (lbs/min)
(inches)
Up to 123 20 Up to 270 ¾

124 to 177 25 271 to 390 1

178 to 363 32 391 to 800 1¼

364 to 545 40 801 to 1200 1½

546 to 1045 50 1201 to 2300 2

1046 to 1363 65 2300 to 3000 2½

Table 6-7 Pipe Size Estimates.

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Examples
A surface fire where the design concentration has to be achieved in one minute. If a space requires
300kg of CO2, the flow rate from the main manifold would be 300kg/min and the size of the feed pipe
would be 32mm bore.
If the system used 4 discharge horns in a balanced distribution system, the feed pipe would branch
into two pipes each flowing at 150kg/min and would be sized 25mm bore.

NOTE: The design concentration would include any extra CO2 for losses through openings
and that demanded by the MCF but would not include any extra CO2 allowed for cooling. This
would be allowed to discharge at the same rate and would extend the discharge time beyond
one minute.

The same philosophy applies in a local application system except that the minimum discharge time is
30 seconds, which may be extended beyond this time to discharge any extra CO2 added for cooling.
A deep seated fire where the design concentration has to be achieved within seven minutes, but a
concentration of 30% (must be achieved within) two minutes.
When an order has been received, the Contract Engineer would calculate the flow rate accurately. For
estimating purposes it is sufficient to adopt a short cut method.

To determine the flow rate divide the volume protected by:


3 if in cubic metres and answer in kg/min.
51 if in cubic feet and answer in lbs/min.
In an extended discharge system where the CO2 quantity is derived from

Table 6-4, it is simply necessary to divide the quantity of CO2 required by the length of time of the
extended discharge to determine the flow rate.

6.9.3 Nozzle Sizes

These are determined by use of the Calculation Program, and nozzle orifice sizes are drilled in
accordance to the range stated on the relevant data sheets.
A point to bear in mind is that the maximum number of discharge horns that can be fed by one
container is 11 – N3.
The larger the nozzle orifice the smaller the number of horns that can be used, i.e. only one N11

6.10 CO2 Storage Container Location


It is important to get a commitment from a prospective client about the location of storage containers
because this will affect the installation of pipe, detection lines and cabling, and remote pull controls.
The containers shall be located in a secure area and arranged so that they are readily accessible for
inspection, testing, recharging and other maintenance.

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Containers shall be located as near as possible to the space they protect. They may be located
within the protected space, but must not be exposed to a fire in a manner that is likely to impair
system performance. If located within the protected space the manual/pneumatic actuator can be
used to provide a means of mechanically operating the system from outside the protected space. The
chosen location should provide protection from mechanical, chemical, electrical and other types of
damage. Suitable guards or enclosures should be provided when necessary, as required by an
appropriate risk analysis. The floor at the container location must be suitable for withstanding the
loading exerted by the containers.
The containers must not be exposed to the direct rays of the sun. When excessive temperature
variations are expected, suitable enclosures shall be provided.

The general ambient storage temperatures should not exceed the following:
a) For total flooding systems: not greater than 55ºC or less than -18ºC.
(b) For local application systems: not greater than 46ºC or less than 0ºC.

NOTE: The minimum storage temperature for local application is higher than that allowed for
total flooding systems because the discharge area limit tests were carried out at a minimum
temperature of 0ºC and to operate at lower temperatures would cause the figures in Table 6-5
to be incorrectly applied.

6.11 Distribution Valves


When the multiple hazards are located reasonably close together they can be protected with a single
bank of containers with the CO2 being directed to the hazard on fire by opening the appropriate
distribution valve on a distribution valve manifold.
When using this method it is important to consider the list below:
a) The amount of CO2 is sufficient for the largest hazard.
b) There is only one supply of agent so it must not be possible for fire to spread from one zone
to another.
c) Any number of zones can be protected by a single bank of containers but Insurers’ rules
generally limit the number to 5.
d) A reserve supply of CO2 should be considered.

6.12 Automatic Operation


Systems should preferably be operated automatically by a detection system which is appropriate to
the risk. FM Approved systems are required to be operated automatically.
Where applicable e.g. slow burning hazards; the requirements of BS 5839 should be observed.

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6.13 Manual Control


All systems must be fitted with a manual release facility.

6.13.1 Manual Release


When mechanically operated pull-handles are used the following limitations apply:
Maximum length of cable =45m
Maximum number of corner pulleys = 10
Maximum number of sets = 1
All mechanical functions must be tested upon completion of the installation to ensure proper
performance.

6.14 Alarms
System condition indicators should be provided as appropriate to the surroundings.
a) A total flooding systems should have indicators located outside the entrance doors to show:
• CO2 Discharged - Red Lamp
• Manual Control Only - Green Lamp
• Automatic and Manual Control - Amber Lamp
These indications may not always be necessary for a local application system.

b) Additional alarms may be needed to be transmitted to remote locations including a Central


Station, and other system conditions may be required such as:
• System Totally Disabled - Amber Lamp
• Fire - Red Flashing Lamp
• System Operated - Red Steady Lamp
• Supply Healthy - Green Lamp

NOTE: Warning labels are required to be located alongside manual release points and located
on all entrance doors.

Depending upon the size and complexity of the site or system, instructional wall charts may be
required.

Operating and Maintenance manuals should always be provided.

Audible alarms should be provided as appropriate to the type of system and protected area, but at
least to the requirements of BS 5306 part 4.

Where BS 5839 is not a requirement, local alarms may be mains operated provided the supply can be
guaranteed.

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6.15 Electrostatic Discharge


WARNING: Care should be taken when discharging carbon dioxide into potentially explosive
atmospheres.

When applying CO2 into potentially explosive atmospheres, in particular those containing explosive
vapours and gases, the following should be taken into account:

Electrostatic charging of steel piping not bonded to earth may occur during the discharge of carbon
dioxide – therefore pipework shall be bonded and earthed in accordance with BS 7430 and BS 7671.

The discharge of carbon dioxide is known to generate an electrostatic charge in the hazard. Under
certain conditions, impingement of the CO2 on isolated conducting surfaces over time can lead to a
build-up of charge which could generate an electrical spark which could pose as an ignition risk.

6.16 Detection
Automatic detection systems used with CO2 extinguishing systems should comply with appropriate
Codes of Practice, these include:
• BS 5839 - Fire Detection and Alarm Systems in Buildings.
• BS 6266 - Data Processing Installations.
• FOC rules.
• This manual.
FM Approved systems are required to be installed with FM Approved detection and release devices.
NOTE: Attention is drawn to the considerably higher concentration of detectors required by
BS6266 when protecting computer suites.

This philosophy should not be extended into other areas of protection without prior consultation with
Kidde Fire Protection.

6.17 Safety Requirements


WARNING: The exposure of personnel to carbon dioxide at fire suppression design
concentration levels present serious hazards through toxic and asphyxiation effects that can
be lethal.

Suitable safeguards are required to protect people in areas where the atmosphere may become
hazardous by the presence of carbon dioxide gas from a fixed fire extinguishing system. Carbon
dioxide at atmospheric pressure is a colourless, odourless and electrically non-conducting inert gas
which is nearly 1.5 times denser than air resulting in possible migration of carbon dioxide travelling to
lower levels. These hazards to personnel have to be taken into account in the design and installation
of the systems. Consideration to the possibility of carbon dioxide collecting in pits, wells, shafts or

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any other potential lower lying areas where carbon dioxide might escape too which fall outside the
protected enclosure and/or the cylinder storage area.

6.17.1 Total Flooding Systems


Entry into a protected space may only be made when the system is on manual control and automatic
release has been prevented.
If a CO2 protected room is normally occupied by people a normally closed valve should be fitted into
the feed pipe so that a malicious or accidental release at the container bank is stopped from
discharging into the room. The valve should only open when demanded by the detectors or by a
manual release unit.
The condition of the valve should be automatically monitored and indicated. CO2 trapped in the feed
pipe should be indicated by means of a pressure switch and a locked closed valve fitted so that the
CO2 can be safely vented to atmosphere.
A time delay may be used, but only in addition to an isolation device (refer to Section 6.14 for alarm
signals).

6.17.2 Local Application Systems


An isolating device to prevent automatic release is not necessary, if it can be shown that following a
risk analysis a hazardous concentration cannot be created within the total volume of the room
containing the local application system. A time delay and pre-discharge alarm is acceptable to the
Health and Safety Executive in this circumstance.
The facility provided on system actuators and control heads for totally disabling a system are not to be
used as a normal ‘entry to space isolating device’.

WARNING: Carbon dioxide extinguishes fire by reducing the oxygen content from the normal
21% in air to ~15% or lower which are levels that are lethal to personnel.

6.18 FM Approved Systems


The Kidde Fire Protection High Pressure CO2 System is FM Approved. FM Global Datasheets
should be consulted prior to installation of an FM Approved system. Specifically, FM Global
Datasheet 4-11N, Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, should be reviewed for conformance.

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7. HYDRAULIC FLOW CALCULATION PROGRAM

7.1 Hydraulic Flow Calculation Program (KFP CO2 – version 2.0.9


January 2010)
The high pressure CO2 calculation program (KFP CO2) has been written within the Windows™
environment. Installation procedures will be provided with the software files. (It is our assumption
that the user has a basic knowledge of this operating system and its operation will not be addressed
within this manual.) The computer program will establish pipe sizes as well as calculate terminal
pressures, discharge time, and nozzle drill sizes. The primary requirement for a proper calculation is
to insure that the system is modelled into the computer program correctly. Therefore, the input
parameters may be printed out as well as the calculation results. This makes it possible to verify the
input data against the intended design parameters and/or the actual installation. It is possible to input
either kilograms required for each nozzle fixed flow rate or the existing nozzle drill size (fixed code).

The Kidde Fire Protection Carbon Dioxide Flow calculation program has been divided into three main
areas:
1. Commands Available
2. Output
3. File Utilities.

NOTE: The calculation information can be entered and displayed in metric or imperial units. It
can be converted at any time upon command by simply using the metric check box.

7.1.1 Commands Available


This area has been subdivided into the following categories:
• System Information
• Hazard Information
• Piping Model Data
• Calculate and Display Results
• Clear All Current Data

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Figure 7-1 Software Main Title Page

7.1.2 System Information


Within the Systems Information screen there are four submenus:
• Project Data
• Revision
• Cylinder Data
• Configuration Variables

Figure 7-2 System Information

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7.1.3 Project Data


The Project Data section consists of the following data:
• Project Number: Reference number
• Project Name: Name of project or end user
• Site Location: Installation location
• Hazard Name: Name of protected hazard

7.1.4 Revision
This data field is used to track versions/changes on a specific data file and/or submittal.

7.1.5 Cylinder Data


The Cylinder Data section consists of the following data:
• Number of Cylinders: The number of cylinders required to contain the amount of CO2 required
for a discharge. This value may be entered by one of two means: the value may be directly
entered into this field or a value may be selected from the pop-down window, which may be
accessed by clicking onto the arrow at the right of the data field.
• Cylinder Capacity: The CO2 cylinders are available in 6.8kg, 22.6kg and 45kg capacities.
• Storage Pressure (bar): This is a fixed selection. All high pressure CO2 calculations are based
upon an average storage pressure of 58.6 bar @ 21°C (850 psi).
• Pipe Length Factor: The length of the main piping run affects the vapour time associated with a
CO2 discharge. The longer the run, the greater the amount of CO2 vaporised within the piping.
The discharge rate of each nozzle must be increased to draw more liquid CO2 into the piping
network to compensate for the vapour. Table 7-1 is a guideline for the pipe length factor.

Distance Factor

0 – 15m
1.10
(0-50ft)
15 – 30m
1.20
(50-100ft)
30 – 90m
1.30
(101-300ft)
90 – 120m
1.40
(301-400ft)
120 – 150m
1.50
(401-500ft)
Table 7-1 Pipe Length Factors

• Exclude Pipe Size: Occasionally, it is desirable to exclude or inhibit specific pipe sizes from
being selected and used by the calculation program. To exclude a pipe size from being selected,

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simply choose the specific size or “None”. Only a maximum of 2 sizes may be excluded from the
calculation. The sizes in this list represent all the pipe sizes possible for both steel pipe and
tubing.

NOTE: The user should be aware as to which pipe sizes are applicable to the pipe type that
will be utilized in the piping network.

Pipe Temperature: The initial pipe temperature should be entered here to accurately calculate
the vapour portion of the discharge.

Figure 7-3 Exclude pipe sizes


• Loss Factor (%): To compensate for enclosure tightness or lack thereof, the loss factor
(expressed in percentages) will proportionally increase the amount of CO2 storage required to
assure a minimum concentration. The default value is 10%.
• Minimum Temperature: For high pressure CO2 systems where the cylinders may be exposed to
temperatures below 0°C (32°F) for local application or -18°C (0°F) for total flooding systems.
• Main/Reserve: Adjusts the quantity of equipment for the Bill of Material printout.

7.1.6 Configuration Variables


Report Title: The data entered here will appear in the general heading area on all printouts. The
intended use is to allow Kidde Fire Protection distributors to incorporate their company name into the
printouts.

7.1.7 Hazard Information


Within the Hazard Information screen there are three subcategories:
• Hazard Data

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• Area
• Area Nozzle List

7.1.8 Hazard Data


The first section is used to input the hazard area name(s) for reference, type of CO2 protection,
concentration and temperature (Figure 7-4). More than one area name may be included; however
each area name must be entered separately.

Figure 7-4 Hazard Data

• Area Name: Enter the name of the specific area - commas are not accepted.
• Type: Select the appropriate hazard type (see Figure 7-5) and the calculation module will perform
the necessary cross checks needed to determine if the calculated system’s discharge
performance is satisfactory. See Table 7-2 for some examples of the cross checks performed.

The latest edition of BS 5306 part 4 / NFPA 12 should be consulted prior to determining the fire type
for each hazard.

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Figure 7-5 System Type

Fire Type Required Duration Comparison


TF Surface <=60 seconds Did the calculated requirement of gas discharge in
time?
TF Deep Seated <=420 seconds Did the hazard achieve 30% concentration in 2
minutes, and the remainder of gas required in less
than 7 minutes?
LA Rate by Area >=30 seconds Was there at least 30 seconds of LIQUID discharge
from each nozzle?
LA Rate by >=30 seconds Was there at least 30 seconds of LIQUID discharge
Volume from each nozzle?
Ext’d Discharge See below

Table 7-2 Cross checks performed depending on “Fire Type” selected

7.1.9 Extended Discharge


A fifth fire type of ‘Ext’d Discharge’ is for those hazards that require an extended discharge. The
program accommodates this by requesting a few bits of information and then compares the calculated
results to what the calculated requirements are based on the information supplied to the program.
When ‘Ext’d Discharge’ is chosen, the Extended Discharge Input form is shown.

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There are three choices available based on the hazard:


• Dry Electrical Hazard
• Hydroelectric Generator
• Job Specification

1. Dry Electrical Hazard: A typical hazard of this kind is anything that requires a 30% concentration
held for some period of time, i.e., a transformer room or a compartmentalised gas turbine. If this
option is chosen, simply fill in the volume, choose a loss factor per minute (usually between 1%
and 3% is sufficient for enclosures that have average leakage), and type in the cool-down (or
hold) time in minutes. After supplying these three pieces of information, press the Compute
button.

Figure 7-6 Extended Discharge Input Form

Next an ‘Extended Discharge Wizard’ dialog box will be shown (Figure 7-7); fill in the design criteria
for the ‘Initial Discharge’. Based upon the information supplied, the program will be able to compute
the extended discharge CO2 quantity and the rate of discharge per minute. If the initial discharge
design criteria needs to be modified, simply depress the ‘Edit Initial Discharge Information’ and the
program will re-compute the requirements for the extended discharge. When finished, simply press
the ‘Close’ button and the information from this form will automatically transfer to the Hazard Data
screen. Next add the required amount of discharge nozzles.

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Figure 7-7 Extended Discharge Wizard Input Section

2. Hydroelectric Generator: If this option is chosen, simply type in the volume and select the cool-
down time from the drop-down list. After completing this, press the ‘Compute’ button. The
software will use
3. Table 6-4 to calculate the amount of gas required and then calculate the appropriate rate of
discharge per minute. After this is complete, press the ‘Close’ button and the information from this
form will automatically transfer to the Hazard Data Screen. Then add the required amount of
discharge nozzles.
4. Job Specification: Sometimes manufacturers supply a specification for how the extended
discharge shall perform. In this case, select this option and fill in all the fields, i.e., volume, CO2
quantity, rate, and the cool-down time. Next, press ‘Compute’ so the program can compute/set
the necessary values needed for the calculation module. When this is complete, press the ‘Close’
button and the information from this form will automatically transfer to the Hazard Data Screen.
Next, add the required number of discharge nozzles.

• CO2 % (Design Concentration): For Total Flooding Systems only, this is the minimum
percentage of CO2 concentration required for this specific area. Refer to BS 5306 part 4 / NFPA12
for further information.
• Temperature: For Total Flooding Systems only, enter the normal ambient temperature for the
area. If the area has a temperature in excess of 100°C (212°F) or below -18°C (0°F), the program
will automatically compensate an additional 2% CO2 gas for every 5°C above 100°C and 2% CO 2

Gas for every 1°C below -20°C.

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7.1.10 Area
Enter the appropriate values in the Length, Width and Height field and the program will compute the
correct room volume and amount of agent required automatically. Please note, the Width and Height
fields are both set to a default of 1. If the volume is known, enter it into the Length data field and leave
the Width and Height fields as 1. Once the data has been entered, clicking on the ‘Add’ button will
assign this data to the current hazard.

7.1.11 Area Nozzle List


Each area must have one or more nozzles associated with it. Each nozzle will have a unique ID
number. These numbers are automatically assigned and are incremental, starting with 301. The
proper type of nozzle must be chosen for the type of hazard area being protected. Once a nozzle has
been added, a blank line will appear at the bottom of the nozzle grid. If no blank line appears at the
bottom of the grid, the nozzle has not been added. To change the nozzle type, simply click on the
row(s) and choose the correct nozzle type from the list. To change an existing nozzle number, select
the nozzle to be changed and type in the new nozzle number.

Figure 7-8 Area Nozzle List

7.2 Piping Model Data


The piping information is the heart of the system model. This area is where the pipe and kgs/nozzles
data is recorded. Several pieces of data are required and Section 7.2.2 provides a brief description of
each of the columns.

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Figure 7-9 Piping Model Data

7.2.1 System Design Considerations for Sectioning of Pipe


The first step is to make an isometric sketch of the system. All rises and drops should be noted, as
well as other known pertinent data such as manifold size and pipe schedule.
A separate pipe section is required for any one of the following conditions:
• Change in pipe diameter.
• Change in pipe schedule.
• Division of flow (at a tee).
• Rise or drop in elevation greater than 15.2m (50ft).

7.2.1.1 Terminal Points

The following must be observed on placement of terminal points:


• All terminal points should progress in logical numeric succession. The starting point (point 1) is
located at the bottom of the first cylinder’s dip tube. From here the subsequent points are plotted
moving toward the discharge nozzles.
• A terminal point is placed upstream before a tee where a division of flow occurs. Where flow is
routed through only one branch of a tee, a terminal number can be omitted if none of the four
conditions mentioned above occurs.
• A Pressure Operated Directional Valve (POD) should be kept as close to the beginning of a
section as possible. A POD valve can begin a section by placing the terminal point at the valve’s
inlet.
• A terminal point should be located at the start of a rise or drop of greater than five feet.

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• Number the terminal points consecutively to the end of each distribution section. Do not duplicate
numbers on the same calculation.
• Multi-hazard systems (utilising POD valves) demand close attention. The hazard requiring the
greatest flow rate (not necessarily the greatest quantity of CO2) should be calculated first, since it
will establish the size of the manifold and main discharge header. These sizes must be used in
calculations for the other hazards.

7.2.2 Column Headings and Descriptions


Nodes: These points identify the section of pipe, nozzle or a cylinder that is being modelled.

Start: This indicates the beginning of a pipe, manifold, or cylinder section.

End: This indicates the end of the same section. If this line is a nozzle, clicking the button that
appears in this cell will cause a ‘Nozzle Reference’ box to be visible. Here the user can scroll through
the hazards and select the desired nozzle, or simply type in the nozzle number into the end cell.

Figure 7-10 Nozzle Reference Box

Cylinder Qty: The quantity of cylinders flowing through this specific section of manifold piping. Enter
a quantity of zero (0) to indicate distribution piping.

Pipe Len: Length of pipe in feet or meters as applicable, including all elevation changes.

Elev: Change of elevation within the pipe section, expressed in feet or meters.
• A positive number indicates a rise in elevation.
• A negative number indicates a drop in elevation.
• A zero indicates no change in elevation.

Type: Type of pipe to be installed. There are several types available, accessible through the pop-
down, for use:
• 40T: Schedule 40 pipe with threaded fittings. Select for BS5306 systems using BS1387 pipe, up
to and including 40mm.
• 40W/V Schedule 40 pipe with welded or grooved / Victaulic fittings. Select for BS5306 systems
using BS1387 pipe, up to and including 40mm.

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• 80T: Schedule 80 pipe with threaded fittings. Select for BS5306 systems using BS3601 or API5L
pipe.
• 80W/V: Schedule 80 pipe with welded or grooved / Victaulic fittings. Select for BS5306 systems
using BS3601 or API5L pipe.

Tubing: Stainless steel tubing with compression fittings (


Table 7-3).
Not to be used in BS5306 systems

Tubing OD Wall Thickness


inches mm (inches)

1/4 8 0.065

5/16 9 0.065

3/8 10 0.065

1/2 15 0.065

5/8 18 0.065

3/4 20 0.095

7/8 22 0.095

1 25 0.095

1-1/4 32 0.188

1-1/2 40 0.188

2 50 0.188
All tubing to be either:
• Grade 304 seamless (ASTM A-213, A-269)
• Grade 304 welded (ASTM A-129, A-269)
• Grade 316 seamless (ASTM A-213, A-269)
• Grade 316 welded (ASTM A-249, A-269)
NOTE: Grade 304L and 316L tubing is NOT permitted.

Table 7-3 Tubing Chart

Size: The size of pipe in the section. When a pipe size of “0" is chosen, the program will
automatically calculate the pipe size required. Depending on the type of pipe chosen under the pipe
type column, the appropriate pipe sizes will be displayed in the pipe size drop down list i.e. if 40T is
chosen, a size of 22cm (7/8") will not be available.

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Figure 7-11 Pipe Size

Fittings 90's: Indicates the number of 90° elbows in the pipe sec tion. When 45° elbows are used,
they are treated as an equivalent number of 90° elb ows. In this case, 0.5 would be inserted for each
45° elbow and included in the 90's field.

Figure 7-12 Tees and Valves

Tees/Valves: The default for this section is ‘None’. For sections where tees or selector valves are
used, the following choices are available:
• Thru: The beginning of the pipe section begins with a thru tee. If the side branch of a tee is used
to provide pressure for tripping a pressure switch or pressure release, it is treated as an
equivalent number of elbows. In this case, 0.6 would be included in the 90's field.

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• Side: The beginning of the pipe section begins with side tee. If one of the thru branches of a tee
is used to provide pressure for tripping a pressure switch or pressure release, it is treated as an
equivalent number of elbows. In this case, 2.0 would be included in the 90's field.

• Dirt Trap or Blow-Out (Figure 7-13): The equivalent length of the dirt trap fittings will
automatically be included in the calculation program.

Figure 7-13 Typical Dirt Trap Arrangement

• Pressure Operated Directional Valve (POD): The beginning of the pipe section begins with a
POD valve. The equivalent length of the valve will automatically be included in the calculation
program. If a pipe type of ‘Tubing’ was chosen, it will be automatically changed to 40T.

• Thru & POD: To save time by avoiding additional lines of piping data input, if the pipe section
begins with a thru tee and is followed by a POD selector valve, the pipe modelling can be
configured as one line of input. All fitting equivalent lengths will automatically be included with the
input. If a pipe type of ‘Tubing’ was chosen, it will be automatically changed to 40T.

• Side & POD: Same as above but using a side tee instead of a thru tee.

• Ball Valve: When the section of piping contains a ball valve for purposes such as lockout or
isolation, the equivalent length of the valve will automatically be included in the calculation
program. If a pipe type of ‘Tubing’ was chosen, it will be automatically changed to 40T.

• Check Valve: When the section of piping contains a check valve, i.e., a main with reserve
system, the equivalent length of the check valve will automatically be included in the calculation. If
a pipe type of ‘Tubing’ was chosen, it will be automatically changed to 40T.

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• Fix Code: This default button should be on when the values in the ‘Kgs Required’ column indicate
the actual nozzle code or drill diameter in inches for a particular nozzle.

Flow Rate: This default button should be on when the values in the last column indicate the
discharge rate in kgs (pounds) per minute to be discharged from a nozzle. To set the rate for a
particular nozzle, select the far right cell, click the ‘Flow Rate’ default button, and then either type the
flow rate in or use the drop down list and select the “Get Rate” option. The computer will automatically
calculate and display the required flow rate needed for that particular nozzle. Alternatively, the flow
rates can be all set simultaneously after finishing the piping model by following the above steps, but
instead of selecting ‘Get Rate’ select ‘Set All’ (Figure 7-14).

Figure 7-14 Flow Rate

NOTE: The ‘Get Rate’ and ‘Set All’ functions only work for total flooding hazards and for
hazards that utilize the ‘ext’d discharge’. The rate must be determined by the local application
nozzle selector slide rule and inputted manually.
Unless a low rate orifice nozzle is selected for a hazard, all flow rates will default to a minimum
of 4.54kg/min (10lbs/min). This is to insure that the nozzle will not freeze up and clog the
discharge pipe.

7.2.2.1 Add, Copy & Paste, Insert, and Delete

Add: The ‘Add’ button works similarly to the Add buttons on the previous screens. Clicking the ‘Add’
button will add a blank line to the bottom of the data grid. Other ways to add data: Function key ‘F5’,
the ‘Right Arrow’ key (if positioned in the last column of the last row), or depressing the ‘Shift’ and
‘Insert’ keys simultaneously.

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Copy & Paste: To copy information in the row(s) select the desired cell(s) to be copied and press
‘Copy’ (F9 function key). To copy multiple rows at one time, simply click on any cell in the first row to
be copied and while continuing to depress the mouse button, highlight the remaining rows and select
‘Copy’ (F9 function key). Select a cell in the row where the copied rows are to be pasted. Press the
‘Paste’ button (F10 function key).

NOTE: Only consecutive rows can be copied at once. The lines will be inserted starting at the
row of the cell that is highlighted. This information can be pasted at any time and as many
times as necessary without reselecting the rows to be copied.

Insert: The ‘Insert’ button is used to insert a line of data into the data grid in a specific location other
than at the next available position at the bottom of the grid. In order to insert a line, click onto the
highest line in the data grid that must be moved down and depress the ‘Insert’ button (F7 function
key).

Delete: The ‘Delete’ function (F8 function key) is used to delete a line of data in the data grid.
Highlight the data line within the data grid by highlighting it with the mouse and click the ‘Delete’
button. A verification message will appear to validate the request. Confirm the request, the data line
will be deleted and any data lines below it will be moved up to compensate for the deleted line of data.

7.2.2.2 Fix Pipe

After running a calculation, it is always recommended to ‘Fix Results’ (Figure 7-16). After this is done,
the input data can be fixed to represent the pipe sizes, pipe schedules, and actual nozzle codes that
were determined by the calculation program. This is useful for ‘as-built’ modifications etc.

NOTE: This option is only available after a ‘fix results’ calculation has been performed.

7.3 Calculate and Display Results


By clicking on the ‘Calculate and Display Results’ button, the piping data file will be passed on to the
calculation program for processing. Once the processing is complete, the results will be displayed on
four different screens:
• Calc Results
• Nozzle BOM
• Nozzle Info
• Discharge Info

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7.3.1 Calc Results


System Information: This section of the Results screen indicates the cylinder quantity, size, pressure
and temperature as entered in the System Information Screen. Inhibited/excluded pipe sizes are also
noted.

Figure 7-15 Calculation Results – System Information

Piping: This section of the Results screen displays the following information:
• Section Nodes - The starting and ending nodes for a particular section of the pipe model.
• Nominal Pipe Size - The computed or inputted pipe size and schedule.
• Length - Length of pipe within the section, including elevation changes.
• Elev - The length of an elevation change within the section of pipe.
• EQL - Total equivalent length of the section of pipe, including pipe, elbows, tees, couplings
unions, valves, and additional information inputted into the equivalent length column of the data
file.
• Section Flow - The flow rate through the pipe section.
• BAR - The pressure at the termination of the section.
• Nozzle Flow - The flow rate through the pipe section and nozzle.
• Nozzle Code - The calculated/ideal nozzle code.

NOTE: If tubing was chosen rather than pipe, the calculation results printout will give
information on the minimum wall thickness (in inches) that is required for each size of tubing.

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Fix Results: This will run one additional calculation using the pipe sizes and actual nozzle sizes
available. It is recommended to always use this feature to ensure that the system will be acceptable
and utilising actual available nozzle codes.

Figure 7-16 Fix Results

7.3.2 Nozzle BOM


The ‘Nozzle Bill of Materials’ or ‘Nozzle BOM’ will provide the ordering bill of materials. This will
include quantity, nozzle type, code required and the Kidde Fire Protection stock number.

Figure 7-17 Nozzle BOM

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7.3.3 Nozzle Summary


Similar to the ‘Bill of Materials’ the ‘Nozzle Information’ individually lists each nozzle also comparing
its calculated code vs. its actual code. The actual code is the closest manufactured code available.

Figure 7-18 Nozzle Summary

7.3.4 Discharge Information


The ‘Discharge Information’ screen provides evaluation data in the form of average vapour and liquid
CO2 discharge times, and weights of CO2 discharged. Also included is the maximum vapour time
achieved by a nozzle within the CO2 system, along with each nozzle’s residual vapour discharge.
Here a comparison is made as to how much gas is required in a given amount of time and how much
gas is discharged at the end of the discharge period for each hazard.

Figure 7-19 Discharge Information

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7.4 Output/Print Data and Results


This screen will allow the user to send both the results of the calculation and/or the input data used for
the calculation to a selected printer. A ‘Bill of Materials’ option is also available to provide a basic
BOM based on the flow calculation.

7.4.1 Items to Print


Input Data Listing: When this option is selected, the program will output the data file.

Calculation Results: The selection of this option will output the results of the calculation.

BOM: The mechanical high pressure CO2 system BOM, including pipe and pipe fittings. Once this has
been printed, the system must be recalculated before printing the BOM again.

Figure 7-20 Output/Print Data and Results

Print CO2 Requirements: Selecting this option will print the CO2 requirements for each individual
hazard (not applicable to LA Rate by Area and LA Rate by Volume hazard types). A step by step
walk-through of how the requirement was calculated will be printed. This information can be sent
directly to a printer to obtain a hard copy (useful for submitting to authorities having jurisdiction, etc.)
or it can be printed to a text file, which can then be entered into AutoCAD or a word processing
program.

NOTE: If no total flooding hazards are defined, this option will not be available.

7.4.2 Output Units


Metric: This selection will produce a metric unit output.
Imperial: This option will output the required information with standard English units.

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7.4.3 Configure Printer


There are numerous types of printers on the market and the program is designed to incorporate a
wide range of printers. It is advisable to click on ‘Configure Printer’ to verify the current Windows™
selected printer.
There are numerous fonts available, even though the program will accept and use a number of them;
the suggested font is ‘Arial’ which is commonly found within the Windows™ list of fonts. However,
there are a number of acceptable fonts and by selecting and trying these fonts, based on the
numerous styles and types of printers; Kidde Fire Protection cannot assure satisfactory results. The
printout uses various configurations and sizes to produce its hard copy printout.

7.4.4 Print
Clicking on this command will start the printing or writing of the selected data.

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8. FLOW CALCULATION
ION SOFTWARE

8.1 Equivalent Length


The equivalent length for all components is automatically calculated within Kidde Fire Protection
software.

8.2 CO2 Calculation Example


The following pages depict an example of a calculation performed using the KFP CO2 software
program.

Figure 8-1 Isometric Drawing


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Figure 8-2 System Information

Figure 8-3 Hazard Information

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Figure 8-4 Piping Model Data

Figure 8-5 Calculate and Display Results

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Figure 8-6 Nozzle Summary

Figure 8-7 Discharge Information

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8.3 Software Hot Keys Reference List


FUNCTION HOT KEYS

PIPING MODEL FUNCTION PRIMARY ALTERNATE

Add F5 Key Shift + Insert

Insert Pipe F7 Key Insert Key

Delete F8 Key Shift + Delete

Copy F9 Key

Paste F10 Key

HAZARD DATA FUNCTION


Area Name & Area/Volume Sections

Add F5 Key Shift + Insert

Delete F8 Key Shift + Delete

Area Nozzle List Section

Add F5 Key Plus Sign (+) Key

Delete F8 Key Shift + Delete

GENERAL FUNCTIONS

Move One Cell To The Left Left Arrow Key Shift + Tab

Move One Cell To The Right Right Arrow Key Enter Or Tab

Move One Cell Up Up Arrow

Move One Cell Down Down Arrow

Drop Down A List Box Shift + Down Arrow

Go To System Information Screen F1 Key

Go To Hazard Data Screen F2 Key

Go To Piping Model Screen F3 Key

Calculate And Display Results F4 Key

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9. INSTALLATION

9.1 Purpose
The following installation procedures, in combination with the commissioning procedures, are
intended to ensure that the system satisfies the required designed properties and ensure the correct
functionality/operation of the installed Kidde Fire Protection High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Fire
Suppression System.
The Installation Engineer of a Kidde Fire Suppression System shall be familiar with this product
manual.

9.2 Personnel Safety


Personnel safety is the primary concern. Safe procedures shall be observed during handling of
cylinders, installation and testing. Never assume that a cylinder is empty and therefore treat all
cylinders as if they are fully charged. Always have the cylinder valve protection cap fitted before any
movement of the cylinder. Failure to do so can result in serious bodily injury, death, and property
damage.

WARNING: All pressurised cylinders can be extremely hazardous. CO2 Klem cylinder valves
are capable of producing a high discharge thrust from the valve outlet when opened.

9.2.1 UTC Fire & Security Cardinal Rules and General Rules

9.2.1.1 Intent

The purpose of the UTCFS EH&S Standard Work: Gaseous Suppression System Standard is to
establish minimum safe requirements for use of compressed gas cylinders as related to suppression
systems. For businesses operating outside UTCFS, we recommend compliance to this guidance as it
represents current best safe practice.

9.2.1.2 Applicability

This UTCFS EH&S Standard Work Gaseous Suppression System Standard applies to all UTCFS
business units worldwide including those joint ventures, partnerships or other business arrangements
where UTCFS holds a majority ownership interest, majority voting control, or where UTCFS, by
contract, has agreed to manage the company. Each operation will comply with all applicable legal
EH&S requirements, UTC EH&S requirements and with this UTCFS EH&S Standard Work.
This standard applies to any activity or process where a fire suppression system is installed,
upgraded, serviced, or tested by a UTCFS Employee(s) or Contractor.

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9.2.1.3 Cardinal Rules:

A. Employees shall never transport cylinders without approved /suitable valve assembly
protection (i.e. protective cap, transport cap, discharge and actuation port cap, locking pins,
metal sleeving).
B. Employees shall never remove the protection cap(s) or locking pin before a cylinder is
secured.
C. Employees shall never leave cylinders unsecured.
D. No work is to be undertaken on a suppression system unless: (a) the means for activation has
been rendered safe, electrically, pneumatically and mechanically; and (b) any stored pressure
in the manifold or distribution and/or actuation pipe-work has been safely discharged.
E. Employees shall never use cylinders which have signs of damage, corrosion and or have
exceeded their next required proof pressure test date.

9.2.1.4 General Rules:

A. Employees shall never install, maintain, modify or repair compressed gas system without a
permit to work system and or clear detailed safety control methods in place.
B. Employees shall never work with valves or regulators unless trained and competent / licensed
to do so and a permit to work and or risk assessment for the task is in place.
C. Employees shall store cylinders in a defined ventilated compressed gas cylinder storage area.
The storage area must be suitable and sufficient to protect the cylinders from damage,
interference and have adequate means to secure the cylinders.
D. All transportation of cylinders shall only be undertaken when the cylinder(s) are secured and
fitted with approved valve assembly protection (i.e. protective cap, transport cap, discharge
and actuation port cap, locking pins, metal sleeving).
E. All vehicles used for transportation of cylinders must be suitable for the load, possess
sufficient means of securing the cylinders, have a separate designated compartment in which
to transport the cylinders from the personnel area (cab), this may be by segregation (steel
compartment) or open area. If a local requirement, vehicles should be fitted with the relevant
signs indicating that compressed gas is being carried and the local requirements for
transportation regulations complied with.
F. All personnel transporting cylinders must be trained in the safe handling and transportation of
compressed gas, where required have applicable licenses/permits, posses suitable
mechanical aids to transport them safely and be familiar with the MSDS and Emergency
Procedures for the type of gas they are transporting.
G. All unrelated works within the vicinity of the cylinder bank location must be either completed
or well controlled prior to the installation, maintenance, modification or repair of the
compressed gas cylinders and all related works must be subject to the permit to work system
or risk assessment and suitable controlled (e.g. warning barriers and warning notices).

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H. All Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) is clearly defined and used when required. When
installing or removing pressurized actuation equipment, suitable safety glasses and gloves
must be worn.

9.3 Safety Precautions: Hazards to Personnel


Exposure to atmospheres containing about 5% CO2 leads to shortness of breath and slight headache.
At the 10% level, headache, visual disturbance, ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and tremor are followed
by loss of consciousness.
The exposure of personnel to carbon dioxide at fire extinguishing concentrations (typically in excess
of 30vol %) creates serious hazards, through toxic and asphyxiation effects, that will be lethal.
Carbon dioxide is also denser than air and will drift and accumulate in low spaces, such as cellars,
pits and floor voids, which may be difficult to ventilate effectively. Furthermore CO2 and can migrate
into adjacent spaces outside the protected area and pose a hazard there too.
The rapid expansion of large quantities of CO2 results in a substantial localised cooling of the
installation and of the air surrounding the point of discharge. This can present a frost burn hazard.

9.4 Handling and Storage of CO2 Cylinders


Observe the following precautions to prevent accidental discharge of CO2:
On despatch, all cylinder and valve assemblies are fitted with transport caps which must not be
removed until after the cylinders have been securely restrained, store the transport caps for future
use.
Never use the cylinder valve to turn or move the cylinder; this could cause damage or leakage: all
cylinder movement should take place with the cylinder transport cap fitted.
Never store cylinders in direct sunlight or in location where the cylinder temperature is likely to exceed
55°C.
Never depress the cylinder valve actuating pin as this action will open the valve and discharge its
contents causing the cylinder, unless securely restrained, to act as a projectile.
Never fit any release device to a cylinder valve until it has been secured in the cylinder rack and
connected to the discharge pipework.

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Figure 9-1 Cylinder and Klem Valve Assembly with Protection Cap Fitted

9.5 Re-Entry into a Flooded Area


Never enter an area after a CO2 discharge until it has been thoroughly ventilated to external
atmosphere.
If it is necessary to enter an area containing CO2 always use self-contained Breathing Apparatus,
never use a filter or canister type mask and never work alone. As an added precaution the person
entering should be tethered by a manned lifeline.

9.6 Dismantling and Modifications


It is recommended that Kidde Fire Protection be notified of any intention to alter or extend the system
or areas protected in order that advice is given of any effect that this may have on the original design.

9.7 Preliminary Checks


Check that all equipment has been delivered; any damaged equipment must be replaced.
Check that the area(s) to be protected agree with the installation drawings.
Check the CO2 cylinder location for ease of access during maintenance; also safety. Check that the
ambient temperature of the cylinder location complies with the following limitations:
• Total flooding systems: -18 to 55°C.
• Local Application flooding Systems: Minimum 0°C Ma ximum 46°C.

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9.8 CO2 Cylinders


CO2 is stored in solid drawn steel cylinders containing gas in liquid form equal to two thirds of its water
capacity. The pressure within the cylinder varies with changes in ambient temperature, increasing
with rising temperature. At 21°C the pressure is 58 .6bar. Test pressure of the cylinder is 250bar.
The CO2 cylinder assembly comprises a cylinder, cylinder valve and rigid syphon tube which must
ALWAYS be installed in an upright position.

Water Total Dimension (mm)


Fill Weight
Part No Capacity Weight Diameter Outlet
(kg)
(Litres) (kg) Ø Height
E7194-004 67.5 45 120 Approx 267 1531

E7194-006 34.0 22.6 81 Approx 230 1106

E7194-005* 10.2 6.8 15 Approx 140 865

*E7194-005 is not listed for use with an FM Approved System


NOTE: All outlet dimensions are ±10mm

Specification
Cylinder Body: 1999/36/EC (TPED)
Material: Steel
Test Pressure: 250 bar
Fill Ratio: 0.661kg/litre
Standard Point Finish: Red

9.8.1 Klem Cylinder Valve K24509


The Klem cylinder valve is a compact, horizontal servo-assisted valve which can be operated by
pressure or by use of the manual lever on the valve actuator K62341.
The valve is opened by depressing the actuator rod and applying a force of between 23 and 27kg.

WARNING: The valve will close immediately once the force is removed from the actuator rod.

Each cylinder valve incorporates a safety disc designed to rupture and discharge the CO2
cylinder contents when the ambient temperature reaches approximately 60°C.
Refer to Data Sheet DS K24509 for further detail on Klem Cylinder Valve such as
dimensions/thread details.

9.8.2 Single Cylinder Installation


The CO2 cylinder should be located as near as possible to the hazard it is to protect, but should not
be exposed to the fire in a manner that is likely to impair the performance. It should not be exposed to

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weather conditions or put in a location where it can be subjected to chemical or other damage.
Suitable guards or enclosures should be provided when necessary.
1. Offer strap up to a suitable structure or wall and mark the hole centres for drilling at an elevation
from ground level.
2. Drill appropriate fixing holes (
3. Figure 9-2).
4. Place and clamp the container in position.

Figure 9-2 Single Cylinder Strap Fixing Details

Cylinder Size Weight


Part Number Dim A (mm) Fixing Holes Materials
(kg) (kg)
K16896 6.8 175 9.5mm Ø 1.0
Mild Steel 25mm x 3mm
K4881 22.6 292 10.5mm Ø 1.2
Nylon Dipped Black
K62943 45.0 320 12.7mm Ø 1.5

9.8.3 Single Row Cylinder Installation


CO2 cylinders should be located as near as possible to the hazard they protect, but should not be
exposed to the fire in a manner that is likely to impair the performance. They should not be exposed
to weather conditions or put in a location where they can be subjected to chemical or other damage.
Suitable guards or enclosures should be provided when necessary.
1. Offer the cylinder back rack up to a suitable structure or wall and mark the hole centres for drilling
at an elevation from the ground. Check that the back rack is correctly offset in relation to the
manifold inlet.
2. Drill appropriate fixing holes ( Figure 9-3).
3. Fix the back rack to the suitable structure or wall using the bolts.

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4. Place the cylinders in position against the cut-outs in the back rack.
5. Hook the rack bolts through the 17.5mm diameter hole(s) in the back rack.
6. Locate the straight end of the rack bolts through the 17.5mm diameter holes in the front strap and
clamp the containers firmly in place using the nuts and washers supplied with the rack bolts.

Figure 9-3 Single Row Cylinder Installation Details

Part Number Material Finish Weight (kg)

Steel Back 2 Cylinder K17238 MS Angle Paint Black 1.8


Racks 3 Cylinder K17235 MS Angle Paint Black 2.7

Steel Front 2 Cylinder K13744 MS Strap Nylon Dipped 2.7


Straps 3 Cylinder K13745 MS Strap Black 4.5

Single Row Rack Bolt Assembly K62752 MS Rod Paint Black 0.4

9.8.4 Double Row Cylinder Installation


CO2 cylinders should be located as near as possible to the hazard they protect, but should not be
exposed to the fire in a manner that is likely to impair performance. They should not be exposed to
weather conditions or put in a location where they can be subjected to chemical or other damage.
Suitable guards or enclosures should be provided when necessary.
1. Offer the cylinder back rack up to the wall and mark the hole centres for drilling at an elevation
from the ground. Check that the back rack is correctly offset in relation to the manifold inlet.
2. Drill appropriate fixing holes (Figure 9-4).
3. Fix the back rack a suitable structure or wall using the bolts.
4. Place the cylinders in position against the cut-outs in the back rack.
5. Slide the rack bolt through the wood centre rack and hook onto the back rack.
6. Place the front row of cylinders into position.

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7. Place the front straps in position and clamp the cylinders firmly in position using the nuts and
washers supplied.

Figure 9-4 Double Row Cylinder Installation Details

Part No Weight (kg)

Cylinder Centre 2 Cylinder K24334 1.4


Racks 3 Cylinder K24335 2.0
Two Row Rack Bolt K62753 1.1

Two Rack Special Rack Bolt K17327 0.7

45kg Cylinders

Part No Weight (kg)

Cylinder Centre 2 Cylinder K22654 1.1

Racks 3 Cylinder K22655 1.8


Two Row Rack Bolt K17245 1.0

Two Rack Special Rack Bolt K17327 0.7

22.6kg Cylinders

9.9 CO2 Manifold Pipe


On multiple cylinder systems manifold pipes are supplied as a complete assembly including factory
installed check valves.
Manifolds can be installed in any orientation to allow connection of the discharge hoses from the
cylinder valves.

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NOTE: Cylinders MUST ALWAYS be installed in the vertical position.

1” (25mm) NB Manifold 1¼” (32mm) NB Manifold

Assembly Number of Weight Assembly Number of Weight


Part No. Cylinders (kg) Part No. Cylinders (kg)
K21207 2 2.7 K21215 2 3
K21209 3 3.9 K21217 3 4.5
K21211 4 5.0 K21219 4 5.9
K21213 5 6.3 K21221 5 7.3

Figure 9-5 CO2 Manifold Pipes

9.10 Distribution Piping


All the pipework sizes shown in the schematic of the installation have been determined using a
computer programme. It is important that these sizes are used to ensure the correct flow of CO2 within
the stated discharge time.

9.10.1 Piping
The pipe and fittings materials must conform to the requirements of BS 5306 part 4, as shown in the
following tables:

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CLOSED SECTION OF PIPEWORK

Nominal Pipe Size Type of Fitting Grade or Material Conforms to:

WPA or WPB BS 3799:1974


Forged steel, screwed,
3000 lb
Up to and including 40mm ASTM A105N ANSI B16.11:1996

Wrought steel, butt welded WPA or WPB BS 1640-3:1968

WPA or WPB BS 3799:1974


Forged steel, socket
Above 40mm up to 50mm
welded, 3,000 lb
ASTM A105N ANSI B16.11:1996

OPEN SECTION OF PIPEWORK

Nominal Pipe Size Type of Fitting Material/Grade Conforms to:

Up to and including 20mm Screwed fittings Malleable iron BS EN 10242:1995*

Screwed fittings Wrought steel BS EN 10241:2000


Up to and including 40mm
Wrought steel, butt welded WPA or WPB BS 1640-3:1968

WPA or WPB BS 3799:1974


Forged steel, screwed,
3000 lb
ASTM A105N ANSI B16.11:1996
All sizes up to 150mm
WPA or WPB BS 3799:1974
Forged steel, socket
welded, 3,000 lb
ASTM A105N ANSI B16.11:1996

*Fittings conforming to BS EN 10242 may be used on open section pipework greater than 20mm
provided that they are suitable certified by the manufacturer for the anticipated pressure.

Table 9-1 Closed and Open Ended Pipework Section – High Pressure Systems

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BS1387 BW - Heavy

BS 3601 S 430

BS 3601 ERW 430

Up to & including 40mm BS 3601 BW 320 or 430


Schedule 40
BS 3602-1 HFS or CFS 360 or 430

API 5L S or ERW B

ASTM A106-77 HF or CD A or B

BS 3601 S 430

BS 3601 ERW 430

Over 40mm up to &


BS 3602-1 HFS or CFS 360 or 430 Schedule 80
including 50mm

ASTM A106-77 HF or CD A or B

API 5L S or ERW B

Abbreviations: HF-Hot Finished, CFS-Cold Finished Seamless, CD-Cold Drawn, HFS-Hot Finished Seamless,
S-Seamless, ERW-Electric Resistance Welded & Induction Welded.

Table 9-2 Open Ended Pipework

Flange bolts, studs, nuts and washers: Bolts and studs shall conform to BS EN 1515-1. Nuts shall
conform to BS EN 1515-1. Washers shall conform to BS 3410 or BS 4320.

NOTE: Plain washers should be fitted under bolt head and nut. A minimum of two threads
should project above the nut when fully tightened

Gasket for flanged joints: Flanges joints shall be fitted with a gasket. The recommendation of
the gasket manufacturer should be followed in selecting the grade, specification and thickness to
be used.

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Nominal Pipe Size Conforms to: Type of Pipe Grade of Steel Minimum Wall Thickness*

BS 3601 S 430

BS 3602-1 HFS or CFS 430


Up to and including Schedule 40 (schedule
40mm 80 for joints)
ASTM A106-77 HF or CD B

API 5L S or ERW B

BS 3602-1 HFS or CFS 430

50mm and above ASTM A106-77 HF or CD B Schedule 80

API 5L S or ERW B

*Schedule numbers determine the minimum wall thickness in accordance with BS 1600. Where
the specified pipe is not obtainable in these dimensions, the next largest thickness should be used.

Figure 9-6 Closed Section Pipework

NOTE: Crosses must NOT be used.

• All pipe and fittings shall be galvanised inside and out.


• Screwed threads shall comply with the dimensions specified in BS 21.
• Use PTFE pipe tape on all pipe screw threads (or other approved thread sealant).
• The pipework MUST be firmly supported because, in the event of a fire, the discharge will
impose a force on the pipework. If the piping becomes dislodged, considerable damage
could be caused and the extinguishing system may not function correctly. Allowance must be
made for expansion and contraction of the pipework.

Table 9-3 for the minimum recommended pipe support spacing.

Pipe Size (mm) 15 20 25 32 40 50 80 100 150

Max Spacing (m) 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.4 3.7 4.3 5.2

Table 9-3 Pipe Support Spacing

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9.11 Flushing of Pipe Work


After installation the pipe work should be ‘flushed’ in order to remove debris, impurities, remnants of
sealing material, cutting burrs, etc. as well as to verify that flow is continuous and that the piping is
unobstructed. It is recommended that a flow rate of ~6m/sec is achieved during flushing which may
require the distribution pipe work to be flushed in sections. Flushing shall be completed prior to
installation of the discharge nozzles and before the cylinder bank assembly. Recommended media
are compressed air or an inert gas such as nitrogen.

Note: Test Report/statement of completion must be issued, see example shown in Table 9-4. It is
recommended that the calibrated flow meter used is listed on the Test Report.

9.12 Pressure Testing of Pipe Work


If a pressure test of the pipe work is requested, then once the installation of the open ended pipe work
is complete, all nozzle connections shall be plugged. For Europe the PED Directive 97/23EC applies
and requires that documentation for used pipe and fittings as well as test reports is retained in the file
for 10 years.

9.12.1 Pressure Testing Using Water


The pipe work shall be pressure tested to the requirements of the authorities having jurisdiction and/or
as stated in the system documentation. It is recommended that water is used as the pressurising
media however in some circumstances that may not be allowed and a gas may have to be used, see
Section 9.12.2.
Before carrying out the pressure test:
1) Verification documents for the pipes and fittings used shall be present

2) The installation has been visually inspected and found to be in good order

It is recommended that the pressure applied during the test is 1.5 times the maximum operating
pressure (normally 60 bar, test pressure equal to approx. 90 bar).
The recommended holding time is 10 minutes to ensure that both the pipe and fittings used and the
overall assembly will withstand the operating pressure as well the "water hammer" effect which occurs
at the start of the discharge. A pressure drop of more than 5 bar shall not be accepted.
If the required pressure cannot be maintained for the minimum hold time, all connections shall be
checked for leakage. Any connection found to be leaking shall be tightened and the procedure is
repeated until a successful test has been completed.
The pipe from the manifold to the distribution pipe inlet will need to be fitted with a test valve which
incorporates a hose connection to the pressure testing equipment (union/flanged connection to be
supplied locally).
If no union/flanged connection with the distribution inlet is available, one of the manifold check valve
connections may be used. Disconnect all discharge hoses from the manifold. Connect the pressure
testing equipment to the check valve (3/4” BSP).

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Warning: It shall be ensured that water does not enter the cylinder valves or remains in the
manifold arrangement after the pressure testing. Piping shall then be blown through with
compressed air, an inert gas such as nitrogen until all moisture has been removed from all
components (e.g. pipe work, manifolds, diverter valves etc.)

9.12.2 Pressure Testing Using Gas


The pipe work shall be pressure tested to the requirements of the authorities having jurisdiction and/or
as stated in the system documentation. It is recommended that water is used as the pressurising
media however in some circumstances that may not be allowed and a gas may have to be used.
Before carrying out the pressure test:
1) Verification documents for the pipes and fittings used shall be present

2) The installation has been visually inspected and found to be in good order

The following procedure must be adhered to:


The pipe from the manifold to the distribution pipe inlet will need to be fitted with a test valve which
incorporates a hose connection to the pressure testing equipment (union/flanged connection to be
supplied locally).
If no union/flanged connection with the distribution pipe inlet is available, then one of the nozzle
connection points or a manifold check valve (3/4” BSP) may be used.

9.12.3 Precautions
Pneumatic testing involves the hazard of energy stored in compressed gas. Particular care must
therefore be taken to minimise the chance of failure of brittle components during a pneumatic test.
In areas where water cannot be accepted as the media for pressure testing (i.e. operating computer
rooms etc) compressed air, or an inert gas (e.g. nitrogen) may be used. All due precautions shall be
taken to prevent injury to personnel while the pipes are under pressure (i.e. maintaining a safe
distance from the pipe work and a total evacuation of all areas affected prior to and during the
pressure test).
During the pressure test, the test gas pressure must be applied slowly through a pressure regulator.
When a pressure of approx. 2 bar is attained, a preliminary check shall be made, including
examination of joints/fittings etc. After the inspection (if all joints/fittings etc. are found to be tight) the
pressure shall be gradually increased in steps until the test pressure is reached, holding the pressure
at each step long enough to equalise piping strains.

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Test Report
Pipe Work Installation
Date: Client:

Client's Order Number: File Number:

Installer:

Equipment Serial Number: Flow meter/pressure gauge/transducer:

System Description

Isometric / drawing number

Date: Amount / l/min Duration / min

Pipe Flushing

Leakage Test

Pressure Test

Drying of Pipe Work

Remarks:

Witnessed/Approved by

For: Client For: Installer For:

Name Name Name

Signature Signature Signature

Table 9-4 Example Test Report for the installation and verification of pipe work

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9.14 Electrical Clearances


Where exposed electrical conductors are present, clearance no smaller than those given in Table 9-5
shall be provided between the electrical conductors and all parts of the CO2 system that may be
approached during maintenance, where practicable. Where these clearance distances cannot be
achieved, warning notices shall be provided and a safe system of maintenance work shall be
adopted.
Minimum clearance from any point on or about the permanent equipment where a man may be
required to stand (measured from position of the feet)

To the nearest unscreened live conductor in air (‘section clearance’)

Metres 2.5 2.5 2.7 2.7 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.57
9 9 4 4 9 5 0 5 0 1 7
To the nearest part not at earth potential of an insulator supporting a live
conductor ('ground clearance')
Metres 2.44
Max rated Voltage 11 15 22 33 44 66 88 110 132 165 220 275
(XY)

Table 9-5 Safety Clearances for Pipework

NOTE: The term insulator includes all forms of insulating supports, such as pedestal and
suspension insulators, bushings, cable sealing ends and the insulating supports of certain
types of circuit breaker etc.

IMPORTANT: See qualifying notes of clause 34 and definitions 30 and 31 of BS 7354: 1990
from which this table is taken.

9.15 Installation of Pipework


Piping is normally supplied to site in random lengths. Installation of this pipework must be carried out
in accordance with the site fabrication drawings.
Table 9-5 shows recommended clearances to enable operation, maintenance and repair work to be
carried out safely.

NOTE: All dirt, swarf and cutting oil must be removed from each section of pipe before
installation. CO2 pressure will remove any debris and may deposit it on valuable equipment.

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Before installation of any pipework check the following:


• That all screw threads are clean and free of any damage.
• That all flange faces are clean and free of any damage.
• That pipe bores are clean and unobstructed.
• The route of the piping. Make sure that it is possible to fix the piping securely on the wall and in
the ceiling and floor voids.
• That none of the pipe fittings have been used before because of the risk of distortion.

NOTE: Use PTFE tape on all pipe screw threads (or other approved thread sealant).

To install the pipework, carry out the following procedure:


Mark the positions of the supports and hangers.
Drill the wall or ceiling and install the required quantity of RawlBolts® or anchor bolts to suit the
type of support being used.
Install a pipe hangar or clip adjacent to each nozzle in order to prevent movement of the nozzles
during discharge.
All CO2 pipework should be painted signal red to BS 381C ref 537 (equivalent to BS 4800 ref 04-
E-53)
All exposed metalwork in CO2 systems shall be efficiently earthed to prevent the metal work
becoming electrically charged.

9.16 Pressure Operated Direction Valves

¾ to 2 Inch Pod Valves – See section 5.22.1 for component details

3” & 4” Inch Pod Valves – See section 5.22.2 for component details

3” & 4” Companion Flange, Bolts and Gasket – See section 5.22.3 for component details

Pressure Operation for POD valves ¾” to 4” – See section 5.22.4 for component details

Manual Operation – See section 5.22.5 for component details

Valve Open Indicator Switch – See section 5.22.6 for component details

9.16.1 Installation of Pressure Operated Directional Valves (POD Valves)


Before installation of POD valves check the following:
• All screw threads are clean and free of any damage.
• If using a flanged valve check that all flanges are clean and free of damage.
• That all flange bolt holes on the valve align with the flange bolt holes on feed pipe.

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• With the Safety Lock pin removed check that the indicator switch clicks into operation.

After the checks have been carried out satisfactorily install the POD valve as follows:
1. Install the POD valve in the main feed line at a position where access for manual operation of
maintenance/service is unhindered by other obstacles. Where possible install the POD valve at a
height of approximately (1.5 meters) 5’- 0” (maximum). Make sure that the arrow shown on the
valve body to indicate the direction of flow faces away from the CO2 manifold.
2. Connect a nipple and socket union to the outlet side of the POD valve for ease of installation to
the main CO2 feed line.
3. Use PTFE pipe tape on all screwed pipe fittings.
4. To prevent accidental discharge of fire fighting systems during installation work check the
following before connecting the pilot gas lines:
• That the Safety and Reset pin is screwed fully home in the control head.
• That all safety pins are fully inserted in the cylinder release heads, and POD valves.
5. Using 3/16” bundy tubing and fittings, connect the nitrogen pilot cylinder valve to the pilot gas inlet
port of the POD valves and from the POD valve gas outlet port to the CO2 cylinder pressure
release head as shown in Figure 5-46 and Figure 5-47.

NOTES:
• Clip the bundy tube to the wall at approx 457mm centres.
• ¾ to 2 inch POD valves require adaptors K90220 and K90219 fitted in the pilot gas inlet port and
adaptor K90219 fitted to the pilot gas outlet port.
• 3 and 4 inch POD valves require adaptor K90219 fitted to both inlet and outlet pilot gas ports.
• A POD valve indicator switch, if fitted, must be wired as shown in

9.16.2 Installation of Flexible Discharge Hose


Before installation of any hoses check the following:

1. That the hose is clean and free from dirt before installation.
2. That the hose is free from damage
3. That all screw threads are clean and free of any damage.

NOTES: Do NOT use PTFE pipe tape on discharge or Pilot line hoses. Do NOT over-tighten
fittings.

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Height to Underside of Manifold

Cyl. Size (kg) Cyl. Part No Flexible Hose K97112

22.6 E7194-006 1577

45.0 E7194-004
1800 ± 100
45.0 E7194-001
Table 9-6 Manifold Heights, all dimension in mm.

WARNING: Always connect the loop to the manifold inlet or pipework if single cylinder, before
connecting to the cylinder valve outlet.

9.17 Control Head Actuating Devices


See section 5.8 for component details

9.18 System Actuator Assembly

Nitrogen Pilot Gas Cylinder and Valve – See section 5.9 for component details

Optional Pressure Monitoring Switch – See section 5.9.1 for component details

Control Head – See section 5.10.1 for component details

Control Head with Switches – See section 5.10.2 for component details

9.19 Safety and Reset Pin


The Safety and Reset Pin device, supplied with the control head, when screwed fully home will reset
the control head causing the firing pin to retract to its normal position, see Figure 5-17. Unscrew to
release and make the control head active again (retain reset pin in safe location for future use).

WARNING: DO NOT attempt to reset whilst still electrically or pneumatically energised.

When carrying out servicing or maintenance, screw the safety / reset pin fully home to inhibit
(isolate) the system.

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Figure 9-7 Safety and Reset Pin

Specification
Body Material: Steel
Weight: 0.1kg

9.19.1 Installation of Control Head Actuating Devices


The installation procedure is as follows:
1. Ensure the correct mounting bracket has been issued (K62487 or K62932) and install.

NOTE: Check the distance to the 1st cylinder valve release head to ensure that the long pilot
gas flexible hose K93434 can be easily coupled to the nitrogen pilot gas cylinder valve outlet.

2. Lower the control head so that its swivel nut projects through the hole in the mounting
bracket and bolt onto the bracket.

WARNING: Do NOT fit the nitrogen pilot gas cylinder at this time.

3. Check the operation of the control head safety and reset.


4. Remove the red plastic dust cap from the control head threads.
5. Ensure that the Safety and Reset pin is screwed fully in.
6. Verify that the actuating pin (Figure 5-15 and Figure 5-16) does not project by more than
3mm.
7. Check that when the Safety and Reset pin is screwed FULLY OUT and the Push-to-Fire
button of the control head is operated the actuating pin extends so that it now projects by a
minimum of 6mm. If a Push-to-Fire button is not supplied, remove the port plug (Figure 5-19)

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and push the pin in. Ensure that no dirt or foreign matter falls into the control head while the
port is open; reconnect the port plug.
8. Verify that as the Safety and Reset pin is screwed in, the actuating pin retracts, reverting to
its original position when the Safety and Reset pin is FULLY IN.

9.19.2 Manual Push-To-Fire Button

See section 5.10.4 for component details

9.19.3 Solenoid Installation


Before installation of the standard or flameproof solenoid check the following:
• All screw threads are clean and free of damage.
• The tip of the plunger does not project by more than 3mm.

9.19.4 Installation of Standard Solenoid (K62422B)


1. Make sure that the Safety and Reset pin is screwed fully home into the control head before
attaching the solenoid.
2. Attach the solenoid to the 24mm diameter screwed port on the control head by hand, taking care
not to cross thread the unit. When fully home the solenoid can be finally tightened using an open-
ended spanner (27mm A/F thin section).
3. Insert the 20mm screwed thread of the cable gland, which is attached to the loose end of the
flexible cable of the solenoid, through the 20mm diameter hole located in the junction box and,
using a 20mm back nut tighten the gland from inside the junction box.
4. Connect the two crimp terminals to their relevant connections inside the junction box.

WARNING: Ensure that the nitrogen pilot gas cylinder has NOT been fitted.

5. Remove the Safety and Reset pin and energise the solenoid causing the firing pin to operate
(Figure 5-15 and Figure 5-16).
6. To reset de-energise the solenoid and re-insert the Safety and Reset pin.

Solenoid designed in accordance with BS 5490 IP55. The unit is prewired and supplied complete
with flexible conduit.

Mechanical Specification
Case Material: Aluminium Alloy.
Finish: Grey Anodise.
Weight: 0.77kg.

Electrical Specification

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Cable: PVC
Coil resistance at 20°C: 64.5 Ohms ± 5% 24v DC (Nom inal) 8.5 Watts.

9.19.5 Installation of Flameproof Solenoid (K93206/AX)


1. Make sure that the Safety and Reset pin is screwed fully home into the control head before
attaching the solenoid.
2. Check the solenoid nameplate for correct voltage, wattage and service. The solenoid must be
installed only in locations covered by group II category 2 G/D enclosures and where the
flammable gases present in the atmosphere have ignition temperatures higher than the
temperature classification stamped on the nameplate. Ambient temperatures must not exceed the
value stamped on the nameplate.
3. Attach the solenoid to the 24mm diameter screwed port on the control head by hand, taking care
not to cross thread the unit. Once fully home the solenoid can be finally tightened using an A/F
open-ended spanner.
4. Connect the solenoid to the control circuit via an ATEX approved junction box or MICC cable
gland.
5. Access to the cable terminal connector is achieved by removing the four cap screws and spring
washers and withdrawing the housing cover. It may be necessary to rotate the cover slightly to
ease withdrawal.
6. After the cover has been removed connect the MICC cable into the terminal connector and tighten
the screws.

Solenoid designed in accordance with ATEX directive: ATEX 94/9/EC classification: for potentially
explosive atmospheres flameproof enclosure EX II 2 G EEx d II C T6 to T4
II 2 D IP65 T 85 to T135ºC
Mechanical Specification
Case material: Aluminium Alloy
Finish: Epoxy Gloss Grey/Green
Weight: 1.4kg

Electrical Specification
Coil resistance at 20°C: 16 Ohms ± 10% 24v DC (Nomi nal), 16.8Watts

NOTE: Suitable for offshore and marine conditions.

9.19.6 Operation Check


WARNING: Ensure that the nitrogen pilot gas cylinder has not been fitted

Remove the Safety and Reset pin and energise the solenoid causing the firing pin to operate (Figure
5-15 and Figure 5-16).

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To Reset de-energise the solenoid and re-insert the Safety and Reset pin.

9.19.7 Control Head and Solenoid Wiring


The internal switches of the control head can be used to indicate whether the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin
has been inserted or the control head has been operated or reset. A suitable junction box should be
used for the connections (Figure 9-8). Normally the ‘operate’ switch is not used to signal to the control
panel that the extinguishing system has operated; the manifold mounted pressure switch is utilised
instead.

Figure 9-8 Control Head and Solenoid Wiring

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Colour State Terminal


Reset and Safety Red NC 1
pin switch Black NO 2
Orange Common 3
FROM Operate Switch Yellow NO 4
CONTROL White NC 5
HEAD Grey Common 6
From Solenoid 7
8

Table 9-7 Control Head and Solenoid Wiring

NOTE: It is recommended terminal connections are to be made in a junction box. If a solenoid


is used, connect the control panel between terminals 5 and 8, and link 6 and 7

After the control head (K62304) has been operated, the actuation signal is removed if the solenoid is
wired as shown in Figure 9-8.

9.19.8 Special Instructions to comply with 94/9/EC (ATEX)


1. Area classification
Control Head Basic and Control Head c/w Switches part numbers, K62303 and K62304
respectively.
Control heads are one part of a pneumatic activation system for extinguishers. These Control
heads have been designed and certified as non-electric equipment for compliance to the following
hazardous area classification:
Group II category 3 GD c T6 X

The user of this equipment should make sure they are aware of the following information.
2. Placing the device into service
These Control Heads may be installed in an area classified as Zone 2 or Zone 22 or unclassified.
3. Safe use of Control Heads
Control Heads are for use only as a component of a pneumatic activation system for
extinguishers compatible with the activation pressure (65bar at 20°C). The Control Head solenoid
activation option is limited to certified version K93206/AX.
The switched version is to be used with an intrinsically safe supply suitable for the hazard area.
Control Heads are supplied with a resetting tool that also acts as a disable device to allow
maintenance on the extinguishing system.
4. Assembling and dismantling
Control Heads are supplied complete and ready to install in accordance with chapter 6:
Installation.

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5. Installation
Control Head installation shall be in accordance with Section 9.19.1, except that for zone 2 or
zone 22 compliance solenoid K62422B is not to be used.
6. Maintenance (service and emergency repair)
The Safety and Reset Pin must be used to disable the control head before any system
maintenance is performed. For maintenance refer to Section 11.
7. Adjustment
Control Heads have no adjustable components.
8. Limitations of use
Control Heads must only be used within areas specified by the hazardous area certification as
indicated on the equipment label.
9. Special Parameters
The ambient temperature for this equipment is –18°C to 55°C.

9.20 Cable Release Assembly


This device is used in conjunction with a remote pull box and cable system to manually operate the
control head. See section 5.15.1 for details

9.20.1 Installation of Cable Release Assembly


To install the single release assembly (Figure 9-9), proceed as follows:
1. Unscrew and remove the box lid and gasket.
2. Slacken the cable clamp locking screws and slide clamp off the inner bowden cable (use a
2.5mm A/F hex wrench).
3. Pull out the inner cable from the release assembly.

NOTE: Do NOT remove top cover from control head.

Unscrew both blanking plugs from the control head body (use a ¼” A/F hex wrench).

NOTE: A manual Push-to-Fire button, if fitted, should be unscrewed.

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Figure 9-9 Cable Pull Ring Connection

4. Feed in the inner cable through the blanking plug port on the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin side of
the control head, through the top hole of the cable pull-ring inside the control head and out
through the blanking plug port on the other side of the control head.
5. Slide the outer Bowden cable, complete with box, onto the free end of the inner cable and
screw cable into the blanking port and tighten.
6. Attach the cable box to the wall at a point convenient to the remote pull cable conduit.

Figure 9-10 Curvature of Cable

7. Make sure that the control head cable is not forced to bend through a radius of less than
45mm (approximately 1 ¾”) along its length (Figure 9-10).

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Figure 9-11 Cable Release Assembly K62478 (cover removed)

8. Slide the cable clamp into the inner cable, loop the inner cable end and feed back through
the clamp as illustrated in Figure 9-11.

NOTE: With ‘Safety and Reset’ pin screwed fully home make sure that there is approximately
3mm of slack cable between the cable clamp and the cable attachment nut inside the box.
Adjust if necessary.

Feed remote pull cable into the cable clamp and secure with the two locking screws.

Test for satisfactory operation with the pilot valve and cylinder assembly removed and adjust tension
of remote cable if necessary. Refit the box lid and gasket.

Leave the system in an operable condition.

9.21 Pull Box (K1114)


See section 5.14 for component details

9.21.1 Installation of Emergency Pull Box


To install the pull box proceed as follows:
WARNING: To prevent accidental discharge of the fire fighting system during installation work,
make sure that the safety and reset pin is screwed fully home into the control head or the
complete pilot valve and gas cylinder assembly is unscrewed from the control head.

1. Attach the pull box using the single 7/16 (11.1mm) diameter fixing hole.
2. With front plate and glass removed, use a slotted screwdriver to remove the 7/16” Whitworth
grub screw from the centre of the pull handle.
3. Feed the 1/8” diameter bronze cable through the pull handle, steel conduit and pulley
assemblies, up to the cable clamp located inside the cable release box.

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4. With the cable protruding inside the cable release box slacken the two cable-clamp locking-
screws and attach the bronze cable as shown for single release mechanism.
5. With approximately 76mm of cable protruding out through the pull handle, tie a single knot in
cable. Solder the knot completely.
6. Slide the cable into the handle recess, tighten and then cut-off excess cable.
7. Re-fit the 7/16” Whitworth grub screw to the pull handle.
8. With the pilot gas cylinder detached from the control head, remove the Safety and Reset pin,
pull the handle in the pull box and test the system for each operation.
9. Check that the control head operates.
10. Insert the Safety and Reset pin.
11. Refit the pilot cylinder.
12. When satisfied with the operation re-locate glass and front plate and tighten using the four
long 2½” long x 2BA round head screws.
13. Remove the Safety and Reset pin and hand it to a responsible person.

NOTE: All cable runs must be straight. Changes in direction must only be accomplished by
the use of pulleys; bends and dog legs must not be used.

9.22 Cylinder Valve Pressure/Lever Actuator (K62341)

9.22.1 Installation of Cylinder Valve Actuator


Before installation check the following:
• Remove safety pin and rotate manual lever for ease of movement of both the lever and piston.
• Return lever original position and insert safety pin.
• Manually reset the piston.

After these checks have been carried out satisfactorily install as follows:
1. Remove the securing pin.
2. Slide the release head onto the cylinder valve and refit the securing pin, lightly tap fully home.

NOTE: Leave safety pin in place until commissioning system.

9.23 Pilot Gas Rigid Tubing and Fittings


See section 5.17 for component details

9.23.1 Assembly
1. Tubing must be cut off square and all burrs and swarf removed as loose particles could damage
any seals used elsewhere in the pipeline.

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2. Place tubing nut and sleeve on tube.


3. Offer the tubing to the coupling, pushing it right home so that the tubing bottoms on the tubing
stop inside the fitting.
*This is important as it ensures that the correct amount of tubing projects beyond the sleeve to
give a sound joint.
4. Hold the tubing square to the coupling and screw the tubing nut up finger tight so that the sleeve
is trapped between the tubing nut and the seating radius of the counter bore.
5. While holding the tube firmly in contact with the tubing stop, screw the tubing nut down to
reasonable spanner tightness. This varies between 3/4 and one full turn. On fittings for tubing
sizes of 12mm outside diameter and over, a smear of lubricant applied to the sleeve and the
threads of the tubing nut will affect a sound joint with the minimum of effort.
6. Slacken off the assembly about a ¼ turn then pinch down once again.

Where an inaccessible fitting would make the assembly of a sound joint difficult, it is recommended
that the sleeve is pre-assembled onto the tubing. This can be done by following the above procedure
but using a fitting of the correct size clamped in a vice. The tubing assembly can then be done and
released and transferred to the final union with the sleeve already correctly positioned.

WARNING: Do NOT use Loctite®, adhesive or tape on any part of this assembly.

9.23.2 Hose Installation


Before installation of any hoses check the following:
• That the hoses are clean and free from dirt before installation.
• That the hoses are free from damage
• That all screw threads and fittings are clean and free of any damage.

1. Install the correct length pilot gas flexible loops as shown in Figure 9-12 for single row cylinders or
Figure 9-13 for double row cylinders.
2. Install a pilot gas vent in the last open port of the pressure/lever actuator.

NOTES: Do NOT use PTFE or any other pipe sealant. Do NOT over tighten fittings.

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Figure 9-12 Single Cylinder Row Pilot Gas Operation

Figure 9-13 Double Cylinder Row Pilot Gas Operation

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9.24 Pneumatic Time Delay Unit


The CO2 pneumatic time delay must be installed in the discharge manifold with the arrow stamped on
the unit pointing in the direction of discharge flow.

1) 3/16” Enots fitting (F) x 1/8 NPT(M)


2) Pneumatic actuator
3) 1/8” NPT (M) x 5/16” Tube (M)
4) Pilot Hose
5) 5/16” tube (M) x ¾” NPT (M)
6) 1.77L Pilot Cylinder
7) & 8) Time delay unit
9) ¾” NPT (M) x 1/8” BSP (F)
10) 1/8” BSP (M) x 3/16” Enots fitting (F)
11) Manual actuator
12) Cylinder bracket

Figure 9-14 Pneumatic Time Delay Unit with the Lever/Manual Control Head

9.24.1 Nitrogen Pilot Cylinder Installation


1. Locate the nitrogen cylinder mounting bracket in an area where the cylinder valve assembly
and control head will be protected from inclement weather by a suitable total or partial
enclosure, preferably adjacent to the CO2 storage cylinders.
2. Install the mounting bracket clamps and hardware. Install the nitrogen cylinder in position in a
mounting bracket; tighten sufficiently to hold the cylinder in place while allowing the cylinder
enough free play to be rotated.
3. Turn the cylinder until the cylinder valve discharge outlet is in the desired position. The
nitrogen cylinder must be positioned so that control head is readily accessible during manual
operation.
4. Securely tighten the mounting bracket clamps and hardware.
5. If the cylinder is being used to drive a pressure operated siren (981574), then the add-on
label (supplied with the cylinder) should be affixed over the area at the center of the cylinder
main label (bounded by a dotted line). This ensures the cylinder function is adequately
indicated.

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9.24.2 Installation of Pressure Operated Control Head

Figure 9-15 Pressure Operated Control Head

1) Remove the protection cap from the cylinder actuation port.

2) Install the pressure operated control head using a suitable wrench. Tighten securely. Connect
the actuation line to the pressure port using the appropriate adapter.
WARNING: Ensure that the pilot line is non-pressurized and the actuating pins are in the
retracted (SET) position. Failure to follow this procedure will cause the cylinder to discharge
accidentally when the control head is installed on the cylinder valve.

9.24.3 Time Delay


The unit may be installed at any angle below horizontal. Install the time delay by following the steps
listed below:
1. Inspect the threads and the time delay for any damage.
2. Kidde recommends installing union fittings before and after the time delay to facilitate future
service work.
3. Ensure the piping is properly supported with pipe hangers prior to installing the time delay.
4. Bushings or bell reducer fittings may be used to connect to 1/2-inch (DN15) piping. The time
delay connections are 3/4-inch (DN20).
5. Install the time delay with arrow stamped on the unit pointing in the direction of discharge. The
unit may be installed at any angle below horizontal. It is recommended that the time delay unit is
always installed in the fully pendant position.
6. Provide sufficient clearance around the time delay to allow operation of the lever operated or
other control head provided as a manual override.
7. Verify the control head is in the ‘SET’ position.
• Any bypass of the time delay must be supervised.

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• The time delay may be installed in the discharge piping or the actuation line.

NOTE: The time delay period is preset at the factory; however the actual time delay period may
vary up to 100% depending on the ambient conditions and/or variations in installation.

9.24.4 Lever Operated Control Head


Install the lever operated control head by following the steps listed below:
1. Inspect the threads and control head for damage. Ensure the control head is in the SET position
with the safety pull pin and seal wire intact.
2. Remove the protection cap from the appropriate control port.
3. Using a suitable wrench, assemble the control head to the cylinder valve actuation port. Tighten
the swivel nut securely..
4. Provide suitable clearance around the control head to allow operation.

9.25 Lockout Valves


The construction of the two-way union end ball valve product design helps make installation and
maintenance easy. This product has the ‘free floating’ ball principle. The ball is not fixed and is free to
align under line pressure, allowing for a tight shut-off with the flow in either direction, regardless of the
position of the valve in the pipeline. In order to facilitate maintenance, the assembly consists of a
union on each side of the valve body.
• The lockout valve with limit switch must be installed in the discharge pipe network, downstream of
all cylinders, check valves, and directional/stop valves.
• Lockout valves can be installed in either the vertical or horizontal position using good pipe fitting
practices.
1. Place two to three wraps of Teflon tape or paste on male threads of pipe.
2. Attach lockout valve unions to pipe, but do not fully tighten at this time.
3. Rotate the valve body into position, and then tighten both unions.

NOTE: Valve should be locked in the ‘open’ position using a padlock. Installation must be
electrically supervised.

9.25.1 Stem Seal Adjustment


If leakage is evident in the stem packing area, tighten the adjusting nut (beneath the handle) 1/8 turn.
If the leak persists, repeat the above.

NOTE: The switches and the corresponding cams are preset by the valve assembly supplier to
the configurations indicated below; no adjustment to the cams is required. When the cam is

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engaged with the switch, the switch contacts are closed, thus closing the normally open
contacts.

Terminals 1 to 6 are used with the microswitches.


Terminals 7 and 8 are for optional equipment, not part of this assembly.
Switch 1 can also be wired to provide positive indication that the valve is fully closed (LED,
strobe, bell etc).
Switch 2 must always be wired in series with the electric control head in the releasing circuit.

NOTE: The limit switch assembly consists of 2 single pole, double throw (SPDT) mechanical
switches, which are rated to 15 amps.

9.26 Wiring Diagram


Below are illustrations of the ball valve in the fully open (normal operating mode) and closed
(service/maintenance mode) positions.

Figure 9-16 Switch When Ball Valve is in Fully Open Position

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Figure 9-17 Switch When Ball Valve is in Fully Closed Position

9.27 CO2 Operated Pressure Switch (K60218) Installation


See section 5.20 for component details.
Before installation of the pressure switch (Figure 5-36), check the following:
• The ¾” BSP inlet thread is clean and free of any damage.
• When manually operated using the visual indicator and re-setting cap, the switch roller is in the
coupler channel and the operation is smooth with no binding.

After the above checks have been satisfactorily carried out, install the pressure switch as follows:
1. A ¾” BSP screwed connection is required on the end of the manifold, attach a ¾” BSP galvanised
hexagon nipple.
2. Attach the pressure switch or, wall mount the switch, make up all pipework to suit the site location
of the pressure switch making sure that there is a ¾” BSP galvanised union in this line for each of
installation and/or removal of equipment.
3. To the ¾” BSP outlet connection on the pressure switch attach a ¾ BSP galvanised hexagon
nipple and one half of the union as mentioned in (2) above.
4. Connect the pressure switch to the pipework via the union and hand-tighten.
5. Mark the two pressure switch fixing holes on the wall or framework.
6. Loosen the union nut and remove the pressure switch.
7. Drill the two holes.
8. Reconnect the pressure switch to the pipework and tighten the union nut.
9. Fix the pressure switch to the wall or framework.

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NOTE: Alternatively, the switch may be wall mounted by adapting the ¾ threads to 3/16” ENOT
and using bundy tube to connect.

9.28 CO2 Operated Pressure Trip (K17554) Installation


See section 5.21 for component details

Figure 9-18 Installation of CO2 Operated Pressure Trip

Prior to installation of the pressure trip check the following:


• Always install the pressure trip in a vertical position as shown.
• Dimension from top of doorframe is typical & should be adhered to where possible.
• Use PTFE tape on all screw threads.
• The maximum load that can be suspended from a pressure trip is 100lb (45kg).

Install the pressure trip as follows:


1. To the ¾” BSP male screwed connection on the pressure trip attach a ¾” BSP elbow a suitable
length of ¾” BSP galvanised pipe and one half of a ¾” BSP union.
2. Offer the pressure trip assembly up to the CO2 distribution piping and hand tighten the union nut.
3. Making sure that the pressure trip is located in the centre of the doorway and at a suitable vertical
dimension above the door frame so as not to hinder the operation of the equipment mark the one
off fixing hole on the wall.
4. Loosen and disconnect the pressure trip assembly.
5. Drill the pressure trip fixing hole on the wall.
6. Reconnect the pressure trip assembly to the CO2 pipework.
7. Using an adequate wall fixing to attach the pressure trip to the wall.
8. Once attached to the wall finally tighten the union nut.
9. Attached the cable & cable ring to the pressure trip.

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9.29 Weight Monitoring Device


WARNING: Please note the following information and consider procedures as mandatory:
The CO2 cylinder is charged at high pressure (~69bar(g)).
The anti-recoil cap MUST be fitted to the valve outlet and the protection cap MUST be fitted
before moving the CO2 cylinder.
Normal pressure vessel handling precautions MUST be observed.
The weight indicator mechanism, frame and CO2 cylinder ARE heavy.
PPE MUST be worn when carrying out installation and maintenance.

CAUTION: The frame must be fixed and all floors and walls must capable of supporting overall
weight loadings.

The weight of the weight indicator mechanism is heavy and may operate at any time. It is
therefore recommended that the weight indicator mechanisms and the CO2 cylinders are
installed in unoccupied areas.
To install the weight indicator mechanism carry out the following procedure:
1. Assemble the mounting frame (supplied by others).
2. If the weight indicator mechanism is outside or in a damp environment, it is recommended
that the threads are sprayed with oil to keep them free of rust.
3. Using the mounting rod fit the body to the mounting frame using the M12 nut and washer.
4. Remove the terminal box cover, by undoing the four M4x16mm screws.
5. Connect the flexible conduit to each terminal box (Figure 9-19).

NOTE: Make sure that the flexible conduit, rated at IP65 minimum, passes underneath the
weight when it is in the down (operated) position and that it does obstruct the movement of
the weight.

Figure 9-19 Flexible Conduit Installation

NOTE: It is recommended to connect the microswitch in SERIES. This enables the wires to
monitor continuously.

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CAUTION: Do NOT touch the microswitch.

If the microswitch is to be wired ‘Normally Closed’ (N/C), continue to ‘Normally Closed’


procedure. If the microswitch is to wired ‘Normally Open’ (N/O) skip the following procedure and
continue to the ‘Normally Open’ procedure on the following page.

Normally Closed
If the microswitch contacts are to be wired in the ‘Normally Closed’ (N/C) positions, i.e. in series,
carry out the following procedure:

1. Remove the BLUE wire from the terminal block, cut 10 mm from it and electrically insulate
the end with an insulating cap or tape.
2. Thread the two core cable through the flexible conduit and connect to the terminal box
(Figure 9-20). Use an insulated crimp pin connector for each wire.
3. Replace the terminal box cover.
4. On the end/last terminal box, the spare exit hole from the terminal box must be sealed or
blanked off to maintain IP 65 rating.

NOTE: A simpler ‘Series’ installation using a single wire is shown in Figure 9-21. However, the
wire will not be monitored continuously.

Figure 9-20 Electrical Installation - Series Two Wires

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Figure 9-21 Electrical Installation - Series One Wire

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Normally Open
If the microswitch contacts are to be wired in the ‘Normally Open’ (N/O) positions, i.e. in parallel,
carry out the following procedure;
1. Remove the YELLOW wire from the terminal block, cut 10 mm from it and electrically
insulate the end with an insulating cap or tape.
2. Thread the two core cable through the flexible conduit and connect to the terminal box
(Figure 9-22). Where two wires are to be connected into same terminal outlet, use an
insulated blade terminal connector.
3. Replace the terminal box cover.
4. On the end/last terminal box, the spare exit hole from the terminal box must be sealed or
blanked off to maintain IP 65 rating.

5. Figure 9-22 Electrical Installation – Parallel

6. Make sure that the protection cap is fitted and inspect the cylinder for external damage.
7. Weigh the cylinder for correct contents using a scale weighing device and record the weight.

WARNING: If the cylinders are to be moved in a skid assembly, they must be securely
wedged in position to prevent movement.

8. Transport the cylinder to its position at the mounting frame using a suitable trolley. Remove
the securing wedge from the cylinder.
9. Remove the protection cap from the cylinder and store in a safe place.
10. Screw the neck collar fully onto the cylinder ensuring that all threads are engaged. Make sure
that the cylinder valve outlet is in the correct position.
11. Connect the flexible discharge hose to the manifold and torque to between 30 and 40Nm.
12. Remove the anti-recoil cap from discharge outlet of the cylinder valve and store in a safe
place.

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13. Connect the other end of the flexible discharge hose to the discharge outlet of the cylinder
valve and torque to between 30 and 40Nm.
14. Fit the two hanger rods through the holes in the body and the neck collar. Secure with an M10
nut and washer on each hanger rod.
15. Make sure that the M10 nuts are screwed evenly onto the hanger rods by the same amount.
16. Tighten the M12 nut, on the mounting rod, until the cylinder is 20mm from the floor or
mounting frame base.

NOTE: Make sure that the cylinder is hanging vertically. If not, carefully adjust the nuts on
the hanger rods until the cylinder is hanging vertically

17. Fit an M10 nut to the weight rod and wind halfway down. Fit an M10 washer to the weight rod,
followed by the weight, another M10 washer and finally an M10 nut. DO NOT TIGHTEN.
18. With the weight rod in the “full” (uppermost) position, slowly wind the nuts and weight up the
rod away from the body, until a position is reached where the weight rod will just begin to drop
from its stop.
19. From this set point, wind the inner nut towards the body by five turns. Hold this position and
lock the other nut against the weight. With the weight in the ‘full’ position, the indicator is now
set.
20. If required, carry out the testing procedure (Section 11.7).
21. Repeat steps 1 to 19 for each weight indicator mechanism and cylinder.

9.29.1 Special Instructions for Compliance with 94/9/EC

9.29.1.1 Area classification

• Weight Indicator Mechanism E8731-402


• Weight Indicator Mechanism without the switch E8731-403.
• Weight Indicator Mechanisms are used to monitor the contents of CO2 45kg extinguisher
assemblies.
• Weight Indicator Mechanisms have been designed and certified as non-electric equipment for
compliance to the following hazardous area classification: Group II category 3 GD c T6 X

The user of this equipment should make sure they are aware of the following information;

9.29.1.2 Placing the Device into Service

These Weight Indicator Mechanisms may be installed in an area classified as Zone 2 or Zone 22 or
unclassified.

9.29.1.3 Safe use of Weight Indicator Mechanisms

Weight Indicator Mechanisms are for use only as a contents indicator system for CO2 45kg
extinguishers.

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The switched version is to be used with an intrinsically safe supply suitable for the hazard area.

9.29.1.4 Assembling and dismantling


Weight Indicator Mechanisms are supplied complete and ready to install in accordance as stated in
this Manual.

9.29.1.5 Weight Indicator mechanism Installation


The installation of the Weight Indicator Mechanism shall be in accordance as stated in this manual,
except that where fitted the switch circuit shall be intrinsically safe and appropriate to the hazard.

9.29.1.6 Maintenance (service and emergency repair)


For maintenance of Weight Indicator Mechanisms refer to Section 11.

9.29.1.7 Adjustment
After Installation adjustment of the Weight Indicator Mechanism is not required. For initial set up
follow instructions provided in installation chapter.

9.29.1.8 Limitations of use


Weight Indicator Mechanisms must only be used within areas specified by the hazardous area
certification as indicated on the equipment label.

9.29.1.9 Special Parameters


The ambient temperature for this equipment is –18°C to 55°C.

9.30 CO2 Discharge Nozzles


There are various nozzles suitable for either ‘total flooding’ and/or local application systems. In all
cases it is essential that they are installed in their correct locations as defined by the code number
stamped/engraved on the nozzle body.

9.30.1 Multi-Jet Nozzle (K61792 & K61793)


These nozzles are the standard carbon dioxide discharge nozzles. The horn has been developed to
prevent the scattering of burning material that can take place with a high velocity discharge.

Specification
Environment: Industrial/Offshore/Marine
Material: Horn – Mild Steel
Nozzle – Brass
Filter – St. St. (N3-N5 only)
Finish: Horn – Black Paint & Nozzle – Natural

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Weight: K61792 N13 - N18: 0.8kg approx.


K61793 N3 - N12: 0.6kg approx.

Refer to data sheets K61792 AND K61793

9.30.2 Flanged Multi-Jet Nozzle (K5814)


The flanged carbon dioxide horn is designed for use in those areas where the nozzle may become
blocked by dirt or the process being protected. The force of the discharge automatically blows the disc
clear.
Three discs available are:
• Bakelite - Temperatures up to 200°C and ambient pr essures below 50 psig.
• Tin Foil - Temperatures up to 400°C and ambient pr essures below 25 psig. (used where
fragmented pieces cannot be tolerated)
• Mica - Temperatures above 400°C and ambient pressu res below 50 psi.

NOTE: Ensure that the frangible discs are not dented or damaged during installation.

The flanged horn may be fitted to ductwork by the addition of the appropriate adaptor.

Specification
Material: Body: Aluminium Nozzle: Brass Filter: St. St. (N3-N5 Only)
Finish: Body: Natural Nozzle: Natural
Weight: 0.9 kg approx.

Refer to Datasheet K5814

9.30.3 Flanged Nozzle Duct Adaptors K61420A-D


The range of duct adaptors is designed for those situations where it is required to fit the flanged CO2
nozzle (K5814 N3 - N8) to circular or square section ductwork.

NOTE: 4 - 5/16" Whitworth Hex Head screws c/w nuts and washers together with joint sealing
tape supplied with each adaptor.

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Adaptor Assembly Weight (approx) Ducting Size

K61420A 1.3kg 610mm Dia.

K61420B 1.3kg 457mm Dia.

K61420C 1.3kg 305mm Dia.

K61420D 1.1kg Flat

9.30.4 Duct Nozzle (K13045)


The CO2 nozzle and duct adaptor is used to protect ductwork in areas where space is limited.

See datasheet K13045.

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9.31 Pneumatic Capillary Tube, Conduit and Fittings

Figure 9-23 Pneumatic Capillary Tube, Conduit and Fittings

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9.32 CO2 Operated Siren (981574)


The pressure operated siren shall be located in accordance with the installation plan. Connect the
alarm to the pilot piping with 1/2-inch schedule 40 pipe.
• The siren must be installed upstream of the time delay.
• Typically located inside the protected space.
• Install a dirt trap and union as shown in Figure 9-24.
• Maximum 76.2m of 1/2-inch pipe between the Siren and the manifold.

Figure 9-24 CO2 Operated Siren

9.33 Odouriser Assembly (K4135)


At normal atmospheric pressures and temperatures, the extinguishing gas is colourless and
odourless. To enable CO2 to be detected during and following a discharge an odouriser shall be
fitted. The unit must be fitted in the main pipe run so that the pressure of the gas passing through the
pipe bursts a seal in the unit and releases a liquid odorant into the gas system. Burst pressure range
3 Bar +/- 10%.

Each unit contains 10cc of odorant which is sufficient to produce a positive and identifiable lemon
smell in a protected space. One odourising device will be sufficient for 1000 Kg/CO2 max.

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Figure 9-25 Odouriser Assembly

NOTES:
This unit must be installed downstream in the advised positions (Figure 9-26).
If odouriser is removed, the opening is to be plugged off immediately.
Odouriser must NOT be installed in the inverted position as shown in diagram 4 below.

Figure 9-26 Odouriser Installation

9.34 CO2 Warning Labels


Entrance Door Warning Label K93681
Manual Control Point Label K93680

Specification
Label Material: 22 SWG Aluminium

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10. COMMISSIONING
This chapter describes the commissioning procedure in terms of both visual and mechanical function
checks:

10.1 Visual Checks


Before commencement of commissioning tests, visually check the following:
1. Check that the installation conforms to the engineering drawings. Any deviations from drawings
must be reported.
1. All work, e.g. electrical wiring, carried out by other contractors has been completed satisfactorily.
2. Check the protected area for confinement of the extinguishing agent, i.e. that no passage is
allowed to other spaces through floor or ceiling voids, ductwork, holes in partitions or vents,
unless allowance has been made.
3. Check that all manual controls are accessible and correctly identified.
4. Check that the discharge nozzles are unobstructed and are adequately secured. Check that the
nozzles comply with sizes shown on the drawings.
5. Check that the container and valve manifolds are correctly sized, and that check valves and POD
valves are installed for correct directional flow.
6. Check the manifold-to-container installation for undue strain on connecting loops because
incorrect installation can cause service problems.
7. Check the containers are installed in an accessible location, that the area is clean, dry and
ventilated and meets the safe temperature requirements.
8. Check that all system controls, such as valves, lock off, pull boxes, manually or electrically
operated devices are accessible to operating personnel. If located outdoors ensure that they
conform to the required standards and that adequate shelter has been provided.
9. Check that pipes and fittings are sized in accordance with the drawings and are adequately
secured. All piping must be rigidly secured to the nozzle to prevent damage from recoil.
10. Check that all warning labels and notices give correct information for system operation and that
they are suitably located.
11. Check weigh containers to ensure Nett content is in accordance with the requirements.

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10.2 Mechanical Function


WARNING: Do NOT proceed with any functional tests until every precaution has been taken to
prevent accidental discharge.

10.2.1 General
If the control head is connected to the pilot gas cylinder check as follows:-
1. Make sure that the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin is screwed fully home.
2. Unscrew the pilot gas cylinder from the control head.
3. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin.
4. Check the distance moved by the firing pin.
5. Energise the solenoid, if fitted, from the control panel. The solenoid operates the control head
thereby causing the control head firing pin to be moved downwards by a minimum distance of
3mm thus giving a total projection of 6mm. This insures that the solenoid and control head are
both operable and have functioned correctly.
6. After the test has been carried out satisfactorily reset the control head by screwing the ‘Safety and
Reset’ pin fully home and checking that the firing pin does not project more than 3mm.

10.2.2 Manual Push-to Fire


1. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin.
2. Remove pin from ‘Push-to Fire’ button
3. Manually fire the control head by operating the ‘Push-to-Fire’ button as shown in Section 5.10.4
4. When the manual operation of the ‘Push-to-Fire’ button has been proved, reset the control head
by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.
5. Replace pin into ‘Push-to fire’ button.

10.2.3 Pull Box


WARNING: Do NOT proceed with any functional tests until every precaution has been taken to
prevent accidental discharge.

1. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin from the control head.
2. Remove the front cover and glass from the pull box unit.
3. Pull the handle in the pull box unit and manually fire the control head.
4. When satisfied, reset the control head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.
5. Reset the cable arrangement as described in Section 9.21.
6. Relocate the glass and front cover plate to pull box unit.

10.2.4 Pressure/Lever Actuator and POD Valves


Details of the pressure/lever actuator are given in Section 5.3.

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Check the pressure /lever actuator and POD valves as follows:


1. Remove the pressure/lever actuator complete with pilot loops and vents from the container valves
and secure them, making sure that they are clear of the container valves. The entire pilot gas
system must remain intact.
2. Remove the safety lock pin from each actuator and check the manual operation.
3. When satisfied with the manual operation of the release heads check the POD valves, if installed,
by connecting a pilot gas (nitrogen) test cylinder to the head.
4. Remove Safety Lock Pin from each POD valve and check for manual operation (Valves up to 2”).

NOTE: If the POD valves are fitted with switches check that the indication has been given at
the control panel that the POD valve is open.

5. When satisfied with the manual operations of the POD valves reset and re-insert the Safety
Lock pins.
6. With the pressure/manual release heads still removed, depress the Push-to-Fire button on
the control head thereby releasing the pilot gas (nitrogen) into the pilot line causing the
pressure/manual release heads to operate.

NOTE: If POD valves are installed in the system check that these have been opened before
checking the pressure/lever actuator.

7. After the POD valves and/or pressure/lever actuator have functioned correctly re-set each
control head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.
8. Push piston inside pressure/lever actuator back to set position.
9. Remove the pilot gas (nitrogen) test cylinder from the control head.
10. Visually check that the plunger assembly has returned to its normal position. When satisfied,
re-connect the pilot cylinder and the pressure/lever actuator to the container valves. Tighten
the running nut at the control head/pilot cylinder interface.

10.2.5 Pressure Trip


Check the pressure trip mechanism, if incorporated in the CO2 system, as follows:
1. Physically lift the pivoted lever allowing relevant equipment, e.g. fire curtains or dampers, to be
operated.
2. After manual operation of the pressure trip has been carried out successfully, re-set all fire
curtains, dampers etc.
3. To demonstrate operation of the pressure trip assembly, release one container from the main
bank. Disconnect all pressure levers actuators and CO2 outlet hoses from the cylinders not
required for the test.

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WARNING: Do NOT discharge CO2 while there are personnel present in the area. The engineer
carrying out the test MUST observe the safety regulations governing the use of CO2

4. If POD valves are installed in the main distribution line, remove the Safety Lock pins and
manually open.
5. Discharge the CO2 cylinder and check that the trip assemblies have all functioned correctly.
6. Re-insert the Safety Lock pin to the CO2 container.
7. Re-set the pressure trip assemblies.
8. Reconnect cylinders and replace discharged cylinder.

10.2.6 Pressure Switch


If a pressure switch assembly is installed in the main CO2 line check that it has operated as follows:
1. Check that an alarm signal has been given on the main control.
2. Check that the pressure switch operating rod has extended into the transparent cover.
3. When satisfied re-set the pressure switch.
4. Manually close the POD valves and re-insert the Safety Lock pins.
5. Disconnect the empty CO2 container and reconnect the remaining cylinder and replacement.

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11. MAINTENANCE
This part of the manual describes procedures which enable a proficient Service Engineer to undertake
the regular inspection and testing of a Kidde Fire Protection CO2 System safely in accordance with
the recommendation of BS 5306 part 4.

Before going to site the Service Engineer should obtain the relevant details and drawings of the
systems to be serviced and refer to report of previous service visits and of fault call-outs since the last
service.

The Engineer’s signature on the Service Report and on the record card after carrying out the work is
confirmation that the system, on that day, is in complete operational order. It is an advantage to have
a witness to this fact, and the Engineer should therefore encourage the customer’s representative to
accompany then whilst the work is completed.

The first action to take, when arriving at site, is to report to the customer’s representative and to ask if
there are any specific instructions with which to comply.
• Ask if any particular problems have arisen since the last service visit.
• Ask if any fires have occurred and how the system performed.
• Record any false or accidental operation and get reasons.
• If it is necessary to take some action which may cause inconvenience to the Customer, ask their
permission first.
• Notify all concerned that the fire protection system is being maintained and may be inoperative.
• Work systematically and in a clean, tidy and professional manner.
• Consider the possibility of genuine fire alarm occurring whilst work in being conducted on the
system and make appropriate arrangements.
• Prepare a service report. Submit a copy to the Client, one to the Service Manager and retain a
copy.

NOTE: Service visits should be on a six-monthly (minimum) basis.

11.1 Preliminary Checks


Before commencement of maintenance work the following checks are to be made:
1. Check the installation for any structural alternation that could affect the efficiency of the system.
2. Check the protected area for confinement of the extinguishant. If the system has been altered in
any way, and/or if the customer’s building or plant has been modified since the last inspection
visit, this must be noted on the Service Report. The Client must be informed of any factor
jeopardizing the fire protection system.

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3. Check if doors and windows are being propped open and would not be shut in the event of a
system operation. Report this to the Customer and note it on the report sheet.
4. Check that all manual controls are accessible, correctly identified and have not become obscured.
5. Check that the discharge nozzles are unobstructed and are adequately secured.
6. Check that all warning and instruction labels are clearly visible and legible. Check that all
necessary safety precautions and operational instructions are clearly stated.
7. Check that the paintwork is in good condition.
8. Check that containers are accessible and that the area is clean, dry and ventilated.
9. Check that pipes and fittings are adequately secured. All piping must be rigidly secured at the
nozzle to prevent damage from recoil.
10. Check that all system controls, such as valves, lock-off units, pull boxes, manually or electrically
operated devices are accessible to operating personnel. Any damage must be noted and rectified
after obtaining the customer’s official order number for the additional work. Rectification work
should be recorded on a report sheet separate from the service report sheet.

11.2 Component Function Tests


WARNING: Do NOT proceed with any functional tests until every precaution has been taken to
prevent accidental discharge. Ensure that all personnel in protected areas know that you are
there and of the work you are doing.

11.2.1 General
• Check that the manifold bracket fixings are secure.
• Check that the manifold check valve is in good condition and is tight.
• Check that the manifold-to-container discharge valve couplings are tight.

11.2.2 Control Head


Check the control head as follows:
1. Make sure that the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin is screwed fully home.
2. Unscrew the pilot gas cylinder from the second head.
3. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin.
4. Energise the solenoid from the control panel. The solenoid plunger operates the control head
causing the firing pin to be moved downwards by a minimum distance of 3mm, (6mm projection)
proving that the solenoid and control head are both operable and have functioned correctly.
5. Check the distance moved by the firing pin. Reset the control panel.

NOTE: The solenoid WILL be damaged if the control head is reset while in the activated mode.

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6. After the test has been carried out satisfactorily, reset the control head by screwing the
‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home and checking that the firing pin does not project by more
than 3mm.

11.2.2.1 Push-to-Fire Button


7. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin.
8. Manually fire the control head by operating the ‘Push-to- Fire’ button.
9. When the manual operation of the ‘Push-to-Fire’ Button has been proved reset the control
head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.

11.2.2.2 Pull Box


Check the operation of the pull box as follows:
10. Remove the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin.
11. Remove the front cover and glass from the pull box unit.
12. Pull the handle in the pull box firmly and manually fire the control head.
13. Rest the pull cable arrangement.
14. When satisfied reset the control head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset pin fully home.
15. Relocate glass and front cover panel to pull box unit.

11.2.2.3 Pilot Gas Cylinder


16. Screw the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.
17. Check the pressure is approx 65 bar. If it is below 55bar the container should be refilled.

11.2.2.4 Reinstatement
18. Refit the pilot gas cylinder to the control head.

11.2.3 Pressure/Manual Release Heads and POD Valves


To check the pressure/manual release heads and POD valves proceed as follows:
1. Remove the pressure/manual release heads complete with pilot loops and vents from the CO2
container discharge valves. The entire pilot gas system must remain intact.
2. Remove the Safety Lock pin from each release head and check the manual operation. Manually
reset the release head piston and refit the Safety Lock pins when satisfied.
3. Remove the Safety Lock pin from each POD valve and check for manual operation.

NOTE: If the POD valves are fitted with indicator switched, check that the indication has been
given at the control panel that the POD valve is open.

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4. When satisfied with the manual operation of the POD valves reset and re-inserts the Safety
Lock pins.
5. Connect a nitrogen pilot gas test cylinder to the control head and connect the pilot loop. With
the pressure/manual release heads still removed from the CO2 cylinder, operate the control
head thereby releasing the pilot gas (nitrogen) into the pilot causing the pressure/manual
release heads to operate.

NOTE: If POD valves are installed in the system, check that these have opened before
checking the pressure/manual release heads.

6. Check that there are no leaks in the pilot gas system and that the pilot vent bleed (K24051)
operates correctly. Sufficient pressure to operate the pressure/manual release heads, and
POD valves if fitted, should be maintained in the system for a MINIMUM OF 10 MINUTES.
7. After the POD valves and/or pressure/manual release heads have functioned correctly re-set
the control head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home.
8. Disconnect the pilot line from the pilot gas cylinder and remove the pilot gas cylinder from the
control head. The pilot gas line will now be vented.
9. Manually reset the piston and visually check the plunger in each pressure/manual release
head.
10. Reset the control head and replace the test pilot gas cylinder with the full pilot gas cylinder.
Tighten the running nut at the control head/pilot cylinder interface.
11. When satisfied, re-connect the pressure/manual release heads to the CO2 container
discharge valves.

11.2.4 Pressure Trip


The trip may be operated from the pilot line or from the discharge pipework. Check the pressure trip
mechanism if incorporated in the system as follows:-
1. Physically lift the pivoted lever (shown in Figure 9-18) allowing relevant equipment to be operated
e.g. fire curtains or dampers.
2. After manual operation of the pressure trip has been carried out successfully, re-set all fire
curtains, dampers etc.
3. To demonstrate operation of a pressure trip assembly which is operated from the discharge
pipework, release one CO2 cylinder or connect a portable CO2 extinguisher to the manifold.
Disconnect all other cylinders.

WARNING: Do NOT discharge CO2 while there are personnel in the area. The engineer carrying
out the test MUST observe the safety regulations governing the use of CO2

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4. If POD valves are installed in the main distribution line, remove the Safety Lock pins and
manually open.
5. Discharge a CO2 cylinder or portable CO2 extinguisher and check that the trip assemblies
have all functioned correctly.
6. Re-set the POD valve and re-insert the Safety Lock pin to the CO2 container.
7. Re-set the pressure trip assemblies.

11.2.5 Pressure Switch


If a pressure switch assembly is installed in the main CO2 line, check the correct operation as follows:
1. Remove the clear plastic spindle cover, reverse and screw it onto the spindle.
2. Check that an alarm is given when the spindle is pulled out.
3. When satisfied re-set the pressure switch.

NOTE: The switch may be pressure tested by connecting a CO2 container onto the distribution
pipework.

11.3 Instructions for Commissioning the System after its Operation


1. Refit the cylinder transport caps.
2. Remove the empty CO2 cylinders.
3. Refill the CO2 cylinders or replace with fully charged cylinder and secure.
4. If distribution valves are fitted check that they are closed.
5. Check nozzle orifices for debris. Clean if necessary.
6. Re-set all system ancillaries, including pressure switches, pressure trips, dampers, curtains, door
or window shutters, ventilators, remote lock-off services and pull boxes.
7. Reset each control head by screwing the ‘Safety and Reset’ pin fully home. Remove the ‘Safety
and Reset’ pins and leave them in the possession of an authorised person.
8. Replace the empty pilot gas cylinder with a new or refilled assembly.

11.4 Every Six Months


• Check tightness of nuts and bolts.
• If required, carry out the testing procedure (refer to Appendix A).

11.5 Every Twelve Months


• Check the threads for rust, clean and apply an oil spray if necessary.
• Carry out the six monthly checks.

11.6 Weight Monitoring Device – Testing Procedure


WARNING: The following MUST be observed:

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The CO2 cylinder is at high pressure.


The anti-recoil cap MUST be fitted to the valve outlet and the protection cap MUST be fitted
before moving the CO2 cylinder.
Normal pressure vessel handling precautions MUST be observed.
The weight indicator mechanism, frame and CO2 cylinder ARE heavy.
PPE MUST be worn when carrying out installation and maintenance.

If the user wishes to confirm that the weight indicator mechanism is functioning correctly, a test
kit can be built (Figure 11-1).

The procedure for testing is given below is as follows:


1. Assemble the test kit as shown (
2. Figure 11-1).
3. With the weight rod in the ‘FULL’ position, carefully lower the test weight, between 3.2kg
and 4.5kg, onto the test kit.

NOTE: The test weight, 3.2kg to 4.5kg, represents a weight loss of CO2 of 7% to 10%

4. When the weight indicator mechanism is set correctly, the mechanism will trip.

Figure 11-1 Test Kit

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11.7 Beam Scale – Testing


During the scheduled maintenance of the cylinders confirm that the CO2 contents are in accordance
with the weight specification as shown on the label.

Weighing procedure:
1. Remove the cylinders from the wall brackets and connecting pipes or flexible hoses. Fit anti-
recoil caps to outlet ports.
2. Ensure the cylinders are adequately supported.
3. Transfer cylinders to weighing station.
4. Place cylinder to be weighed directly adjacent to yoke assembly.
5. Slide yoke under valve.
6. On spring balance set dial to zero by means of adjusting screw.
7. To weigh the cylinder, pull handle downwards to raise the cylinder until the weighing beam is in a
horizontal position.
8. Read off the scale and record weight.
9. For establishing the actual gross weight of the cylinder, multiply the recorded weight by 12 (e.g.
weight of 10kg the gross weight 10 x 12 = 120kg).

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12. APPENDICES

12.1 CO2 Components

Kidde Fire Protection - CO2 Components


Equivalent Length
Part Number Part Description FM Approved
Sch.40 Sch.80 BS 1387

E7194-004 45kg CO2 Cylinder & DIN Valve Assembly 


E7194-005 6.8kg CO2 Cylinder & 1" DIN Valve Assembly

E7194-006 22.7kg CO2 Cylinder & 1" DIN Valve Assembly

K24509 Klem Valve (DIN 477) 


K97112 1/2" Flexible Loop 
K24004 3/4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  11m 8m 11m

K24005 1" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  11m 8m 11m

K24175 1 1/4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  11.9m 10.4m 11.9m

K24176 1 1/2" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  11.9m 10.4m 11.9m

K24177 2" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  15.6m 13.4m 15.6m

K24774 3" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  39m 29.9 39m

K24776 4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve  75.6m 54.9m 75.6m

K24628 3/4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  11m 8m 11m

K24629 1" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  11m 8m 11m

K24630 1 1/4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  11.9m 10.4m 11.9m

K24631 1 1/2" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  11.9m 10.4 11.9m

K24632 2" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  15.6m 13.4m 15.6m

K24775 3" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  39m 29.9 39m

K24777 4" Pressure Operated Direction Valve with Indicator Switch  75.6m 54.9m 75.6m

K62341 Pressure & Manual Actuator Assembly 


K62959 N2 Pilot Cylinder 
K62969A N2 Pilot Cylinder with Pressure Switch 
K62303 Control Head 
K62304 Control Head with Switches 
K60218 Pressure Operated Switch 
K62422B Solenoid 

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K62459 Pneumatic Diaphragm Actuator 


K62412 Push-to-Fire Button 
K62478 Cable Release Assembly 
K1114 Pull Box 
K1122 Pulley 
K4135 Odouriser Assembly 
K17554 Pressure Release 
K18366 Pressure Operated Door Release 
K93433 Pilot CO2 Loop 
K93434 Pilot CO2 Loop 
K24051 Pilot Vent 
K62932 Control Head Mounting Bracket 
K61793 Multi-Jet Nozzle 
K5814 Multi-Jet Nozzle (Flanged, N4-N8)

K5814SS Multi-Jet Nozzle (Flanged, N3-N8)-St.St 


K61792 Multi-Jet Nozzle 
K93206/AX 24vDC Flame Proof Solenoid

K62459 Pneumatic Diaphragm 


K62462 N2 Pilot Cylinder

K62462A N2 Pilot Cylinder with Pressure Switch

K62487 Control Head Mounting Bracket

K62685 Beam Scale

E7772-004-02 Direct Acting Solenoid

K13045 Duct Nozzle (N3-N4) 


K62755 Hose to Pipe Adaptor

K62401 Safety Pin 


K9002 Phosphor Bronze Cable 
K921 Safety Relief Device 
981574 CO2 Siren 
E6000-001 CO2 Discharge Time Delay Assembled Kit 
E6000-002 CO2 Discharge Time Delay Assembled Kit 
E8731-402 Continuous Weight Monitoring Unit

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E8731-403 Continuous Weight Monitoring Unit without Switch

K16896 Single Cylinder Strap (6.8kg)

K4881 Single Cylinder Strap (22.6kg)

K62943 Single Cylinder Strap (45kg) 


K17238 Single Row Cylinder Rack (2 Cylinder)

K17235 Single Row Cylinder Rack (3 Cylinder)

K13744 Single Row Cylinder Front Strap (2 Cylinder) 


K13745 Single Row Cylinder Front Strap (3 Cylinder) 
K62752 Single Row Cylinder Rack Bolt Assembly 
K24334 Cylinder Centre Rack (2 Cylinder, 45kg) 
K24335 Cylinder Centre Rack (3 Cylinder, 45kg) 
K62753 Two Row Rack Bolt (45kg) 
K17327 Two Rack Special (45kg)

K22654 Cylinder Centre Rack (2 Cylinder, 22.6kg)

K22655 Cylinder Centre Rack (3 Cylinder, 22.6kg)

K17245 Two Row Rack Bolt (22.6kg)

K21207 1" Manifold (2 Cylinders) 


K21209 1" Manifold (3 Cylinders) 
K21211 1" Manifold (4 Cylinders) 
K21213 1" Manifold (5 Cylinders) 
K21215 1 1/4" Manifold (2 Cylinders) 
K21217 1 1/4" Manifold (3 Cylinders) 
K21219 1 1/4" Manifold (4 Cylinders) 
K21221 1 1/4" Manifold (5 Cylinders) 
K23925-EU Manifold Check Valve 
K24267D Single Row Manifold Bracket (1") 
K24267E Single Row Manifold Bracket (1 1/4") 
K24268D Double Row Manifold Bracket (1") 
K24268E Double Row Manifold Bracket (1 1/4") 
K62489 Remote Cable Release Assembly

K60103 3" Companion Flange and Gasket

K60104 4" Companion Flange and Gasket

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K60105 3" Gasket

K60106 4" Gasket

10611106-112 Lock Out Valve with Limit Switches 


10611106 1/4"Lock Out Valve 
10611107 1/2" Lock Out Valve 
10611108 3/4" Lock Out Valve 
10611109 1" Lock Out Valve 
10611110 1 1/4" Lock Out Valve 
10611111 1 1/2" Lock Out Valve 
10611112 2" Lock Out Valve 
K93681 Entrance Door Warning Label 
K9368 Manual Control Point Label 
K90220 POD Valve Adaptor

K90219 POD Valve Adaptor

K61420A-D Flanged Nozzle Adaptors

Appendix 1 –CO2 Component List: Those components included in the FM Approved System
Indicated.

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