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First Name

 

Isabel

Last Name

 

Choe

 

UH Email

isabel8@hawaii.edu

Date

2/27/17

 
 

Semester

2

Year

 

2017

 

Grade Level/Subject

5/Reading

Lesson Duration

12:30-1:15 (45 minutes)

 
 

Title

 

Themes, Challenges, and Lessons

 
 

Central Focus (Enduring Understandings)

 
 

A description of the important understanding(s) and concept(s)

 
 

Good readers need to be able to comprehend what they’re reading in order to get the most out of their reading

 

experience. Reading strategies helps readers to delve deeper into the text by providing them ways to better comprehend what they’re reading. By having a better understanding of the text, readers will be able to use text evidence to determine the theme of the story.

 

Content Standard(s)

 
 

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) that align with the central focus and address essential understandings,

 
 

concepts, and skills

 
 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

 
 

Student Learning Objectives

 
 

Outcomes to be achieved by the students by the end of the lesson or by the end of the multi-lesson learning segment

 
 

The students will be able to identify a challenge/challenges that the character in their story faces, lessons that come out of facing those challenges, and the theme of the story based on evidence from the text. - Text (provide evidence from book)

 
 

Assessments The procedures to gather evidence of students’ learning of learning objective(s) to include formative (informal) assessments applied throughout the lesson and a summative assessment (formal) of what students’ learned by the end of the lesson (include any assessment tools)

 
 

Formative Assessment(s):

 

Students will be able to create a chart that includes the title of the book they’re reading, a

 

challenge/challenges the character in their book faced, a lesson that could come out of the character overcoming a challenge/challenges, and the theme of the story Summative Assessment Task: The Challenges Can Lead to Lessons chart Summative Assessment Tool:

 

Well Below

Developing Proficiency

Meets with Proficiency

Meets with Excellency

Is not able to identify a challenge a character faced

 

Struggles to identify a challenge a character faced

Is able to identify a challenge a character faced

Is able to actively identify and describe a challenge the character faced

Is not able to determine any lessons learned from the challenges the character overcame

Struggles to determine a lesson learned from the challenges the character overcame

Is able to determine a lesson learned from the challenges the character overcame

Is able to actively determine and describe a lesson learned based on the challenges the character overcame and explain why

Is not able to discuss/determine what the theme of the story is

 

Struggles to determine the theme of the story is based on a challenge the character faced, and what lesson was learned

Is able to determine what they think the theme of the story is based on the challenges the character faced, and the lessons learned

Is able to discuss and determine what they know the theme of the story is based on text evidence, the challenges the character faced, and the lessons learned

 

Students’ Prior Academic Knowledge and Assets The students’ content knowledge, skills, prior academic experiences, and personal/cultural/community assets to draw upon to support learning. Be explicit about the connections between the learning tasks, and students’ prior academic learning, and their assets.

 
 

Prior Academic Knowledge: Knowledge/understanding of what theme is, how to determine what a character challenge in the story is, and what lesson the character learned from the challenge they faced.

 

Students Personal/Cultural/Community Assets: Possible experience with overcoming a challenge and a lesson they learned in their own lives, whether it was at home, at school, etc. I will tell them what a challenge and a lesson is. Then I will provide them with my own example. Next, I will ask them to quickly think of a challenge they faced and the lesson they learned from overcoming that challenge. Finally, I will have one or two students share.

 

Academic Language and Language Supports

 
 

1.

Oral and written language that the students need to learn and use to participate and engage in the content.

2.

The planned instructional supports to help students understand, develop, and use academic language.

 

Theme: Broad idea of the story (ex: Bridge to Terabithia’s theme is friendship) Challenge: Something that a person must overcome Lesson: Something that is learned after overcoming the challenge

 

I will define theme, challenge, and lesson during the anticipatory set/building background part of the lesson.

 
 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

 
 

A description of what the teacher will do and say and what the students will do during the lesson that 1) uses clear

 

steps that convey the use of multiple strategies, supports, and resources and 2) list opportunities offered for multiple modes of participation

 

Name of reading strategy being taught: Mistakes Can Lead to Lessons Title of book/text being used in the lesson:

 

Procedures

Teacher will….

Students will…

 

Anticipatory Set/Building

Link to previous knowledge of

Actively watch and listen to me

Background. Introduce

theme and teach what theme is

desired results; ask essential

and what it isn’t

question(s); connect with student experience. Is this a review or new information? How does the lesson link to

  • - Refer to T-Chart with one column titled “theme is” and the other titled “theme isn’t”

previous learning? Is pre- assessment necessary? This is an intentional experience

  • - theme is and example - theme is the “big idea” of the story

or activity that ALL students engage in to ensure everyone starts at the same level of understanding.

  • - theme isn’t and example - theme isn’t the lesson the story teaches

Time: approximately 2-5 minutes

  • - common themes in literature

-

friendship

-

love

-

family

-

growing up

-

money

doesn’t buy

happiness

-

cheaters never win

-

never give up

-

don’t judge a book

by its cover

-

treat others the way you want to be

   

treated

   

You can determine the theme from a challenge a character faces

  • - Define challenge: a challenge is

something that a person has to

overcome

  • - For example, a challenge I

faced was when I fell down the

stairs and sprained my ankle. It was hard to walk around

You can also determine theme through a lesson a character learns from the challenge they faced -Define lesson: a lesson is something that is learned after overcoming a challenge -For example, the lesson I learned was that I need to be more careful walking up and down stairs

Ask a few students to share a challenge that they faced, what they did to overcome it, and a lesson they learned from it

Share

Modeling/ Mini Lesson. Explicit

What/how will you model?

Introduce reading strategy:

Actively listen to me

teaching of targeted concepts and/or strategies that

Reading strategies can be useful to help you to better

students are expected to

understand what you’re

learn and demonstrate their understanding. Consider:

How will you support students to activate their own

reading. The reading strategy I’m going to teach you today is called

“Challenges Can Lead to Lessons”

thinking?

We’re going to use this

Time: approximately 10-15 minutes

strategy to help us figure out what challenge a character went through, what lesson can be learned through overcoming that challenge, and the theme of a story

Be engaged by listening to what the challenge is

Read Katie & Missy and model how to create the chart.

  • - show premade chart under elmo

  • - chart is drawn horizontally

Be engaged by listening to what the

  • - chart has 4 columns: 1 st column

lesson is

is for the title of the book, 2 nd

column is for the challenge(s) a character faces, 3 rd column is for the lesson(s) learned, and the last

   

column is for the theme

   
  • - think aloud and tell students what challenge the character of the story faced and write it down

  • - the challenge Katie faced is having to clean up after Missy

  • - think aloud and tell students what lesson was learned from the challenge the character faced and write it down

  • - the lesson learned is that you should be neat and clean, especially if

 

you’re going to somebody else’s house.

We can tell this is the

lesson because Katie got annoyed from cleaning up after Missy, but

Missy didn’t notice and

continued to make a mess.

Be engaged by saying what they believe the theme of the story is and

  • - think aloud/ask students what they think the theme of the story is based on the challenge the character faced, and the lesson that was learned

listening to what the actual theme is

-

Since Katie had to clean up after Missy, and the lesson learned is that we should try to

be clean if we’re at somebody else’s house, the theme, or the “ is to

respect other people’s property”

   

Have the students get into small

Work together

   

Work time. An opportunity for students to apply the learning taught during the

mini lesson. Contains two distinct components:

1. Guided Practice. An opportunity for students to practice the learning with support. 2. Independent Practice. An opportunity for students to apply the learning independently. Time: Approximately 30-45 minutes

groups and work on the chart together on the same short story (story about Barry)

  • - one sheet of paper with chart on both sides (one for group work and one for independent practice) per person

  • - talk with their group members about the challenge(s) faced, the lesson(s) learned, and the theme of the story - every student writes down the answer their group comes up with individually

- Allow one or two students to showcase their work to provide the class a better understanding of what to do

Share/listen

Independent Practice: Have students transition into

Work on their “Challenges Can Lead to Lessons” chart

 

working by themselves.

  • - Tell students to use the Challenges Can Lead to

Lessons strategy to the chart based on the

chapter book they’re

currently reading

  • - Walk around and see if anybody is struggling

(pull aside struggling students to provide 1-1 or small group instruction)

Closure. Provides an opportunity for students to summarize the

Have students (quickly) find others who have similar

Share/describe their work to their classmates

learning and connect to

 

themes

future learning. Time: Approximately 10 minutes

  • - talk about their book/charts

  • - talk about how they came to determine the theme of their story

 

Differentiation

 

Adaptations to instructional strategies, the learning environment, content, and/or assessments to meet the needs of

 

students who require further support (e.g., ELL/MLL, struggling, accelerated, 50/IEP, etc.)

 

TYPE OF LEARNER

List the type of accommodation or differentiation (content, process, or performance task) and describe how you will differentiate.

   
 

ELL/MLL

Small group instruction Choice of text

 

Struggling

Provide more modeling and guided practicing as needed Provide them with extra help to complete task

 
 

Add more details (and text evidence) in their chart

 

Accelerated

Compare the challenge(s) and lesson(s) from the text to those challenge(s) and lesson(s) from their life

504/IEP

More modeling and guided practice Frequent check-ins

 
 

Instructional Resources and Materials

 
 

Books, texts, and other materials needed for the lesson

 

Elmo, projector, example text, paper, pencils, erasers, short stories for guided practice, (http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/reading-worksheets/theme-worksheet.pdf & http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/reading-worksheets/theme-worksheet-3.pdf) individual chapter books

Analysis of Student Work and Lesson Reflection (Complete after teaching the lesson)

  • 1. What went well? In other words, describe an area of success in this lesson. The lesson went better than I thought it would. Although some of the students didn’t want to do paperwork, they were engaged in the “Challenges Can Lead to Lessons” activity. I had them get into small groups before the independent practice, and the students showed that they could work well with their classmates.

  • 2. Describe one area for growth you learned as a result of this lesson. In other words, would you do anything differently? What I would do differently in my next lesson is to have less “me time.” It was pointed out to me that there was a lot of me talking in the beginning of this lesson. Next time, I would try to throw the conversation to the students, even if it’s only for 30 seconds or so. This was, I would be able to better engage the students and allow them to gain a better understanding of the content.

  • 3. Explain how students were informed of the assessment criteria during the lesson. I didn’t tell the students exactly what they were being graded on, but I did tell them the criteria (the challenge, the lesson, and the theme) that I wanted on their charts. Instead of just throwing them into the reading strategy, I provided them with a few opportunities. I modeled it for them and allowed them time to work in small groups to have practice before they worked on it individually.

  • 4. Summarize and discuss student learning for the whole class related to the essential reading strategy and student learning objectives, based on assessment data and assessment criteria. Refer to and include a graphic (tables or chart) that depicts students’ learning. Use evidence from work samples to support this discussion. The students seemed to grasp the idea of facing and overcoming a challenge and learning a lesson from doing so. However, the concept of theme (and possibly my lack of detailed explanation), stumped them a little.

Student

Challenge

Lesson

Theme

C

MP

MP

MP

K

MP

MP

DP

J

MP

WB

DP

S

DP

MP

DP

A

ME

MP

MP

S

MP

MP

MP

K

DP

MP

MP

M

ME

MP

MP

N

ME

MP

DP

A

ME

ME

ME

M

MP

MP

DP

K

DP

MP

MP

L

ME

ME

ME

C

ME

MP

MP

L

MP

ME

ME

C

MP

MP

MP

J

MP

ME

MP

K

ME

ME

MP

J

MP

ME

MP

J

DP

MP

MP

C

MP

MP

MP

M

ME

ME

MP

L

ME

MP

MP

Y

MP

MP

MP

D

WB

WB

WB

J

MP

MP

MP

J DP MP MP C MP MP MP M ME ME MP L ME MP MP
J DP MP MP C MP MP MP M ME ME MP L ME MP MP

This is an example of a student who pretty much met the criteria. He even tried to put some text evidence.

This is another example of a student who did well and tried to put text evidence.

This is an example of a student who didn’t put text evidence, but showed that he

This is an example of a

student who didn’t put text

evidence, but showed that he pretty much understood what was asked of him.

This is an example of a student who seems to have an idea of what was

This is an example of a student who seems to have an idea of what was asked of him, but could have provided more details.

This student was the only student who didn’t fill out his chart. I can’t determine if

This student was the only student

who didn’t fill out his chart. I can’t determine if he didn’t understand

what was required of him or if his

book didn’t have a challenge, a

lesson, and a theme.

  • 5. Explain how feedback was provided to students to address their needs and strengths related to the learning objective(s). Describe how students used this feedback during the lesson or will use the feedback in future learning opportunities. I walked around the room while the students were working and peeked over their shoulders to see how they were doing. If I noticed something was off, or thought that I could provide some help to them, I made sure to talk to those students. I noticed some light bulbs going off while/after I talked to students. Some students asked me questions as I walked around, and I did my best to provide them with the best answer to those questions.

  • 6. Based on the analysis of student learning, describe the next steps for student learning for the whole class. Explain how these next steps follow from the analysis of student learning. Support your instructional decisions with principles from research and/or theory. The next steps for student learning for the whole class would be to backtrack and delve deeper into theme (and possibly challenges and lessons) and provide the students with more opportunities to expand their knowledge on theme. Although they had background information on theme, I could tell that some of the students were a little bit confused. According to Herrell, Jordan, and Eby (2012), it is essential to “present new, unfamiliar, and complex material in small steps, modeling each step by doing an example. Give clear and detailed instructions and explanations as you model each process” (p. 153). Instead of having the students focus on different books, I could have them read the same book so that we could have a grand conversation. On page 370 of “Literacy for the 21 st Century: A Balanced Approach (6 th ed.)”, a teacher who was trying to teach theme to her students held a grand conversation with her class about the book. She had them look for examples on human rights from the book. Then, she put them into small groups where they created lists of human rights. She even designed different activities for her struggling and advanced students. I believe that this could be a good next step to help the students better understand theme. Another step to further develop the students’ understanding of theme would be to do other theme related reading strategies with them.

References

Eby, J. W., Herrell, A. L., & Jordan, M. (2013). Teaching in the Elementary School: A Reflective Action Approach (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Tompkins, Gail. (2014). Literacy for the 21 st Century: A Balanced Approach (6 th ed.). Pearson Education, Inc.